Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Online; 2020

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Poster Session #74
DEV Saturday Poster Session
Saturday, May 23, 2020
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Virtual
99. Pyramidal Skills Training for Registered Behavior Technicians in a Clinic Setting
Area: DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
MELISSA A. DIAZ (Fayette County Public Schools; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Simmons University), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Chrystal Jansz Rieken (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Tyler Re (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

The current study employed two experiments to examine the effects of pyramidal training on implementation of paired choice preference assessments with training as normal and Behavioral Skills Training (BST) by RBT-level staff in a clinic setting. The first experiment utilized an AB design to examine the use of BST as an intervention for training a Registered Behavior Technician, as the Tier 1 participant, to implement BST to train Tier 2 participants. In the first experiment, the Tier 1 participant was provided written instructions on a paired choice preference assessment and BST. In the baseline phase the Tier 1 participant trained the experimenter to the “best of their ability” on implementation of a paired choice preference assessment with the written information alone. After the baseline phase, the Tier 1 participant received training on BST and the paired choice preference assessment from the experimenter. In the second phase, the Tier 1 participant was again provided the instructions for the paired choice preference assessment and BST, and then was prompted to again train the experimenter to the “best of their ability”. The second experiment used a multiple baseline probe design to examine the effect of training, provided by the Tier 1 participant, on the accuracy of implementation of the paired choice preference assessments by Tier 2 participants when compared to written instructions alone (baseline), training as normal (phase 2) and BST (phase 3). The design consisted of three phases. In the baseline phase, the Tier 2 participants were provided with written instructions for a paired choice preference assessment, 1 minute to review the instructions, and then instructed to implement the preference assessment to the “best of their ability”. Data was collected on accuracy of implementation. After the baseline phase, the Tier 1 participant was instructed to train the Tier 2 participants as usual with the written instructions provided to all participants and data sheet. After training, Phase 1 started. Data was collected on Tier 2 participants accuracy of implementation after receiving “training as normal” from the Tier 1 participant. For the final phase, phase 3, the Tier 1 participant had received training on BST from the experimenter. The Tier 1 participant trained the Tier 2 participants on a paired stimulus preference assessment using BST. Data was collected on accuracy of implementation of the preference assessment. Results indicated that pyramidal training was effective in increasing accuracy scores when compared to the baseline phase. The results also indicated that training using BST resulted in a more accurate implementation of the paired choice preference assessments by Tier 2 participants, when compared to training as usual.

 
100. Teaching With Acoustical Guidance: A Review
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
NICOLE BAJCAR (Brock University), Kimberley L. M. Zonneveld (Brock University)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

Teaching with acoustical guidance is a teaching procedure that uses an acoustical stimulus to provide immediate feedback to a learner (Quinn, et al., 2017) and has been used to increase a variety of skills, such as football skills (Harrison & Pyles, 2013; Stokes et al., 2010), precision shooting (Konttinen et al., 2004), dance movements (Carrion et al., 2019) and appropriate walking (Hodges et al., 2019). TAGteach also uses an acoustical stimulus to provide immediate feedback to learner, but also includes several other components (TAGteach International, 2004) and has been used to increase a variety of similar skills such as appropriate walking (Persicke, et al 2014), dance movements (Arnall, et al., 2019; Quinn, et al., 2015), rugby skills (Elmore, et al., 2018) and a golf swing (Fogel, et al., 2010). Given the similarities between these procedures, there seems to be some ambiguity regarding these terms in the literature. Therefore, this poster will examine the current literature on teaching with acoustical guidance and TAGTeach, discuss the procedural differences between these procedures, and provide directions for future research.

 
101. Evaluation of Residential Services for Older Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Residing in the Community
Area: DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
TANYA HOUGH (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Jack Spear (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

People with intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities in the United States are living longer in recent decades. People 65 and older are in better health than previous decades due to more awareness of the beneficial effects of a healthy diet, preventative medical care, and physical exercise. Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are living longer as well. However, this presents challenges in meeting the needs of this population. This paper details the results of a survey developed to assess several areas of services, including social engagement, health-related services, group home environment, and staff training and development, were evaluated to identify areas in need of improvement. Participants consisted of 95 direct care staff working for a not-for-profit agency providing residential services to adults with intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities. The results of the survey indicate that need for improving social engagement opportunities for older adults residing in the community and more training on working with older adults with intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities for direct care staff in a residential setting.

 
102. Feasibility of Using Behavioral Marker via Mobile Sensors in Measuring Physical Activity: A Pilot Study
Area: DEV; Domain: Basic Research
SEUNGMIN JUNG (Yonsei University), Changseok Lee (Yonsei University), Heewon Kim (Yonsei University), Kyong-Mee Chung (Yonsei University)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract: Direct observation of behaviors is the main assessment method of behavior analysis, yet data collection has been limited due to practical difficulties of collecting vast amount of information with accuracy. Recently, mobile sensors collecting passive data have emerged as an effective and efficient way to measure behaviors simultaneously as they occur. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using behavioral markers collected via mobile sensors in measuring physical activity. A pilot study was conducted on 15 college students for 15 days. ‘YouNoOne’, a software program that collects heart rate, step counts, and significant motion counts was installed on each participant’s personal smartphone and a distributed smartwatch. As a ground-truth, a short questionnaire asking about the participant’s real time physical activity, including the status, intensity, location and ability to move, was administered 6 times a day. The results showed that after controlling for the location and ability to move, passive data significantly and uniquely accounted for the status of physical activity. However, passive data failed to significantly account for the intensity of physical activity. Findings suggest that passive data collected via mobile sensor can be useful in measuring the behavior regarding physical activity but needs further elaboration.
 
 

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