Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

46th Annual Convention; Online; 2020

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Poster Session #392
VRB Monday Poster Session
Monday, May 25, 2020
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Virtual
83. On the Stand: A Contextual Speech Analysis of the Kavanaugh Hearing
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
SEBASTIAN GARCIA-ZAMBRANO (Southern Illinois University), Rocco G Catrone (SIU-Carbondale), Natalia Baires (Southern Illinois University), Manish K. Goyal (Southern Illinois University), Amrinder Babbra (Doctoral Student Southern Illinois University), Jessica M Hinman (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale), Darwin S Koch (Southern Illinois University)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Despite the availability of tools from Contextual Behavioral Science to analyze political speeches, there are biases in identifying relational frames in such behavior. The purpose of the current study was to code statements from Brett Kavanaugh’s 2018 confirmation hearing using Hayes et al.’s (2001) definitions of relational frames. After formulating new definitions of relational frames, levels of reliability increased but not significantly. The results demonstrate the need for Relational Frame Theory to refine definitions of relational frames, as coding political speeches can be useful in identifying particular relational frames used to modify behaviors of a verbal community.
 
83A. Establishing Derived Equivalence Relations of Monetary Exchange via Observational Learning With Individuals With Autism
Area: VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
KWADWO O. BRITWUM (Southern Illinois University), Mark R. Dixon (Southern Illinois University), Anne Sheerin (Southern Illinois University)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

The present study investigated whether two adults with Autism will demonstrate equivalence relations after observing each other demonstrate specific prerequisite conditional discriminations. Participants were taught in group context to perform relations between objects of particular value and a combination of dollar bills and coins equal to the value of the object (A1234B1234). Afterwards, participants were taught in the same group context to perform relations between combinations of money equal to the value of the objects (B), and a separate combination of dollar bills and coins that is equal to the value of B (B1234C1234). Each participant was trained on two separate class members while the other participant observed, (a) participant 1 (class members 1 &2), (b) participant 2 (class members 3&4). Post training probes revealed the emergence of equivalence relations between combinations of money and particular objects for all stimulus classes involved in direct training with each participant. Results provide some implications for the use of equivalence-based instructional programs with individuals with Autism in group context.

 
84. An Evaluation of the Relationship Between Derived Relational Responding and Intelligence
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
Clara Merten (Utah Valley University), Mickelle Cheever (Utah Valley University), CALEB STANLEY (Utah Valley University)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: The present study aimed to examine the relationship between derived relational responding and intelligence. Experimenters administered the PEAK-Transformation Pre-assessment, which provides a measure of relational responding, and the WISC-V, which provides a measure of IQ, with 109 participants. All participants were typically developed children between the ages of three and thirteen. The experimenters then conducted a Pearson correlation between the two measures. The results from this study showed a strong, positive correlation (r = .659, p < .05) between total scores for the PEAK-T Pre-assessment and the WISC-V, which suggest relationship between derived relational responding and intelligence. Additional correlations were conducted between each subtest of the PEAK-T Pre-assessment and the WISC-V. The results showed a moderate correlation between the PEAK-T Receptive subtest and the WISC-V (r = .568, p < .05) and a strong, positive correlation between the PEAK-T Expressive subtest and the WISC-V (r = .666, p < .05). Finally, correlations were conducted with each relational frame within the PEAK-T assessment and the WISC-V, which also showed significant correlations between each relational frame and IQ scores. The current findings are consistent with previous research which have examined the relationship between derived relational responding and intelligence.
 
85. Evaluating Multiple Exemplar Instruction to Establish Bidirectional Naming in Children With Autism
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
ANGELICA NOEL COPPOLA (University of Southern California; FirstSteps For Kids), Amanda N. Chastain (FirstSteps For Kids), Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids), Courtney Tarbox Lanagan (FirstSteps for Kids, Inc.), Zoey Isabella Ulrey (University of Southern California), Jasmine Lau (University of Southern California)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

A bidirectional naming repertoire consists of responding both as speaker and listener and is demonstrated when one is only taught a speaker repertoire and can then derive listener behavior without direct training and vice versa. Bidirectional naming is foundational to complex human language but many children with autism and other developmental delays may not develop this repertoire without proper instruction. A substantial amount of research by Douglas Greer’s research group has found that multiple exemplar instruction (MEI) is effective in establishing bidirectional naming in young children but very little research has attempted to replicate this finding outside of that particular research group. The purpose of this study is to evaluate MEI for establishing bidirectional naming in children with autism in a community-based autism clinic. We are using a multiple baseline design across participants to evaluate the effects of MEI on the emergence of bidirectional naming in young children with autism. The procedure is currently underway with the first participant and acquisition data are positive thus far. Results will be discussed in terms of real-life replication of university-based research in community-based settings.

 
86. Assessment of Reading and Writing Skills Based on Stimulus Equivalence Paradigm
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
JULIA ZANETTI ROCCA (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso), Victor Hugo de Souza (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso), Deisy De Souza (Universidade Federal de São Carlos), Ricardo Campos Junior (Universidade Federal de São Carlos), Elenice Seixas Hanna (Universidade de Brasilia), Julio C. De Rose (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos), Raquel Melo Golfeto (Universidade Federal de São Carlos)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

Reading and writing skills may be conceived as a network of equivalence relations between stimuli (e.g., printed words, dictated words, and pictures) and stimuli and responses (e.g., naming, writing, etc.). This conceptualization has been foundational to the development of evaluation tools and teaching programs. The Reading and Writing Network Assessment (Avaliação da Rede de Leitura e Escrita [ARLE]) is an online 15-task instrument that evaluates matching-to-sample, naming, reading, and writing skills. The present study sought to describe the empirical network of relations, measured by the ARLE, that characterizes performance in beginning readers. The records of 2388 students, 6 to 12 years old, were assessed through an online platform. All of the tests used the R programming language. Generalized additive models (GAMs) were used to assess potential relations between skills using the MGCV package. Generalized cross validation was used to calculate variable importance in multiple regression models using the Caret package. After calculating the importance of each variable, a single model was constructed using all variables with the GAM. The least important variables were progressively removed until all remaining variables were statistically significant, evaluated by p values. The graphs were constructed using the ggplot2 package. The data analysis showed that all of the skills were significantly related to reading and writing measures. Matching printed words to dictated words and naming consonants were strongly related to reading. Matching printed words to pictures was the skill that was most related to spelling. An index that was created to compare the network of relations for students with different repertoires indicated increasing integration between skills as the repertoire evolved, which was predicted by the stimulus equivalence paradigm. The integration index may be a useful tool for the prediction and control of effects of teaching procedures that seek to establish reading and writing in non-readers.

 
86A. Effect of a Program to Enhance Paraphrasing in University Students
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
HORTENSIA HICKMAN (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, FES-Iztacala), Maria Luisa Cepeda Islas Islas (FES Iztacala UNAM), Sergio Mendez (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, FES-Iztacala, UNAM), Ilse Fernández (UNAM, FES-Iztacala), Julio Ramírez (UNAM, FES-Iztacala)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Paraphrase is a skill that is related to reading comprehension which is essential in academic training, especially at a university level. Among other issues, this ability is considered as a study strategy. Starting from the fact that paraphrase is a skill that can be trained, the objective of the present study is to evaluate a computer program to enhance this ability. The program was developed using the Super Lab V. 4 software. It considers the following phases: Welcome, Instructions, Pretest, Intervention, Posttest and Gratitude. A reading and subsequently questions with closed response options were presented in the pretest and in the posttest. In the Intervention phase, a phrase was shown to the participant and he had to press a key to continue, then the same phrase and three response options were shown, which referred different types of paraphrasing. The phrases attended methodology, biology or psychology subjects. Once the student selected the phrase, he could earn 1 or 5 points depending on the type of paraphrasing. The program recorded both the selection of the responses and its latency. A non-probabilistic sample was used, consisting of 103 students belonging to the first semester of the Psychology career. A Pretest-Postest design was implemented. The measure for the data analysis was the selection of the paraphrasing type and the emitted responses both in the pretest and in the posttest by the participants. A Student's t-test was applied. Results showed statistically significant differences between the pretest and the posttest responses. There was also a change in the selection of the paraphrases from a basic to a complex level. It is concluded that the educational software is a good tool for teaching and learning paraphrasing ability. Keywords: Paraphrase, university students, paraphrase program.
 
87. Content Validity of ABA Language Assessments: Totality of Skinner’s Verbal Operants and Relational Frames in Four Common Language Assessments
Area: VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
TAYLOR MARIE LAUER (Missouri State University), Brylie Mason (Utah Valley University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Caleb Stanley (Utah Valley University)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Content validity describes the degree to which a measure represents all facets or components of the construct being measured. This form of validity is best represented as a percentage of the totality of a given construct represented in an assessment. ABA language training is often guided by assessments of verbal operant (Skinner, 1957) and relational operant (Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001) performance. Using these initial texts, we identified generalized operant components that are included within each model (e.g., VB: echoics, tacting, manding, metonymical tact, magical mand; RFT: coordination, spatial reasoning, temporal reasoning). We then sorted all items contained within the PEAK Relational Training System (PEAK), the Training and Assessment of Relational Precursor Abilities (TARPA), the Verbal Behavior Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP), and the Assessment of Basic Language Learning Skills - Revised (ABLLS-R) into the identified content categories. We then evaluated the percentage of content categories from both the VB and RFT models represented within each assessment. Results suggested that PEAK contained the greatest percentage of VB items and both PEAK and TARPA contained most RFT items. VB MAPP and ABLLS-R did not relational learning targets. Interrater agreement exceeded 80% and results have implications for comprehensive language training systems.
 
88. Relational Coherence Evident in Gender Stereotyping: Relational Density Theory
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
ANNALISE GIAMANCO (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Morgan Brueseke (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Relational Density Theory (Belisle & Dixon, in press) describes the apparent self-organization of equivalence classes quantitatively using classical mechanical models. Two emergent properties are relational resistance and gravity, both of which occur as a function of the volumetric-mass-density of verbal relations. That is, classes that contain more class members and stronger relations are likely to be resistant to counterconditioning and to obtain new relations without any direct reinforcement. In relational frame theory, coherence describes the pre-experimental proximity of stimulus relations. In the present study, we evaluated coherence as the geometric distance between stimuli that are traditionally masculine, feminine, or neutral. The geometric model was developed using a multidimensional scaling procedure, where the distance between stimuli could be calculated as a relative function. Participants then read passages describing four characters that were female-feminine, female-mixed, male-masculine, and male-mixed, and evaluated the relational density of emergent frames as a function of pre-experimental coherence. The present set of analyses provide a behavioral model of gender stereotyping as the self-organization of relational classes based on coherence in terms of pre-experimental gender norms. Social implications of these data are discussed.
 
89. Teaching the Verbal Operants to College Students Through a Stimulus Equivalence Protocol
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
ANGELICA A. AGUIRRE (Minnesota State University, Mankato), John O'Neill (Contextual Behavioral Science Institute), Courtney Sowle (Minnesota State University, Mankato), Emily Boduch (Minnesota State University, Mankato), Iloria Phoenix (Minnesota State University, Mankato), Ibelizet Dominguez (Minnesota State University, Mankato), Breanna Perron (Minnesota State University, Mankato), Ashley Yang (Minnesota State University, Mankato)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

Several behavioral analytic researchers report that one of the main features of a good instructional system is “it must be effective in helping students learn more rapidly than they would on their own” (Barrett et al., 1991, p.80). Since the 1980’s, there has been an elaborate amount of research on stimulus equivalence protocols (SEP) in teaching reading, spelling (De Souza & Rehfeldt, 2013), grammar (Connell, 2004), and complex academic skills with individuals with and without disabilities (LeBlanc, Miguel, Cummings, Goldsmith, & Carr; 2003; Lovett, Rehfeldt, & Dunning, 2011). A study conducted by O’Neill et al. (2015) compared an online SEP to an assigned reading study method to teach Skinner’s (1957) verbal operants to college students. O’Neill et al. found the online SEP group outperformed the assigned reading group by 10 percentage points (one full letter-grade difference). The current study aims to systematically replicate the O’Neill et al. (2015) study by examining the effectiveness of this SEP for teaching undergraduate college students to identify and understand the verbal operants. Current pilot data indicates the SEP was effective in deriving multiple untrained selection-based and topography-based relations across multiple verbal operants.

 
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE