Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

40th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2014

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Poster Session #382
CBM Mon Noon
Monday, May 26, 2014
12:00 PM–2:00 PM
W375a-d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
69. Compliance to Mothers’ Instructions With Medical Treatment
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
ROBSON ZAZULA (Universidade Estadual de Londrina), Márcia Cristina Gon Caserta (Universidade Estadual de Londrina)
Abstract: The atopic dermatitis is a skin chronic disease with unknown etiology and high incidence in childhood. Although the response of following medical recommendations is an important behavior to control the symptoms, there are high rates responses of non-following prescriptions, that are often described as noncompliance. In addition, less importance is assigned to the antecedent environmental variables of following medical prescriptions, especially verbal instructions. This study aimed to evaluate, in a brief direct assessment, the control exerted by direct and indirect instructions, verbalized by mothers, in compliance with treatment. Four typically developing 9- and 14-year-old girls and their mothers were evaluated. All assessments were conducted according to a brief multielement experimental design, in three phases: baseline, direct instructions condition and indirect instructions condition. The results indicated that a direct assessment procedure could be conducted with chronic diseases outpatients, and assess compliance during treatment interactions. During all outpatient assessments were identified high levels of compliance with treatment during direct instruction conditions. On the other hand, when mothers requested most frequently with indirect instructions, the children demonstrated low percentages of compliance behaviors. The results of this study can be important to identify most important variables and to develop groups or individual intervention programs.
 
70. Evaluating the Effects of "The Sleep Fairy" for Bedtime Problems in Typically Developing Children
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CATHERINE NIEDERMEYER (Behaven Kids), Keith D. Allen (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Brett R. Kuhn (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Lisa Kelly-Vance (University of Nebraska-Omaha), Lisa St. Clair (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Abstract: Concerns about disruptive behaviors at bedtime by children are frequently reported by parents during visits with primary care physicians. An intervention that appears easy to implement and is also child friendly is The Sleep Fairy, a story book intervention used to decrease disruptive bedtime behaviors. This investigation involved a controlled evaluation of The Sleep Fairy as a treatment for disruptive bedtime behaviors. Parents of five typically developing children (m = 3, f = 2) and their parents participated. In a multiple baseline design, the independent variable was introduced sequentially. Results indicate that three out of the five childrens behavior showed substantial improvements immediately. A fourth showed improvements after further exposure to the independent variable. A decrease in sleep onset latency was also observed in four children. Results were maintained at one month follow-up. Finally, parents indicated that The Sleep Fairy was acceptable and that they would recommend it to others.
 
71. The Impact of Children With Chronic Disease or Disorder on Marital Satisfaction
Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
DAYI JUNG (Yonsei University), Euihyun Kwak (Yonsei University)
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of a child’s disease on marital satisfaction amongst mothers of children with pediatric cancer survivors (PCS), developmental disability (DD) and typical development (TD). All mothers (PCS=172, DD =114, TD=157) completed the Korean-Marital Satisfaction Inventory (K-MSI). The results showed that mothers of each group have different levels of dissatisfaction across different domains. For example, mothers of DD scored significantly higher on child-care related subscales including conflict over child rearing and dissatisfaction with children. Mothers of PCS had significantly higher scores on subscales related to aggression and conflict with in-laws. Lastly, mothers of TD scored significantly higher on subscales measuring role orientation and family history of distress than those of DD and PCS. These results imply that the causes of marital dissatisfactions can differ depending on a child’s chronic disease or disorder. Different strategies for marital satisfaction should be required to overcome marital problems. Clinical research implications and limitations are discussed.
 
72. Acceptance and Commitment Training for Pervasive Developmental Disorder Staff: Intra-Subject Study
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
ANGELA ROCIO MUÑOZ TORRES (Horizontes ABA Terapia Integral), Oscar Cordoba (Horizontes ABA Terapia Integral ), Monica Maria Novoa Gomez (Pontificia Universidad Javeriana)
Abstract: Pervasive developmental Disorder staff presents high rates of occupational distress and burnout syndrome (Skirrow & Hatton, 2007), this factor may contribute to high rates of staff turnover and absenteeism. In this study, five psychologist working on PDD intervention design and caretakers complaints attention were involved in a four half-day sessions intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (designed using a protocol by Bond and Hayes, 2004). Pretest, Posttest and Follow up data were taken using a Spanish version of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and a Spanish version of AAQ-II was used to take session per session measures. Participants with high level of emotional exhaustion showed a reduction in this variable after the intervention, while participants with lower level of emotional exhaustion showed little effect. It is hypothesized that behaviors related to emotional exhaustion in this study were part of an experiential avoidance pattern in vital areas different from occupational. For this reason, changes in emotional exhaustion may be related to an increased use of acceptance strategies and a related engagement in other vital areas.
 
73. Caregiver Impact of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Assessing Stress, Sense of Competence, and Relationship Satisfaction
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
NICOLE KLINE (Florida Institute of Technology), Ivy M. Chong Crane (Florida Institute of Technology: The Scott Center for Autism Treatment)
Abstract: While the impact of psycho-social variables has been evaluated for children with chronic illness and related disabilities, questions remain unanswered for families affected by ASD. Participants included 68 primary caregivers seeking services for a child aged fifteen months to 12 years suspected of or diagnosed with an ASD. Assessment tools included: 1. Parenting Stress Index-Fourth Edition-Short-Form (PSI-4-SF; Abidin, 2012), 2. Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (PSOC; Johnston and Mash, 1989), and 3. Relationship Assessment Scale (Hendrick, 1988). Independent samples t-tests were conducted to determine differences with a nonclinical control population (60 participants with a typically-developed child) regarding perceptions of stress, competence and relationship satisfaction. ASD caregivers reported experiencing significantly higher stress than Control caregivers (p=.000). A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to assess whether perceived competence and relationship satisfaction variables were predictors of overall stress in the clinical sample. Results indicate that these variables significantly impact parenting stress (p <.001). Implications for parent involvement in treatment and child outcomes are discussed.
 
74. The Effects of Written Instructions and Verbal Feedback on Caregiver Performance of Pediatric Feeding Procedures
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
MARK GRANGER (McNeese State University), Alfred Royal Tuminello Jr. (McNeese State University), Charlotte Lynn Carp (McNeese State University)
Abstract: Previous research has demonstrated high levels of treatment integrity in controlled clinical settings for multicomponent training packages aimed at pediatric feeding disorders implemented by parents (Mueller et al., 2003). The present study replicated and extended this research by including after session feedback in a training package designed for food refusal with two relatives of a 2 year old blind child. During baseline, participants were exposed to written protocols before each session explaining the procedure, then conducted the procedure with the child on their own. Following baseline, participants continued to be exposed to written protocols and continued to conduct the procedure alone; however, feedback of their performance was given following each session. For one participant, results showed high levels of treatment integrity with both written instructions alone and with feedback. For the other participant, results showed high levels of treatment integrity with the written instructions only within the first couple of sessions; however, those high levels were not consistent until feedback following the session was included. These data are consistent with previous research in demonstrating high levels of treatment integrity for behavioral feeding protocols implemented by parents, and suggest that feedback may be an important component to the training package.
 
75. Teaching PCIT-Based Parent Skills Prior to Parent Conducted Behavioral Treatment Evaluations
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
GREGORY YOUNG (Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), Joslyn Cynkus Mintz (Little Leaves Behavioral Services), Ashley Murphy (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Emily Hemler (Kennedy Krieger Institute), R. J. Boyd (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based treatment, yet there is limited research on the utility of modified PCIT-based parent skills in combination with additional individualized behavioral treatments. The current study examined the utility of incorporating PCIT-based skills into parent training prior to conducting an individualized behavioral treatment evaluation for John, a 12 year old male diagnosed with ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome, and Oppositional Defiant Disorder. John was admitted to an outpatient clinic for the assessment and treatment of aggressive (verbal and physical) and disruptive behavior. A multiple baseline across skills design was used during pre-treatment parent training with Johns mother. Results indicated that the parent training intervention produced significant reductions in this parents negative interactions (e.g., questions and criticizing statements) and increases in positive interactions (e.g., use of labeled praise and planned ignoring of problem behavior). Following this parent training, an individualized levels system (e.g., Hagopian et al., 2002) was evaluated across three conditions with Johns mother serving as the therapist across all treatment settings. Rates of problem behavior were reduced by 80% or greater across each condition and also during demand fading procedures; thus, supporting the utility of teaching PCIT-derived skills prior to initiating parent-conducted treatment evaluations.
 
76. Utilizing In-vivo Feedback to Train Caregivers to Implement Pediatric Feeding Protocols
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
AMANDA L. GIBSON (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Melanie H. Bachmeyer (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Caitlin A. Kirkwood (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Courtney Mauzy (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Jonathan V. Mariano (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Diane Berth (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Abstract:

Although caregivers are responsible for feeding their children, systematic examinations of procedures to train caregivers to implement feeding protocols are lacking. A few researchers have examined the effects of multicomponent behavioral skills training (BST) packages that include combinations of verbal instructions, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback to increase the procedural integrity of caregivers implementing feeding protocols (e.g., Mueller et al., 2003; Sieverling et al., 2012). In-vivo feedback, without the use of other BST components, has been shown to be effective in training caregivers to implement other behavioral protocols (e.g., Shanley & Niec, 2010). The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of using only in-vivo feedback to increase the correct delivery of prompts and consequences by caregivers implementing feeding protocols. We used a multiple baseline design across caregiver dyads. Interobserver agreement was conducted on at least 70% of sessions. Agreement was above 90% for each dyad. Percentage of correct prompts and consequences were low during baseline (written instructions only), increased to clinically acceptable levels following in-vivo feedback, and remained at high levels during post-training and follow-up sessions for all dyads. Implications of these findings will be discussed.

 
77. Examining The Validity Of Indirect Functional Behavior Assessment Methods: How Accurate Are They?
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
JENNIFER S. KAZMERSKI (East Carolina University), Ryan Ford (East Carolina University), Jessica Buzenski (East Carolina University )
Abstract: This study replicates and extends previous research on the convergence of the Functional Assessment Interview Record for Parents Checklist (FAIR-P-CL) with all phases (descriptive, interpretive, verification, implementation and monitoring) of functional behavior assessment. The FAIR-P-CL is an indirect descriptive assessment that aims to define the target behavior, identify potential environmental factors that enable the target behavior, and identify maintaining consequences. To evaluate convergence, five children between three and five, who were referred for displaying disruptive behavior frequently in the home, were selected. A multiple baseline across participants was used to expose each participant to baseline, experimental functional analysis, intervention analysis, and intervention verification. Alternating treatment designs were used to evaluate changes in participant behavior across conditions during experimental functional and intervention analysis phases. Results indicated convergence of FAIR-P-CL data across all phases of the functional behavior assessment. This extends previous research regarding convergence of the phases of a functional behavior assessment (Lewis & Sugai, 1996; Yarbrough & Carr; 2000). Further research is underway to determine if the FAIR-P-CL is sensitive enough to identify appropriate function-based interventions with the absence of a verification phase. Results from the present study extend the utility of indirect functional behavior checklists.
 
78. The Effectiveness of Parent Training Program About Acceptance Process
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
GÜLEFSAN ÖZGE AKBEY (Anadolu University), Fidan Gunes Gurgor (Anadolu University)
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to search the effectiveness of parent training program about acceptance process. The sample of this study consists of 30 parents of children with intellectual disabilities attending special education schools. The study has 15 parents in control group and 15 parents in experiment group in the city center of Eskisehir during the academic year 2013-2014. This study consists of two phases. In the first phase of the study, Family Resilience Scale-FRS was applied two groups and we started to apply to parent training program for experiment group.In this program,we used e-abdep(e-FISEP, being family information and support program, is a scientific research project supported by TBITAK and Anadolu University), bulletins and handbook.The program has four session.First session,orientation to defiency;second session,understanding of childrens defiency and statement;third session;family supporting models and four session; orientation of environment and living together.For control group,we only applied Resilience Scale-FRS. Finally,we started this program but we will finish the program on April.We will show results with graphics on our Poster.
 
79. PT for PT: How Precision Teaching Helped Me With Physical Therapy
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
SHOSHANA STEIN (Stein Homeschool ), Sorah Stein (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Abstract: Physical therapy is not the most desirable activity for the average teenager, however, at times, it is needed. In the present study, a 13-year-old girl with Mitochondrial disease required physical therapy to address muscle weakness and pain. The physical therapist administered the Functional Movement Screen to assess movement patterns, provided manual therapy, supervised therapeutic exercises, and assigned home exercises. The teen and her mother broke down the assigned composite exercises into component movements and conducted frequent, timed exercise sessions and charted them on standard celeration charts. By doing this, the teen grew stronger in some areas and her mother and the physical therapist were able to identify subtler component areas of weakness from looking at celerations and implement exercise modifications that were needed to increase safety. By breaking down composite exercises into component movements and collecting data frequently, we helped physical therapy treatment to be more effective and safe, and were able to better track progress towards overall strengthening.
 
80. Tackling Terms and Conditioning Confusion: Sexual Behavior and Applied Behavior Analysis
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Abstract: When working within sexual health and with people who engage in varying topographies of sexual behavior, the first thing to remember is that sex is behavior: its something we do and it follows the same rules as all other topographies of behavior. However, regarding communication, of particular difficulty are defining terms of sexual desire and arousal (Pfaus, et al., 2003). This study evaluates a hypothetical vignette involving a teenage boy who, upon encountering female staff at an autism center, egressed to masturbate in specific areas of the center. In defining his arousal and masturbatory behaviors, clinicians hypothesized several combinations of potential functions of the behavior, the various roles of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, and responding between the presence of the female staff, the erection, and ejaculation. Using three- and four-term contingency presentations, there are several possible configurations of this behavior based upon looking at the sequence of the behavior as operant or respondent. The purpose of this discourse is to stimulate further investigation and discussion into the contingency models for sexual arousal and desire that can be utilized by both the behavior analysis and sexual health care communities.
 
81. The Errorless Teaching of Swallowing for a Child Vomiting Every Meal
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
KENJI OKUDA (Academy of Behavioral Coaching)
Abstract: A case of psychogenic vomiting in the context of phobia was treated by a combination of exposure, the errorless teaching approach, and differential reinforcement of incompatible behaviors. Subject: A 4-year-old girl who began a difficulty of swallowing since she had some accident while eating at home was trained by a behavior therapist. Design: Change was assessed on the basis of her mother's records at home of daily frequency of vomiting and monthly weight within a single case multiple baseline across settings design. Procedures: The therapist demonstrated these procedures on hers behavior in front of her mother just one time. Result: The girls vomiting behavior was no longer occurred immediately. By contrast, a normal swallowing behavior has occurred even if tough meat. This outcome has been maintained for 5-months follow-up. And the girl's weight was recovered. These procedures, exposure, the errorless teaching approach, DRI, and some techniques of respondent conditioning were discussed.
 
82. CANCELLED: The Validity Of Indirect Functional Behavior Assessment Methods: How Accurate Are They?
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
RYAN FORD (East Carolina University), Jennifer S. Kazmerski (East Carolina University), Jessica Buzenski (East Carolina University )
Abstract:

IV. This study replicates and extends previous research on the convergence of the Functional Assessment Interview Record for Parents Checklist (FAIR-P-CL) with all phases (descriptive, interpretive, verification, implementation and monitoring) of functional behavior assessment. The FAIR-P-CL is an indirect descriptive assessment that aims to define the target behavior, identify potential environmental factors that enable the target behavior, and identify maintaining consequences. To evaluate convergence, five children between three and five, who were referred for displaying disruptive behavior frequently in the home, were selected. A multiple baseline across participants was used to expose each participant to baseline, experimental functional analysis, intervention analysis, and intervention verification. Alternating treatment designs were used to evaluate changes in participant behavior across conditions during experimental functional and intervention analysis phases. Results indicated convergence of FAIR-P-CL data across all phases of the functional behavior assessment. This extends previous research regarding convergence of the phases of a functional behavior assessment (Lewis & Sugai, 1996; Yarbrough & Carr; 2000). Further research is underway to determine if the FAIR-P-CL is sensitive enough to identify appropriate function-based interventions with the absence of a verification phase. Results from the present study extend the utility of indirect functional behavior checklists.

 
83. An Evaluation of a Brief Behavioral Workshop for Caregivers
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
KARIN STERN (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Emily Sangkavasi (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Urszula Wojciechowska (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Melissa Luke Gonzalez (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract:

A brief behavioral workshop is traditionally offered at the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program at Kennedy Krieger Institute. The goals of the workshop are to equip caregivers with effective strategies to recognize behavioral functions and provide specific tools to implement function-based interventions. The aim of this study was to assess change in caregivers' knowledge following participation in the workshop and their ability to apply it into everyday situations. We implemented pre- and post-tests to assess whether caregivers' responses changed following participation in a 4-hour behavioral workshop. We generated a questionnaire comprised of three scenarios, each related to a different behavioral function (attention, escape, and tangible). Majority of caregivers had higher post-test scores suggesting an increase in knowledge related to behavioral principles. Analyses of the data by behavioral function revealed that increases in post-test scores were only observed for caregivers who attended the specific meeting addressing the relevant function; increases were not observed for those caregivers who did not attend that meeting. All caregivers had some previous knowledge on the subject matter, suggesting that a Needs Assessment should be conducted. Future research should assess change in caregivers' behaviors using more direct methods, such as role-play and direct observations on caregiver-child interactions.

 
84. Evaluating the Clinical Effectiveness and Generalization Effects of Treatment for Problem Behavior Maintained by Compliance with Mands
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
LENA V. WILLSE (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Molly Gemp (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Jonathan Dean Schmidt (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Lynn G. Bowman (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Samantha Hardesty (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: A primary goal of most treatments is to bring behavior under a level of stimulus control that permits individuals to interact appropriately with their peers, particularly during times when they are not able to access desired reinforcers. However, there is a lack of research evaluating generalization by having individuals with functionally equivalent problem behavior interact with each other in situations that previously evoked such behavior. For the current study, the severe problem behavior of two participants with autism spectrum disorders was targeted for assessment and treatment. Results of functional analyses indicated that both participants' problem behavior was maintained by other's compliance with mands, particularly in a leisure context. The use of a multiple schedule that alternated between differential reinforcement of other behaviors and noncontingent reinforcement was sufficient to produce a significant reduction in problem behavior for one participant; the addition of a token economy system was necessary for the second participant. After identifying effective treatments, we emphasized generalization by implementing each participant's treatment concurrently while they interacted with each other. Results show that each participant's treatment was successfully generalized across a variety of interactive activities, as evidenced by low to zero rates of problem behavior.
 
85. Rapid Acquisition of Pill Swallowing
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
WILLIAM J. WARZAK (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Michelle Grimes (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Abstract: We describe a pill swallowing protocol for a 16 year-old typically developed female (Jill) whose historical baseline for pill swallowing was zero. Jill was medicated (liquid) for ADHD but her history was otherwise unremarkable. During Session 1 we identified the target behavior, ascertained that Jill’s personal protocol of filling her mouth with water and then inserting her medication was ineffective, and, determined that she could, with much effort (i.e., long latency, elevated SUDS), swallow a sprinkle, the smallest item on her hierarchy. A six-step pill size hierarchy was established using various cake decorations and candies. Each item was scaled for subjective units of discomfort (S.U.D.s) to ascertain its place in the hierarchy and ultimately ranged from cupcake sprinkles to a placebo of her ADHD medication in capsule form. For each trial, we recorded the a) latency (in seconds) from “pill in hand” to swallow, b), pre-trial SUDS, c) problem behaviors (e.g., refusal, gagging, etc.), and, d) ultimate success or failure. We report successful pill swallowing following a change in pill insertion and subsequent shaping of pill swallowing as a function of graduated pill size over trials. We include a table of her data and will provide figures at ABAI.
 
86. Treating Packing: A Comparison of Nuk Re-distribution and Nuk Presentation
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
AMY L PROSKOVEC (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Suzanne M. Milnes (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Jennifer M. Kozisek (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Janelle Butler (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Cathleen C. Piazza (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Abstract: Packing (holding food in the mouth without swallowing) may occur if a child lacks the oral motor skills and/or motivation to swallow. Two interventions investigators have evaluated for the treatment of packing are altering presentation method (i.e., presenting bites with a Nuk brush or flipped spoon; Sharp, Harker, & Jaquess, 2010) or re-distribution (i.e., collecting packed food from the child's mouth and replacing it on the child's tongue; Gulotta, Piazza, Patel, & Layer, 2005). Although studies have shown that both procedures increase mouth clean, it is not clear whether one procedure is more effective than the other. The purpose of the current investigation was to compare the effects of re-distribution using a Nuk relative to presenting bites using a Nuk on packing and mouth clean for a 2-year-old girl who packed thickened liquids and pureed food. We used a reversal and multielement design to evaluate the procedures with thickened liquids and a multielement design to evaluate the procedures with pureed food. For liquids and solids, presenting the bite using the Nuk was more effective, resulting in decreased packing and clinically meaningful levels of mouth clean.
 
87. CANCELED: Inappropriate Verbalizations
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
TIMOTHY TEMPLIN (HABA)
Abstract:

The following study focuses on an individual who displays verbal behavior that is often perceived as teasing, harassing others or simple disruption to a hospital unit. The intervention applied a technique to reinforce productive verbal behavior, while at the same time assist the patient in learning how to acquire social attention in a more acceptable manner. This patient has had behavior problems for many years and the theme is invariably about poor interactions with his peers. Based on a review of the literature a definition was developed to address a problem identified as inappropriate verbalizations. Using this definition, the patient was observed for inappropriate verbalizations, during the daily routine. This addresses the research question by directly viewing the patient in a social interaction in the very type of setting where he has had altercations in the past. During the treatment phase, the patient had the opportunity to read a joke, previously selected by the author, to an audience of fellow patients during this line-up process. An A-B-A-B design made a comparison of the patient in the baseline and treatment phases.

 
88. A Conjoint Consultation Bio-behavioral Intervention to Treat Encopresis in an Eight-year-old Male
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
MARIA ALEJANDRA RAMIREZ (Central Michigan University ), Michael D. Hixson (Central Michigan University), Seraphim Mork (Central Michigan University ), Teryn Bruni (Central Michigan University ), Jessica Sevecke (Central Michigan University)
Abstract:

A bio-behavioral encopresis intervention was designed and implemented in the school and home for an 8-year-old second grade male who had been experiencing encopresis since kindergarten. The intervention consisted of a home only phase, and a home and school phase. The purpose of this intervention was to decrease his smearing and bowel movements in his pants from one to two per day to zero, and increase bowel movements in the toilet from zero per day to at least one per day. Components of the intervention included administration of Miralax, per doctor recommendation, at least three scheduled sittings lasting between three to five minutes, praise and access to tangibles following scheduled sittings, and positive practice following bowel movements in the pants. The results showed that after the school component was added, and Miralax was administered consistently, there was an increase in medium sized bowel movements on almost a daily basis. Treatment integrity however was a major obstacle in this intervention.

 
 
Keyword(s): poster session

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE