Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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36th Annual Convention; San Antonio, TX; 2010

Program by Continuing Education Events: Friday, May 28, 2010


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: BACB
Developing a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program Suited for Persons With Intellectual Delay and Coexisting Conditions
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Republic C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Gary LaVigna, Ph.D.
SUSAN M. S. SMITH (Woodward Resource Center), JAMES R. PRICKETT (Woodward Resource Center), JAN MUNSON (Woodward Resource Center), CINDY GRONERT (Woodward Resource Center), GEORGE DOBRZYNSKI (Woodward Resource Center), SHERI BOWLES (Woodward Resource Center)
Description: The number of intellectually challenged persons who live in residential treatment settings and engage in suicidal and nonfatal self-harm behaviors is plentiful and may be growing, making the identification of effective treatment methodology critical. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a treatment that has been found to be effective for individuals exhibiting these behaviors; however, DBT materials and activities that cater to those dually diagnosed with mental illness and intellectual delay are scarce. This workshop will illustrate the Woodward Resource Center’s DBT program, which converts the DBT philosophy into materials and activities that are well suited for this special population. Specifically, the following will be covered: functional assessment and hypotheses of persons who may benefit from this treatment, aspects of effective skill groups, several adapted activities for both group and individual therapy sessions, phone consultation, organization of a productive consultation team, and strategies to effectively convey knowledge of the technology from professional to direct-care staff.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify and describe adapted activities from each of the DBT skill modules: mindfulness, emotion regulation, interpersonal effectiveness, and distress tolerance; 2. visually illustrate the concept of “dialectical thinking” to increase its utility in the daily lives of this special population; 3. identify five ways to make DBT skill groups effective for the mentally retardation and developmental disabilities population living in residential treatment settings; 4. discuss strategies used to shape staffs’ behavior so that it reflects DBT philosophy; 5. discuss strategies used to shape clients’ ability to describe their private events.
Activities: Attendees will view a PowerPoint presentation that vividly illustrates DBT philosophy converted into materials suitable for persons who are intellectually delayed with coexisting conditions; review accompanying handouts that include several take-home, ready-to-use activities; and view videotaped examples of validation techniques applicable to both verbal and nonverbal clients.
Audience: Persons with an interest in clinical behavior analysis, and/or an interest in an extension of DBT to persons who are intellectually delayed with coexisting conditions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: BACB
Values Work in Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Travis C/D (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM/AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Paula Braga-Kenyon, M.S.
EMILY KENNISON SANDOZ (University of Mississippi), KATE KELLUM (University of Mississippi)
Description: Behavior change is hard for humans. From discrete trial training to individual psychotherapy, we see humans trying to change their own behavior in such a way so as to foster behavior change in another. Recently, values work has been described as a way to direct and dignify the hard work of behavioral interventions. This workshop will explore the conceptual and practical implications of this idea. In this workshop, we will 1) examine the challenges to successful behavioral intervention, 2) define values and related concepts in behavioral terms, and 3) explore conceptually and experientially the impact of making values an explicit part of any behavioral intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. describe in behavioral terms potential obstacles to successful intervention with respect to therapist behavior, client behavior, and behavior of others in the support system; 2. define values in behavioral terms and give examples of valued activities; 3. describe the theoretical justification for values work in behavior analysis; 4. describe three ways that values work might be applied to their own work in behavior analysis.
Activities: Activities will include a 20-minute introduction to analyzing the behavior of all individuals involved in behavior analytic interventions; a 30-minute discussion of challenges facing successful intervention and shaping the audience's responses into terms of stimulus control; a 10-minute introduction to the concept of values; a 20-minute experiential exercise fostering contact with values, followed by a debriefing; a 20-minute discussion of values and discriminating valued activities from those under aversive control; a 30-minute experiential exercise practicing discrimination of valued activities with those under aversive control, followed by a debriefing; a 20-minute presentation on examples of values work in behavior analysis; a 20-minute small group exercise generating examples of explicit values work that might fit the participants' own activities in behavior analysis; and a 10-minute closing.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for anyone working in the area of behavior analysis who is interested in ways to make their work more meaningful for themselves, their clients, and the system supporting their clients. Participation will require a basic understanding of behavior analysis and a willingness to engage in values-based experiential exercises.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: BACB
Sleep Disorders and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Research Update and Behavioral Interventions
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Seguin (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michelle Turan, M.A.
JULIE KNAPP (Cleveland Clinic Center for Autism), ALLISON NEWMAN (Cleveland Clinic Center for Autism)
Description: Research indicates that difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep are common in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with as many as 70-80% experiencing sleep problems in their youth. Lack of sleep contributes to secondary symptoms such as irritableness, inattention, memory problems, disruptive behaviors, cognitive inflexibility, depression, emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and aggression. Lack of sleep also affects physical health, family functioning, and quality of life. In this workshop, updated research will be offered on theories of sleep problems in ASD and common pediatric sleep issues in this population such as parasomnias and primary insomnia. Behavioral assessment, such as sleep diaries and behavioral logs, will be presented for collecting baseline data and ongoing data for measuring treatment effectiveness. Information will be provided on possible medical causes that will help clinicians make more appropriate physician referrals. Finally, behavioral interventions such as environmental modifications, sleep hygiene, restriction of daytime sleep, positive bedtime routines, and graduated extinction procedures will be offered.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify common sleep problems in children with ASD; 2. recognize secondary symptoms associated with poor sleep; 3. learn key components in behavioral assessment of sleep; 4. arrange a child’s sleep environment for promoting sleep success; 5. describe evidence-based behavioral strategies for improving sleep.
Activities: Didactic instruction and case studies.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, social workers, speech and language pathologists, and special education teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: BACB
RFT 101: An Introduction to Relational Frame Theory
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Lone Star Ballroom Salon E (Grand Hyatt)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Erin Richard, M.A.
DANIEL J. MORAN (Trinity Services, Inc.), PATRICIA BACH (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Description: Arbitrarily applied what? Derived relational who? If you started learning about relational frame theory (RFT) and then stopped when you read Crel {ArxB and BrxC…}, or have just been interested in learning the basics of RFT, this is the introductory workshop for you. This workshop will outline and explain the basic concepts of RFT and help the audience members understand an expanded functional approach to verbal behavior. We will discuss, from a behavior analytic point of view, how people can listen with understanding and speak with meaning. The workshop will simplify functional contextualism principles and discuss basic RFT research methods and results in a manner that will help people new to RFT begin applying the concepts to their own behavior analytic endeavors. The workshop will clarify the core assumptions of functional contextual behavior analysis and how they apply to discussing language and cognition. Future directions for improving language acquisition and treating autism will also be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What is arbitrary applicable relational responding? 2. What are the fundamental assumptions of modern functional contextual behavior analysis compared to mainstream psychology’s fundamental assumptions? 3. What occurs with transformation of stimulus functions?
Activities: The workshop will be guided by an animated slide show and will be punctuated with audience and small group participation. Slide show handouts will be available as well.
Audience: Beginners, clinicians, and researchers.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: BACB
Refining Teaching Through Technology: Using PowerPoint to Create Highly Individualized Behavior Analytic Teaching Programs for Children With Autism
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bonham A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Becky Penrod, Ph.D.
JESSICA SLATON (Nashoba Learning Group)
Description: Children with autism often require very specialized prompting, prompt fading, error correction, or stimulus arrangement to effectively learn new skills. For some children with autism, the level of precision necessary in executing these teaching strategies is so great that it cannot reliably be performed without technology. Examples of such precision include the difference between a 1 second and 1.5 second time delay prompt, presenting a verbal SD with the same volume and intonation every trial, or exaggerating the size of a stimulus by exactly 5% vs. 8%. Children with autism who require that prompts be broken down so minutely and faded so gradually can benefit from computerized teaching programs that are capable of providing such precision. There are many educational software programs available on the market, but they lack the individualization necessary and may in fact reinforce incorrect answers by providing auditory or visual stimuli after each answer. Using Microsoft PowerPoint is an excellent (and free) alternative way to create highly individualized and precise teaching programs for the most challenged learners with autism. Examples of skills successfully taught using individualized PowerPoint programs are object identification, sight words, phonics, answering social questions, and addition and subtraction on a number line.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to do the following: 1. Participants will be able to use PowerPoint to create behavior analytic teaching programs using time delay prompts; stimulus superimposition and fading; echoic prompts; prompts that are faded within session; and within-stimulus prompts that manipulate size, position, color, and movement. 2. Participants will be able to use PowerPoint to insert, modify, and animate pictures, shapes, and text boxes, including making stimuli appear and disappear or change position contingent upon clicking a target stimulus or in sequence with other stimuli. 3. Participants will be able to use PowerPoint to incorporate individualized multi-media reinforcement (music, videos) into teaching programs, on both fixed and variable ratio schedules. 4. Participants will be able to use PowerPoint to create multiple types of error correction procedures within teaching programs. 5. Participants will be able to use PowerPoint to record and deliver verbal SDs. 6. Participants will be able to describe several strategies for generalizing skills learned via PowerPoint to more naturalistic and functional settings.
Activities: Participants will review teaching programs created with PowerPoint to become familiar with the capabilities of the program, and complete hands-on activities with PowerPoint. It is very strongly recommended that participants bring their laptop with them to complete hands-on activities. Laptops should have a working version of Microsoft PowerPoint. Colleagues attending the workshop together may share a laptop if they desire. Participants who do not bring laptops will still benefit from observing the instructor model the steps of these activities, and can complete hands-on activities by mapping out their slides on paper. Participants will be led through a series of task-analyzed activities using individual components of PowerPoint to create behavior analytic teaching programs including, but not limited to, inserting and modifying stimuli; recording and using auditory stimuli; animating stimuli; making stimuli appear and disappear; specifying when stimuli animate (automatically, on a time delay, or contingent upon clicking other stimuli); and inserting and using multi-media reinforcement. Detailed written instructions will be provided for all participants, including task analyses for some of the more complex programming tasks. There will be time for participants to begin designing their own individualized PowerPoint teaching programs, with guidance from the instructor. The instructor will be using PowerPoint with Windows Vista, but is familiar with earlier versions.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts who are responsible for designing individualized teaching programs for children with autism and who have easy access to PowerPoint in their work setting, but may not be familiar with using it. An in-depth knowledge of behavior analytic teaching strategies is necessary. No experience with PowerPoint is necessary, though a basic understanding of how to use a computer is assumed (e.g., browsing the internet, using word processing software, cutting and pasting, making selections from drop-down menus, etc.) The strategies covered in this workshop are applicable to many types of learners, but are particularly relevant to learners who demonstrate slow progress and require a very high level of consistency and precision in their teaching.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: BACB
Data-Based Process to Improve Outcomes for Children With Autism
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bonham C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda Adams, Ph.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Florida Institute of Technology), JORDAN P. BOUDREAU (Florida Institute of Technology), MEGAN A. BOYLE (Florida Institute of Technology), NICOLE BECKER (Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: Organizations that serve children with autism require valid measures of how efficiently their clients are acquiring language and social skills, the accuracy and speed with which their teachers are implementing client programs, and an efficient process for using those data to change teacher performance and programs when children are not acquiring the skills they need. This is because the number of service delivery hours that such organizations can provide is limited by both funding and a small time window for the delivery of effective interventions. Organizational performance engineering is the application of behavior analysis to solve organizational performance problems so that individuals and organizations can achieve desired results. The process is called PARSE, an acronym which stands for 1) pinpoint performance problems worth solving; 2) analyze their causes; 3) recommend the best solutions; 4) solve the problems by designing and implementing the best solutions; and 5) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of the solutions implemented. The skills participants will acquire in this workshop will allow them to implement an efficient data-based process to improve outcomes for children with autism.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop the participant will have acquired the following skills: 1. After collecting information about a client’s desired results and the organizational performance necessary to achieve those results, the designer will pinpoint the performance problems by a) defining the client’s desired results and performance necessary to produce those results and b) evaluating current results and performance to decide whether the problem is worth solving. 2. Given information about the causes of performance problems, the designer will analyze those problems, classifying them as “can-do,” “know-how,” and/or “want-to” problems and identifying their causes as defective resources, training programs, and management practices. 3. Given an evaluation of current performance problems and an analysis of their causes, the designer will list possible solutions, considering the estimated value, cost and compliance of each solution with ethical standards, and recommend those solutions with the best return on investment. 4. Given a list of recommended solutions to a performance problem which may include resources, training, and performance management, the designer will solve the problem by designing and implementing the solutions which may include more efficient resources, training, or performance management practices. 5. After collecting measures of improvement in performance and results, the time and costs to produce that improvement, the designer will evaluate solution effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment and recommend design changes needed to produce further improvements.
Activities: Fluency practice: Participants will gain fluency in component skills of organizational performance engineering by practicing with flashcards, measuring, and graphing their own learning efficiencies. Practice solving organizational performance problems: Participants will practice solving organizational performance problems with case studies provided by the instructor. Discuss performance engineering projects: Participants will discuss their performance-engineering projects, present their work to the instructor and fellow students and help their fellow students solve project-related problems.
Audience: This workshop will be of interest to anyone responsible for solving human performance problems, whether these exist at the organizational, process, or individual levels. It can help agency directors change the flow of resources and feedback to and within their organizations so that their agencies can achieve their missions of helping clients achieve their goals. It can help agency managers redesign work processes so that their staff are able to work together more efficiently to help clients achieve their goals. And it can help agency supervisors and trainers provide more efficient resources, training, and management practices so that individual staff will be more efficient in helping clients achieve their goals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: BACB
Designing and Implementing Video Modeling Procedures to Teach Skills to Individuals With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bonham D (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Josh Edelman, M.A.School District Administrator
CASANDRA C. NGUYEN (Autism Spectrum Therapies), SABRINA D. DANESHVAR (Autism Spectrum Therapies), SUSAN E. TIRELLA (Autism Spectrum Therapies)
Description: Video modeling is an empirically validated method for teaching children with autism and other developmental disabilities a wide range of target behaviors. These skills include play, social skills, conversational speech, and self care routines. The purpose of this workshop is to review the research on video modeling comparing adult to child models as well as in vivo verses video instruction. Participants will learn to identify the components of effective video modeling instruction, design their own protocols, and be able to implement video modeling procedures to teach a variety of learners across a variety of settings.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop the participants will be able to do the following: 1. demonstrate an understanding of the research behind video modeling procedures; 2. identify appropriate candidates for video modeling procedures; 3.identify appropriate target behaviors to teach using video modeling; 4. develop scripts, videos, and data collection methods; 5. implement video modeling to teach target skills in a variety of settings (home, classroom, clinic, community, etc.).
Activities: Workshop includes didactic instruction, discussion, and small group activities during which participants will identify target behaviors, develop scripts, and create their own videos.
Audience: Professionals and parents working with individuals with autism or other development delays such as behavior analysts, teachers, speech language pathologists, and school psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: BACB
Developing the Social Skills of Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders Served in Inclusive Settings
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bowie A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Kenneth MacAleese, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (The May Institute), MARISSA PETRUCCELLI (May Institute)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to enhance the competencies of participants to design and improve social skills of students with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). This workshop will review the research on assessment and intervention with social skills of students with ASD. The workshop will focus on the development of effective social skill interventions based on a variety of assessments. The participants will learn how to empirically assess social skills of students with ASD through a variety of measures. Using this information the participants will learn how to design 1) effective direct instructional interventions to improve social skills, 2) interventions within general education classrooms to teach and generalize social skills of these students, and 3) interventions to generalize these skills to home and community settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. identify assessment instruments and methods to inform the development of social skill development in students with ASD; 2. design direct instructional methods to increase social skills; 3. design function based interventions to teach social skills that complete with problem behavior; 4. design strategies to support social skills development in inclusionary settings; 5. adapt curriculum and activities for students with ASD to increase social interactions; 6. design strategies to encourage social interactions between students with ASD and their typical peers; 7. increase opportunities for students with ASD to practice social skills in different environments (e.g., other school settings, home, community); and 8. increase success of students with ASD in a variety of settings.
Activities: Participants will follow a process of case based assessment of social skills with students with ASD. Participants will then use this assessment process to gather information on students that they working with. Based on this assessment the participants will learn the process of designing a comprehensive social skills intervention plan to increase social skills. Participants will this process to design interventions with students that they are currently working with.
Audience: Behavior analysts, educational consultants, and technical assistance providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: BACB
Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Autism: Evidence-Based Strategies to Enhance Communication and Remediate Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Scott Gaynor, Ph.D.
OLIVER WENDT (Purdue University), MIRIAM CHACON BOESCH (Purdue University), RAVI NIGAM (Governors State University)
Description: This workshop will provide an introduction and overview of interventions in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One of the core ASD symptoms includes a “delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language.” Approximately 25-50% of children with ASD are functionally nonverbal and will not develop sufficient natural speech or writing without ongoing and systematic AAC intervention. AAC augments or replaces spoken language through alternative means of communication. The first part of this workshop will review evidence-based AAC strategies to facilitate functional communication skills, enhance natural speech production, and increase social-communicative behaviors. Strategies include unaided approaches such as manual signs and gestures, and aided approaches such as graphic symbols, Picture Communication Exchange System, and speech-generating devices. The second part will focus on how to use AAC for remediating challenging behaviors such as aggression or self-injury. AAC strategies can be part of functional communication training—a systematic program to replace challenging behavior with alternative communicative responses. Results from recent systematic reviews of single-subject and group experiments will be reviewed to identify empirically supported AAC interventions. Pseudoscientific treatment claims will be outlined along with guidelines for evidence-based decision making when providing AAC services for ASDs.
Learning Objectives: After completion of this workshop participants will be able to do the following: 1. summarize and critically appraise research related to ASD and AAC approaches such as manual signs and gestures, communication boards with graphic symbols, tangible symbols, Picture Exchange Communication System, speech-generating devices, and functional communication training; 2. understand the potential benefits of AAC intervention on the development of natural speech in children with ASD, as well as the roles of behavioral versus naturalistic AAC intervention approaches for children with ASD; 3. understand how single-subject research is used to evaluate the effectiveness of AAC interventions, how practitioners can easily estimate the amount of treatment effectiveness, and how to identify quality criteria for sound treatment research in AAC; 4. define evidence-based practice in AAC, understand the benefits of systematic reviews and meta-analyses for clinical decision-making in ASD, and identify empirically supported AAC interventions for this population; 5. understand the controversy about facilitated communication and rapid prompting method, and be able to distinguish scientific from pseudoscientific AAC treatment claims.
Activities: Lecturing will provide an initial overview on the various AAC interventions and their effectiveness for individuals with ASD. Videotaped case studies will illustrate differences between AAC approaches and provide a better understanding of different intervention components. During practical exercises participants will learn how to use easy-to-compute nonparametric measures within a single-subject design to determine how effective an AAC or FCT intervention truly was. Group discussion will revolve around the presentation of two controversial videotapes, one on facilitated communication (FC), and the other on rapid prompting (RP). Participants will learn warning signs to watch for, when separating scientific from pseudoscientific treatment claims, and will subsequently apply these criteria to the FC and RP controversies. Finally, resources will be discussed that are available to practitioners seeking for best available AAC treatment evidence. Attendees will be provided with handouts of all the information covered in the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is intended for professionals working in the autism field who have an interest in AAC interventions for individuals presenting with little or no functional speech. Specifically, practitioners with motivation to implement evidence-based practices in AAC and particular interest in treatment efficacy will find this workshop very suitable for their needs. This can include applied researchers, behavior analysts, special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, graduate students in any of these disciplines, and other practitioners serving individuals with autism. A basic understanding of single-subject research methodology is advantageous to fully benefit from this workshop, but not strictly necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Successful Programs to Meet the Needs of Adolescents and Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Ross, Ed.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Eden II Programs), JOANNE GERENSER (Eden II Programs), PETER F. GERHARDT (Organization for Autism Research), NICOLE WEIDENBAUM (Nassau-Suffolk Services for Autism)
Description: There has been considerable research done in the past 20 years in the area of autism and related disorders. We have learned a great deal about the genetics and neurobiology of autism and made great strides in early identification and intervention. Clinical research in speech and language, social skills, and behavior problems has resulted in a much better understanding of the complex nature of autism. The research clearly supports the use of applied behavior analysis in the treatment and education of learners with autism. One problem, however, is that very little of this research has included adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While many of the findings with children can be relevant in our work with adults, there remain significant gaps in the literature that, unfortunately, leave many more questions than answers. The lack of available literature to guide service providers in their work with adults with ASD is particularly problematic today. The dramatic increase in the incidences of ASD began almost 15 years ago and we are just now beginning to see this impact in the field of adult services. Many of the schools that opened in the past decade to meet the demands of parents who wanted good behavioral education programs are now facing the real challenge of how to address the needs of these learners as they become adolescents and adults. Still other programs that have been providing adult services for years to other populations are now being asked to expand their programs and accept learners with ASD. This workshop will address key aspects of developing an effective program for adolescents and adults with ASD. Specifically, the workshop will review the available literature in the areas of employment, recreation and leisure skills, sexuality, speech and language, promoting independence, community integration, and quality of life. In addition, assessment and programming to address each of these areas will be presented. Video tapes of program implementation as well as other relevant visual supports will be incorporated within the workshop. The workshop’s primary focus will be on adolescents and adults with autism who continue to demonstrate significant challenges and limitations. The essential components needed to specifically address individuals with ASD will be highlighted. In addition, the important modifications and adaptations that are necessary to meet the needs of individuals with ASD as they grow older will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. discuss the relevant literature relating to services and treatments of adults with ASD; 2. identify key components of an effective program to meet the needs of adolescents and adults with ASD; 3. describe programming to address employment, sexuality, recreation and leisure, and other key areas in the lives of adolescents and adults with ASD; 4. describe strategies for promoting independence and community access for adults with ASD.
Activities: The workshop will include lecture and group discussion as well as videos of different aspects of service delivery for adolescents and adults with ASD. Participants will review data sheets, program forms, assessment materials, and other program materials used within a behavioral program for adolescents and adults with ASD.
Audience: Service providers, program administrators, behavior analysts, parents of adolescents with ASD, and adults with ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: BACB
Systematic Staff Training for School-Based Autism Support Programs Using the Analysis of Verbal Behavior
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bowie B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Shawn Kenyon, M.A.
MICHAEL MIKLOS (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network), AMIRIS DIPUGLIA (PaTTAN/ PA Verbal Behavior Project)
Description: A large scale implementation effort, the Pennsylvania Verbal Behavior Project, has developed and implemented systematic and multi-tiered approaches to staff training. This workshop will include a review of staff training procedures for the acquisition of the basic conceptual skills and practice skills needed to teach students with autism the primary verbal operants. Participants will be provided with various training protocols and competency checklists. Opportunity to practice skills such as assessing fluency for tacting the verbal operants and intensive teaching processes will be provided. Staff training procedures to be reviewed include basic conceptual skills, procedures for delivery of discrete trial instruction of the basic verbal operants, systems implementation reviews, and fidelity measures of implementation. Participants will receive a resource CD, a DVD reviewing processes implemented in the Pennsylvania Verbal Behavior Project, and training manuals.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. practice using a procedure to measure staff fluency for identifying the verbal operants as presented in discrete trials; 2. demonstrate effective processes for monitoring treatment fidelity of intensive teaching and discrete trial training of verbal operants and other skills; 3.describe components of a review process for determining implementation fidelity for classroom organization, data collection, effective consultation and decision making systems, instruction, and behavior management; 4. identify key components of staff training at various stages of program implementation; 5. describe the integration of staff training, materials organization, teaching protocols, and data systems for classroom based programs serving students with autism.
Activities: The session will involve lecture, videotape demonstrations, data review, discussion, and guided practice for participants in certain training protocols. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in analogue demonstrations of training processes.
Audience: Behavior analysts, trainers, teachers, and administrators providing consultation to classroom based programs involved in the education of students with autism. The session will also be relevant to those interested in training procedures for behavior analytic service providers in a variety of school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: BACB
Practical Applications of Relational Frame Theory to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Programs: Training Generative Verbal Behavior
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bowie C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Ruth DeBar, Ph.D.
IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway), JOHN D. MCELWEE (Pennsylvania Verbal Behavior Project), SIRI MORRIS MING (VB3)
Description: Generative verbal behavior (GVB)—the ability to understand and produce novel verbal behavior in the absence of direct instruction—is key to the flexibility and complexity of language and should, therefore, be a core goal of any language training program. However, achieving GVB has been extremely difficult for many children with autism spectrum disorders. Relational frame theory (RFT), which conceptualizes generalized or derived relational responding as the core process underlying language and cognition, may constitute an important resource for the training of GVB when designing early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) instructional programs. This theoretical approach also allows an important expansion of Skinner's influential analysis of verbal behavior. This workshop will demonstrate how RFT concepts can be incorporated into EIBI programs with the design of instructional program sequences for early to advanced learners. This workshop will discuss RFT as a behavior analytic account of GVB, and provide demonstration and discussion of specific instructional programs and their sequencing to facilitate GVB, including analysis of the correspondence between Skinnerian verbal behavior programs (specifically those using the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program) and core RFT skills, and an introduction to the Training and Assessment of Relational Precursors and Abilities (TARPA)—a computer-based protocol for systematic assessment and training of relational framing skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify the core concepts of RFT's approach to language; 2. describe the key theoretical concepts of mutual entailment, combinatorial entailment, and transformation of stimulus function; 3. use and develop instructional programs to teach higher order operants; 4. describe several areas of basic RFT research and the implications for EIBI instructional design; 5. assess students using the TARPA; 6. design instructional programs to teach nonarbitrary derived relational responding; 7. design instructional programs to teach derived verbal operants (e.g., derived naming); 8. design instructional programs to teach intermediate to advanced derived verbal operants (e.g., spatial, comparative, and hierarchical relations)
Activities: Activities will include didactic instruction and demonstration, whole group exercises and discussion, and role play practice. All presentation materials, references, and a copy of the TARPA will be provided electronically prior to the workshop for participants who have pre-registered, or at the workshop for on-site registrants.
Audience: This workshop is targeted to behavior analysts with expertise in verbal behavior and designing instructional sequences for children in EIBI programs. A basic familiarity with RFT is suggested, though not required, and prospective audience members may wish to review the material and RFT tutorial at www.contextualpsychology.org.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: BACB
Collaborating With Families During Assessment and Intervention Planning Utilizing Routines as the Context for Intervention
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jack Apsche, Ed.D.Ed.D., Licensed Psychologist,
AMANDA L. LITTLE (University of Texas at Austin), NANETTE L. PERRIN (Early Childhood Autism Program)
Description: Though the display of challenging behavior is not an uncommon occurrence in young children, some children exhibit behaviors that develop into more serious behavior problems affecting the overall family quality of life (Campbell, 1995; Turnbull & Ruef, 1997; Wang, Summers, Little, Turnbull, Poston, Mannan, 2006). Through the use of functional analysis, challenging behavior can be assessed and successfully reduced in a variety of community settings. For example, recent researchers have intervened on challenging behavior during problematic family routines, such as during mealtime or going to the grocery store (e.g., Buschbacher, Fox, & Clarke, 2004; Lucyshyn, Albin, Horner, Mann, Mann, & Wadsworth, 2007). This workshop will provide participants with interventions implemented during family routines, discuss a recent single-subject design research study that includes parent and child data, and provide valuable tools related to collaborating with families throughout the process of functional behavior assessment (FBA) and intervention planning during home and community routines. Strategies for how to teach parents to be the primary interventionists during these processes and intervene with high fidelity of implementation will be discussed and demonstrated through videotaped footage of routines. Strategies to promote generalization to nontrained routines will be shared with participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will be able to do the following: 1. operationally define a family routine that involves child challenging behavior; 2. list the functions that maintain behavior; 3. label the function of a child’s challenging behavior as shown during a videotaped segment; 4. identify setting events, antecedents, and consequences that maintain challenging behavior; 5. develop appropriate, evidence-based interventions for each of the setting events, antecedents, and consequences found based on the results of the FBA conducted during problematic family routines; 6. identify new replacement behaviors to teach the child; 7. describe strategies that are used to promote the generalization of parents’ use of these strategies to nontrained routines; 8. discuss ways to plan for generalization to novel service providers, settings, and situations.
Activities: Participants will engage in a review of the current literature related to intervening with young children who exhibit challenging behavior and their families, then discuss the results of a single-subject, multiple-probe design study that was conducted during problematic family routines with young children with autism and their mothers. Participants will learn the steps vital to conducting an FBA (e.g., operational definitions of target behaviors, choosing appropriate data collection measures, etc.); conduct the steps of a FBA during home and community routines; develop an individualized behavior intervention plan based on the results of the FBA for specific problematic family routines that includes setting event, antecedent, and consequence interventions as well as teaching new skills; and collect data on parent fidelity of implementation of the strategies included in the intervention plan. Videotaped routines will be used for each of these activities. Participants will also review a family quality of life tool used to measure changes in the family system during intervention. An intervention model to guide professionals in identifying methods for enhancing the generalization of strategies to new interventionists, settings, and routines will be discussed.
Audience: Behavior analysts (including Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts), service providers, other professionals in the field of behavior analysis, special education teachers, and others who support individuals at home and in the community who exhibit challenging behavior and who have autism and/or other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
An Overview of Direct Instruction for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Mission B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
CATHY L. WATKINS (California State University, Stanislaus), TRINA D. SPENCER (Utah State University), MARY MEEHAN TAYLOR (The Institute for Effective Education), HILLARY WHITESIDE (The Institute for Effective Education), TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University)
Description: Direct instruction is an integrated system of curriculum and instruction that attempts to arrange all critical variables to produce learning. Direction instruction has been tested and shown to be effective through scientific research with relevant populations of children, including children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Participants in this workshop will learn how direct instruction programs can be implemented with learners with ASD and support the acquisition of their basic language and academic skills. Participants will be introduced to instructional design principles, organizational recommendations, and instructional procedures that enable practitioners to deliver these programs and adapt to the specific needs of children with ASD. This workshop will enable behavior analysts to implement instruction in a wide variety of academic areas. However, language for learning will be specifically highlighted throughout the workshop. Data supporting the effectiveness of direct instruction programs with learners with ASD will be presented. Decision making and placement of students into programs will be discussed in depth. The importance of treatment fidelity will be addressed with strategies for determining whether or not instructional modifications are needed. Guidelines for such modifications will also be examined.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will learn the following: 1. instructional design principles; 2. direct instruction delivery procedures; 3. how to place children into programs and make instructional decisions; 4. guidelines for adapting direct instruction programs for the children with ASD.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, demonstration, and discussion. Video examples of instructional programs will also be presented and participants will have the opportunity to practice direct instructional presentation skills.
Audience: Practitioners who are already board certified or have a solid behavior analytic repertoire and practitioners who have limited experience with direct instruction or wish to learn how to apply it with children with ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB
Building Cooperation and Motivation to Learn
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bonham B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Tina Sidener, Ph.D.
ANNA MATCHNEVA (One Step Ahead Services Inc.), ALEXIA STACK (Private Practice)
Description: Building learner cooperation and motivation in intensive behavior intervention programs is critical for the acquisition of new skills and concepts. Having an in-depth understanding of the components required to teach learner cooperation and motivation, how to problem solve when motivation decreases, how to train staff effectively, and how to design measurement systems is imperative for the implementation of effective intervention programs. This workshop is designed to examine six core concepts for effectively establishing cooperative learning skills. Participants will partake in group discussions and video analysis in order to develop an understanding of the six core concepts: motivation, reinforcement and schedules of reinforcement, preference assessment, token economies, and refusals to cooperate.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. define motivation and identify motivated and unmotivated learners; 2. define preference assessment; 3. discuss advantages and disadvantages of various types of preference assessment; 4. describe schedules of reinforcement; 5. identify different schedules of reinforcement; 6. define token economy; 7. discuss advantages and disadvantages of token economies; 8. identify refusals to cooperate; 9. identify strategies to increase student coopertation.
Activities: The overall objective is for participants to identify components of a motivated learner and what environmental changes to make in order to achieve this therapeutic goal. Over the course of the workshop, participants will engage in a variety of activities aimed at identifying the components needed to create a motivating learning environment: Participants will view and analyze videos to identify components of motivated and unmotivated learners. Participants will view videos and identify schedules of reinforcement. Participants will listen to case studies and identify schedules of reinforcement. Participants will view, via video, two case studies and complete a case analysis of the learners.
Audience: Behavior analysts, staff serving individuals with autism and related disorders, parents and caregivers, and teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Emotional and Immoral Behaviors of Children
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Presidio B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Florence DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D.
JEANNIE GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Many children in the child welfare system develop severe behavioral and emotional problems due to early abuse or neglect and multiple placements and caregivers. Often, the treatment focus follows the medical model with the assumption that behavioral symptoms are the result of underlying psychopathology. Instead, behavior analysts conduct observations of behavior in a variety of settings to determine the effect of various stimulus conditions and setting events, functional assessments to determine the causes and maintainers of various behavioral symptoms, and careful analysis of learning histories to determine the efficacy of various reinforcers and punishers. Immoral and emotional behaviors may be related to learning histories and contingencies that are not observable in the immediate environment. Feelings may be establishing operations for the salience of particular reinforcers and punishers. Certain adult and peer behaviors may be discriminative stimuli for particular reinforcers and punishers in these children’s learning histories. The presenter will discuss the impact that learning history has on current behavior and ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that take this into account. Case examples will be provided, along with opportunities to get feedback on the cases of participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. name several emotional and immoral behaviors of children and adolescents who are diagnosed with severe psychological disorders; 2. tell how the learning histories of children diagnosed with severe psychological disorders effect their emotional and moral behaviors; 3. describe several behavioral techniques that can be used to treat children diagnosed with severe psychological disorders; 4. explain the limits of typical behavioral interventions and suggest alternative interventions that can be used to treat children diagnosed with severe psychological disorders; 5. describe how to apply these techniques to assist children diagnosed with severe psychological disorders in their own professional settings.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools ,and community settings; take notes; ask questions; view a PowerPoint presentation; present their own cases for feedback; and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or typically-developing children who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Effective Behavior Plans: Assessment, Design, and Implementation
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Bonham E (Grand Hyatt)
Area: DDA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara Esch, Ph.D.
JOSE D. RIOS (Private Practice), ISAAC L. BERMUDEZ (Behavior Functions, Inc.), ARTURO ZEPEDA DE MIRANDA, JR. (Miranda United Children's Home, LLC.), RUTH TELLO DILEVA (Familias First), NATALIE STAFFORD (Inclusive Education & Community Partnership), HOWARD HAZARD-TSERNOV (Inclusive Education and Community Partnership), F. ELIZABETH DAVIDSON (Inclusive Education and Community Partnership)
Description: Functional assessments and behavior intervention plans are increasingly used, developed, and implemented across a variety of settings such as schools, homes, early intervention services, residential programs, adult workshops and day programs, geriatric facilities, and rehabilitation centers. Despite this, until recently there have not been any standard methods or protocols for the design and development of assessment and treatment plans. This workshop will address a variety of steps necessary to conduct effective and comprehensive assessments and intervention plans including common problems encountered in assessment and treatment plans; a protocol for designing comprehensive plans; the importance and types of commonly used functional assessment methods; the logical relationship between functional assessment results and the intervention methods chosen (i.e., those based on the function of the problem behavior); ethical issues related to plan development and implementation; and staff and systemic issues related to plan implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. be able to understand how functional assessment methodology logically relates to the development of an effective behavior intervention plan; 2. understand how to include the assessment information into a written plan; 3. review how to place your functional assessment results into a functional assessment report; 4. know how to select effective, research-based interventions according to the assessed function of the problem behavior; 5. review the steps for implementing many research-based intervention strategies; 6. understand how to place your behavior intervention plan recommendations into a report and how to create a behavior intervention plan easy to use by staff members; 7. be able to discriminate between correctly and incorrectly written behavior intervention plans; 8. understand the importance of treatment integrity of the behavior intervention plan; 9. identify the staff issues that affect plan implementation and secure systemic support; 10. be able to write behavioral goals and objectives to evaluate the effectiveness of the behavior intervention plan; 11. understand the ethical concerns related towards assessment and interventions in behavior intervention plans using evidence-based best practices.
Activities: Much of this workshop is didactic, but among the planned activities are small group exercises that include evaluating one or two actual behavior plans, writing goals, reviewing assessment methods, and viewing one or two videotaped exercises.
Audience: This is an advanced presentation that requires participants to have adequate knowledge of applied behavior analysis methods and terms. This presentation is targeted towards professionals who design, implement, fund, support, and evaluate functional assessment and behavior intervention plans in settings such as schools, day programs, clinical settings, and residential facilities. This target audience includes educators, therapists, social workers, interventionists, psychologists, graduate-level students, and behavior specialists and analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: BACB
An Introduction to the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure: Rationale, Design, and Recent Empirical Issues
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon F (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EAB/VRB; Domain: Experimental Analysis
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
SEAN HUGHES (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), DERMOT BARNES-HOLMES (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), NIGEL AUGUSTINE VAHEY (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), CATRIONA O'TOOLE (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
Description: The implicit relational assessment procedure (IRAP) is a computerised response-time metric that requires participants to respond in a manner either consistent or inconsistent with their behavioural history. The response-time differentials between consistent and inconsistent tasks provide an index of implicit cognitive biases. Implicit attitudes appear to be useful in the analysis of relatively established behaviours that do not often come under deliberative control (e.g. addictive compulsions or prejudice). Whereas explicit measures are frequently criticised as suffering from the limitations of introspection and as largely reflecting a person’s tendency to respond in a socially desirable manner, implicit measures are relatively impervious to such confounding biases. A key objective of the workshop will be to provide a comprehensive introduction to the IRAP that guides participants through the empirical, theoretical, and procedural considerations in utilising the measure. The workshop will outline the key empirical literatures that gave rise to the IRAP, and offer strategies for successfully designing and implementing IRAPs to maximise precision while minimising attrition in the participant’s specific research area. These principles will be illustrated in practice for workshop participants by the facilitators. Thereafter, recent applications of the IRAP in differing research and applied domains will be showcased.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. describe, introduce, and place the IRAP within the extant literature; 2. communicate the psychometric properties of the IRAP within the theoretical framework of the newly offered relational elaboration and coherence (REC) model derived from relational frame theory; 3. identify and explain the practical and analytic strengths and limitations of the IRAP relative to alternative implicit and self-report measures; 4. generate a stimulus set relevant to their target domain; 5. correctly implement all relevant design parameters and minimise the possibility of participant attrition across the IRAP task.
Activities: The workshop will facilitate practical experience in designing and conducting an IRAP study and give participants the opportunity to engage in all stages of the experimental process. Towards this end, workshop participants are encouraged to bring a laptop with the IRAP software pre-installed (all materials and software are available for free at http://psychology.nuim.ie/IRAP/IRAP_1.shtml).
Audience: This workshop provides an in-depth introduction to the empirical and theoretical rationale underlying the IRAP while concomitantly developing the skills needed to effectively design and implement the measure in the participant’s target domain. As such, researchers new to the IRAP as well as those interested in refining their understanding of the measure would equally benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Formulating Effective Behavioral Contingencies Across Home, School, and Community Settings
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Crockett A/B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Susan Tirella, M.Ed.
CHRISTINA BRACEWELL LOVAAS (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), COLLEEN DAVIS (Monterey County Office Education), JAMES I. POTTER (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.)
Description: The design and implementation of effective contingencies to solve problems of social importance is the sine qua non of behavior analysis. This workshop will provide assistance to all levels of staff and parents to make conspicuous the contingencies operating in a given situation across home, general, and special education classes as well as community settings. Participants will learn to formulate and deliver supplementary reinforcement contingencies as prescribed by best-practice recommendations. Each participant will receive a copy of a "Worksheets for Designing Contingencies" booklet that compiles many of the contingencies known to reflect "best practice" for achieving ethical change in problematic behavior. For service providers already familiar with the principles and operations of behavior analysis, the worksheets contained within this binder will serve as a convenient means of standardizing communication and documentation of procedures. For those less familiar with applied behavior analysis, the booklet will provide an overview of the critical concepts, principles, and operations that the ethical utilization of each of the contingencies contain therein. Each contingency description is designed so that each page can be copied and completed for an individual learner or client. Each participant will be required to select and complete contingency worksheets for a learner of his or her choice in order to increase desirable (e.g., participation or other pro-social) behavior and/or decrease undesirable (e.g., self-injurious, injurious, or disruptive) behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop the participant will be able to do the following: 1. select and complete contingency worksheets to increase desired behavior and weaken undesirable behaviors; 2. formulate and deliver supplementary reinforcement contingencies as prescribed by best-practice recommendations.
Activities: Participants will formulate and learn to deliver supplementary reinforcement contingencies as prescribed by best-practice recommendations. Participants will also be required to select and complete contingency worksheets for a learner of his or her choice in order to increase desirable (e.g., participation or other pro-social) behavior and/or decrease undesirable (e.g., Self-injurious, injurious, or disruptive) behavior.
Audience: BCBA, BCABA, graduate students, teachers, parents, and program supervisors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Consultation to Schools
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon E (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Jonathan Tarbox, Ph.D.
MICHAEL M. MUELLER (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.), AJAMU NKOSI (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.)
Description: Behavior analytic consultation to schools (BACS) is the first behavior analytic model of school consultation. The BACS is specifically designed for severe or destructive behaviors in school settings. The BACS is an expert-led, rather than a teacher-training, model of consultation and follows a series of best-practice steps derived from the empirical applied behavior analysis (ABA) literature. Where all other models of school consultation rely on didactic verbal training aimed at teacher implementation of behavioral strategies, the BACS model has as a core belief that behavior analysts should be the ones providing behavior analytic services. BACS includes functional behavior assessment (FBA), functional analysis (FA), treatment selection, treatment analysis, teacher training, evaluation of teacher implemented treatment, generalization analyses, and social validity assessments. Overviews of each step, video examples, and hands-on training will be used. Discussions of related topics will include ethics, current behavioral practices in schools, professionalism, working with teams, and other various other issues related to providing best practice ABA in schools.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop the participant will be able to do the following: 1. compare and contrast existing models of school consultation; 2. pinpoint weakness in existing teacher training models of consultation; 3. conduct a functional behavior assessment; 4. conduct a functional analysis in a public school; 5. choose a behavioral intervention based on the results of an FBA or FA; 6. evaluate the effectiveness of a selected treatment; 7. train staff using methods that lead to high treatment integrity by the trainee; 8. evaluate teacher implemented treatments; 9. conduct and evaluate generalization analysis such as teacher implemented treatments in the referral environment; 10. conduct assessments of social validity data and use the outcomes of such assessments for future treatment planning.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, handouts, video segements, and practice of real time data recording techniques.
Audience: Behavior analysts working in schools, behavior analysts consulting with public schools, school teachers and administrators, and anyone who might even consider practicing applied behavior analysis in public school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB
Special Education Policy: Navigating the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act to Help Families Fund Applied Behavior Analysis Services
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon D (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jerome Ulman, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.)
Description: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is the primary policy for special education programs across the United States. IDEA is a complex law and mandates services for children age birth through age 22 with a variety of disabilities. Practicing behavior analysts should be familiar with IDEA policies in order to appropriately serve their clients. Moreover, IDEA policy may be used to financially support behavior analysis services. This session will cover Part C (birth through age 2) and Part B (age 3 to age 22) of IDEA. Participants will learn IDEA policy regarding individualized education program (IEP) and individualized family service plan (IFSP) development, functional behavioral assessments, intensity of services, instructional methodology, independent educational evaluations (IEE), extended school year services, and parent training. Participants will also learn about the IEP and IFSP meeting process and how the process supports families and their external service providers. Finally, participants will better understand how to use the IEP and IFSP process to assist families in funding behavior analytic services.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. Participants will describe the differences between Part B and Part C of the IDEA. 2. Participants will identify when an FBA is required under IDEA. 3. Participants will list the components of an IEP and IFSP. 4. Participants will understand how to determine appropriate intensity of services. 5. Participants will discuss the process for approving an IEE. 6. Participants will describe the process for selecting instructional methodology. 7. Participants will describe how parent training may be a service under IDEA. 8. Participants will understand the IEP and IFSP process.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture accompanied with detailed handouts for participants. Participants will be taught how to locate and navigate IDEA policy online. Participants will also use case study activities to practice their understanding of IDEA policy. Time will be allotted for questions to help participants work through complicated topics.
Audience: Practicing behavior analysts who serve clients age 22 or under.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Use Performance Improvement Methods to Start and Manage an Applied Behavior Analysis Service Provider Organization
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Independence (Grand Hyatt)
Area: OBM/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Jamie Hughes, M.A.
JOSEPH D. CAUTILLI (Behavior Analysis and Therapy Partners), SHANE D. ISLEY (West Coast Behavioral Consultants, Inc.), MICHAEL WEINBERG (Orlando Behavior Health Services, LLC)
Description: In this workshop, participants will receive information and instruction on methods to start an applied behavior analysis (ABA) based service provider organization and manage professional and/or staff behavior using performance improvement methods described in organizational behavior management literature (e.g., Aubrey Daniels, Gilbert, Austin, Mawhinney). Hiring methods, employee selection, setting targets, reinforcing staff performance, addressing problem performance, quality improvement, six sigma, statistical process control, staff selection methods, staff training, and other methods will be presented. With several decades of research data and implementation outcomes to support its use, performance improvement (PI) has become the primary organizational and human resources methodology in many companies. Now in its 10th year, this workshop will provide particpants current research and methods from the the PI literature to start and manage an ABA human services organization. Examples of areas that will be covered include employee selection methods, pinpointing, setting targets, functional assessment, reinforcement methods, behavioral anchors, assessment centers, and others.
Learning Objectives: By the end of this workshop, participants will learn to do the following: 1. state three key approaches for selecting staff; 2. state and describe three methods to evaluate staff performance; 3. state examples of staff improvement goals and improvement approaches; 4. identify and discuss the research base for performance improvement methods (at least three studies or references that are empirically derived); 5. identify key expected performance outcomes and ABA service delivery standards; 6. describe methods of assessing bases of problem performance and approaches to rectify these problems; 7. state and demonstrate two data collection and display methods for staff performance; 8. describe three key behavioral coaching methods for performance improvement purposes.
Activities: Facilitators will help participants identify the type and nature of service organizations they may wish to establish or learn to manage using PI methods. Facilitators will also help identify systems to establish the organization and how it will carry out its mission. Participants will write sample mission and vision statements. Facilitators will help participants create basic business plans for carrying out their missions and for selecting the type of staff needed. They will also help create basic systems for staff selection using presented methods. Participants will draft standards of performance and behavior analytic service delivery expected of their staff and organization and create systems of staff performance measurement and goal setting, along with means of reinforcing desired and improved performance (and how it will be measured). The workshop will include a small group activity to conduct functional assessment and devise a plan or approach in a work setting for addressing problem performance. Participants will practice devising and conducting behavioral interview methods for selecting new staff.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, organizational behavior management specialists (entry or intermediate level), human services managers, human resources professionals, current and prospective program directors, and entreprenuers wishing to establish an ABA based service organization.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Precision Teaching and Standard Celeration Charting
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Travis A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paula Braga-Kenyon, M.S.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), JOHN W. ESHLEMAN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), KERRI K. MILYKO (University of Nevada, Reno), HENRY S. PENNYPACKER (University of Florida), JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
Description: This workshop will teach the steps of precision teaching with particular emphasis on reading and charting human performance on a standard celeration chart (SCC). Participants will learn: to write precise performance statements (pinpointing), the three important dimensions of behavior to monitor, the features of the SCC, standard charting conventions, and how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The instructors will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of settings to illustrate key concepts taught in the workshop. Examples from university teaching, educational intervention with special needs and regular education students, and the monitoring of private events will be used. Participants will receive a copy of the Handbook of the Standard Celeration Chart, all materials used in the workshop, and a CD containing selected articles and an electronic version of the SCC.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. write precise performance statements (pinpointing); 2. read performance data charted on a SCC; 3. chart performance data charted on a SCC; 4. describe data on a SCC in terms of its frequency, celeration, and bounce; 5. describe change in performance using SCC change terminology; 6. describe appropriate data-based change decisions.
Activities: Applying principles derived from behavior analysis of well-designed instruction, our world-class group of workshop instructors will use a range of activities to ensure participants learn the skills targeted in the objectives. Participants will engage in choral responding and paced practice, timed practice on key concepts and skills, and both small and large group discussions.
Audience: Anyone seeking an introduction (or refresher) to precision teaching and standard celeration charting, including persons interested in using SCCs to improve their teaching or clinical practice and individuals planning to take the BACB examination.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB
Operationalize Your Staff Training—Make Simple Training Videos
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Travis B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: TBA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Janice Doney Frederick, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc)
Description: This workshop will show participants how to create simple training videos for staff and parents. Using pedagogy from behavior analysis theory and practice, as well as beginning filmmaking techniques, participants will learn to plan their training video to achieve the best outcomes for their intended audience. Basic, bare-bones videomaking will be demonstrated and attendees will participate in the processes of production, editing, and finishing a brief training video created in the workshop. Ethical considerations for producing video using children and consumers will be discussed at length.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn the following: 1. Participants will learn the ethical considerations of presenting correct procedural methodology and accurately describing expected outcomes. They will also receive information on the use of consumers of behavior analysis services in their training videos. 2. Participants will learn how to create a storyboard to organize the filming, give a diagram of the skill being taught, the best way to present the skill, and the sequence of steps needed to create the video. 3. Participants will create a script to ensure the behavioral techniques are presented and explained properly, to give the volunteer “actors” cues for their verbal and physical behavior, and to prevent extensive filming time. 4. Participants will video their “actors” performing the script, and make adjustments to the video shoot as necessary. 5. Participants will either observe the presenter as she edits the footage into a training video, or download the footage to their own laptop and edit alongside of the presenter. 6. Participants will learn how to add titles and narration to enhance the training video. 7. Participants will learn how to publish the video into a format that will be usable for their needs.
Activities: After a 1 1/2-hour pre-teaching overview of the filmmaking process, participants will create a storyboard and script for a 1-3 minute training video. Using equipment provided by the presenter, the participants will video a simple training sequence, such as matching-to-sample, or a mand request. The presenter will transfer the video into MovieMaker to start the editing process. Those with iMovie should be able to follow along due to the intuitive nature of the program, however the presenter is not skilled with iMovie. Using the a projector, projection screen, and a laptop, the presenter will guide participants through the process of editing footage and adding narration, titles and instructions to the project. The raw video will be copied to the participant’s laptops or pen drives during the workshop, and those with laptops will be encouraged to work along with the presenter to create their own version of the training video.
Audience: The audience should be intermediate to advanced due to the nature of the activity. Training videos should always represent the behavior analytic skill and processes as accurately as possible. Novice behavior analysts are unlikely to have the skill necessary to examine the process sufficiently to ensure the information is complete and accurate.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB
Wearing Two Hats: The Behavioral Speech Pathologist
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Presidio A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: VRB/DDA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Christopher Perrin, M.Ed.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.), TRACIE L. LINDBLAD (Four Points), JAMIE M. SEVERTSON (Trinity Services, Inc.)
Description: The field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) provides overlapping interests with speech pathology. One of the primary goals of ABA is to improve socially important behaviors using techniques established in the principles of behavior. One common area of practice for speech and language pathologists and behavior analysts is the treatment of communication deficits across diverse populations. In fact, Skinner’s (1957) theories of verbal behavior (VB) have become increasingly popular among practicing speech pathologists, especially as collaboration with behavior analysts becomes more common. However, there is some debate among speech pathologists regarding the theoretical underpinnings and practices that define a truly behavioral approach to speech and language. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a clear understanding of behavior-oriented, evidenced-based speech pathology. We will discuss the roles of speech pathologists and what it means to have a “behavioral orientation.” We will also define evidenced-based practice, and teach audience members to critically evaluate the scientific research that is available for commonly used speech pathology techniques so that practitioners can make educated treatment decisions. Finally, we will discuss strategies to promote effective communication and collaboration among behavior analysts and speech pathologists.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. differentiate between behavior-oriented and traditional speech pathology; 2. understand the expectations of a behavior-oriented speech pathologist; 3. define and explain the importance of utilizing evidenced-based practices; 4. use information provided to critically analyze scientific literature to guide clinical practice; 5. discuss ethical considerations when assessing and treating clients; 6. describe a behavioral approach to teaching communication skills; 7. identify methods of conducting appropriate assessments; 8. outline treatment objectives based on assessment results; 9. understand and use behavioral and speech pathology terminology.
Activities: This workshop will include didactic instruction, interactive discussion, and a review various evidenced-based assessment and treatment techniques. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their skills by reviewing client scenarios to determine the proper assessment course, reviewing mock-assessment results to determine a proper course of treatment, and role-playing with other participants. They will also practice “translating” speech pathology terminology into behavioral terms and vice versa.
Audience: This workshop is intended to meet the needs of speech pathologists who are interested in transitioning to a behavioral approach. Also, this workshop will improve the current practices of behavior-oriented speech pathologists by teaching them more about evidence-based treatments as well as the theory behind behavioral science. This workshop is also geared towards behavior analysts who collaborate with and/or train behavior-oriented speech pathologists, as well as graduate students in both fields who are interested in learning more about evidence-based practices and a behavioral approach to treating communication deficits.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB
From Verbal Classes to Verbal Shaping, Verbal Governance, and Other Verbal Processes
Friday, May 28, 2010
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Presidio C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Experimental Analysis
CE Instructor: Rachel Thompson, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Balitmore County), CHRISTINE HOFFNER BARTHOLD (University of Delaware)
Description: This workshop will provide a review of the basic verbal classes (e.g., manding, tacting, intraverbals, autoclitics) and the relations among them as well as a background for examining research on verbal processes that enter into a variety of human settings and may be fundamental to a variety of applications. Topics will include multiple causation in verbal behavior, the shaping of verbal behavior, correspondences between saying and doing, verbal governance, naming and other higher order classes, the role of verbal behavior in judgments of one's own behavior, and the implications of these areas for treatment and for educational and other settings. Those who may find this workshop useful include (1) individuals who have read Skinner's book, “Verbal Behavior,” and who would like a contemporary updating of the issues treated there; (2) those familiar with the concepts of verbal behavior mainly as they are used in applied settings and who would like a more systematic overview; and (3) those with a general background in behavior analysis who would like to extend such basic concepts as reinforcement and stimulus control to important aspects of human behavior. A reading of Skinner's book is recommended to participants, but is not required.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. Participants will be able to interpret instances of verbal behavior in terms of the different verbal classes that may have entered into them; 2. they will be able to recognize higher-order verbal classes and their nesting (as when individual tacts are members of a higher-order class called naming) and to understand the problems that may arise when different contingencies operate on classes at different hierarchical levels; 3. they will be able to distinguish accounts of verbal behavior that emphasize function (e.g., the stimulus control of verbal behavior and the contingencies that shape and maintain it) from more common everyday accounts in terms of form (e.g., topographies, grammatical, and linguistic categories); and 4. they will be able to recognize functional verbal processes (including verbal shaping and verbal governance) as they occur in natural settings and as they may be incorporated into behavior analytic applications.
Activities: The workshop will consist of brief lectures outlining the classes and functions of verbal behavior, interspersed with presentations of research data, demonstrations, visual aids, and discussions, as well as other audience-participation activities.
Audience: The workshop will be suitable for behavior analysts at the graduate level or higher, for undergraduates who have completed all of the requirements for BCaBA certification, and for professionals in related fields including, but not limited to, education, psychology, and behavior therapies. Familiarity with the basic concepts of behavior analysis (e.g., reinforcement, operants, shaping, stimulus control) is highly recommended.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB
Activity Schedules: Beyond Independent Activities
Friday, May 28, 2010
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Republic C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Gary Novak, Ph.D.
DAVID M. CORCORAN (BEACON Services), JOSEPH M. VEDORA (BEACON Services), ROBERT K. ROSS (BEACON Services)
Description: The purpose of this intermediate workshop is to train participants in the use of various forms of visual activity schedules. Activity schedules will be described and explained, as well as instruction on how to effectively establish stimulus control using them. Activity schedules have been employed with individuals with autism to promote independence and increase on-task behavior. In addition to addressing their use with individuals with autism, this workshop will describe their expanded use to a variety of conditions at home and school. Specifically, this workshop will focus on novel uses of activity schedules including their use to increase social, play, and self-help skills; increase food acceptance; incorporate choice; facilitate transitions; and address community behavior. Instruction on the use of computer schedules will be provided. This will include demonstrations of computerized activity schedules that incorporate sounds and video clips.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. describe and set up basic activity schedules; 2. identify settings and occasions to use them, as well as learners to use them with; 3. describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals’ learning styles; 4. implement basic activity schedules; 5. troubleshoot and describe modifications enhancing usefulness of activity schedules; 6. create and implement advanced activity schedules.
Activities: This workshop will include a review of activity schedule instructional methodology; a review of videotaped exemplars of activity schedules; small group practice in the implementation of activity schedules to establish play skills, social skills, acceptance of nonpreferred food, and independent toileting; and a demonstration of computerized activity schedules.
Audience: Behavior analysts and teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB
Behavioral Marriage and Family Therapy: Nuts and Bolts You Can Use
Friday, May 28, 2010
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Republic B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sarah Bloom, Ph.D.
BRYAN CRISP (Private Practice)
Description: Research has shown the efficacy of behavior analytic interventions with a wide variety of childhood disorders. The challenge for helping professionals is to enlist parents as data collectors and interventionists. By meeting with parents early and often in the therapy process, the behavior analyst begins not only the intervention, but maintenance and generalization as well. This 3-hour workshop will address common family and marriage issues and provide a wealth of examples of how different challenges can be handled behaviorally. Additionally, problems associated with supporting parents as they apply behavior analysis in the home will be addressed. This program is appropriate for parents and counselors who work with children in the home setting. This workshop is based on the book, "Behavioral Family Therapy, an Evidence Based Approach."
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify common objections to behavior analytical assessment and intervention in the home; 2. describe the rationale for careful data gathering in a natural setting; 3. utilize various methods of in-home assessment; 4. design concurrent interventions to replace and teach behaviors; 5. describe effective ways of engaging parents to accomplish therapeutic goals; 6. identify and deal with the challenges of using behavioral interventions in the home setting.
Activities: Participants will engage with the workshop material through direct instruction, didactic conversations, and role play.
Audience: Parents, behavior analysts, and others who work with children and families in therapeutic settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: BACB
The Operant Origins of EEG Neurofeedback and How to Use It With Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Friday, May 28, 2010
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Seguin (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ania Young, M.S.
LYNDA KIRK (Austin Biofeedback & EEG Neurotherapy Center), TERESA BALAWEJDER (Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services)
Description: Neurofeedback is a well-established operant training method for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD may affect as many as 8% of school children and often persists into adulthood. With recent "black box" warnings on a number of the most popularly prescribed ADHD medications, concerned parents and consumers are seeking effective, safe non-drug alternatives. This workshop explores the operant origins of EEG neurofeedback from its early studies to present day usage. This workshop will explore how clinicians assess clients, conduct neurofeedback sessions, and interpret client-derived data. Areas of research that still need to be conducted will be reviewed. This is the perfect workshop to wet your feet in this blossoming area of research and practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. understand what EEG neurofeedback is and how it works at the brain neuronal level of operant training; 2. understand how neurofeedback is used clinically to assess and train children (and adults) with ADHD; 3. understand the importance of brainwave and behavioral data in effective neurofeedback training; 4. identify many of the conditions comorbid with ADHD, such as anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), specific learning and developmental disorders, and learn how neurofeedback can also be used to address these comorbidities; 5. know the levels of efficacy of neurofeedback applied to ADHD as defined by the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (www.aapb.org); 6. understand the definition of neurofeedback and its accepted clinical applications as defined by the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (www.isnr.org); 7. review selected clinical cases with the presenters.
Activities: Participants will have the opportunity to learn through didactic lecture, video clips of neurofeedback sessions, PowerPoint review of example case studies, and ample question and answer opportunities.
Audience: Clinicians, researchers, parents, students, and anyone wishing to learn more about this topic.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: BACB
Using Excel for Analyzing Treatment Outcomes in Applied Settings
Friday, May 28, 2010
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Travis C/D (Grand Hyatt)
Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Linda Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
BRYAN J. DAVEY (ACCEL), DONALD M. STENHOFF (BISTÅ Autism Center), ELEAZAR VASQUEZ, III (University of Central Florida), REBECCA RENEE WISKIRCHEN (ACCEL), CHRISTINA BAROSKY (BISTÅ Autism Center), STEPHANIE A. JOHNSON (STAR, Inc.)
Description: Visual display of data is imperative when communicating functional relationships and intervention outcomes with consumers and fellow practitioners. BCBAs are expected to be skillful in using graphs to convey results. However, simply possessing knowledge of graphical displays may not transfer to effective or efficient software use. Excel is an efficient way for behavior analysts to create graphs. Excel graphs convey effect across multiple-baseline, alternating treatment, and reversal designs. In addition, standard celeration charts and cumulative review graphs are often used to display client progress. These graph types are often used to display interview results (e.g., FAST, MAS); preference assessment; structural and functional analyses; treatment (e.g., DRA, DRNO, FCT, etc.); and discrete trial program outcomes. While Microsoft Excel 2003 and 2007 can be difficult to use, this workshop will provide participants with hands-on training to promote effective use. At the completion of the workshop attendees will be able to create spreadsheets, data sets and graphs (e.g., alternating treatment designs, reversal designs, cumulative record) and manipulate graph components (e.g., axes, phase change lines). Instructors will provide several models, followed by opportunities for participants to practice with feedback. Additionally, workshop instructors will provide an Excel CD tutorial that will assist participants in future Excel projects. Participants are required to bring a laptop with the Excel application.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to do the following: 1. setup, input, and manipulate data within an Excel 2003 and 2007 spreadsheet ; 2. create graphs for alternating treatment, reversal, multiple-baseline designs, standard celeration, and cumulative records; 3. use the chart wizard, construct graphs of all data, select data sets within a spreadsheet, and update databases and graphs as data collection continues; 4. manipulate graph components (e.g., axes, data points, data paths, secondary axis) and use drawing tools to insert additional components (e.g., arrows, data labels, phase change lines, boxes).
Activities: Participants will be provided concise instruction and several models, followed by two case examples completed with instructor support to ensure skill acquisition. Finally, participants will complete case examples that provide opportunities to solve challenges inherent in the Excel 2003 and 2007 applications. The case examples will consolidate and increase fluency of the skills taught during the instructional phase of the workshop.
Audience: Behavior analysts, practitioners, students, researchers, educational service providers, and others interested in the visual display of data in single-subject research and program progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Language for Living: A Functional Communication and Language Assessment, Curriculum, and Skill-Tracking Instrument
Friday, May 28, 2010
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Lone Star Ballroom Salon E (Grand Hyatt)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: R. Schell, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A.), TROY FRY (Holland Center), COLLEEN CORNWALL (ABLE Academy)
Description: Language for living (LfL) is a functional communication and language assessment, a curriculum, and a skill-tracking instrument for people with moderate and severe developmental disabilities—including autism—and limited communication repertoires. This instrument, like the assessment of basic language and learning skills(ABLLS), the assessment of basic language and learning skills-revised (ABLLS-R), and the verbal behavior milestones assessment and placement program (VB-MAPP), is based on B .F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior. Unlike these instruments, LfL does not include a developmental sequence of language skills leading to conversation and academic improvement. Instead, LfL includes functional communication and language skills, which are necessary for effective and independent functioning as an adult. LfL can be used with young children with severe or multiple developmental disabilities and very limited skill repertoires. LfL can also be used with older children, who have made very little progress on the ABLLS, ABLLS-R, or the VB-MAPP and for whom a functional curriculum of daily living skills is being considered. LfL is especially useful with adults with severe or multiple developmental disabilities and very limited communication and language skills, especially those with whom communication and language are no longer expected.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. conduct an assessment using LfL; 2. select an appropriate communication response form for three sample students; 3. be able to write individualized education program goals based on an assessment using LfL; 4. be able to describe teaching procedures appropriate for specific skills.
Activities: This workshop will include a presentation along with hands-on activities designed to help participants achieve the workshop objectives.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, teachers, and speech-language pathologists, especially those who provide communication and language training to children and adults with severe developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: BACB
Motivating Learner Participation Without Blocking Escape, Forced Physical Prompts, or Nagging
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Republic A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Claudia Dozier, Ph.D.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Institute Knospe-ABA)
Description: The goal of this workshop is to discuss the importance of learner assent and the effect it has on skill acquisition. The ability to gain learner assent through the development of instructional control is an absolute must in teaching children with and without autism spectrum disorders. However, one of the main procedures used in basic compliance training (blocking escape) works contrary to the idea of learner assent. So the question then becomes, how can instructional control be developed with an unwilling learner without the use of common escape extinction procedures? And what effect does the process of earning instructional control without these procedures have on the ultimate skill acquisition of the learner? This workshop shares a method of earning instructional control with unwilling learners through a seven-step procedure that when applied comprehensively in programming can eschew the need for blocking escape, forced physical prompting, and nagging procedures in programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will have learned the following: 1. to value the importance of learner assent in home, clinic, and education settings; 2. creative and practical methods for controlling the access to reinforcement in all environments; 3. the value and process of pairing oneself with reinforcement; 4. the value and process of being meticulously contingent with words and actions; 5. the differences between positive and negative reinforcement and why one is valuable in earning instructional control with an unwilling learner; 6. to effectively use and increase a variable ratio of reinforcement; 7. to prioritize learning objectives and use differential reinforcement effectively; 8. how to best use extinction and negative punishment procedures; 9. the concept of a teaching arc and how to prolong the value of teaching over several different reinforcement teaching settings for the length of teaching interactions.
Activities: The workshop will include discussion, a video demonstration, a lecture on the seven steps to earning instructional control, and the development of a teaching arc.
Audience: Anyone working with unwilling or unmotivated learners who are interested in working without blocking escape, forced physical prompting, or nagging procedures, including parents, teachers, therapists, and behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: BACB
It Takes a Village: Integrating Services for Students With Autism—a Collaborative and Cohesive Approach
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bonham B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Timothy Ludwig, Ph.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Advance, Inc.), LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance, Inc.), ANN MICHAEL (Partners in Learning, Inc.), PAMELA MODUGNO (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI A. LORENZETTI (Advance, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Partners in Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. SWANFELD (Partners in Learning, Inc.)
Description: Integrating applied behavior analysis (ABA) programming with other service delivery disciplines has been historically challenging in inclusive settings. Often, professionals from varied backgrounds do not design cohesive curriculum, resulting in disjointed programming and confusion for the student with autism. A traditional pull-out model for speech and occupational therapy limits contact and training opportunities among professionals and often results in inconsistent expectations for student performance. Research shows that removal models do not foster generalized skills application, particularly in the area of communication. As generalization and the need for systematic and repeated opportunities to acquire new skills is part of the learning profile for those on the autism spectrum, it is critical for service providers to communicate and address the needs of students via best practice recommendations. This workshop addresses the concern for cohesive curriculum among service providers, offering a sample model of integrated services that unite both the classroom and the home environment to better serve the needs of students with autism.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. utilize ABA principles and protocols to objectively measure progress during school-based integrated speech sessions, 2. utilize ABA principles and protocols to objectively measure progress during school-based integrated occupational therapy sessions, 3. integrate school-based therapy goals and curriculum into home and family settings via ABA methodology, 4. integrate school-based therapy goals and curriculum into classroom and individualized instruction sessions via ABA methodology.
Activities: The workhop will include a lecture, video samples, sample data sheets and assignments, and curriculum development references and guidelines.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for members of child study teams including teachers, speech therapists, occupational therapists, behavior specialists, and consultants, as well as those serving students with autism in inclusive settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: BACB
Developing Social Skills in Learners with ASD: From Assessment to Intervention
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bowie A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Derek Reed, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (Hofstra University), ERIN SPARACIO (Eden II Programs), JOY TRAMUTA (The Genesis School)
Description: Children with autism exhibit many deficits in the area of socialization. It is difficult for children with autism to respond to peers in social situations as well as to initiate to others. There are many other areas of socialization that children with autism have great difficulty with, such as ending a conversation, listening to another conversation to obtain information, and knowing how to join in a conversation. This workshop will discuss a variety of innovative strategies that have been successful for improving social skills in children with autism. Specific strategies to be discussed will include topics such as the use of behavioral rehearsal, role playing, using video modeling and video rehearsal, along with other technology based interventions, and conducting ABC analyses of social situations. Carol Gray’s social stories will also be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned the following: 1. a minimum of three new methods for increasing social skills in children with autism; 2. how to operationalize advanced concepts such as friendship when teaching a child with autism; 3. how to use behavioral rehearsal with children with autism to improve social skills; 4. how to use self-monitoring for children with autism to help them to monitor their social skills.
Activities: Participants will watch video clips of a variety of strategies that can be used to increase social skills in individuals with autism. Specific activities will include writing a story about a social situation or a student, conducting an ABC analysis on a social situation, and operationalizing a variety of advanced social concepts.
Audience: Psychologists, special educators, social workers, speech pathologists, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: BACB
Integrating Applied Behavior Analysis With Psychiatry: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Medication Management
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Bryan Davey, Ph.D.
LISA A. STUDER (Melmark New England), JAMES CHOK (Melmark New England), SILVA ORCHANIAN (Melmark New England), FRANK L. BIRD (Melmark New England)
Description: This workshop will discuss an interdisciplinary team approach to treating severely challenging behaviors, with a focus on the integration of applied behavior analytic (ABA) services and psychopharmacological intervention. The workshop will begin with an overview of the various classes of psychiatric medications and a review of the available research concerning the effectiveness of medications for individuals with developmental disabilities. Next, the utility of integrating psychopharmacological treatment with ABA services, along with the unique challenges of evaluating medication effects in children with limited communication skills, will be discussed. The critical role data analysis plays in evaluating psychopharmacologic interventions will be highlighted and several case studies will be reviewed that demonstrate a variety of clinical outcomes for students with developmental disabilities receiving psychopharmacologic services at our agency. Lastly, participants will be asked to evaluate hypothetical data of individuals receiving psychiatric medications and make recommendations during a role-playing exercise of an interdisciplinary treatment team review.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify the major psychiatric medication classes and the main therapeutic function of each class, 2. have a better understanding of the available scientific literature regarding the effectiveness of psychiatric medications with individuals with developmental disabilities, 3. identify the benefits and limitations of combining psychopharmacologic and ABA interventions, 4. analyze behavioral data to aid in the decision making process when psychiatric medication is part of the treatment plan, and 5. effectively communicate key behavioral changes that are associated with the main functions and side effect profiles of major psychiatric medications.
Activities: With the guidance and assistance of workshop presenters, participants will engage in a discussion regarding the different components of the interdisciplinary approach to treating severely challenging behaviors. Individuals will discuss their experiences with this approach and highlight the benefits and limitations. Participants will review sample case data and practice identifying key behavioral changes that may be associated with the introduction of psychiatric medications. Participants will also practice making recommendations from an ABA perspective with an appreciation for the potential impact psychopharmacologic interventions may be having on behavior.
Audience: This workshop is for behavior analysts, behavioral psychologists, professionals in a similar field, and parents and caregivers who work with individuals with significant behavior challenges.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Rapid Training Procedure to Teach Staff How to Implement Verbal Behavior Intensive Teaching Sessions
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bonham C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Pennsylvania Verbal Behavior Project)
Description: This workshop will give a detailed overview of a three-step procedure created to teach staff to name the verbal operants fluently and to utilize errorless and error correction teaching procedures. These important prerequisite skills are needed before staff can successfully implement applied behavior analysis (ABA) and verbal behavior (VB) intensive teaching sessions with students with autism.
Learning Objectives: This workshop will achieve the following objectives: 1. Participants will fluently name the verbal operants. 2. Partipants will demonstrate fluent errorless and error correction and generalization run-throughs. 3. Participants will leave the workshop with the skills needed to teach the three-step procedure to others including staff members and parents.
Activities: The workshop will include a lecture, simulation activities, role playing, and discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, teachers and others interested in learning the skills needed to implement ABA and VB intensive teaching sessions with students with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: BACB
Variables That Affect Social Skills Instruction: The Important Role of Enthusiasm in the Development of Social Competence
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Presidio C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Suzanne Mitchell, Ph.D.
JENNIFER E. COPELAND (Melmark), JESSICA R. EVERETT (Melmark New England)
Description: Social skill instruction is an integral component in the education of students with autism spectrum disorders. A variety of social skill instruction manuals are available in the commercial market, making it difficult for parents and practitioners to determine evidence-based procedures and best practice guidelines in this arena. However, very few commercially available curriculums include a component where functional assessment is conducted to determine variables that may affect the individual’s acquisition of specific targets. In the present workshop, the variable of enthusiasm will be closely examined in regard to the ways that instructors, peer partners, and individual learners may each interface during social interactions. We will review the impact that enthusiasm may have as a motivating operation, a target behavior, and as reinforcer during peer interactions. We will also review the learner’s acquisition of developmental milestones that may impact success with social skill interventions, particularly related to the development of affect. Various strategies will be presented for tailoring instruction and classroom-based activities that may facilitate the natural expression of enthusiasm among peer groups and instructors. Participants will be supplied with resources for assessment and training methods that can be customized to match individual student needs.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify tools used to assess enthusiasm as a component of social skills instruction in children with autism spectrum disorders; 2. identify whether instructor and peer enthusiasm is a motivating operation for targeted skills and strategies for tailoring instruction accordingly; 3. describe developmentally appropriate activities that promote enthusiasm during group instruction; 4. understand the importance of developmental milestones related to effect in terms of targeting and designing instruction for individual students; 5. apply resources to train staff to integrate the variable of enthusiasm into the social skills instruction with individual students.
Activities: The workshop will include didactic instruction, discussion, and small group activities. Video clips may be shown that illustrate targeted concepts. Case studies will also be presented to illustrate the targeted concepts. Small group assignments will focus on instructional strategies that promote the use of enthusiasm across a variety of activities that allow for the natural expression in peers.
Audience: Individuals working in public and private school environments, as well as those in clinic-based settings such as psychologists, special education teachers, behavior analysts, or speech and language pathologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: BACB
A Behavior Analytic Approach to Teaching Cognition and Executive Function to Students With Autism
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bowie B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Sarah Dunkel-Jackson, M.S.
MARY ANN CASSELL (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc), JONATHAN J. TARBOX (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.), DOREEN GRANPEESHEH (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.)
Description: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) intervention programs are commonly accused of teaching only basic skills and/or producing only “rote” or “memorized” performances, and therefore neglecting higher-order human abilities. “Cognition” and “executive function” are two higher-order areas of functioning that research has demonstrated are often lacking in individuals with autism. “Cognition” is said to be the ability to understand one's own and/or the mental states of others, which in behavioral parlance, amounts to responding to the private events of others. “Executive functions” are said to be the brain functions which control goal-directed behavior. From a behavioral perspective, goal-directed behavior is nothing more or less than any other behavior and can therefore be taught like any skill. In this presentation, we will describe a behavioral approach to teaching the skills labeled as “cognition” and “executive functioning” by the general community. In both cases, intervention involves analyzing supposed mental functions into observable behavior and environment relations and then using proven behavioral procedures such as prompting, reinforcement, prompt-fading, discrimination training, and multiple exemplar training to establish generalized operant repertoires. Current behavioral research and directions for future research will also be discussed.
Learning Objectives: This workshop will accomplish a variety of tasks: 1. Participants will be able to behaviorally define cognition and executive function and relate those definitions to the symptoms of autism. 2. Participants will also be able to task analyze and select appropriate areas for intervention for specific cases. 3. Participants will gain knowledge of one behavioral approach and curriculum for teaching cognition and executive function skills. 4. Participants will be able to select appropriate science-based teaching methods for each skill area. 5. Participants will be able to discuss the current and future research needs in this area.
Activities: This workshop will use videos, case studies, and research analysis to meet the objectives listed. Participants will be given the opportunity to apply knowledge given through videos and case studies and will have the opportunity to ask questions.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are BCABA and BCBA members involved in the treatment of autism or those interested in the behavioral application of higher order human abilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB
How to Use Electronic Medical Records to Optimize Behavior Analytic Practice
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Crockett C/D (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Louis Hagopian, Ph.D.
DANIELLE SUTTON THORP (Butterfly Effects, LLC), CHARLOTTE FUDGE (Butterfly Effects, LLC)
Description: In February 2009, President Obama proposed a goal to make all health records electronic by 2014. As such, the future success of the behavior analytic practice rests on the ability of the provider to become educated on how to incorporate electronic medical records (EMRs) into the service delivery paradigm. The benefits of the EMR system to the behavior analyst are many. First, the electronic storage of assessment and treatment data is expected to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration, thereby improving treatment outcome. In addition, the 24/7 data accessibility feature of the EMR enables the practitioner to carefully monitor client progress and make timely treatment modifications. The EMR also has the potential to improve accountability to quality intervention by increasing service delivery visibility. Finally, it is anticipated that the EMR will streamline the billing and scheduling process. This half-day workshop will introduce EMR management systems, including one developed by the presenters, specifically designed for the needs of the behavior analytic practitioner. The workshop will highlight the utility of the EMR in building a virtual treatment team network, selecting therapy goals and corresponding treatment plans, facilitating provider education and training, monitoring client progress, and analyzing outcome data.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. be able to identify the importance of the EMR in interdisciplinary collaboration; 2. possess a working knowledge of how to use an EMR system to select goals, set treatment plans, and monitor progress of the behavior therapy client; and 3. understand requirements of federal regulatory bodies as they apply to the EMR system.
Activities: The workshop will open with an overview of EMRs and their importance in the future of health care delivery and interdisciplinary collaboration. Through guided notes and case example, participants will learn to identify the impact of the EMR to clinical practice, as well as federal regulations that guide their use. Live demonstrations will review navigation of several virtual systems with accompanying instructional handouts. For mastery of the platforms and its tools, breakout sessions will be organized for an in depth systems management overview, including attributes of data gathering and analyses for clients. Participants will be given opportunities to practice skills in sample accounts, while receiving feedback from trainers.
Audience: This workshop is designed for the clinician or researcher who want to learn how to use EMRs for the purpose of data collection, analysis, multidisciplinary collaboration, and administrative tasks.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
What treatments Work for Autism? The National Standards Project
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Crockett A/B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kate Kellum, Ph.D.
SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (National Autism Center)
Description: This workshop is important because it describes the results of the National Standards Project, a comprehensive systematic review of the autism treatment literature. The National Standards Project involved a review of 775 studies and resulted in a report that identified the strength of scientific evidence currently available for a broad range of educational and behavioral treatments. Further details are provided about the extent to which favorable outcomes are reported based on the age of research participants, the diagnostic group to which they belong, and the treatment targets (e.g., communication, problem behaviors, play, etc.). Overall, the vast majority of interventions that were established as effective in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders came from the behavioral literature. This workshop also describes the limitations of our knowledge and future directions required by the research community. Finally, the process of evidence-based practice is described and the role of research findings in this process is emphasized. The overall message of the workshop is that we have identified effective treatments, but more research will be necessary.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop the participants will be able to do the following: 1. identify effective treatments for autism spectrum disorders; 2. describe the process of evidence-based practice; 3. list areas that require further empirical investigation in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders.
Activities: Workshop attendees will participate in this workshop in several ways. First, there will be a didactic component of the workshop. Second, attendees will actively generate lists of treatments that they believe have strong evidence of effectiveness, limited evidence of effectiveness, and no evidence of effectiveness. Third, participants will be asked to participate in small and large group discussions about the future directions of autism treatment research based on the findings of the National Standards Project.
Audience: Professionals providing direct or indirect services to individuals on the autism spectrum should consider this workshop. Interested participants will desire detailed information about effective treatments as well as interventions with limited or no research support.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: BACB
Planning a Successful Social Skills Group for Children With Autism: Practical Methods and Solutions for Teaching Social Skills in a Group Setting
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Texas Ballroom Salon F (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mike Stoutimore, Ph.D.
AMANDA C AZARBEHI (Tyndale University), ROSTAM AZARBEHI (Azarbehi Consulting)
Description: In recent years the occurrence of autism has appeared to be on the rise. Recent studies have estimated rates in North America to range from 30 to 60 in 10,000 ( Fombonne, 2008; Croen, & Daniels 2007). With educators encountering an increased number of students with autism there is more need than ever to identify effective classroom intervention strategies. A central deficit of children with autism is their poor social-communication skills. Social skills groups or camps are becoming and increasingly popular way of addressing these challenges. While therapists and educators recognize the social challenges faced by children with autism, they often find it challenging to know how to best address these needs. The proposed workshop will aim to review the recent research examining the effectiveness of the most commonly used social skills group techniques for children with autism. The goal of this workshop will be to equip educators with research-supported, practical, and easy-to-implement strategies for running social skills groups for elementary-age children with autism. Lecture, video demonstrations, and small group activities will be incorporated into this workshop. Participants will leave with a newly developed “tool box” of techniques which can be used to successfully run a social skills group. Dr. Azarbehi has over a decade of experience working as a researcher and therapist within the field of autism. She has served as a member of the New Brunswick Autism Steering Committee, helping to secure funding for, create, and run a province-wide autism intervention training program. Dr. Azarbehi’s research focuses on evaluating the effectiveness of early autism intervention programs. She currently works as a professor at Tyndale University College and as clinical developmental psychologist at North York General Hospital.
Learning Objectives: The workshop has the following goals: 1. equip educators with research-supported, practical, and easy-to-implement strategies for running social skills groups for elementary-age children with autism; 2. that participants will leave with a newly developed “tool box” of techniques which can be used to successfully run a social skills group.
Activities: Lecture, video demonstrations, and small group activities will be incorporated into this workshop.
Audience: Professionals working within the field of autism early intervention.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB
The Development and Implementation of Social Skills Groups for Children and Adolescents With Asperger Syndrome
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Mission B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cheryl Ecott, Ph.D.
KELLEY HARRISON PISTACCHIO (The Groden Center, Inc.)
Description: Several behavioral intervention strategies have been developed to address social skills deficits in the population of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; Stahmer et. al., 2003). With the staggering increase in the prevalence of ASDs (now reported to be 1 in 91; HRSA, 2009), there is even greater need for services to address the special needs of these individuals. Group-based interventions have been demonstrated to be effective in teaching social skills to individuals with ASDs though generalization to community settings has been limited (Williams, et.al, 2007). This interactive workshop will include a brief overview of the characteristics of Asperger syndrome followed by step by step guidelines for developing and implementing comprehensive social skills programs for this population, including a parent training component. This will include recruitment and marketing, assessment, development of materials, identification of skills to target, protocol development, evidence-based teaching strategies, methods to promote generalization, and program evaluation. Samples of teaching materials and session outlines will be provided and some group activities will be demonstrated with the audience. Several video segments from different age groups will also be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. identify the core components of establishing a social skills group program, 2. describe at least three different evidence-based social skills teaching strategies, 3. describe at least three group activities designed to teach a specific social skill, 4. identify methods for promoting generalization of social skills to community settings, 5. describe methods for assessing areas of need and program effectiveness.
Activities: Participants will be engaged in a variety of small group activities designed to provide hands-on experience in the implementation of social skills group activities. This will include activities in which the participants act as group members as well as group leaders.
Audience: This workshop will be beneficial for clinicians involved or interested in starting social skills programs for children and/or adolescents with Asperger’s syndrome, high functioning autism, or related social disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: BACB
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Case Conceptualization and Treatment Applications
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Seguin (Grand Hyatt)
Area: CBM/TPC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy Bruce, Ed.D.
DANIEL J. MORAN (Trinity Services, Inc.), PATRICIA BACH (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Description: This workshop will provide a step-by-step framework for functionally conceptualizing client behavior problems, and will discuss selection and application of specific acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) interventions. The workshop will also help attendees develop their own ACT consistent interventions, exercises, and metaphors. Process and outcome measures will be discussed. The workshop will also discuss first order and second order therapeutic approaches, and help the attendees discriminate when to use the appropriate therapeutic intervention. This workshop will be based on content from the publication "ACT in Practice: Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy" (Bach & Moran, 2008, New Harbinger).
Learning Objectives: This workshop will have the following objectives: 1. Workshop participants will become familiar with the six core ACT principles of defusion, self-as-context, acceptance, values, committed action, and contacting the present moment, which will be described from a strict behavior analytic perspective. 2. Workshop participants will be able to select ACT interventions appropriate for addressing specific core principles. 3. Workshop participants will learn how to apply specific ACT interventions based on the case formulation. 4. Workshop participants will learn to use ACT case conceptualization to facilitate creating one’s own ACT consistent metaphors, exercises, and interventions for application in the context of a client’s unique history and presenting complaints.
Activities: The workshop will use a case-based approach beginning with instructor supplied cases and later using participants’ clinical cases for practice in ACT case formulation, selecting interventions, and assessing the effectiveness of interventions and outcomes. There will be a 60 minute slide presentation, demonstrations, large group exercises, and case-based practice. Participants will be provided with handouts to use with their clients for assessment and homework assignments to augment in-session interventions.
Audience: This workshop is suitable to clinicians with little exposure to ACT who would like to learn how to apply it broadly. It is also suitable for participants who have attended ACT experiential workshops and would like to improve their skill in functional contextual case formulation and deciding when to apply specific ACT interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Technology Based Data Collection Tools: Creation and Implementation
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Presidio A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: DDA/EAB; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Melissa Andretta, M.S.
CHERYL K. BROWN (Willamette University), JOHN TENNY (Willamette University)
Description: This workshops will involve hands-on exploration of the process of creating data-collection tools, gathering data, and generating a variety of reports using the eCOVE Observation Software. This software is used in schools across the US and beyond, and special educators using K-12 student records of behaviors and interventions designed the special education edition. It includes 25 frequency and duration data-collection tools, and through the use of five templates has the ability to custom create unlimited data-collection tools. Data can be collected on any observable behavior either individually or in a group setting, with the ability to disaggregate the data based on observee demographics. Observations are stored in a local database for recall and analysis. Reports can be generated on individual observations or observations over time. The reports can be of a single person or a group for a single observation; or a comparison of individuals, an individual to a matching demographic group, or two demographic groups. Reports can be printed, saved, exported, and can include a time stamp for each button (incident of behavior) clicked with interval between clicks. For full participation, laptop (Mac or Windows) or Netbook computers are highly recommended.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. operate the eCOVE Observation Software; 2. create tools using the five templates; 3. import observees, set up observation rooms, and gather data on multiple individuals using multiple data-collection tools; 4. generate reports using the five report types of individuals and groups from single observations and observations over time.
Activities: No purchase is required for this workshop; software (trial version) will be provided to all attendees along with a printed manual and handouts. The workshop activities will include hands-on, guided interactive exploration of the software features; data collection using video of K-12 students; discussion of interobserver reliability; practice developing new tools using the five templates, individually and in small groups; generation and discussion of reports of data collected; and small group discussion of the benefits and limitations of using technology in data-collection.
Audience: Anyone who observes human behavior, anyone who teaches others about observing human behavior, and researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: BACB
Supervising Human Service Staff: Maximizing Work Proficiency and Enjoyment
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Travis A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: DDA/OBM; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Cynthia Anderson, Ph.D.
DENNIS H. REID (Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support Center), CAROLYN GREEN (Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support Center), MARSHA B. PARSONS (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: This workshop will describe strategies for maximizing work proficiency and enjoyment among support staff in human service settings. Initially, an evidence-based, behavioral process for training and managing staff performance will be presented in terms of step-by-step procedures for supervisors and staff trainers. The focus will then be on how to ensure that staff not only work proficiently, but also enjoy their work. Strategies to be discussed include performance- and competency-based staff training, monitoring performance in a manner acceptable to staff, providing supportive and corrective feedback in ways staff tend to prefer, and how to make a supervisor's feedback reinforcing to staff. Systematic steps supervisors can take to make nonpreferred staff duties more desirable will also be described as well as how to make the overall work environment enjoyable. Behavior analytic research providing the evidence base for the recommended procedures will likewise be summarized, based in large part on the instructor's published research and supervisory experience.
Learning Objectives: This workshop has the following objectives: 1. At the conclusion of the workshop, the attendee will be able to describe the steps constituting a behavioral approach to staff training. 2. At the conclusion of the workshop, the attendee will be able to describe what research has shown regarding the type of performance feedback that is usually most and least acceptable to staff. 3. At the conclusion of the workshop, the attendee will be able to describe a means of systematically monitoring staff performance that typically is well received by staff. 4. At the conclusion of the workshop, the attendee will be able to describe three supervisory actions that survey research has shown to enhance staffs' enjoyment with their work environment and three actions shown to impede enjoyment. 5. At the conclusion of the workshop, the attendee will be able to describe an evidence-based strategy for enhancing staff preference for a strongly disliked work task.
Activities: Workshop activities will include instructor presentation, viewing PowerPoint summaries of key points, completing pencil and paper activities relating to scenarios depicting applications of key points, viewing role-play demonstrations of target procedures by instructors, practicing target procedures in role-play situations with instructor feedback, and opportunities to ask questions and receive instructor feedback.
Audience: The target audience includes anyone who either supervises staff or is dependent on staff for carrying out programmatic procedures (e.g., authors of behavior support plans). The workshop will be most relevant for supervisors and managers in group homes and related residential settings, adult day treatment sites for people with intellectual disabilities, consultants, and supervisors in school settings serving people with special needs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: BACB
Graphical Methods for Interpreting the Effects of Medication on Behavior
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bonham D (Grand Hyatt)
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Maria Malott, Ph.D.
CHERYL L. ECOTT (AdvoServ), BRADFORD RICHARDSON (AdvoServ)
Description: The use of psychoactive medications constitutes an intervention that is not easily evaluated or reversed to determine a causal relationship between its use and subsequent effects on problem behavior for a given individual. Despite the difficulty of making experimental determinations about medication effects in many applied settings, many behaviors of interest to behavior analysts are also the behaviors targeted for intervention with pharmacological agents. This workshop will describe several variations of graphical presentations that may help illustrate the effects of medication on the occurrence of appropriate and inappropriate behavior to caregivers and professionals. This information may be helpful to caregivers and professionals by providing objective rationale to help determine a therapeutic dose, and subsequent changes in medication. Included in these descriptions is an explanation of a combination graph that utilizes both y-axes to display behavior and medication concurrently. Basic instructions on how to create these graphs will be presented in Microsoft Excel (bring your laptop to participate in making graphs). Advantages, disadvantages, and uses of each graphical presentation of data to evaluate effects of medication and corresponding changes in behavior will also be discussed. Case studies will be presented for evaluation of the effects of medication on behavior.
Learning Objectives: This workshop has the following objectives: 1. At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to create a graph that indicates medication changes. 2. At the conclusion of this workshop, using the graphing methods discussed, the participant will be able to describe and evaluate the effects of medication on behavior. 3. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will have knowledge of the limitations, advantages and disadvantages of the graphing methods discussed in this workshop.
Activities: Basic graphing activities using Microsoft Excel will be completed. There will be a discussion of several case studies of individuals with complicated medication regimen. During this discussion, we will describe and evaluate medication effects on behavior by utilizing the graphic methods discussed in the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts and clinicians or other professionals that collaborate with physicians or psychiatrists in treatment for an individual with a developmental disability, mental health diagnosis, or indivduals who are dually diagnosed. This workshop is designed for participants who have a basic knowledge of single-subject design and Microsoft Excel.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: BACB
“Does Everyone Understand?” Using TAGteach to Deliver Clear Instructions and Positive Reinforcement in a Variety of Applications
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bonham E (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christine Barthold, Ph.D.
THERESA MCKEON (TAGteach International), KEVIN S. CAULEY (Step by Step Learning Group), ELIZABETH BENEDETTO-NASHO (Step by Step Learning Group Inc.)
Description: TAGteach is a user friendly formula for the delivery of clear instructions, immediate assessment and positive reinforcement. TAG stands for Teaching with Acoustical Guidance. The acoustical guidance is the click or other auditory conditioned reinforcer. The teaching part is a formalized function of professional sport coaching and operant conditioning. TAGteach is cited by Julie Vargas in her text book, Behavioral Analysis for Effective Teaching, “It‘s amazing that it took until the turn of the twenty-first century for someone to use a specialized conditioned reinforcement for gymnastics, speech therapy, and academic skills.” The TAGteach approach can be used in almost any type of teaching or training context because of its unique strategy to identify, highlight, and reinforce elements crucial to skill acquisition. The acoustic marker and unique phrasing provides an explicit link between the desired behavior and reinforcement, decreased stimuli to improve processing, clarity of criteria for leader and learner, and feedback that does not invoke a social response. The workshop will incorporate video, demonstrations, and practical exercises to introduce the technology, define the principles, and review current applications and research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. show confidence and skill using an audible marker; 2. identify and create clear achievable goals called tag points; 3. use the tag as a marker, information, and a specialized conditioned reinforcer; 4. deliver tag points using TAGteach phrasing to reduce verbal stimuli; 5. identify specific areas to implement tagging into current curriculum; 6. identify the benefits of using TAG language and a specialized conditioned reinforcer.
Activities: An introduction to the fundamentals of TAGteach will be enhanced with videos of various disciplines and populations currently implementing TAGteach techniques. Attendees will participate in interactive exercises that provide the opportunity to experience “being tagged,” creating specialized conditioned reinforcers, and developing TAGteach phrasing for their unique applications. There will also be time set aside for discussion.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, clinicians, therapists, and those who wish to gain working knowledge of using a specialized conditioned reinforcer.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Applied Behavior Analysis in Teacher Education Programming: Principles, Practice, and Hands-On Applications of Appealing Evaluation Technologies
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Republic C (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Shira Ackerman, Ph.D.
TOM SHARPE (Educational Consulting, Inc.), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide a hands-on application of a data supported protocol for the comprehensive description, discrete and sequential analysis, and feedback and goal-setting activities necessary to effective teacher training in postsecondary classroom and on-site K-12 deliberate practice environments. Workshop activities include (a) introduction to the importance of a behavior systems approach to teacher training, (b) hands-on observation system construction, and (c) data collection and analysis activities designed for instructional and on-site practicum supervision purposes. Additionally, detailed explanation and hands-on interaction with protocols designed for logically sequenced training activities are provided, including (a) classroom video observations, (b) on-site data-based assessment and immediate feedback and goal-setting, and (c) research and development into effective educational practice. Workshop participants will leave with a familiarity of behavior systems educational protocols designed for effective professional training practice. Participants will be provided with a copy of the complete software tools and methods procedures on CD and Word files of all necessary illustration materials in relation to the educational protocols discussed as a function of workshop participation. It is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: This workshop has the following objectives: 1. Workshop participants will exit with skills in the area of applied behavioral teacher training. Skills include the ability to design observation systems that match with training objectives, construct video-based observational learning laboratory experiences, implement on-site data-based feedback and goal-setting experiences to determine if training objectives have been met, and develop a set of applied research activities to document the relative effectiveness of professional training activities. 2. Participants will be able to discuss in the principles and practice of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional teacher training. 3. Participants will be able to construct observation systems relevant to their particular professional teacher training objectives. 4. Participants will be able to design and implement video-based observational learning activities in relation to educational objectives for professionals in training. 5. Participants will be able to understand and apply a range of computer-based data collection and analysis techniques in relation to recommended data-based on-site feedback and goal setting protocols. 6. Participants will be able to develop an applied research agenda in relation to professional training objectives to determine the relative effectiveness of instructional efforts.
Activities: Activities include s teview of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional training activities. hands-on application of observation system construction designed as compatible with professional training objectives, hands-on application of observational laboratory development in relation to the classroom instruction of relevant behavior analytic professional training objectives, hands-on application of data-based on-site feedback and goal-goal setting protocols in relationship to deliberate practice activities of professional trainees, introduction and review of recommended research activity development in relation to determining the relative effectiveness of recommended professional training activities.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in the area of professional teacher education and in the area of postsecondary training for professional competencies in general. Those working in postsecondary educational settings where focus is on the education, on-site training, and assessment of professional practice competencies, and who are challenged with how to teach, describe, and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary materials particularly appealing to a wide range of professional training, assessment, and applied research applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELLED Direct Instruction: Small Group Implementation With Typical and Atypical Learners
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Presidio B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Matthew Normand, Ph.D.
ANN FILER (BEACON Services), WENDY L. KOZMA (BEACON Services)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to familiarize participants with direct instruction (DI) programs and train participants in the effective implementation of DI lessons within a small group setting of two or more children. Preparation for small group instruction is essential for children’s success as they move from one-on-one home-based instruction to classroom based programs. Preparation for group instruction is an important focus in any instructional setting. Appropriate at the one-on-one instructional level, basic attending skills, turn taking, shared attention and group responding are fundamental elements of every DI lesson; DI lessons can therefore be a vehicle for teaching group participation skills. As children transition to a group instructional format, curriculum materials and teaching methodology typically require adaptations for optimal success. DI procedures, which reinforce group participation skills, will be highlighted and reviewed. Adaptations to the DI curriculum which can be applied to group learning will be emphasized and demonstrated. The application of DI within inclusion settings will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to practice lesson formats within a small group instructional setting. Video demonstrations and vignettes will be included to illustrate workshop learning objectives and to model DI lesson implementation procedures.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. follow scripted lesson formats as outlined in teacher presentation books; 2. correctly utilize sound-out/slash, point-touch, hand drop, and audible signals to ellicit group responses; 3. pronounce and blend sounds accurately, according to the sound pronunciation guide; 4. identifythe appropriate error correction procedure for a given exercise; 5. carry out the appropriate error correction procedure for a given exercise; 6. discuss protocols for monitoring and record student progress as specified in DI teacher guides.
Activities: The workshop will begin with presenters overviewing the schedule for the day. This will be followed by an introduction: BEACON Services, Evergreen Center, and Criterion Child Enrichment. Then there will be an overview to DI methodology and teaching strategies followed by group practice of signals and error corrections. There will be an overview of DI programs followed by group practice in DI lesson formats. Then there will be a demonstration of methodology within a small group instruction followed by practice of small group lesson implementation. Throughout the workshop, there will be video demonstrations and discussion.
Audience: Classroom teachers, behavior analyists with an interest in DI, parents, and program administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: BACB
How to Prepare Video Lectures for On-Line Instruction of Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Travis C/D (Grand Hyatt)
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Alissa Greenberg, M.A.
DANA R. REINECKE (Room to Grow)
Description: As more on-line instruction becomes available, behavior analysts should learn new tools for the teaching of behavior analysis in this medium. This workshop will teach participants how to create lectures to transmit online for distance education. We will teach participants to capture a slide presentation with or without video, and turn this presentation into a QuickTime movie file or other format allowing near-universal access by viewers. For users of Windows-based computers, we will teach how to use the software program Camtasia. For those with Apple computers, we will teach how to use the software program ScreenFlow. Neither presenter has financial interests in these software programs. Participants must come with a computer with ScreenFlow or Camtasia installed. This will be a hands-on workshop with participants developing video lectures ready to be posted on the internet. To attend, please bring a computer (either PC or Apple; working microphone and webcam, either Camtasia (for PC) or SScreenFlow (Apple) installed, at least one PowerPoint (or Keynote) slide presentation, at least one short video clip, and at least one photo. To view a brief video demonstration of what you will learn in the workshop, please go to: https://www.sage.edu/academics/education/programs/aba_autism/abaworkshop2010/.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. use Screenflow or Camtasia to capture a lecture utilizing slides, video, pictures, or any other medium; 2. edit the captured lecture to add callouts, text boxes, and volume control; 3. format the captured lecture into a QuickTime movie format or other viewable format.
Activities: Participants will be given a workbook consisting of task analyses of procedures designed to create these video lectures. Participants will use their own slide presentations, videos, and pictures to first capture a lecture using the program, and then edit it to their satisfaction. There will be no lecturing to the participants—they will work out of their workbooks, prepared by the presenters, to create lecture materials.
Audience: The target audience consists of teachers and staff trainers who have a need to develop lectures and instructional materials to be delivered online or to be archived for repeated use. Minimal understanding of computers is required.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
It’s Just Good Teaching: The Learn Unit, Verbal Behavior, and Verbal Developmental Milestones
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Travis B (Grand Hyatt)
Area: VRB/TBA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: James Hoko, Ph.D.
SHIRA A. ACKERMAN (Teachers College, Columbia University), DAWN M. SIDELL (Northwest Autism Center)
Description: The verbal behavior approach has been successfully implemented within an inclusive preschool for children with autism and their typically developing peers in eastern Washington. Domino Project Preschool services six children on the autism spectrum and six children who have been considered typically developing by their pediatricians. Verbal behavior is a research-based approach used to provide intensive and appropriate instruction for all students based on their current level of verbal development. The verbal developmental milestones and verbal behavior analysis theory created by Greer & Ross, 2008, is the methodology implemented in the preschool. The full day workshop will provide in-depth instruction on how to implement key components of verbal behavior with children with autism. Attendees will also receive opportunities for hands-on practice with the guidance of the instructors. Data will also be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the verbal behavior approach at Domino Project Preschool.
Learning Objectives: This workshop has the following objectives: 1. Attendees will learn the background of Northwest Autism Center and how Domino Project Preschool began. 2. Attendees will learn the key components and implementation of the verbal behavior theory, verbal developmental milestones, and Skinner’s verbal behavior theory. 3. Attendees will learn everyday implementation of these effective practices in the regular school setting. 4. Attendees will learn effective assessment techniques, the curricular areas to teach, and how to teach them effectively. 5. Attendees will learn data collection procedures in the school setting, how to collect useful data, and how to use it. 6. Attendees will be given data to support the usage of the verbal behavior theory at Domino Project Preschool.
Activities: The workshop will include a lecture, group discussion, Group practice activities, videos, and collaboration
Audience: Educators, related service providers, and professionals working with children.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: BACB
Verbal Behavior Analysis: A Functional Approach to Teaching Language to Children With Autism
Friday, May 28, 2010
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Bonham A (Grand Hyatt)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
CE Instructor: Amanda Adams, Ph.D.
NANCY J. CHAMPLIN (Autism Concepts, Inc.), SUZANNE TAYLOR (Autism Concepts, Inc.), ERIN CAMP (Autism Concepts, Inc.)
Description: Children with autism spectrum disorders demonstrate deficits in communication and language. Research has demonstrated that Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior provides a conceptual framework of language beneficial to teaching children with autism (Sundberg, 2007). Verbal behavior analysis is an area of applied behavior analysis that focuses on assessing functional language skills and examining effective teaching practices to produce functional verbal repertoires (Greer, 2008). This workshop will provide the participants knowledge in the application of verbal behavior analysis to assess and develop a comprehensive language program for children with autism. The verbal behavior milestones assessment and placement program (VB-MAPP) and the assessment of basic language and learning skills-revised (ABLLS-R) will be discussed to demonstrate how to assess and track the progression through the developmental milestones for each learner. We will examine the research conducted by Autism Concepts, Inc. on the verbal behavior of typical preschool-aged children using Skinner’s verbal operants. Other research topics included will be teaching peer-to-peer manding and the play skills of children with autism and typical peers .
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. define verbal behavior analysis, 2. identify the verbal operants, 3. demonstrate how to teach all the verbal operants, 4. discuss variations in conducting the VB-MAPP and The ABLLS-R assessments, 5. plan a comprehensive language program for a targeted individual, 6. identify typical 3- and 4-year old verbal behavior and how this information impacts our work with children with autism, 7. demonstrate how to teach peer-to-peer manding, 8. identify the verbal behavior of preschool-aged children during play.
Activities: This workshop will provide didactic and interactive instruction. Participants will observe through video modeling verbal behavior assessments and one-on-one instruction with children with autism. Participants will plan a VBA program and collect data for verbal operants using forms provided by the instructors.
Audience: This workshop is designed for a general audience of behavior analysts, psychologists, social workers, speech language pathologists, and teachers who serve children with developmental delays and autism spectrum disorders in clinical and school settings or home-based programs. It is also appropriate for parents who want to develop skills in the use of a behavioral approach to teaching language.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic

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