Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

35th Annual Convention; Phoenix, AZ; 2009

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Symposium #170
Teaching Academic Skills to Grade-level Standards via Systematic Instruction for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities
Sunday, May 24, 2009
9:00 AM–10:20 AM
North 121 BC
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Applied Behavior Analysis
Chair: Fred Spooner (UNC Charlotte)
Discussant: Diane Browder (University of North Carolina, Charlotte)
Abstract: Since the passage of NCLB (2002) and reauthorization of IDEA (2004), the focus on teaching academic content (reading, math, and science) to all students, including those with significant cognitive disabilities has significantly increased. One of the key components in this process is knowledge and application of academic grade-level standards. Once understood, teaching academic content through instructional techniques documented as an evidence-based practice (e.g., systematic instruction) is important. The purpose of this symposium is to present evidence as to how grade-level content can be taught to students with significant cognitive disabilities. The first study, presented by Pam Mims, examined the effects of least-to-most prompt system on the number of independent responses to comprehension questions during a story-based lesson for students with severe intellectual disabilities and visual impairments via a multiple probe across materials (i.e., books) design, replicated across two students. The second investigation, presented by Bree Jimenez, assessed the effects of a treatment package (multiple exemplar training, time delay, and self directed learning prompt) via a multiple probe design across science concepts for three students. The third presentation examined effects of time delay and teacher directed graphic organizer on the vocabulary and knowledge with students with significant cognitive disabilities and autism
 
Increasing Participation and Comprehension of Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities and Visual Impairments During Shared Stories
PAMELA MIMS (University of North Carolina-Charlotte), Diane Browder (University of North Carolina, Charlotte), Joshua Baker (UNC Charlotte), Angel Lee (UNC Charlotte), Fred Spooner (UNC Charlotte)
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of least-to-most prompt system on the number of independent responses to comprehension questions during a story-based lesson for students with severe intellectual disabilities and visual impairments. The experimental design used was a multiple probe across materials (i.e., books) design, replicated across 2 students with significant intellectual disabilities. The dependent variable was the number of correct independent responses to comprehensions questions when involved in a story-based lesson. The independent variable was the use of least-to-most prompt system. Results indicated a functional relationship between the independent and dependent variable. For example, during baseline, student 1 correctly answered a mean of 1 comprehension question out of 10 on book one. After the intervention, responses increased to a mean of 9. Similar results were found across all three books and for student 2 as well. Results of this study add to the lack of data-based studies on increasing the comprehension skills of students with significant intellectual disabilities and visual impairments during a literacy activity
 
Secondary Science Concept Generalization and Student-Directed Learning with Students with Developmental Disabilities
BREE JIMENEZ (UNC Charlotte), Diane Browder (University of North Carolina, Charlotte), Ginevra Courtade (West Virginia University)
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a treatment package including multiple exemplar training, time delay, and a self directed learning prompt (KWHL chart (what I Know, what I Want to know, How will I find information, what I Learned) a problem solving technique) on students’ ability to complete an inquiry lesson independently and generalize to untrained materials. To evaluate the effect of the treatment package, a multiple probe across science concepts was used (within participant replication) with between participant replications for the three students with significant cognitive disabilities who received the group lesson. The primary dependent variable was the student’s ability to perform all steps of the science lesson without teacher assistance. Most steps required communicating about the materials and concepts of the lesson. Task analytic assessment was used to measure this variable. Students were taught to self-direct a 12-step task analysis to complete inquiry lessons in chemistry and physical science. All three students were able to show mastery across materials, science concepts, and instructional settings. The results suggest that students with significant cognitive disabilities can be taught how to self-direct science learning within special education settings, as well as inclusive science educational settings
 
Teaching Science Concepts Using Graphic Organizers to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
VICKI F. KNIGHT (UNC Charlotte), Fred Spooner (UNC Charlotte), Diane Browder (University of North Carolina, Charlotte)
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of constant time delay (CTD) and a teacher directed graphic organizer on the vocabulary comprehension and conceptual knowledge with students with significant cognitive disabilities and autism. Using a multiple probe across participants design, researchers selected three middle school students with autism and significant cognitive disabilities (IQ <55). Researchers used CTD to teach vocabulary and multiple exemplars of a graphic organizer to teach the concept of “convection.” A functional relationship exists between the constant time delay and graphic organizer intervention and the increase in science vocabulary terms and conceptual awareness of “convection.” For example, one student with significant cognitive disabilities and autism increased his science vocabulary and concepts from a mean baseline of 3.3 to 12.4 after intervention; another student increased his science terms and comprehension from 2.6 to 10.4 post intervention. Results suggest that students’ ability to generalize from one graphic organizer to the next indicates that students acquired concepts versus memorizing facts. This study contributes to the literature by providing preliminary evidence that research-based strategies, such as CTD and graphic organizers can be used to teach science vocabulary and concepts to students with significant cognitive disabilities and autism
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE