Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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40th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2014

CE by Type: PSY


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: A Comprehensive Merging of Applied Behavior Analysis, Technology, and Visual Supports
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jennifer Dantzler, M.Ed.
HOWARD SHANE (Boston Children's Hospital), STACY CIANCIOLO (Private Practice), JENNIFER DANTZLER (Including Kids, Inc.)
Description: Arguably the ultimate treatment model for persons with complex communication impairments associated with an autism disorder would include evidence-based instruction interwoven with sound technology and effective visual supports. The purpose of this 3-hour workshop is to describe an instructional approach that takes core tenets of applied behavior analysis and blends them with the fundamental principles of the Visual Immersion Program, an evidence-based communication approach created and researched in the Autism Language Program at Boston Children's Hospital. This comprehensive communication approach focuses on seven communication functions that are applied using the latest mobile devices. Because of contemporary technological breakthroughs, communication can now be afforded through traditional grid-type displays as well as visual scene displays. The presentation will describe the distinctive features of each display type, including criteria for determining the optimum display design for a given individual's personal profile. In addition, this workshop will include ways in which principles of applied behavior analysis can be used to improve performance in each of the seven communication operations. Finally, case examples will be presented to demonstrate improved outcomes.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) successfully implement components of the Visual Immersion Program; (2) effectively apply visual supports highlighted in the Visual Immersion Program using the visual immersion approach to assist individuals with autism; (3) effectively select which technology and applications are most effective for individuals with autism; (4) successfully apply principles of applied behavior analysis in order to improve performance in each of the seven communicative functions within the Visual Immersion Program; and (5) describe the distinctive features of communication display types including criteria for determining the optimum display design for a given individual's personal profile.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation including case examples, small group activities, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstration of case examples to demonstrate improved outcomes. Supplemental materials for identifying communication and language barriers within traditional approaches will be provided to support participant learning.
Audience: Do you currently teach communication and language using symbol-based approaches? Are you finding your learner is successful with manding but is unable to comprehend more complex symbol representations and language? The intended audience includes licensed psychologists and Board Certified Behavior Analysts currently providing behavior analytic services in home, school, and/or community settings; speech and language pathologists; and other professionals implementing communication and language programs on low-tech and high-tech devices who find themselves having difficulties with teaching comprehension of language using traditional approaches.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Communication Device, Language Comprehension, Technology, Visual Scenes
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Ethical and Effective Behavior Plans Through Formal Case Formulation
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Isaac Bermudez, M.S.
ISAAC BERMUDEZ (Love 2 Learn Consulting LLC), JOSE D. RIOS (Private Practice), DOUGLAS P. BEATTY (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), KRISTINE DICKSON (Inclusive Education & Community Partnership)
Description: Despite growth in functional assessment and behavior intervention programming, too often there are errors made that lead to ineffective treatment plans. A recommended process to identify potential errors is a formal case formulation. Clinical case formulation involves the summarization and integration of assessment data and related client information for the purpose of selecting interventions. The information gathered during the functional assessment process is used to build effective intervention strategies, strategies that are logically related to the purported function of the behaviors being targeted. In this workshop, we will discuss case formulation, from the beginning stages of assessment, to data reconciliation, through treatment selection. In addition, we will provide participants with a structure for conducting case formulation meetings. Participants will also get an opportunity to critique behavior plans as they would during a formal case formulation meeting. Finally, this workshop will culminate in a discussion of other factors that will affect and impede treatment implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the important role of functional assessment in selecting logically related treatment plans; (2) discuss considerations when stating the function of behavior; (3) explain how to reconcile the assessment information learned from indirect assessment, direct assessment, and functional analysis; (4) describe research-based behavioral interventions that are logically related to the function of the problem behavior; and (5) analyze the role of the mediator in the implementation of behavior intervention plans.
Activities: This workshop will offer didactic instruction, slide presentation, and an exercise. In addition, this workshop will provide participants with handouts to further their education in the topic.
Audience: BCBAs, supervising practitioners, licensed psychologists and related professionals, graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABCs of Behavior Analysis: The Basics, Their Interactions, and Their Implications
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EAB/TBA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), MARNIE NICOLE SHAPIRO (The Ohio State University), JOSHUA GARNER (The Ohio State University)
Description: In this workshop we will review selection of behavior by its consequences, contingencies of reinforcement and aversive control, stimulus control and attention, and sources of novel behavior. We will examine the rationales behind important behavioral language practices, such as specifying what is reinforced by what in arranging and/or interpreting reinforcement contingencies, describing behavior in the context of three-term or higher-order contingencies, distinguishing between positive and negative reinforcement, emphasizing the behavior of attending in analyzing stimulus control, and treating complex behavior in terms of multiple causation. We will identify and address misrepresentations of behavior analytic concepts and practices, as when ignoring is suggested as the most effective treatment for reducing unwelcome behavior, or when reinforcement is falsely equated with bribery, or when it is argued that reinforcement has hidden costs. Along the way we will consider benefits and pitfalls of translations between technical and colloquial vocabularies, as well as practices that tempt us to attribute behavior to weakly defined or unmeasurable entities such as feelings or emotions. We will also consider extensions of basic concepts and terminology to applications, particularly as reflected in the content of certification exams.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) discuss how behavior changes in terms of the selection of behavior by its consequences (as in shaping); (2) provide a behavioral criterion for distinguishing between positive and negative reinforcement; (3) discuss how attention enters into the acquisition of stimulus control; (4) distinguish between different arrangements for producing novel behavior; (5) analyze examples of complex behavior in terms of multiple causation and the interaction of basic processes; and (6) defend against critiques of behavior analysis that are based on misunderstandings of the basic processes.
Activities: The workshop will include presentations supplemented by visual materials and discussions, videos of some basic phenomena as they have been displayed in classroom demonstrations, and computer simulations of shaping and of reinforcement schedules. The basics of behavior analysis will be reviewed in the context of an organization developed for the new fifth edition of the presenter's book Learning (which may be useful to some participants but which is not required for this workshop).
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists as well as (1) students of behavior analysis, especially those completing degrees or preparing for certification examinations; (2) those seeking a refresher overview of basic phenomena; and (3) those teaching or assisting in courses covering the basics of behavior analysis. Those seeking an introductory treatment may also find this workshop appropriate, on the assumption that anyone attending these meetings will already have at least some familiarity with these topics from undergraduate coursework or independent reading.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): attention/discrimination, novel behavior, reinforcement contingencies, shaping
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Work Smarter, Not Harder! "Self & Match": An Interactive Workshop to Develop a Comprehensive Self-Monitoring and Motivational System
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W181a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jamie Siden Salter, Ed.S.
JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education), KATHARINE M. CROCE ("Self & Match")
Description: This interactive and hands-on workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on "Self & Match," a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a "Self & Match" manual with substantial training materials. Additionally, participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The "Self & Match" system has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional or behavior disorders, autism, and learning disabilities, as well as unidentified students in general education. "Self & Match" can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS, and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings, including (but not limited to) public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) identify the basic components of the "Self & Match" system; (3) effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (4) identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (5) identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (6) create a "Self & Match" self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace; and (7) systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, and the "Self & Match" system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own "Self & Match" system.
Audience: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge of systematic self-monitoring and motivational systems as behavior interventions. Workshop attendees will gain a tool/guide to develop their own "Self & Match" systems to utilize in school, home, or clinic settings. This workshop is designed for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from K to 21.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Intervention, PBS, Self-Monitoring
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Successive Approximations: Useful Shaping Strategies and Tactics to Improve Your Teaching
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W176b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (Pappy's Pet Lodge), KATHLEEN DIGNAN (University of North Texas), ERICA FOSS (University of North Texas)
Description: Shaping is a powerful tool for teaching new complex behaviors and producing engaged and confident students, but poor shaping can easily lead to learning plateaus and frustrated learners and teachers. Shaping is often described as an art and as a difficult skill to learn; however, shaping is an orderly and predictable process with rules. This workshop will teach several tactics and strategies for successful shaping and show different ways to engineer behavior (e.g., shaping, micro-shaping, and adduction). Participants will leave with a newly developed understanding of how to look at the shaping process beyond the general concept of successive approximations. Students will learn the rules regarding the mechanics of shaping, the requirements of a conditioned reinforcer, what to reinforce, how to reinforce, how to shape movements and actions, how to arrange the environment to facilitate shaping, how to use resurgence to accelerate shaping, and how to shape the stimulus control based on characteristics of the stimuli (e.g., touching red objects) or characteristics of the response (e.g., stacking objects).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) deliver cues, conditioned reinforcers, and primary reinforcers efficiently; (2) deliver reinforcers in a way that facilitates shaping; (3) isolate movements through environmental arrangements; (4) establish stimulus control of behavior; (5) evaluate students' behavior to decide where to begin shaping; and (6) teach complex behaviors and concepts from simple behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use video examples to illustrate key concepts about shaping. Participants will implement these concepts in interactive games designed to practice and master the strategies and tactics discussed. During the games participants will play the roles of both teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the games as teacher and student.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as anyone interested in the processes of shaping and learning or anyone interested in improving their teaching techniques. The concepts of the workshop can be applied to any population in any learning setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): learning, shaping, teaching, therapy
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Socially Savvy: Assessing and Teaching Social Skills to Young Children With Autism
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W184bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James Ellis, Ph.D.
JAMES T. ELLIS (Step By Step Behavioral Solutions), CHRISTINE DANIELLE ALMEIDA (Newton Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will provide step-by-step guidance in assessing and teaching social skills to young children, primarily children ages three to five. Attendees will be introduced to the Socially Savvy Checklist, which is designed to help identify social strengths and weaknesses in young children. The attendees will then learn how to craft IEP objectives based on areas of weakness and determine and develop teaching and data collection procedures. Teaching strategies covered include systematic use of prompting and reinforcement strategies, development and use of detailed teaching plans, and the use of visual supports and social stories. A major focus of intervention will be on how to embed social-skills intervention in the context of a variety of typical, age-appropriate, and fun activities. Attendees will also learn how to create their own social-skills groups, allowing them to meet the varying social needs of different children within the same social context.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) use the Socially Savvy Social-Skills Checklist to determine social-skills strengths and weaknesses in young children, (2) develop IEP objectives based on information gathered through use of the checklist, (3) identify and develop teaching plans to address targeted social skills, (4) develop practical data collection systems, (5) identify age-appropriate and fun activities within which to teach social skills, and (6) design social-skills groups to simultaneously meet the varying social needs of multiple children.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, discussion, video observation, guided practice, and small group break-out.
Audience: Target audience includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, preschool and early elementary special educators, behavior analysts, speech-language pathologists, and other professionals working with young children with autism or other social impairments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Preschool, Social Pragmatics, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Promoting the Generalization and Maintenance of Skills in Learners With Autism and Related Disorders
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W175a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Association for Science in Autism Treatment)
Description: Educators and other services providers of learners with autism and related disorders are often faced with situations in which skills do not generalize or maintain over time. Many providers fail to recognize the steps they should be taking to promote generalization and maintenance or teach in ways that actually inhibit generalization; nonetheless, the field of applied behavior analysis offers both a framework and a number of methods that can be implemented to circumvent these challenges. During this workshop, the various forms of generalization (stimulus, response, and temporal generalization) will be described along with specific methods that may increase the likelihood that generalization and maintenance can be observed. Efforts to address generalization and maintenance need to be individualized for each learner, tailored to the target skill, and planned for in a systematic manner. More specifically, methods will be presented that can be incorporated at three broad phases in the teaching process, during treatment planning and prior to the initial teaching of a target skill, during the process of teaching the particular target skill, and after the target skill is mastered. A framework for determining how best to maintain target skills after they are mastered will also be offered.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) differentiate the various types of generalization, (2) identify common obstacles and teaching approaches that impede generalization and maintenance, (3) design and implement a variety of strategies to promote generalization, (4) design and implement a variety of strategies to promote maintenance, (5) identify learner and task characteristics that will inform when such strategies could be implemented, and (6) evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to promote generalization and maintenance.
Activities: Although the workshop is primarily didactic, participants will be given many opportunities to engage in discussion and will participate in tasks that will concretize and synthesize the didactic information and increase the likelihood of later implementation. Videotaped vignettes of a variety of teaching interactions will be provided to illustrate an array of generalization and maintenance strategies. Data collection tools and tracking forms relevant to generalization and maintenance will also be shared along with a bibliography of articles related to generalization. Examples will be provided throughout the presentation and adapted to the interests and needs of the participants.
Audience: This workshop will benefit professionals from a variety of disciplines—including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists—as well as parents who are significantly involved in the educational programming of learners with autism and related disorders. Participants should already be familiar with behavior analytic teaching procedures, such as discrete trial instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Autism: Evidence-based Strategies to Enhance Communication and Remediate Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W183b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.S.
OLIVER WENDT (Purdue University), MIRIAM C. BOESCH (University of North Texas), WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), RAVI NIGAM (Governors State University), KASEY PHILPOTT (Little Star Center)
Description: This workshop will provide an introduction to interventions in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One of the core ASD symptoms includes a delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language. Approximately 25–50% of children with ASD are functionally non-verbal and will not develop sufficient natural speech or writing without ongoing and systematic AAC intervention. AAC augments or replaces spoken language through alternative means of communication. The first part of this workshop will review evidence-based AAC strategies to facilitate functional communication skills, enhance natural speech production, and increase social-communicative behaviors. Strategies include unaided approaches such as manual signs and gestures, and aided approaches such as graphic symbols, exchanged-based communication, electronic communication aides, and tablet devices. The second part will focus on how to use AAC for remediating challenging behaviors such as aggression or self-injury. Particular emphasis will be on the application of iPads and AAC apps. The workshop will identify features of evidence-based apps that are most suitable for autism intervention and showcase how to infuse these into behavioral instruction. Data and video cases from recent single-subject experiments will illustrate successful AAC interventions and their implementation into daily activities in an autism center.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) summarize and critically appraise research related to ASD and AAC approaches such as manual signs and gestures, communication boards with graphic symbols, tangible symbols, Picture Exchange Communication System, speech-generating devices (SGDs), tablets and AAC apps, and functional communication training; (2) outline the pros and cons of using tablet devices for AAC intervention, distinguish well-designed from poorly designed AAC apps, and identify app features that are important to facilitate sensory processing and prevent cognitive overload; (3) define the potential benefits of AAC intervention on development of natural speech in children with ASD, as well as the roles of behavioral versus naturalistic AAC intervention approaches; and (4) explain how single-subject research is used to evaluate the effectiveness of AAC interventions, how practitioners can easily estimate the amount of treatment effectiveness, and how to identify quality criteria for sound treatment research in AAC.
Activities: Lecturing will provide an initial overview on the various AAC interventions and their effectiveness for individuals with ASD. Participants will learn the role of single-subject experimental designs for evaluating AAC efficacy and how to apply quality indicators to determine if standards for high quality research and evidence-based practice are met. Videotaped case studies will illustrate differences between AAC approaches and provide a better understanding of different intervention components. Video cases will also demonstrate how to use AAC for facilitating natural speech development, and how to implement AAC intervention into programming in an applied behavior analysis (ABA) setting. Group discussion will revolve around the presentation of different types of AAC apps and evaluation of app features; these will be examined in terms of sensory friendliness, ability to reduce cognitive load, ease of access and programming, suitability for ABA instruction, symbol iconicity, cost-efficiency, and ability to track progress. Finally, resources will be discussed that are available to practitioners seeking best available AAC treatment evidence. Attendees will be provided with digital handouts of all the information covered in the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is intended for professionals working in the autism field who have an interest in AAC interventions for individuals presenting with little or no functional speech. Specifically, practitioners with motivation to implement evidence-based practices in AAC and particular interest in learning about iDevices and tablets for autism intervention will find this workshop very suitable for their needs. These can include BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, applied researchers, behavior analysts, special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, graduate students in any of these disciplines, and other practitioners serving individuals with autism. A basic understanding of single-subject research methodology is advantageous to fully benefit from this workshop, but not strictly necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): assistive technology, autism, communication intervention, tablet devices
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Fun and Effective Programs to Teach and Promote Non-Verbal Communication
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W179b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rebecca Thompson, Ph.D.
REBECCA THOMPSON (Wisconsin Early Autism Project, Inc.), MARY HOPTON-SMITH (Wisconsin Early Autism Project, Inc.)
Description: The ability to interpret and use non-verbal communication is a widely acknowledged deficit in individuals affected by autism. This workshop provides participants with a comprehensive understanding of the significant role that non-verbal communication plays in human interactions. Participants will learn the difference between non-verbal and verbal communication, and how these forms of communication are used during our everyday discourse. Within a behavior analytic framework, participants will learn how non-verbal communication develops during infancy through the three key stages of sharing, following, and directing joint attention. Participants are provided with written programs designed to teach children increasingly complex non-verbal communication skills following a developmental sequence. Each program includes sample target items, prompting strategies, and data collection documents. Programs start from simple interactive games that promote sharing attention and progress to complex activities that teach children to understand how intonation and volume can influence the meaning of information that is vital to navigating social situations successfully. Video examples of the teaching activities are provided, and participants will have the opportunity to role-play and collect data on the activities. This workshop provides participants with a comprehensive curriculum for teaching non-verbal communication to children of all skill levels in both home and school-based settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define the difference between non-verbal communication and verbal communication, (2) identify how non-verbal communication develops in neuro-typical children and how autism might impact the development of non-verbal communication skills, and (3) implement a series of programs to teach a child non-verbal communication skills within structured learning sessions.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, video presentation, and participant practice of activities.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, ABA clinicians, teachers, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, communication, home-programs, intervention
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Developmental Perspective on the First Three Months of Behavioral Intervention for Youngsters With Autism: Working With Children and Their Parents
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W176a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monika M. Suchowierska, Ph.D.
MONIKA M. SUCHOWIERSKA (University of Social Sciences and Humanities), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center), PAUL W. STEPHANY (Stanislaus County Office of Education)
Description: The first three months of early intensive behavioral intervention are a crucial period for a young learner with autism. It has been recommended that the behavioral intervention take into account a developmental perspective, especially as it relates to behavioral cusps leading to autistic development. We will examine several related skills that may be present or absent in young children with autism: stimulus overselectivity, facial recognition, mutually responsive orientation, joint attention, and social referencing. Based on this information, we will propose major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention, together with teaching strategies to accomplish those goals. Moreover, since the first three months of therapy are also important from the perspective of working with the parents, we will present a training program for parents of young children with autism. Teaching Skills for Success is a structured instructional package where behavior analysts work directly with the parents to develop an effective behavior management plan for the child. The program consists of seven units that include the basic principles of ABA, environmental supports, and strategies for shaping a successful behavioral repertoire and for using powerful contingencies. Teaching Skills for Success is accompanied by a workbook that provides a series of exercises for the parents, on which a behavior management plan is developed. The workshop will conclude with suggestions for combining working with the child and working with the parent, as both of those "pieces of the puzzle" fit within the developmental systems approach to treating autism.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to (1) list developmental concepts that relate to early behavioral intervention, (2) characterize skills that are present or absent in young children with autism and that are behavioral cusps for autistic development, (3) list major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention as they relate to the precursors of autism, (4) describe teaching strategies to accomplish the major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention, (5) characterize the elements of the Teaching Skills for Success program, (6) complete the exercises within the training workbook, and (7) design an educational plan for a young child with autism based on responses to the exercises in the training workbook.
Activities: During the course of the workshop, participants will have an opportunity to analyze videos of typically developing children and autistic children to search for the behavioral cusps discussed in the workshop as well as to plan—based on videos of autistic children—goals for the beginning of their therapy. Small group activities relating to the Teaching Skills for Success program will be conducted.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and behavior analysts who work with families of young children with autism and are responsible for programming therapeutic goals for their pupils, as well as for training parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, developmental perspective, EIBI, parent training
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Speech Program Development
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W183c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will present background information on speech assessment, speech target selection, and program development for speech skill acquisition. In addition, it will offer participants an opportunity for individualized case consultation and troubleshooting speech programming for one of their students. For participants not presenting a case, it's an opportunity to observe the problem solving process related to speech development programs. As a group, we will review information from each selected case. This will include results from the Early Echoic Speech Assessment (EESA; Esch, 2008), video clips, current program data, and other relevant information. For each case, Dr. Esch will discuss how to use this information to select appropriate speech teaching targets, how to best sequence these targets, and how to troubleshoot current problems in the program. Specific strategies and techniques may be recommended for individual cases when appropriate. General dos and don'ts when teaching speech and articulation will be included. Participants who pre-register for the workshop will be offered the opportunity to submit their learner's case for the group consultation. Prior to the workshop, participants presenting cases will need to submit a video permission form, signed by parent or guardian, to allow video review by the workshop audience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe several ways to assess current speech function and suggest next steps, (2) identify appropriate sequential and non-sequential speech targets, (3) explain the purpose and use of the Speech Acquisition Sequence Checklist, and (4) write several English vowels using International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcription.
Activities: Didactic instruction (lecture, videos), practice reading and writing IPA symbols, and consultation by Dr. Esch on individual speech cases submitted by participants.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, and anyone who has responsibility for speech development and speech training programs for individuals who haven't yet learned to speak fluently. Participants will have an opportunity to submit individual cases for consultation-model review during the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): articulation, speech, vocal training
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Programming for Pragmatics: Bringing Assessment to Practice for High Functioning Learners on the Autism Spectrum
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W175b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alexia Stack, M.Ed.
ALEXIA STACK (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting), MAGDALENA A. MARKIEWICZ (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting)
Description: It is well known that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience qualitative impairments in social skills development (DSM-V, 2013), including impairments in pragmatic language skills. Moreover, the long term consequences of pragmatic language deficits place individuals with ASD at risk for relational bullying, limit their ability to develop and maintain friendships and romantic relationships, and increase their likelihood of suffering from anxiety and depression. Support for the assessment and development of pragmatic language skills is crucial for individuals with high functioning autism. There is an increase in evidence based practice within the fields of applied behavior analysis, speech and language pathology, and developmental psychology for pragmatic language assessment and programming. Therefore, early intervention addressing pragmatic language skills is necessary for individuals with ASD. Learning to use assessment tools to select goals for intervention, designing programs based on assessment results, and doing ongoing data analysis to monitor learning are all skills required by behavior analysts in delivering services to high functioning learners on the autism spectrum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define pragmatic language skills, (2) discuss higher order pragmatic language skills that are known to be challenging for learners on the Autism Spectrum, (3) the assessment tools that can be used to guide program development, (4) use assessment tools to identify missing component skills needed for higher order pragmatics, (5) design programs based on assessment results, (6) clearly define target behaviors and effective measurement procedures, and (7) identify common error patterns that emerge, and how to problem solve.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, group discussion, data analysis, video analysis, analysis of sample assessment data, small group practice, program development coaching, and application of data-based decision making. Participants will receive supplemental materials to follow lecture material and for note taking purposes. Example assessment data will be made available for small group practice. Sample worksheets and sample data will be included for small group learning objectives.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, and service delivery staff.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Pragmatic language
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Solving Behavior Problems With Precision Teaching
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W184a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard M. Kubina Jr., Ph.D.
RICHARD M. KUBINA JR. (Penn State), KIRSTEN K. YURICH (The Vista School)
Description: The stakes for producing behavioral change have never been higher. General education, special education, early childhood, and even higher education have increasingly become the focal point for effective behavior change technologies. Precision teaching (PT) provides one important part of the solution for addressing behavior problems: an applied scientific measurement system offering the most powerful methods for selecting and identifying behavior; recording behavior; visually displaying data; facilitating timely, learner centered changes; and providing recursive problem solving. Solving behavior problems by adopting the PT framework of the Is-Does Problem Solving System is important for all behavior analysts. The system was developed to uncover orderly relations between behavior and the environment. The Is-Does System includes (1) precise, action-based descriptions of behavior within the context of environmental events; (2) sensitive measurements of behavior with frequency/rate; (3) data monitoring and analysis on standard celeration charts; and (4) decision making. Equipped with this information, behavior analysts precisely engineer effective learning environments, implement intensive data monitoring procedures, and employ ongoing decision making. The workshop provides explicit instruction on the components of the Is-Does Problem Solving System. Applicable materials are provided to participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) categorize environmental variables across programs, program events, pinpoints and movement cycles, and arrangements and arranged events; (2) state the steps involved in systematically analyzing environments when developing and modifying behavior change programs using the Is-Does Problem Solving System; and (3) complete the Is-Does Planning Sheet using presenter and participant generated examples.
Activities: The six-hour workshop activities will instruct participants to use the Is-Does Problem Solving System to systematically evaluate environmental variables to solve behavioral challenges. The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises focused on the components of the Is-Does Problem Solving System. Participants will further evaluate behavioral data on standard celeration charts. Participants will label behavior change pictures, celeration, and bounce significance.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, teachers, precision teachers, behavior analysts, supervisors, or anyone with responsibility for systematically evaluating individual performances and learning environments in order to produce maximum behavior change. The material presented will be appropriate for participants with a moderate understanding of behavior analysis and/or a minimal knowledge of precision teaching, as well as those well versed in traditional practices. The workshop is specifically designed for individuals who routinely review learner behavior and have the responsibility to modify programming in order to produce positive learning outcomes and improve behavior challenges.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavior problems, Decision making, Precision Teaching, Problem solving
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Skinner's Verbal Behavior and Far Beyond Using the PEAK Relational Training System
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W185d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Seth W. Whiting, M.S.
SETH W. WHITING (Southern Illinois University), MARK R. DIXON (Southern Illinois University)
Description: The PEAK Relational Training System developed by Dr. Mark R. Dixon is a program designed to promote verbal behavior and related skills for children with autism. It has already been field tested by practitioners with more than 100 children with autism. Stemming from recent advances in basic and applied research in behavior analysis, PEAK starts the learner at the earliest stages with programs that directly train a beginning repertoire including prerequisite skills and Skinner's verbal operants, yet advances the learner much further by including skills such as extended tacts, autoclitics, metaphor, and perspective taking. PEAK also expands beyond Skinner's approach to language by building the repertoire through stimulus equivalence and relational frames. Instructors utilizing the Peak Relational Training System proceed through the program book while collecting data during each session that demonstrate the learner's progress and allow for ongoing adjustment. Attendees will be trained on how to assess language deficits, identify goals and objectives for students, and implement the most efficient prompting and training techniques to produce evidence-based results. This workshop will walk attendees through the PEAK system, the behavioral concepts underlying its development, and roleplay data collection and program implementation, and provide outlines of PEAK for immediate implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe how Skinner's Verbal Behavior has been incorporated into the Peak Relational Training System; (2) describe how the system utilizes stimulus equivalence and relational frames to promote language; (3) conduct sessions with a participant in each component of the system, including direct training, generalization, stimulus equivalence, and relational responding; (4) collect data on learner responding during sessions; and (5) describe the layout of the Peak Relational Training System and how the programs proceed.
Activities: Participants will view videos of a BCBA conducting sessions using the Peak Relational Training System, collect data from vignettes, fill out and design sample programs, and conduct brief roleplays with others.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, applied behavior analysts who wish to train verbal behavior skills to their clients, administrators who are seeking a verbal behavior program to implement, or verbal behavior researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): PEAK, relational frame, stimulus equivalence, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Motivating Learner Participation Without Blocking Escape, Forced Physical Prompts, or Nagging
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W185bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Schramm, M.A.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA)
Description: The goal of the workshop will be to teach participants an approach to earning instructional control with unmotivated or otherwise challenging learners that does not employ traditional escape extinction procedures such as forced physical prompting, physically holding the learner in the teaching setting, or nagging procedures. Through the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control, participants will be given an easy-to-teach and therefore reproducible path to earning learner motivation while avoiding some of the potentially behavior escalating procedures common in behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the importance of learner assent in home, clinic, and education settings; (2) creative and practical methods for controlling access to reinforcement in all environments; (3) describe the value and process of being meticulously contingent with words and actions; the value and process of pairing oneself with reinforcement; (5) describe the differences between positive and negative reinforcement and why one is valuable in earning instructional control with an unwilling learner; (6) effectively use and increase a variable ratio of reinforcement; (7) prioritize learning objectives and use differential reinforcement effectively; (8) describe how best to use extinction and negative punishment procedures; (9) name three different types of discrete trial teaching; (10) use important motivating operations when teaching intensively; and (11) describe the concept of a teaching arc and how one can prolong the value of teaching over several different reinforcing teaching settings for the length of teaching interactions.
Activities: Discussion, video demonstration, lecture on the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control, and creation ofa teaching arc.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as other professionals who are working directly with children with autism or other challenging disabilities find themselves having trouble developing motivated learning settings regularly or are responsible to teach others how to earn instructional control in home, clinic, or school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W187c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa L. Famiglietti, M.S.
ALYSSA L. FAMIGLIETTI (Advances Learning Center), GINA FUGAZZOTTO (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE FRANCES COREY (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language; conversation; independent, pretend, and cooperative play; social conventions; and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues; (2) facilitate activities that teach body language; conversation; independent, pretend, and cooperative play; social conventions; and perspective-taking; (3) group students into effective learning clusters; (4) use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency; (5) collect data on multiple students; (6) individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; and (7) take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and roleplays.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts who train staff to run social skills groups; licensed psychologists; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): social skills
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Introduction to Behavior Analysis and Dementia
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W181b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DEV/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Maranda Trahan, Ph.D.
MARANDA TRAHAN (Trahan Behavioral Services), CLAUDIA DROSSEL (University of Michigan), JONATHAN C. BAKER (Southern Illinois University)
Description: Behavioral gerontology is the study of how environmental events (antecedents, consequences) interact with the aging organism to produce behavior, and spans basic, clinical, and organizational behavioral research. Older adults account for 12% of the population today, but will make up 20% in 20–40 years. Currently, very few behavior analytic programs offer courses in behavioral gerontology, and thus few behavioral practitioners have knowledge or understanding of the health care issues related to older adults. As behavior analysts begin to extend their services to aging adult populations, knowledge of health care issues and how such issues can impact behavior programming is essential. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an introduction in behavioral gerontology to behavior analytic practitioners. In this workshop we will cover general information on older adults, describe neurodegenerative changes in function, and explain the role of ABA in dementia care. We will review common behavior changes (both excesses and deficits) exhibited by this population and discuss the behavioral assessments and treatments commonly used. In addition, we will briefly discuss the issues for working with older adults with intellectual disabilities. Instructors will provide case examples and arrange lectures, discussions, and small group breakout sessions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the general characteristics of our older adult population, as well as the features of neurodegenerative changes of those with and without intellectual disabilities, (2)identify common behavioral assessments and interventions that can be used with older adults with dementia, and (3) describe how to navigate health care systems in order to coordinate care and find reimbursement opportunities.
Activities: Instructional strategies lecture, discussion, small group breakout, case scenarios, and case presentations.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including practitioners or caregivers who work with older adults with developmental disabilities or older adults with dementia. Students and scientists who are interested in breaking into this new field are also welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervisor Training that Meets the BACB Training Requirements for Supervisors, Part I
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W182 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Parts I and II of this workshop will provide 9 CEs of supervisor training that meets the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s requirements to provide supervision, as specified in their Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline document (available at BACB.com). “After December 31, 2014, only individuals who complete a training experience based on this curriculum outline will be permitted to supervise individuals pursuing the BCBA or BCaBA credentials or practicing BCaBAs.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to:
  1. The supervisor should be able to describe the 6 reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision.
  2. The supervisor should be able to describe the 5 potential outcomes of ineffective supervision.
  3. The supervisor should be able to describe or demonstrate the 12 components of effective, evidence-based supervision.
  4. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the 8 components of behavioral skills training of the supervisee.
  5. The supervisor should be able to describe the 4 formats for providing behavioral skills training with individuals and groups of supervisees.
  6. The supervisor should be able to apply behavioral skills training across relevant skill areas including, but not limited to those outlined in the task list.
  7. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the three components of performance feedback.
  8. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 ways of providing feedback.
  9. The supervisor should be able to describe the 3 methods to evaluate supervisory effectiveness.
  10. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 methods for his/her ongoing professional development as a supervisor.
  11. The supervisor should be able to describe the 7 methods for the ongoing professional development of the supervisee.
Activities: The workshop will provide a variety of learning activities and tests necessary to teach participants the supervisors skills specified in the BACB’s objectives.
Audience: This two-part workshop is for supervisors “of those who deliver behavior-analytic services and those who are pursuing BACB certification” and will satisfy the BACB training requirement for BCBA supervisors. Attend this workshop to meet the BACB’s new training requirement for BCBA supervisors and earn 9 CEs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Analysis, Data-Based Process, Learning Efficiency, Supervision
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Comprehensive Training Program for Functional Analyses and Treatment Development
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W181c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James Chok, Ph.D.
JAMES CHOK (Melmark Pennsylvania)
Description: A functional analysis (FA) is a systematic experimental methodology used in the assessment process to determine a behavior's maintaining variables prior to treatment selection. Research has shown that selecting interventions based upon the results of an FA greatly improves treatment outcomes for problem behavior (e.g., Pelios, Morren, Tesch, & Axelrod, 1999; Hastings & Noone, 2005). Moreover, inaccurate interpretation of FA data can lead to the selection of ineffective interventions, and possibly interventions that inadvertently exacerbate problem behavior (e.g., Iwata, Pace, Cowdery, & Miltenberger, 1994). Thus, utilizing FAs to guide treatment selection is important for behavior analysts working within applied settings. Although designing and conducting functional analyses, and using the results to guide treatment selection, are important skill sets for behavior analysts to possess, the research literature does not yet offer any published examples of how to effectively train the myriad skills that make up this process. The current workshop is designed to teach practitioners how to train these skills in applied settings.
Learning Objectives: The goal of the workshop is to teach individuals in a training role how to teach comprehensive functional analysis and treatment development skills. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to train supervisees to do the following activities: (1) consider ethical dilemmas when conducting functional analyses; (2) conduct standard functional analysis sessions; (3) interview staff members/caregivers and develop idiosyncratic functional analysis conditions; (4) select an appropriate measurement system, functional analysis methodology, and experimental design for functional analyses; (5) interpret functional analysis data; and (6) select treatments that are informed by functional analysis results.
Activities: This workshop will include multiple activities: lecture, modeling of skills, small group practice of skills, and practice taking data and evaluating performance.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including individuals who are responsible for training others to conduct functional analyses and develop treatments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional analyis, staff training, treatment development
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
BACB-Compliant Supervisor Training, Mixed Media Workshop
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W186 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: The mixed media BACB-compliant supervision training workshop is back, bigger and better than ever! Incorporating feedback from our Minneapolis annual convention workshop and the many workshops presented in the past year, this session prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional two and a half hours online through TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost nine hours of content while using only six hours of convention time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and video, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Additionally, participant trios will engage in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, with an additional three CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. We had record-breaking turnout last year, so sign up early! This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the potential outcomes of ineffective supervision, (2) describe the BACB-accepted supervision formats, (3) roleplay behavior skills training, (4) demonstrate how to execute a supervision contract, (5) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback, and (6) identify the levels of supervision and the requirements for each.
Activities: Lecture, identifying skills and deficits in video scenarios, engaging in small group practice with peer feedback and instructor feedback, question and answer time for understanding the rather complex new rules of supervision.
Audience: Participants should be practicing BCBAs with clinical experience who are already providing supervision or who are in the process of determining if they want to become supervisors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): BACB-Compliant, Ethics, Supervisor, Videos
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervision: Understanding Features and Purposes and Demonstrating Skills in Behavioral Training, Performance Feedback, and Evaluations
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W176c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC), DEIRDRE LEE FITZGERALD (University of Saint Joseph)
Description: Thissession will identify the ethical guidelines related to the supervisory role of the BCBA. Participants will become familiar with the purpose of supervision, recognize and demonstrate the important features of evidence-based supervision, practice performance feedback and evaluation skills, describe the components of ineffective supervision, discuss steps for ongoing professional development, and engage in roleplay scenarios related to effective supervision. This session will also prepare participants to meet the supervision training requirement as established by the BACB. However, it is being offered independent of the BACB. Participants will be expected to participate and demonstrate competency in roleplay activities.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the new supervision requirements; (2) describe the reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision; (3) describe the potential outcomes of ineffective supervision; (4) describe and demonstrate components of effective, evidence-based supervision; (5) identify potential ethics violations for front-line therapists, other non-certified implementers, and other supervisees; (6) discuss three methods for providing training or re-training; (7) describe methods for ongoing professional development as a supervisor as well as the importance for the supervisee; (8) describe and demonstrate components of behavioral skills training of the supervisee; (9) describe and demonstrate the different types of performance feedback that can be used with supervisees; and (10) actively engage in roleplay scenarios demonstrating competencies related to effective supervision.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, case study, question and answer, skill demonstration.
Audience: BCBAs and BCBA-Ds only.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): evaluating supervision, Performance feedback, Skills Training, supervision training
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Functional Behavior Assessments in School/Residential Settings: Balancing Rigor With Practicality
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Aaron Barnes, Ph.D.
AARON BARNES (Michigan's Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative), AMY CAMPBELL (Grand Valley State University)
Description: The scope of what constitutes a functional behavior assessment (FBA) in many educational and home settings is broad and varied. Practice may range from informal interviews and anecdotal narrative observation summaries to analog functional analysis, and everything in between. Both policy and resources play a role in determining what the FBA process entails for a particular case in a particular setting, but in many cases steps can be taken to increase both the efficiency and effectiveness of our efforts. This workshop will address practices to increase both the scientific rigor and treatment utility of FBA in natural settings. The presented practices will include selecting indirect and direct assessment methods, conducting assessments with focused efficiency to yield more useful data in less time, utilizing data from indirect assessments to help guide direct assessment procedures, linking data collection from baseline to intervention progress monitoring, and troubleshooting common problems encountered in the assessment and intervention stages of service delivery. The presentation will incorporate technology to enhance data collection procedures. A focus of the workshop will be to share how increased precision during the assessment phase of FBA enhances the development and efficacy of behavior support plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participants will be able to (1) describe the rationale for selecting particular indirect and direct assessment tools in natural (e.g., school, home, community) settings; (2) increase the efficiency of FBA interviews by gathering information that contributes to a functional hypothesis and to the efficiency of conducting direct observations; (3) utilize technology to enhance data collection; (4) conduct targeted direct observation procedures with minimal disruption to naturally occurring contingencies; (5) collect data with high treatment utility in less time; and (6) link the data to behavior support strategies.
Activities: This workshop will alternate between lecture and hands-on activities, including reviewing assessment methods, evaluating initial assessment data to inform subsequent assessment and support plans, demonstrating different ways technology can be utilized to enhance assessment, and reviewing videotaped exercises to practice newly acquired skills.
Audience: The workshop requires participants to have foundational knowledge of applied behavior analysis methods and terminology. The presentation is intended for professionals who design, implement, fund, support, and evaluate functional behavior assessment and subsequent interventions in natural settings including schools, homes, day programs, and residential facilities. This target audience may include BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, educators, therapists, social workers, clinic- or school-based psychologists, graduate-level students, and behavior specialists or analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Efficient Assessment, Functional Assessment, Provider Collaboration
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
B. F. Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D.
MARK L. SUNDBERG (Sundberg and Associates)
Description: This workshop will provide an introduction to the basic elements of Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior. Participants will be taken through the main points of the first five chapters of Skinner's book. That content will teach the participant how to define, classify, and exemplify Skinner's elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual). Additional topics briefly covered will include motivating operations, multiple control, private events, verbal extensions, automatic contingencies, and autoclitics.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) provide the technical definition of Skinner's elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual); (2) classify examples of verbal behavior as mands, tacts, intraverbals, etc.; (3) provide examples of each verbal operant; (4) define and exemplify the motivating operation (MO); (5) define and exemplify Skinner's analysis of multiple control; and (6) define and exemplify autoclitic verbal relations.
Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and exercises in the classification of verbal behavior. Handouts will be provided to each attendee that will provide information on each topic, as well as exercises related to those topics.
Audience: Participants, including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, should have formal training in behavior analysis, and interest in learning or reviewing the basic aspects of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Verbal Behavior Development Protocols: The Foundations of Language Development From Imitation to Naming
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W175c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Derek Jacob Shanman, Ph.D.
DEREK JACOB SHANMAN (Teachers College, Columbia University), SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Teachers College, Columbia University), TIMOTHY MICHAEL YEAGER (Teachers College, Columbia University), LAURA E. LYONS (Columbia University), CRYSTAL LO (Teachers College, Columbia University), AMANDA C. PHILP (Teachers College, Columbia University), HALEY PELLEGREN (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Description: Often children with disabilities are missing prerequisite repertoires necessary to acquire language. Recent research has led to the identification of crucial pre-verbal or verbal developmental cusps. Further, successful establishment of these missing cusps has led to an acceleration in learning and further language development. Certain cusps are considered major developmental milestones that allow children to advance through various stages of verbal behavior development. These prerequisites include induction of generalized imitation, the acquisition of a fluent listener repertoire, the induction of hear/say correspondence, the joining of listener and speaker repertoires, and reinforcement for learning new operants through observation of peers. This workshop will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to identify which of these verbal developmental cusps are present in a child's repertoire, and which are missing. Participants will also acquire mastery of protocols necessary to establish or enhance missing foundational cusps necessary for development of subsequent verbal behavior. Protocols to be covered in this workshop include generalized imitation, the listener emersion protocol to induce listener literacy, the auditory matching protocol to induce hear/say correspondence, multiple exemplar instruction across listener and speaker behaviors to induce naming, and the yoked contingency game board to induce observational learning of new operants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define generalized imitation, listener literacy, hear/say correspondence, naming, and observational learning; (2) analyze pre- and post-intervention probe data and identify when there is, or is not, a need to implement the protocols to induce generalized imitation, listener literacy, hear/say correspondence, naming, and observational learning; and (3) implement, take data on, and tact criterion level responding for the mirror protocol to induce generalized imitation, the listener emersion protocol to induce listener literacy, the auditory matching protocol to induce hear/say correspondence, the multiple exemplar instruction across listener and speaker behaviors protocol to induce naming, and the yoked contingency game board protocol to induce observational learning.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balance of lecture, video demonstration, and small group guided practice. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations, with mastery being attained through guided practice and measured through intraverbal and written responses.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, speech therapists, supervisors, or paraprofessionals who are working with children with and without disabilities. Participants should be well-versed in the vocabulary of the science of behavior and have some understanding of verbal behavior, including basic verbal operants. Graduate students are encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Generalize Imitation, Naming, Observational Learning, Verbal Capabilities
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Inner Behavior: How to Change Thoughts, Feelings, and Urges
Friday, May 23, 2014
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center)
Description: Thoughts, feelings, and urges are inner behaviors that a person can observe, count, and change as needed. Eleven research studies in the United States and Europe across the past 42 years include more than 1,000 charts and show that behavioral observation and methods can change a person's inner behavior. Therapists, teachers, and researchers have used this radical behavior approach in residential, public school, university, geriatric, and therapeutic settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) state the theoretical and research background for observing and changing inner behavior; (2) define a thought, a feeling, and an urge, and name specific examples of each; (3) practice writing pleasant thoughts, feelings, and behaviorally stated responses to urges at 30 to 35 per minute, and say them at 50 to 75 per minute; and (4) develop, write, and discuss a plan to change inner behaviors of self or a client.
Activities: The workshop reviews the history of the field with an emphasis on various charts and techniques to change people's pleasant and unpleasant inner behaviors. Some of the charts and information include data on people with PTSD and children on the autism spectrum. The workshop also includes and teaches details on how to use the standard celeration chart to record, predict, analyze, and change inner behaviors. Participants will count and record some specific inner behaviors for the duration of the workshop, which can be continued or revised later. Participants may also bring charts to share if they have done any prior counting and charting of inner behavior.
Audience: This workshop is for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, clinicians, people teaching behavior analysis, graduate students in behavior analysis and psychology, special education teachers who work with students with behavior disorders and those on the autism spectrum, and others interested in changing inner behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Bedtime Problems, Sibling Rivalry, Toileting Training, and More: Family Advice Packages for the BCBA Clinician
Friday, May 23, 2014
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ennio C. Cipani, Ph.D.
ENNIO C. CIPANI (National University)
Description: Many BCBAs work with families and their children with developmental disabilities. While the main focus of intervention can be direct services to the child, problems related to family life and management of problem areas often arise. Types of problems that families often ask assistance for can be one or more of the following: bedtime problems (waking up, going to bed); eating problems (either too much or selective eating); sibling problems (including arguments and verbal and physical aggression); toilet training (and related problems); car trips (and other outings); and a host of other types of setting concerns. The focus of the workshop will be on developing a repertoire for dealing with common family problem areas. In addition to the lecture, workshop, and training, one- to two-page parent protocols/handouts for each problem area are available for download for course registrants. Permission (for the BCBA course registrant only, not other BCBAs) to copy any form for client use is granted. The access to this alone makes the course a valuable commodity for BCBAs. The lecture will also include suggestions for group training in the form of topic workshops, with use of handouts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) generate a number of procedures in a package for treating child bedtime problems via parent implementation of such procedures and (2) generate a number of procedures in a package for treating sibling rivalry/conflict problems (arguing, fighting, etc.) via parent implementation of such procedures.
Activities: Write a sample protocol for a family who has a child with bedtime problems and identify within one's own caseload which families need help with one (or more) of the family advice packages.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists who are involved with providing services (directly to the child or consultation) to families with children with developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): BCBA clinician, child problems, parent training
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABCs of Verbal Behavior: The Basics, Their Interactions, Their Implications
Friday, May 23, 2014
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), ANITA LI (Florida Institute of Technology), ZIWEI XU (The Ohio State University)
Description: We will review the basic verbal classes (e.g., echoic behavior, manding, tacting, intraverbals, autoclitics) as they were introduced by Skinner, especially in his book Verbal Behavior and as they have since evolved. We will see how these classes are related to such basic behavioral phenomena as reinforcement and stimulus control. This background will allow us to examine current research on verbal processes that enter into varied human settings and that are fundamental to varied applications. The topics we will consider include the distinction between physical and verbal units, naming, and other higher order classes; abstraction; the role of verbal behavior in judging one's own behavior; multiple causation in verbal behavior; the shaping of verbal behavior; correspondences between saying and doing; verbal governance; and the implications of these areas for treatment and for educational and other settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) interpret instances of verbal behavior by identifying the different verbal classes that have come together to produce them; (2) recognize higher-order verbal classes and their nesting (as when individual tacts are members of a higher-order class called naming) and identify problems that may arise when different contingencies operate on classes at different hierarchical levels; (3) distinguish accounts of verbal behavior that emphasize function (e.g., the stimulus control of verbal behavior, and the contingencies that shape and maintain it) from more common everyday accounts in terms of form (e.g., topographies, grammatical and linguistic categories); and (4) identify functional verbal processes (including verbal shaping and verbal governance) as they occur in natural settings and as they may be incorporated into behavior analytic applications.
Activities: The workshop will consist of brief lectures outlining the classes and functions of verbal behavior interspersed with presentations of research data, demonstrations, visual aids, a computer simulation of verbal shaping, and discussions and other audience-participation activities.
Audience: This workshop may be useful to BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as to (1) those who have read Skinner's book Verbal Behavior and who would like a contemporary update of the issues treated there, and/or (2) those familiar with the concepts of verbal behavior mainly as used in applied settings who would like a more systematic overview, and/or (3) those with a general background in behavior analysis who would like to extend such basic concepts as reinforcement and stimulus control to important aspects of human behavior, and/or (4) those involved in the teaching of verbal behavior, especially at the undergraduate level. A reading of Skinner's book is recommended to participants but is not required. For those who would also like a review of the basic phenomena upon which the analysis of verbal behavior is built, a workshop on the ABCs of behavior analysis may be of interest, but it is not a prerequisite for this verbal behavior workshop.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): higher-order classes, tacts/mands/autoclitics, verbal governance, verbal shaping
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preparing for Adulthood: Skill Assessment and Life Skills Programming for Young Adults With Autism
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W175a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Martineau, Ed.S.
ELIZABETH MARTINEAU (Nashoba Learning Group), STEPHANIE DANIELS (Nashoba Learning Group), JESSICA TILLEY (Nashoba Learning Group), KELLEY WARD (Nashoba Learning Group)
Description: Individuals with moderate to severe autism who have received quality ABA programming generally develop a strong repertoire of skills. As those students age, it is critical that programming be geared toward building those skills into routines that will allow them to be as successful as possible as adults. Although there is a substantial body of research to assist in teaching early learners, there is significantly less documented work to assist practitioners in designing functional programming for older students who still require individualized ABA instruction. At Nashoba Learning Group (NLG), we have developed a curriculum for teaching vocation and life skills that has allowed our students to significantly increase their functional skills and independence. Our curriculum utilizes well researched ABA techniques, such as task analyzed instruction, incidental teaching, discrete trial teaching, and stimulus fading to build repertoires of skills essential to success in adulthood. This workshop will review NLG's Life Skills Inventory assessment and curriculum and describe how we use the assessment to identify skills to target. We will compare patterns of student scoring on the assessment by age category and compare performance when students are 22 with ability to participate in adult program activities. We will look in depth at two skill areas in part 2: food preparation skills (for employment and as life skills) and community job placement skills. We will present task analyses and demonstrate how to modify teaching procedures based on students' varying skill levels, including multiple case studies of students performing at different levels as well as task selection for two students with different profiles at a community job placement.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) design integrated vocation and life skills programming for teenagers with autism, (2) assess current student performance in a variety of skill areas, (3) create learning objectives for students for vocation and life skills, (4) teach food preparation skills using task analyzed instruction, (5) match community job placement tasks to individuals in a food service establishment, (6) adapt teaching procedures to students' varying skill levels and supervision needs, and (7) complete a portion of NLG's vocation and life skills assessment for a presented student.
Activities: Participants will engage in a variety of activities throughout the workshop. We will begin with an overview of NLG's vocation and life skills curriculum and assessment tool. Participants will watch a video of a student completing vocational skills and will complete the corresponding portion of NLG's task analysis and then translate that into an item on the vocation and life skills assessment. We will review relative scores on the assessment instrument for NLG students and adult program members by age level and for adults based on relative emphasis of their school programming and the skill area of grocery shopping; participants will discuss how to adapt the procedures for students of varying skill levels. Participants will receive a copy of the assessment tool and instructions for completing the instrument.
Audience: This workshop is designed for licensed psychologists, BCBA level teachers and clinical directors, as well as program coordinators. Presenters will assume that participants are familiar with a variety of ABA techniques and with individualized curriculum design for students up through young adulthood. Participants should have a strong interest in developing individualized programs for children, teenagers, and young adults with autism that result in the students achieving independence on core life skills and work readiness.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Lifeskills Inventory, Lifeskills Training, Vocational Training, Young Adults
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Group Social Skills Instruction for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Design to Implementation
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W181b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Emily Huber Callahan, Ph.D.
JULIE PATTERSON (Virginia Institute of Autism), PEGGY W. HALLIDAY (Virginia Institute of Autism), EMILY HUBER CALLAHAN (Virginia Institute of Autism)
Description: Social interaction deficits are considered to be the core deficits exhibited by individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (Travis & Sigman, 1998; Kanner, 1943). Among others, delays and deficits in the development of social interaction skills impede an individual's ability to develop meaningful social relationships and have been associated with peer rejection and anxiety (Bellini, Peter, Benner, & Hopf, 2007). As such, instruction to remediate these deficits is critical. Social skills groups are often conducted to teach individuals skills (e.g., entering or exiting a conversation, filtering your thoughts, handling a disagreement) used daily to interact and communicate with one another. Though these groups can be fun, running an effective group can be challenging. This workshop will help practitioners design an effective social skills group by first learning how to form a group based on age and compatibility. Then, different ways to develop a curriculum that meets the needs of the participants and allows them to grow within the program will be discussed. Additionally, the incorporation of interactive group activities such as theater games, role-plays, and gaming to teach and practice social skills will be presented. Finally, this workshop will share ideas for implementing group contingencies and self-monitoring procedures.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) form groups based on recruitment, size, and fit; (2) use a variety of activities to provide students with opportunities to practice social skills; (3) facilitate activities that target body language, thinking on your feet, entering a conversation, staying on topic, electronic communication, filtering your thoughts, handling disagreements, and cooperation; (4) describe how to incorporate group contingencies and self-monitoring strategies into social skills group instruction; and (5) design a social skills plan to meet the needs of children and teenagers.
Activities: The objectives for this workshop will be taught through a balanced presentation of lectures, video observations, group discussions, group activities, and role-plays.
Audience: The intended audience for this workshop includes licensed psychologists, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, special education teachers, general education teachers, speech/language pathologists, behavioral technicians, and other individuals who currently are or who are intending to implement social skills instruction in a group setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, group instruction, social skills
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Strategies to Ensure Caregivers of Children and Adults With a Diagnosis of Autism Implement Effective Teaching Interventions During Daily Activities
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed for consultants and program administrators who wish to further their skills in developing and implementing comprehensive intervention programs. In order to facilitate the rapid acquisition of critical language, social, and functional skills, it is important that both the selection of specific learning objectives and the teaching activities be prioritized. It is also critical that those skills be maintained by naturally occurring reinforcement contingencies that associate with the use of those skills in common daily activities. However, many instructional programs for individuals with a diagnosis of autism fail to devote sufficient instructional time to the development of those skills that will result in the greatest overall rate of skill acquisition. Therefore, it is important that parents, educators, and other caregivers be able to identify teaching opportunities available in home, community, and school settings, and that they be able to successfully implement effective teaching and reinforcement strategies. In spite of receiving consultative services, many caregivers report finding it difficult to implement recommended teaching strategies. Techniques will be presented that facilitate caregivers' successful implementation of evidence-based teaching strategies with individuals at various levels of development in home and community settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify strategies for helping parents and educators prioritize the learning outcomes for both language skills and functional living skills based upon a learner's current set of skills; (2) analyze programs for a nonverbal individual and select learning objectives that will help identify the skills necessary to develop instructional control and establish an initial verbal repertoire; (3) analyze an instructional programs for an individual who has acquired a set of basic mand, tact, and intraverbal skills and select learning objectives that will teach more advanced skills in these repertoires and incorporate the use of these skills into a variety of everyday social interactions; (4) compare the existing skill levels of a young child with an autism spectrum disorder with the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children; and (5) identify methods to ensure caregivers come in contact with reinforcement for implementing intervention strategies designed to develop important functional life skills while participating in everyday household, community, and classroom activities.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and discussion at the end of the presentation. Core content will be taught through lecture, and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: Licensed psychologists, BCBAs, and BCaBAs who are currently supervising or implementing behavioral teaching interventions with individuals with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, natural environment, parent intervention, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Systematic Program Evaluation of Educational Services for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W179b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica R. Everett, Ph.D.
JESSICA R. EVERETT (Melmark New England), BARBARA O'MALLEY CANNON (Melmark New England), JAMES T. ELLIS (Step By Step Behavioral Solutions)
Description: The number of students with autism spectrum disorders currently being serviced within the educational system has increased tremendously in the past several years. These students function at varying levels and have varying educational needs. As a result, a variety of programming options have been developed to meet the needs of these students. Systematic evaluation of these programs is necessary to ensure effective progress and efficient delivery of services. Additionally, behavior analysts may be asked to evaluate the effectiveness of individual student programming. The current workshop will review evidence-based practice for educating students with autism spectrum disorders, effective programmatic evaluation strategies, and effective collaboration to best help educational teams and families meet the complicated needs of these students. Programmatic evaluation tools will be reviewed, and discussion will center around tying evaluation results to effective educational recommendations. Collaboration strategies will be reviewed in terms of sharing evaluation results with team members in ways that increase the likelihood of the results being implemented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the various components involved in individual and programmatic evaluation of student progress in learners with ASD, (2) select evaluation tools to be used in programmatic and individual evaluation of student progress, (3) develop recommendations for students with ASD that reflect best practice, and (4) present evaluation results in a collaborative way that increases the likelihood that recommendations will be implemented.
Activities: Open discussion, lecture, question and answer, video examples, small group work, and completion of observational record tools.
Audience: The target audience is BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including behavior analysts working with students with autism spectrum disorders who may be asked to complete programmatic evaluation reviews. Behavior analysts who are asked to complete programmatic reviews of effective services related to individual students will also benefit from this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism Spectrum, Evidence-Based Practice, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Program Evaluation
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Teaching Parents How to Deal Effectively With Their Children's Behavioral Difficulties
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W185d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amos E. Rolider, Ph.D.
AMOS E. ROLIDER (The Academic College of Kinneret, Israel)
Description: In this workshop, a consultation model that emphasizes teaching parents to rearrange significant context variables and to discover the antecedents and functions of their children's most burdensome behaviors will be presented. Parents subsequently learn to identify the function of their own responses to their children's inappropriate behaviors and are trained to select and apply simple and effective interventions based on the discovery of antecedents and maintaining consequences.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify behaviors and typical parental responses associated with the termination of a preferred activity or reinforcer, refusal or inability to provide a preferred activity or reinforcer, demand situations, transition from preferred activity to non-preferred activity, and elicited emotional outbursts; (2) describe the importance of preparing an established weekly schedule and set of expectations; (3) prepare children for antecedents in the form of difficult situations; (4) select an appropriate response based on the function of the inappropriate behavior; (5) select an appropriate motivational program based on DRO/DRA; and (6) practice using the model to deal with children's most common inappropriate behaviors, including bickering and refusal, tantrums and aggression, over-dependence, school-related problems, and other issues.
Activities: Forthcoming.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practitioners, including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, who work with or are interested in working with parents of children who exhibit a variety of behavioral issues; parents; and educators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performance
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic levels for many populations, including populations served by behavior analysts, it is vital that behavior analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles as effectively as possible. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness, and healthy living are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively assess and optimally improve their own or their clients' physical fitness, health, and, if desired, athletic performance. Emphasis will be on behavior analytic "gradual change techniques"; optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and how the use of behavior analytic experimental designs, such as multiple baselines across situations and bounded changing criterion designs, may be used not just to measure change, but actually to facilitate effective behavioral change. New for this year will be an emphasis on functional assessment of dysfunctional health behaviors. Finally, participants will learn how improved health and physical fitness allow individuals to live a valued life and aid in the pursuit of chosen life directions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) state many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy lifestyle; (2) perform functional assessments of current health and fitness related behaviors; (3) perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors, safe and effective exercise, and skilled athletic performance; (4) identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness, and athleticism; (5) use goal setting, task analysis, and pinpointing, and identify skill gaps, set realistically achievable goals, and effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance; (6)use behavior analytic experimental designs not only to measure and assess behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness, and athletic behavioral changes; (7) use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program; and (8) use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors.
Activities: PowerPoint slides, worksheets, and lecture handouts will provide participants with the information necessary to learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; to develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; and to use behavior analytic experimental designs to assess and facilitate desired behavioral change.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to change unhealthy behaviors; promote and develop healthy lifestyles, fitness, and weight loss and maintenance; or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Ethics for Behavior Analysts: Fluency Style
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W175c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: W. Larry Williams, Ph.D.
MELISSA NOSIK (University of Nevada, Reno), MARK MALADY (Brohavior/HSI/WARC), W. LARRY WILLIAMS (University of Nevada, Reno), STUART M. LAW (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to review practice ethics, recent changes in behavior analyst certification standards, supervision guidelines, and disciplinary standards identified by the BACB in a fluency fashion training environment. The workshop is very interactive and will have participants practice SAFMEDS in 1-minute timings with a partner between instructional components throughout the workshop. Participants will also be taught to chart their progress throughout the workshop. Learning channelswill include free say, free write, hear/say, and see/say. Additionally, an example of an ethics rating scale for quantification of a behavior analyst's own ethical behavior will be introduced.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) demonstrate improved fluency in verbal identification of ethical conduct areas and disciplinary standards discussed within the workshop and as measured on the standard celeration chart; (2) self-rate ethical behavior; and (3) chart using a daily per-minute standard celeration chart of 1-minute timings of SAFMED practices.
Activities: 15 min—introduction to SAFMED assessment and learning techniques, introduction to charting; 20 min—baseline probes: SAFMED fluency on ethical areas of conduct and disciplinary standards, pre-tests: free-say and free-write activities on ethical areas of conduct; 20 min—review of ethical conduct guidelines, disciplinary standards; 20 min—SAFMED practice; 20 min—changes in standards and brief focus on behavior analysts as supervisors; 15 min—break; 20 min—SAFMED practice; 15 min—maintaining ethical behavior; 15 min—SAFMED practice with partner; 15 min—introduction to ethical self-rating scale; 15 min—post-tests and workshop survey
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and graduate level students of behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Fluency, Training, SAFMEDS
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Creativity in Play Skills: Why and How Behavior Analysis Can Do This Well
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W181a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/TPC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The workshop will focus on teaching participants procedures for establishing simple play repertoires and procedures for reinforcing the use of these basic play skills in novel settings, with novel materials and in novel combinations. The instructors will describe creativity and generativity in play skills from a behavior analytic perspective. All procedures will be described in terms of basic principles and demonstrated live or via video. Participants will be trained in the use of research-supported strategies to teach play skills and then to support their generalized and expanded use. These strategies will include (but will not be limited to) matrix training (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989), video modeling (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz, & Ahearn, 2009), activity schedules (MacDuff, Krantz, & McClannahan, 1993), and the use of visual/text supports for motor and vocal actions in the context of play scenarios. Creativity will be defined behaviorally with an emphasis on how to support stimulus generalization, response generalization, and recombinative generalization of play skills. Participants will receive materials to support a range of basic play repertoires for children ages 2–5 years, along with opportunities to practice using these materials.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe creativity from a behavior analytic perspective; (2) describe the deficits in children with ASD that result in the need for formally teaching creativity; (3) describe specific procedures to support stimulus, response, and recombinative generalization; (4) identify different types of play skills to be established and a hierarchy for doing so; (5) describe matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity; (6) describe video modeling and one scenario in which to implement it; and (7) establish a basic play activity schedule.
Activities: Outline—Teaching Creative Play Workshop Proposed Schedule: .45, overview of creativity in play behavior—What it is? Why do we need to directly teach it for learners with ASD? review of current research on play skills; .5, ASD and instruction visual learning strengths, response to language instruction, instructional support, "critical keys" stimulus, response and recombinative generalization; .25, break; .75, review matrix training/video modeling demonstrations and practice; .75, review text/visual checklists and picture activity schedules demonstrations and practice
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including persons providing home- and school-based EIBI services to individuals on the autism spectrum.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Creativity, Play Skills
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ethical and Professional Practice With Individuals With Autism and Their Families
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W186 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (The University of Kansas)
Description: Are you ethical? Of course! Are Kim Kardashian, Ryan Braun, and Conan O'Brien ethical? Now that's a bit trickier! Are ethics important? Of course! Then why are they not clear-cut? Luckily, in the field of behavior analysis we have ethical guidelines to guide our practice (BACB, 2010). Addressing the "real world" ethical dilemmas during implementation of applied behavior analysis with families of individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). What do we do when our ethical guidelines conflict with other professionals' behavior in the field? This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding "real world" examples of ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, at centers, and within schools and other organizations. Utilizing video examples and actual scenarios of BCBAs and students working on the BCBA credential, the instructors will guide the participants through identifying the appropriate ethical guideline, lead discussion regarding appropriate actions, and provide guidance on how to manage their ethical compass.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define "ethics" and describe why ethical guidelines are important, (2) identify the 10 Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts, (3) compare the ethical guidelines of behavior analysts to other published guidelines, (4) navigate the BACB ethics app, (5) accurately identify ethical dilemmas presented in video examples, (6) accurately identify which guideline is addressed in a given example, and (7) accurately identify appropriate responses to "real world" dilemmas.
Activities: Review the 10 Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts. Compare these guidelines to other published guidelines. Discuss Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on each of the ethical guidelines. Watch video examples of the guidelines. Discuss how to respond to "real world" dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (as well as those seeking these credentials), licensed psychologists, and others looking for additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals with autism and their families.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, ethical practice, home/community
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Rediscover Your Roots: Using Discrepancy Analysis to Increase Learner Performance
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W176a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, M.S.
MEGAN MILLER (Navigation Behavioral Consulting), STEVEN J. WARD (Whole Child Consulting LLC)
Description: Many behavior analysts are trained on curricula instead of receiving training on how to use behavior analytic research to analyze learner behavior. This is a skill set that one must possess to be an effective behavior analyst. While no one checklist, training, or curriculum can teach this skill in its entirety, the purpose of this workshop is to provide behavior analysts training on how to conduct a discrepancy analysis (determination of why a learner is performing poorly). The presenters will teach the participants how to conduct a discrepancy analysis, to practice analyzing learning behavior, and to solve learning problems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify poor learner performance, (2) conduct a discrepancy analysis, (3) use a discrepancy analysis to improve learner performance, (4) teach learners to overcome common skill deficits that interfere with learner performance, and (5) address common challenging behaviors that interfere with learner performance
Activities: Participants will actively participate using guided notes, templates, role-playing, and vignettes.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn how to conduct a more in-depth problem-solving analysis when their learners are not making progress. Attendees may have an in-depth understanding of behavior analysis and/or be relatively new to the field but have a lack of training or experience with using behavior analysis to determine why their clients are not making progress when using standard behavior analytic techniques such as reinforcement, prompting, shaping, differential reinforcement, and functionally analyzing challenging behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): barriers, learner performance, troubleshooting
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Integrating Functional Behavioral Assessment and Positive Behavioral Interventions in a School System
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W183c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: This workshop will describe how to integrate functional behavioral assessments and positive behavioral interventions in a school-wide system. There are many challenges involved in this process, and participants will learn strategies for overcoming those challenges. Components of the process include gaining administrative support, establishing a culture of consistency, developing school-wide expectations and procedures, gathering functional assessment and progress monitoring data, creating a positive environment with social and tangible reinforcement, classroom management strategies based on function, teacher buy-in and training, behavioral consultation for children with challenging behaviors, and empowering the school to be more independent while fading ourselves. This workshop will help teachers and behavior analysts to work together with the common goal of enabling students to perform better and exhibit more pro-social and emotionally mature behaviors. Teacher-friendly forms that focus on gathering information to conduct effective functional behavioral assessments will be provided. There will also be checklists provided that will make the process of data collection easier and more teacher-friendly. Methods for making behavioral consultation more effective and easily received will be provided as well.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to describe how to (1) gain administrative support for developing a school-wide system, (2) develop school-wide expectations and procedures, (3) gather functional assessment and progress monitoring data, (4) create classroom management strategies based on function, and (5) provide behavioral consultation for children with challenging behaviors.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life cases in schools, take notes, ask questions, view a PowerPoint presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include Board Certified Behavior Analysts, behavioral consultants, licensed psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers, and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who are typically developing who have behavioral and/or emotional difficulties in schools.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral consultation, educational settings
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Engineer Learning: Fundamentals of Iterative Design and Development
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W181c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EDC/TPC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Janet S. Twyman, Ph.D.
JANET S. TWYMAN (University of Massachusetts Medical School/Center on Innovations in Learning), MARTA LEON (Headsprout), MELINDA SOTA (University of Oregon)
Description: We know any skill that can be described can also be taught, and that there are effective ways to teach specific skills. What still remain elusive are the art and science of planning a complete instructional program, from learning objectives through validation by learners. In this workshop, participants will learn a non-linear approach to designing instruction. The outcome of this non-linear approach is not only an effective instructional program, but also a significant gain for instructional designers in terms of knowledge about the subject matter they are teaching and about how their learners learn it. Participants will be able to apply this approach immediately to program an instructional sequence of their own and will meet the workshop objectives listed below. Rather than answering the question "How do I teach skill x?" (where the answer is a specific technique), this workshop will answer the question "How do I design instruction for skill x so that I am confident that I am teaching skill x effectively and systematically?"
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to apply the non-linear programming process to specific instructional examples provided by the instructors and transfer that process to novel examples. Specifically, participants will (1) perform a basic content analysis, state instructional objectives, and create/evaluate relevant criterion tests; (2) determine necessary entry behavior; (3) design a meaningful instruction sequence; (4) analyze performance data and use them to adjust instruction; and (5) suggest ways to maintain learner behavior throughout the instructional sequence. Participants should be able to utilize formative evaluation within an iterative development process to create effective programs.
Activities: The workshop includes short presentations by instructors followed by hands-on activities in which participants will analyze and design components of an instructional program and receive feedback from the instructors. The workshop will also include small-group discussion in which participants will analyze performance data and recommend instructional changes and compare and contrast different potential solutions to a problem in programming instruction.
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, teachers, trainers, educators, and others interested in or involved in the design of instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): formative evaluation, instructional design, program development
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervisor Training that Meets the BACB Training Requirements for Supervisors, Part II
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W182 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Parts I and II of this workshop will provide 9 CEs of supervisor training that meets the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s requirements to provide supervision, as specified in their Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline document (available at BACB.com). “After December 31, 2014, only individuals who complete a training experience based on this curriculum outline will be permitted to supervise individuals pursuing the BCBA or BCaBA credentials or practicing BCaBAs.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to:
  1. The supervisor should be able to describe the 6 reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision.
  2. The supervisor should be able to describe the 5 potential outcomes of ineffective supervision.
  3. The supervisor should be able to describe or demonstrate the 12 components of effective, evidence-based supervision.
  4. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the 8 components of behavioral skills training of the supervisee.
  5. The supervisor should be able to describe the 4 formats for providing behavioral skills training with individuals and groups of supervisees.
  6. The supervisor should be able to apply behavioral skills training across relevant skill areas including, but not limited to those outlined in the task list.
  7. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the three components of performance feedback.
  8. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 ways of providing feedback.
  9. The supervisor should be able to describe the 3 methods to evaluate supervisory effectiveness.
  10. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 methods for his/her ongoing professional development as a supervisor.
  11. The supervisor should be able to describe the 7 methods for the ongoing professional development of the supervisee.
Activities: The workshop will provide a variety of learning activities and tests necessary to teach participants the supervisors skills specified in the BACB’s objectives.
Audience: This two-part workshop is for supervisors “of those who deliver behavior-analytic services and those who are pursuing BACB certification” and will satisfy the BACB training requirement for BCBA supervisors. Attend this workshop to meet the BACB’s new training requirement for BCBA supervisors and earn 9 CEs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Analysis, Data-Based Process, Learning Efficiency, Supervision
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Procedural Integrity of Clinical Programming in Applied Settings
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W176c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Helena L. Maguire, M.S.
HELENA L. MAGUIRE (Melmark New England), AMANDA KENNEDY (Melmark New England), SILVA ORCHANIAN (Regular Affiliate Member), PATRICIA A. FINNEY (Melmark New England)
Description: The clinical effectiveness of a behavior support plan relies not only on the technological sophistication of the written plan, but also on the ability of direct service staff to accurately and consistently implement the behavior support plan. This workshop will present the staff training, supervisory training, and performance monitoring systems for clinical programming that have evolved over the past 15 years at Melmark New England, a private, not-for-profit, community-based organization serving children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, acquired brain injury, neurological diseases and disorders, dual diagnoses, and severe challenging behaviors. Following a review of the OBM literature on effective systems development, workshop participants will review sample training schedules, training protocols, performance monitoring tools, and procedures for training supervisors to implement these systems. The goal of this workshop will be to provide participants with systems to ensure competent and accurate implementation of clinical programs from a direct service staff person's first day on the job.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the components of an effective staff training program, (2) develop training schedules and select training protocols for sample clients, (3) accurately score sample performance monitoring tools after viewing video samples of work performance, and (4) identify the components of training systems necessary for supervisory staff.
Activities: Short lecture, case studies, guided practice with feedback.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as new supervisors or individuals with the responsibility of training or overseeing the training of direct service staff and development of supervisory training programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Generalization: Don't Put It on the Back Burner
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W184a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lauren Kryzak, M.A.
LAUREN KRYZAK (Above and Beyond Learning Group), CHRISTEN RUSSELL (Above and Beyond Learning Group), JENNIFER CAROLAN (Above and Beyond Learning Group)
Description: This workshop focuses on teaching practitioners how to promote generalization when teaching individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Stokes and Baer (1977) issued a call to action for behavior analysts to view generalization as an active process. Despite empirically supported methods to promote generalization, such as multiple exemplar training or self-management, many applied settings still struggle to program and/or test for generalization. Five domains where researchers have used evidence-based strategies to promote generalization will be discussed; these are social skills, language acquisition, behavior reduction, community behavior, and joint attention. Five systems in which change can be made to promote generalization will be reviewed; these are parent training, programming common stimuli, staff training, peer behavior, and treatment integrity checks. Attendees will then be guided to collectively develop 10 practical applications to promote generalization across applied settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the different types of generalization, to promote fluency in speaking about generalization to others (because to get it done, you're going to have to talk about it—a lot); (2)identify empirically based examples of generalization; (3) discuss some system-wide changes that can help achieve the mission of promoting generalization; and (4)identify some pragmatic ideas for getting it done.
Activities: A bound workbook for note-taking, brainstorming, and completion of the exercises. Development of skill acquisition and/or behavior reduction procedures that promote generalization with templates provided to attendees on an individual flash drive.
Audience: BCBAs, licensed psychologists, home- and school-based ABA providers, graduate students, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, generalization
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
From Stabilization to Generalization: The Role and Importance of Behavior Analysis in All Phases of Post-Acute Interdisciplinary Treatment Planning With Survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W184bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Chris M. Schaub, M.Ed.
CHRISTINA M. PETERS (University of Nevada, Reno), CHRIS M. SCHAUB (ReMed), KEVIN ERDNER (ReMed), JIM CONWAY (ReMed)
Description: The workshop will include an overview of behavior analytic philosophy, principles, and procedures toward developing effective interventions for specific target behaviors as well as more broadly developing and implementing comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment programs for individuals with intensive neurobehavioral needs, including aggression, elopement, resistance, dual diagnosis, etc. The primary focus is to present information that will help clinicians and others identify and prioritize treatment plan elements that are essential to integrated, comprehensive neurobehavioral rehabilitation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) demonstrate beginning knowledge of the complex medical, behavioral, and cognitive sequelae associated with survivors of TBI with co-occurring issues; (2) describe the phases of post-acute TBI programming, from stabilization, evaluation, and treatment to discharge planning, preparation, and transition; (3) identify the ways in which the role of the behavior analyst can impact interdisciplinary treatment at all phases of planning and implementation; (4) describe how key behavior analytic concepts and principles can be incorporated into each phase of neurobehavioral programming; and (5) demonstrate a beginning knowledge of the behavior analytic model established by the presenters to guide interdisciplinary team efforts to integrate, prioritize, and program for this challenging population.
Activities: The presenters will provide an overview of ReMed's neurobehavioral population and services, followed by an in-depth discussion of the philosophy and programming that have been developed for this population. Attendees will participate in a hands-on activity designed to review relevant behavior analytic concepts, principles, and procedures and learn how and when each is used within the model to guide the interdisciplinary treatment. Participants will practice implementing the model presented via analysis and discussion of specific case examples to demonstrate application of basic concepts, principles, and tools.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists,as well asbehavior analysts and/or interdisciplinary treatment team members currently working or interested in working with survivors of traumatic brain injury with complex neurobehavioral sequelae.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Brain Injury, Interdisciplinary team,, Neurobehavioral, Rehabilitation
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Measuring Fidelity: How Fidelity Measures Have Evolved in ABA Research and Current Applications for Direct Observation Measures to Ensure Implementation Fidelity of EBPs for Toddler Behavior Issues
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TBA/CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Shelley Clarke, M.A.
MICHELLE A. DUDA (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), SHELLEY CLARKE (University of South Florida)
Description: This workshop will provide an overview of the rationale for more precise and accurate measurement and implementation of the independent variable. This includes ensuring proper documentation and accountability by linking assessment to intervention. The content of the workshop will reflect the current interest in implementation science within applied research that also relates to recent legislative requirements concerning treatment integrity. Presenters will introduce the body of literature within applied behavior analysis that has promoted the need for measurement beyond change in the independent variable. Treatment integrity will be described both from the conceptual and practical viewpoint. Case studies demonstrating implementation measures and direct instruction in how to develop fidelity tools for researchers, teachers, and parents for early childhood studies will be shared.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define and describe the elements of treatment integrity and procedural fidelity, (2) describe the importance of including treatment integrity measures within applied studies, and (3) identify practical approaches to developing treatment integrity measures supplemented with actual case studies.
Activities: The workshop will include an overview of implementation literature in the field of applied research, as well as sharing case studies from the field of intervention research that include measures of treatment integrity via videotape. Participants will be instructed in how to measure treatment integrity and practice with video in small group format, as well as how to develop treatment integrity measures for their own use in the field. Participants will be provided with structured group discussion about individual measures developed. Question and answer discussion with presenters will also be provided.
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, researchers, behavioral consultants, program developers, and purveyors who may be involved in conducting applied intervention research.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Skinner's Verbal Behavior, Chomsky's Review, and the Naming Account
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W175b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Marleen T. Adema, Ph.D.
MARLEEN T. ADEMA (Independent Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D))
Description: This workshop gives an introduction to Skinner's view on verbal behavior and its acquisition. His functional approach will be described, including the verbal operants he distinguished. These verbal operants (e.g., mand, tact, intraverbal) now have an important role within applied work with children with developmental delays. Skinner's (1957) book Verbal Behavior was heavily criticized by Chomsky (1959) in a lengthy review. Chomsky's critical comments will be discussed, as well as responses by behavior analysts. Chomsky's review was and is seen by some as having defeated Skinner and having terminated all work in the area of verbal behavior. But Skinner's book continues to influence both applied and experimental work. One example of this is experimental work on naming. Horne and Lowe's (1996) naming account will be described, and an overview will be given of research that tested this account. Implications of the naming account and naming research with typically developing children for verbal interventions in populations with learning disabilities will also be noted.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define verbal behavior; (2) distinguish Skinner's functional account from the linguists' structural approach to language; (3) distinguish between the verbal operants; (4) identify implications of Skinner's account of verbal behavior for applied behavior analysis; (5) describe the main points of Chomsky's review; (6) describe the main points of behavior analytic responses to Chomsky; (7) define the name relation and specify the characteristics of the naming account; (8) judge whether the naming account has provided any testable predictions; (9) identify whether the naming account has generated any research and, if so, evaluate whether results are in line with the naming account; and (10) identify possible implications of the naming account for applied behavior analysis.
Activities: Participants will listen to presentations on the topics outlined above, including research data, and take part in discussions of and exercises in the analysis of verbal behavior. Examples of verbal behavior will be provided through video. Precision teaching methods will be used to measure learning.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and anyone else seeking an introduction (or refresher) to Skinner's book Verbal Behavior, Chomsky's review, and naming.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Chomsky's Review, Naming Account, VB Applications, Verbal Behavior
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Improving Acquisition of Intraverbal Language Skills: The Role of Verbal Conditional Discriminations
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W187ab (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.)
Description: In order to engage in effective conversational interactions (i.e., non-rote intraverbal responses), individuals must acquire verbal conditional discriminations (VBCDs). But often the prerequisite skills for such discriminations are missing, making it difficult to learn complex language responses. Furthermore, certain instructional formats and sequences may inadvertently impede the acquisition of these critical discriminations. In this workshop, Dr. Esch will discuss and give examples of VBCDs and their prerequisite component skills. In addition, she will provide many examples of instructional worksheets, templates, and data sheets to show how instructional sequences can be arranged to aid VBCD skill acquisition.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define verbal conditional discriminations (VBCDs), (2) list prerequisite skills for acquiring complex intraverbal responses, and (3) describe several examples of instructional formats to promote acquisition of VBCDs.
Activities: Didactic instruction (lecture, videos).
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, speech pathologists, behavior analysts, teachers, clinical directors, program managers, or others responsible for creating and managing language acquisition programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): conditional discriminations, improving language, intraverbal skills, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: The Cipani Get Me Game for Children With ASD: Developing a Parental Repertoire
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W176a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ennio C. Cipani, Ph.D.
ENNIO C. CIPANI (National University), ALESSANDRA LYNN CIPANI (University of California, Riverside)
Description: Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a diverse group of learners: some comprehend language well, but can fail to perform even simple requests. One might say they are disinterested and lack "motivation" to follow adult directives. For others, spoken language seems like a jumble of incomprehensible sounds. I have devised a two-phase structured skills training program that can be deployed by parents (and school personnel): the Cipani Get Me Game (GMG) is a structured training format to sequentially develop two sets of skills in children. It does so by developing the instructional repertoire of the parent(s). First, it is important for any child to be able to be responsive to instructions/directives given to him or her by a parent and/or teacher. In this game, instructional responsiveness is targeted as the sole objective in phase 1 (for both groups). Children with high functioning autism or other high incidence disabilities as well as children with severe and profound intellectual disabilities need such a skill. Therefore, phase 1 directly targets the child's ability to follow an instruction, irrespective of the language deficit in the child. In phase 2, the development of a progressive comprehension of language is the target.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) utilize a diagnostic test to determine language comprehension of a target child; (2) train a parent in the skill repertoire needed for phase 1 implementation of the Cipani GMG; (3) train a parent in the skill repertoire needed for phase 2 implementation of the Cipani GMG, including use of superimposition and stimulus fading of discriminative elements of verbal instruction; and (4) utilize a diagnostic test to determine when the child is able to acquire skills from a group instruction format.
Activities: In addition to the lecture, criterion-referenced test items measuring the attendees' understanding and comprehension of the procedures is embedded in the PowerPoint presentations. Also, to reiterate, role-playing demonstrations are plentiful throughout the training. Rehearsal of such procedures by attendees may be afforded (volunteer basis only, depending on time constraints). Handouts to facilitate training of parents will be provided.
Audience: BCBAs and licensed psychologists who are involved with in-home programs who also conduct parent training. This training is ideally suited for the attendee wanting to develop behavioral skills in a child's parent, starting with a structured training format for building instructional responsiveness to their directives.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
No More Diapers: Using a Behavioral Approach for Toilet Training Success!
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W185bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, Ph.D.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Barbera Behavior Consulting)
Description: Independent toileting is one of the most important life skills for children with autism and other disabilities. Whether a child is toilet trained impacts many areas of life including school placement options, access to childcare, and the ability to participate in some leisure activities. In this workshop, Dr. Barbera will review past and current literature in this area and will present the results of a 2013 toilet training survey she conducted of parents and caregivers. Participants will learn about using a behavioral approach to toilet training and the role of parents, therapists, and educators in the toilet training process. Strategies for assessing toileting needs, developing toilet training plans, implementation of research-based strategies, and the need for making data-based toileting decisions will be presented. Participants will leave the workshop with a Toilet Training Toolkit, which will include an assessment tool, sample data sheets, and strategies to start or re-start toilet training immediately with a variety of children.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) discuss the pertinent toilet training literature; (2) state the purpose and role of a toilet training manager; (3) state the three steps usually needed for toilet training and discuss the reasons why dry pants checks and positive practice have often not been utilized in recent years; and (4) complete forms including the assessment form, plan, and data sheets.
Activities: Lecture, video review, role-playing, and small group activities.
Audience: The primary audience for this workshop is BCBAs, licensed psychologists, and educators. Direct therapists, students, parents, and anyone involved or interested in toilet training are also welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Building General Repertoires for Children With Autism: Instruction That Adds Value
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W176c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jacquelyn M. MacDonald, M.S.
JACQUELYN M. MACDONALD (The New England Center for Children), KELLY L. MCCONNELL (The New England Center for Children), RENEE C. MANSFIELD (The New England Center for Children), CHATA A. DICKSON (The New England Center for Children)
Description: Behavior change is helpful to an individual only to the extent that this change is seen across relevant environments. Although the importance of the generality of behavior change has been emphasized by behavior analysts for more than four decades, there remains work to be done to encourage practitioners to apply recommended methods to improve learners' performance across settings, and to support them in this application. In this workshop we will (1) discuss the meaning of the terms "generalization," "generality," and "general repertoire"; (2) discuss the importance of considerations of use as part of the initial planning for teaching a skill; (3) review strategies for establishing general repertoires; and (4) facilitate exercises whereby attendees will practice these strategies. Strategies to be discussed include those offered by Stokes and Baer in 1977, as well as general case analysis, matrix training, and generalization mapping. Skill areas specifically addressed will include observational learning, imitation, community skills, and social skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the differences in meaning between the terms "generalization," "generality," and "general repertoire"; (2) identify skills that could meet the criteria for behavioral cusp, as defined by Bosch and Fuqua (2001); (3) explain why it is important to plan for generalization from the start of instruction; (4) conduct a general case analysis; (5) design a matrix for matrix training; (6) define observational learning and distinguish it from imitation; and (7) describe a strategy for teaching a student to learn from observing another.
Activities: This workshop will include a balance of lecture, workbook activities, sharing in dyads, practicing skills discussed in the lecture with assistance and feedback, and sharing work with the larger group.
Audience: The target audience is teachers, practitioners of applied behavior analysis, licensed psychologists, and BCBAs (especially those in the first 5 years of their practice).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Autism Education, Generality, Generalization
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing an Adult Program to Provide a Meaningful Adulthood for Individuals More Impaired by Autism
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W181b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Martineau, Ed. S.
ELIZABETH MARTINEAU (Nashoba Learning Group), HEATHER M. BAIROS (Nashoba Learning Group), STEPHANIE DANIELS (Nashoba Learning Group), TOM PETRINI (Nashoba Learning Group), JESSICA TILLEY (Nashoba Learning Group)
Description: As the incidence of autism has increased over the last decades, high quality ABA programs have grown to meet the needs of a sizable segment of the school-aged population impaired by autism. However, the legal imperative to educate all individuals, and the funding available to do so, ceases when individuals turn 21 or 22 (depending on the state). As the young adults with moderate to severe autism who have received quality ABA school programming begin to turn 22 in increasing numbers, solutions need to be developed to allow these individuals to realize their potential and use the skills they have gained to participate in meaningful work, community engagement, continued life skills development, and recreation and leisure activities. For the majority of these individuals continuation of skilled and comprehensive behavior support is required to allow meaningful participation in activities. Nashoba Learning Group (NLG) developed and launched Adult Day and Work Programs in March of 2013 in Massachusetts to efficiently and effectively provide the support these individuals need for a successful adulthood. Our program is growing rapidly and is serving our graduates as well as graduates of other local ABA school programs. This workshop will review the design of NLG's adult program, including curriculum and activities, staffing, behavior plan development, and sample annual goals and objectives. We will review our operating expenses and how we have worked with public and private sources to fund our program. Activities required to develop and start up a program will be outlined as well as challenges that we have faced. The workshop is designed for individuals interested in creating adult programs and in providing services to adults as well as for individuals serving those of transition age who wish to optimize instruction to provide the best preparation for adulthood.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the steps required to create an adult program, (2) discuss key success factors, (3) identify the funding needed to start and maintain a quality program, (4) describe how to reconcile the costs of providing a quality program with available resources, (5) identify a workable design for program activities, and (6) identify behavior management plan priorities.
Activities: Participants will engage in a variety of activities throughout the workshop. We will begin with an overview of NLG's adult program and activities provided to adults. We will review the workplan needed to achieve program launch and the ongoing activities required for program success. The need for fundraising and strong cost negotiation with funding agencies will be reviewed. Critical success factors for the program will be identified. Participants will see video of participants engaged in activities and review and receive copies of template documents, such as behavior management plans and annual goals and objectives.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BCBA-level clinical directors, as well as program administrators and licensed psychologists. Presenters will assume that participants are familiar with a variety of ABA techniques and with individualized curriculum design and behavior plan development. Participants should have a strong interest in developing adult programs that provide participants with meaningful work, community, and life skills development activities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Adult programs, Adults, life skills, work supp0rt
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Practical Strategies for Teaching Higher Order Social Skills to Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W179a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
CECILIA KNIGHT (Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD)), JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: One of the defining features of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a marked impairment in the ability to engage in social interactions with others. The development of appropriate and successful social behaviors is often one of the most critical yet challenging skill repertoires for individuals with ASD to establish. This is especially true for higher order social skills such as detecting and responding to subtle social cues, engaging in reciprocal conversations, understanding humor, and negotiating compromise. This workshop will provide instructors with practical strategies for teaching higher order social skills. Discussion will include a review of specific advanced social behaviors that are commonly problematic for individuals with ASD, as well as ABA instructional strategies that utilize both contingency-based teaching and rule-governed behavior training. Examples of teaching methodologies for a variety of higher order social skills will be presented, including video clip demonstration of techniques commonly effective with ASD learners. Small group training activities will also be conducted to allow for direct rehearsal of targeted instructional strategies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify common higher order social skill deficits exhibited by individuals with autism spectrum disorder, (2) identify effective ABA teaching procedures for higher order social skills training utilizing both contingency-based and rule-governed behavior instruction, (3) demonstrate several ABA instructional strategies for higher order social skills training, and (4) identify beneficial tips for effective social skills instruction and common mistakes to avoid.
Activities: Workshop format will include lecture, small and whole group discussion, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, clinicians, teachers, and therapists interested in teaching advanced social skills and social language skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Parents and graduate students may also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): advanced instruction, social communication, social skills
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Perspective Taking to Individuals With Autism: Research and Practical Strategies
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W183c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adel C. Najdowski, Ph.D.
ADEL C. NAJDOWSKI (Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD)), ANGELA M. PERSICKE (Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD))
Description: Perspective-taking skills are crucial for successful social interactions, yet children with autism spectrum disorders often have difficulty with perspective taking, including detecting what others are thinking, feeling, and wanting, as well as interpreting their use of nonliteral language (e.g., deception, sarcasm, and disguised mands). This seminar will (1) briefly touch upon the influence of relational frame theory (RFT) in the assessment and treatment of perspective taking (please note this is not an RFT workshop), (2) provide a review of behavioral research for training skills in this area, and (3) present practical strategies and curriculum targets for teaching this repertoire.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the basics of how RFT relates to perspective taking, (2) identify key components of a comprehensive perspective-taking curriculum, (3) identify prerequisites for teaching perspective-taking skills, and (4) identify behavioral procedures with empirical support for teaching perspective-taking skills.
Activities: Participants will review research, watch videos, identify which deficit areas exist for presented vignettes, and discuss strategies for intervention.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinicians interested in delivering intervention for perspective taking to children and adolescents with autism, including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists. Schoolteachers and administrators, parents, researchers, professors, and graduate students would also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, perspective taking
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Improving Classroom Behavior Support Practices Through Applied Behavior Analysis for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W183b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (May Institute), MEGAN R. JOY (May Institute)
Description: This workshop will provide behavior analysts with an evidence-based approach to designing effective classroom interventions for students with ASD. It includes the use of functional assessment as a method to systematically evaluate the classroom environment in order to design, implement, and evaluate effective classroom-wide behavioral support practices. Once the environment is assessed, the model incorporates both indirect (i.e., lecture, written training materials) and direct (i.e., modeling, performance feedback) instruction. Finally, participants will learn how teachers participate in a data-based decision making process in order to establish more effective practices, procedures, and interactions with students. Data will be presented supporting the need for a comprehensive training method that includes both indirect and direct instruction for teachers to adequately implement classroom-wide behavior support practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices with students with ASD; (2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in classroom-wide behavior support practices; (3) use a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices; and (4) use instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on-task behavior.
Activities: Participants will have an opportunity to engage in discussions with other behavior analysts, analyze sample data, draw conclusions about relevant classroom-wide interventions, and role-play providing effective performance feedback to educational staff.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as behavior analysts who provide training and consultation to schoolteachers or paraprofessionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Classroom, General Education, Inclusion
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Why Typical Peers Matter: Evidence-based Practices
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W184a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Inc.)
Description: Students who are placed in self-contained classrooms or segregated private schools have limited opportunities to be with typical peers (Cammuso, 2011). Experts continue to debate the value of inclusion and which placement is best to educate students with autism. As our goal is to teach students to be independent and contributing members of society, they require opportunities for inclusion (Wagner, 2000). This workshop presents examples of how typical peers can make a positive and meaningful difference in students' lives by engaging with them in simple, everyday skills. Participants will be taught simple strategies to help students with autism learn skills from typical peers. The presenters will demonstrate how to set up three types of peer modeling in inclusion programs or to adapt video modeling programs for students who have limited access to typical peers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify simple opportunities and strategies to maximize interactions between students with autism and typical peers, (2) apply successful intervention strategies to increase language and behavioral skills for students with autism via typical peer models, and (3) measure behavior changes relating to specific intervention and treatment to gauge the effectiveness of typical peer models as related to content area 9 (behavior change procedures) of the BACB task list; these include the following: 9-26—use language acquisition/communication training procedures, 9-27—use self-management strategies, 9-28—use behavior change procedures to promote stimulus and response generalization, and 9-29—use behavior change procedures to promote maintenance.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, video examples, and step-by-step guided practice to set up three different types of social skills programs for a variety of learners from beginners to those with more sophisticated social skills.
Audience: BCBAs, special education teachers, licensed psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, evidence based, peer model
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Science of Effective Learning Environments: The Importance of Stimulus Control for Students With Autism
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W185d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners in Learning, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LAUREN DEGRAZIA (Partners in Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. RZEMYK (Partners in Learning, Inc.), NICOLE PEASE (Partners in Learning, Inc.)
Description: Many educators struggle with how to teach the learner with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Traditional educational settings often fail to structure classrooms that minimize errors and maximize success for ASD students. Teaching staff may attempt to prompt correct responses, yet fail to establish the environmental antecedent as a discriminative stimulus; thus, these discrete skills fail to generalize into applied, independent behavior. Acquisition rates are low in these settings, while prompting rates and dependency on supports remain high. Despite the use of rewards and corrections in these ineffective classes, the properties for operant behavior change via reinforcement and punishment procedures are not in place. This workshop provides participants with a structured tutorial for classroom applications on how to establish stimulus control, identify antecedent events, and best provide procedures for stimulus discrimination learning. The workshop addresses other key processes for effective learning environments, such as stimulus generalization, the forming of stimulus classes, and the role stimulus equivalence plays in higher order processes such as social behavior. In addition, this tutorial helps participants identify possible barriers to establishing stimulus control, such as masking and overshadowing. The distinction between stimulus prompts and response prompts and their effects on learning rates are examined.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify key processes for effective learning environments; (2) apply methods to establish stimulus control, stimulus generalization, forming stimulus classes, and stimulus equivalence to classroom learning situations; (3) identify possible barriers to establishing stimulus control and use techniques discussed to minimize those effects on skill acquisition; and (4) distinguish between stimulus prompts and response prompts to better address the needs of students.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, video demonstrations, and materials for identifying effective learning strategies and possible barriers to skill acquisition.
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, behavior consultants, classroom teachers, and child study team case managers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W175b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (California Consulting and Research Institute), VANESSA STOUT HUAMAN (360 Core Studio)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppen's (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppen's (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, they will be taught how to assess URT using the BRS.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) position his/her own body in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT); (2) write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in his/her own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors; (3) give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures; and (4) observe, record, and assess another individual's performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS).
Activities: Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological and physical disorders, and Poppen's (1998) development of Behavioral Relaxation Training and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale. Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically. Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other nine relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as a model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time. Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each participant individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback. Criterion Tests: Take URT Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Take BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Assessment: Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers, including the instructor, will simultaneously score the BRS for the model.
Audience: The target audience includes licensed psychologists and practitioners certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board at the doctoral (BCBA-D), master's (BCBA), or bachelor's (BCaBA) degree levels and who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals with traumatic brain injury or developmental disabilities; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of "stress." Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, clinical behavior analysis, family and child therapy, and/or health and fitness training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): mindfulness, relaxation, self-control, stress management
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Children With Behavioral and Emotional Disorders: Integrating Emotional and Moral Behaviors to Promote Generalization
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W179b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional treatment for children with emotional and behavioral problems often follows the medical model with the assumption that behavioral symptoms are the result of underlying psychopathology. In contrast, behavior analysts conduct observations of behavior in a variety of settings to determine the effect of stimulus conditions and setting events, functional assessments to determine the causes and maintainers of behaviors, and careful analysis of learning histories to determine the efficacy of specific reinforcers and punishers. Behavioral treatment facilities for these children often use a contingency-based focus when teaching appropriate behavior that works well for managing children's behavior in a structured setting where individuals follow through with predictable contingencies. However, these children are often not prepared to function in a generalized setting where they are expected to respond to a relationship-based focus for dealing with problem behavior. Additionally, although they may have learned social, academic, and vocational skills, they may be lacking in emotional and moral skills. The presenter will discuss the impact that learning history has on current behavior and ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based and focus on emotional and moral skills. Case examples will be provided, along with opportunities to get feedback on the cases of participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) name several emotional and immoral behaviors of children and adolescents who are diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders, (2) tell how the learning histories of children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders affect their emotional and moral behaviors, (3) describe several behavioral techniques that can be used to treat children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders, (4) explain the limits of typical behavioral interventions and suggest alternative interventions that can be used to treat children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders, and (5) describe how to apply these techniques to assist children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders in professional settings.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools, and community settings; take notes; ask questions; view a PowerPoint presentation; present their own cases for feedback; and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants may include BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers, and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities, or typically developing children who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): EMOTIONAL BEHAVIORS, EMOTIONAL DISORDERS
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: A Contextual Model for Promoting Quality of Life in Elderly Persons With Dementia
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jane E. Fisher, Ph.D.
JANE E. FISHER (University of Nevada, Reno), CYNDY SOTO (University of Nevada, Reno), ALEXANDROS MARAGAKIS (University of Nevada, Reno), OLGA CIRLUGEA (University of Nevada, Reno), SUSAN LONGCHAMP (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: Cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia produce devastating losses to the behavioral repertoires of older adults. Older adults with dementia are frequently under the care of family members, including spouses and adult children. Family caregivers of persons with dementia are faced with significant and frequent caregiving challenges as a result of the changes to the older adult's behavioral repertoire. This presentation will describe a contextual model for promoting the behavioral health and quality of life of persons with dementia and their family caregivers. Presenters will describe the application of behavior analysis strategies useful for working with elderly persons with dementia and their family caregivers. Recent research on factors that contribute to excess disability in older adults with dementia and strategies for detecting and preventing behavioral and cognitive decline due to reversible adverse events in older adults with dementia will be reviewed. The workshop will include videotaped examples to illustrate material. This will include examples of typical behaviors, possible caregiver responses, and demonstration of effective techniques.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) articulate current issues in the treatment of persons with dementia; (2) cite empirical evidence from pharmacological and psychosocial research supporting a restraint-free model of care;(3) identify assessment and treatment strategies consistent with a restraint-free, contextual model of care; and (4) describe the relevance of the contextual model for the use of psychotropic drugs in persons with dementia.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: This workshop will appeal to a broad audience. Attendance will be appropriate for BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and others who wish to gain exposure to the application of behavioral principles to the care of elderly persons with dementia.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Behavioral Monitoring, Caregiving, Dementia
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Responding to Ethical Dilemmas in Everyday Practice
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W175a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rebecca Thompson, Ph.D.
REBECCA THOMPSON (Wisconsin Early Autism Project, Inc.), MARY HOPTON-SMITH (Wisconsin Early Autism Project, Inc.)
Description: This intermediate-level workshop will provide participants with the opportunity to practice applying the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts to ethical dilemmas that arise in the everyday practice of applied behavior analysis. After briefly reviewing the BACB guidelines, participants will break up into small groups to review case scenarios, identify which guidelines are relevant to each scenario, and discuss how they would respond to the ethical dilemmas in each scenario. The small discussion groups will then report back to the entire group to compare their responses to each scenario. This workshop is intended to be interactive and assumes that participants are already familiar with the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts. The presenters will have case scenarios prepared for the workshop, but participants are also invited to come prepared with scenarios they would like to discuss with the group.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe each of the guidelines in the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts, (2)identify which guidelines are relevant to a specific ethical dilemma, and (3) describe responses to ethical dilemmas that are consistent with the BACB guidelines.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through guided practice and group discussion.
Audience: Licensed psychologists, BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA candidates, and ABA clinicians.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Novel Approach to Parent Training: Establishing Critical Discrimination and Responding Repertoires
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W175c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
STEVEN RIVERS (Beacon ABA Services), ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), DENA SHADE-MONUTEAUX (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: Parent training procedures can often require significant hours of clinician time to develop and implement. Once target skills are acquired, the parents do not always demonstrate generalization of the skills across behavioral topographies. An analysis of parent repertoires suggests that what parents are lacking may be three critical skills. The first is the ability to reliably discriminate correct and incorrect responses (appropriate from inappropriate behavior). The second is the ability to identify what is and is not a reinforcing response to their child. Last is the ability to demonstrate the discrimination and performance response successively (discriminate when to deliver reinforcement and then the actual delivery or withholding of reinforcement under the discriminated conditions). This workshop uses a behavioral skills training approach to teach participants how to establish the critical discrimination repertoires and the performance repertoire necessary for parents to effectively manage challenging behavior, reinforce adaptive behavior and do it more critically, and respond to novel behavioral situations. In this model, parents are required to demonstrate the target discriminations across a wide range of adapted and problem behavior to competency prior to moving to the next treatment phase. Efficacy data will be presented, video exemplars will be shown, and sample materials will be provided to participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe critical parent discrimination skills associated with high levels of correct program implementation, (2) describe procedures to teach parents to correctly discriminate between adaptive/desired and maladaptive/undesired behaviors, and (3) develop examples of discrimination training repertoires for parents.
Activities: I. Introductions—background/service model II. Discussion points on the importance/relevance of parent training—(A) review of this training's main focus, (B) critical components of this training model (correct/incorrect, deliver/withhold), and (C) movement through phases contingent on performance for each phase of treatment III. Participant criteria—(A) parent's ability to participate in training session, (B) consent to be videotaped (potential for review), and (C) target behavior maintained by attention IV. Description of treatment phases of parent training model—(A) pre-test (baseline), (B) treatment conditions 1. phases 1–3, and (C) post-test V. Creation of interval data sheets for pre- and post-test phases VI. Creation of data sheets (step by step) for treatment phases—(A) identify target behavior(s) with definitions (for parents and staff) for reference, (B) list child/observer/date/phase/defined characteristics of phase, and (C) trial number, program, target, child/staff responses with definitions VII. Review/identify table-top activity for discrete trial training (DTT) VIII. Format of training sessions—(A) materials required (data sheets, writing instruments, token boards, clipboards, video camera, DTT materials, reinforcers), (B) pre-session set-up and discussions with parent, (C) in-vivo discussion (feedback and check-in regarding trial number), (D) trials conducted per session, and (E) post-session discussions IX. Review video exemplars X. Group role-play with practice data sheets XI. Material packet distribution XII. Data review of past participants (ease of use, rapid acquisition, reductions observed in target behavior) XIII. Questions/discussion
Audience: Practicing behavior analysts (including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists) who provide home-based services and struggle with changing the behavior of parents with respect to behavioral interventions and implementation of teaching procedures.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Discrimination Training, Parent Training
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Essential for Living: A Functional Skills Curriculum With the Essential Eight Skills and the Speaker Initiative
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates)
Description: Essential for Living is a communication, behavior, and functional skills assessment, curriculum, and professional practitioner's handbook for children and adults with moderate to severe disabilities, including autism. Dr. McGreevy will help participants to improve the quality of their instruction and behavior management by teaching the Essential Eight Skills and the steps and goals of the Speaker Initiative.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe when and how to teach must-have functional skills to learners with developmental disabilities; (2) select an alternative, primary method of speaking for non-verbal learners; (3) develop more functional IEPs and ISPs; and (4) measure and document small increments of learner progress.
Activities: Dr. McGreevy will describe the Essential Eight Skills, the Speaker Initiative, and other aspects of Essential for Living. He will also provide in-person and videotaped demonstrations, along with specific exercises for participants.
Audience: The target audience is behavior analysts, including BACB certificants; psychologists, teachers; residential coordinators; and speech-language pathologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Just Do What I Said! Using Performance Engineering to Improve Consultative Practice
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W176b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Steven Celmer, M.A.
STEVEN CELMER (Virginia Commonwealth University), BLAKE GRIDER (Quality Behavior Solutions, Inc.)
Description: How many times have you been in a consultative relationship and given evidence-based recommendations that will benefit a client only to come back a few weeks later and find that hardly any of your recommendations have been completed? Is it because the employees have a poor work ethic? Or perhaps they've been poorly trained? While these would be easy excuses to make, the answer to these questions is almost always "no." The employees' performance is simply a product of their environment and the contingencies in place. In this workshop, participants will improve their consultative repertoire by learning how to analyze performance and deliberately "engineer" it to achieve their goals. Participants will be given scenarios and asked to pinpoint the environmental sources of poor performance, design solutions specifically tailored to address the case of the problem, and plan for evaluating the effectiveness of those interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) evaluate whether a "performance issue" is worth pursuing within the context of overall consultative goals; (2) use a systematic method to identify the causes of performance issues as deficits in environmental accommodations, effective consequences, or skill training; (3) identify appropriate and tailored solutions that will address the core of performance issues; (4) decide which solutions will be the most practical to pursue given the specific consultative setting; and (5) decide upon measures of improvement to collect that will inform potential changes needed to improve intervention effectiveness and efficiency.
Activities: Workshop activities will include (1) presentation of core content through a blend of informative lecture and case studies and (2) practice with the presented analysis rubric through group evaluation of performance scenarios and discussion of participants' current performance-engineering projects.
Audience: This workshop will be of interest to individuals working in consultative roles in the fields of education and developmental disabilities, including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists. The workshop's primary focus is the professional whose role is to consult with others but who, due to this consultative position, has less control over organizational outcomes because of a lack of direct influence over clients. Examples and discussion will primarily revolve around consultation in educational settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Consultation, Developmental Disabilities, Education, Performance Management
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics Through Interactive Teams
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W182 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: R. Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University), R. WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Description: For a professional to behave in an ethical fashion, she or he needs at least three skill sets: (1) familiarity with the ethical standards that are pertinent to her or his profession (e.g, the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts); (2) skills in evaluating everyday professional activities to determine whether they comply with or violate ethical guidelines; and (3) problem-solving and communication skills to tactfully confront and effectively resolve real-world ethical challenges. This workshop will focus on the second and third of these skill sets. Using a team learning approach and real-life examples provided by workshop attendees, participants will develop, rehearse, and receive coaching on strategies to confront and resolve ethical challenges that they encounter in their professional practice. Participants should be prepared to describe an ethical challenge that they have encountered and to do so in a manner that protects the identify of those involved in the ethical issue.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) use the BACB ethics guidelines to evaluate real-world ethical challenges and develop strategies to manage ethical challenges, (2) use communication strategies and other techniques to resolve ethical dilemmas, and (3) evaluate and use constructive feedback from workshop leaders and attendees.
Activities: Working in teams of five to six, participants will identify an ethical challenge and develop a brief skit that depicts a strategy to confront and resolve that ethical challenge. Workshop leaders and other attendees will offer constructive suggestions to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of their efforts to resolve ethical challenges.
Audience: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have BACB credentials and wish to (1) hone their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges and (2) acquire CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in acquiring competence in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world challenges and resolving ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Good Learner Repertoires
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W181a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Steven J. Ward, M.A.
STEVEN J. WARD (Whole Child Consulting LLC), TERESA A. GRIMES (Whole Child Consulting LLC)
Description: A variety of assessments and curricula address important skills, such as daily living skills, language, and academic repertoires. Some students progress very well through these curricula, and others do not. What are the differences between those students who learn efficiently and those who do not? The Inventory of Good Learner Repertoires (Ward, 2008) assesses the ways in which a student learns and, when paired with Teaching Good Learner Repertoires, guides teachers in individualized methods for developing strong learners. Participants in this workshop will learn to assess critical learner repertoires, to design and implement instruction on these repertoires, and to track student progress. Come and learn how to make your students easier to teach!
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify and assess learner repertoires for a student he or she knows; (2) gauge student effort, both subjectively and objectively; (3) select ideal targets for improving instructional efficiency; (4) use "dimensions grids" to isolate target repertoires; and (5) gather data on the development of learner repertoires and make appropriate programmatic decisions.
Activities: Lecture, video review, assessment of a specific learner with whom each participant is familiar, completion (and use) of "dimensions grids" to isolate target repertoires, and group case review.
Audience: This workshop is intended for experienced BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and teachers/specialists with a background in behavioral teaching techniques.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): instructional efficiency, learner repertoires, prompt acceptance
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Self-Management for a Better Tomorrow
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W181c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ryan Lee O'Donnell, M.S.
MARK MALADY (Brohavior; HSI/WARC), RYAN LEE O'DONNELL (Brohavior), SCOTT A. MILLER (University of Nebraska Medical Center), ANITA LI (Florida Institute of Technology), MARC D'ANTIN (Brohavior), NICHOLE L DAVIS (
Lodestone Academy
), MICHAEL FANTETTI (Western New England University, Brohavior  ), ALISON SZARKO (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: Self-management techniques are some of the strongest tools for achieving meaningful behavior change. Self-management can go from the personal level to the professional level and should be used by behavior analysts to facilitate effective behavior change across a wide range of phenomena. The current workshop aims to present the research foundation for using self-management in clinical practice and in daily life. Self-management techniques will be reviewed, and strategies for implementation to maintenance checks will be covered. The workshop will also teach learners how to recruit peers to assist in self-management projects, as well as to establish peer-support networks for projects. Participants will leave the workshop with new tools and at least five ideas for projects they can start and implement when they return to their natural environment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participants will be able to (1) select and utilize self-management procedures across various learners, (2) troubleshoot breakdowns in self-management protocols, and (3) conceptually design self-management procedures from a behavioral viewpoint.
Activities: Instructional formats of this workshop include a plethora of Ignite-style presentations, discussion, and small group breakouts. Workshop objectives will be met through instruction and—via small group breakout—practice selecting personal targets, creating monitoring networks, covering graphical displays and change markers, and learning to use a daily per-minute standard celeration chart.
Audience: This workshop is suitable for practitioners (human service professionals, BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and others) and students of behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Better Tomorrow, Real-World Change, Self-Management
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
BACB Experience Supervision: Preparing the Next Generation of Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W187ab (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lisa N. Britton, Ph.D.
LISA N. BRITTON (Spectrum Center), AMY CRYE (Spectrum Center), THELMISHA VINCENT (Spectrum Center), KATE MATEO ASIS (Spectrum Center)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to provide clarification and support to those who will be conducting BACB experience supervision and/or supervision of BCaBAs. This workshop has three main focus areas: (1) identifying the specific requirements for experience supervision outlined by the BACB, (2) discussing best practices in supervision within the human service industry, and (3) emphasizing the key elements of coaching and performance feedback in improving the skills of behavior analysts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) state the specific requirements for experience supervision identified by the BACB, including timelines for implementation; (2) engage in a coaching/performance feedback scenario with a partner; and (3) provide feedback to others on their coaching/performance feedback skills.
Activities: This workshop will incorporate a combination of instructional strategies including didactic delivery of information, guided notes, videos, discussion, and role-plays to practice key concepts.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BCBA and BCBA-D practitioners who are providing BACB experience supervision to others preparing for careers in behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Cultural Competence in Delivering ABA to Military Service Members, Veterans, and Their Families
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W187c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Kent Corso, Psy.D.
KENT CORSO (NCR Behavioral Health, LLC)
Description: This workshop delves deeply into military and veteran culture in order to help behavior analysts and assistant behavior analysts develop interventions that reflect client preferences, and carry social validity for this population. The workshop will cover the range of clinical problems currently experienced by military service members and veterans, with particular attention to how the experience of serving relates to these clinical sequelae. Attendees will learn about military values, terms, acronyms, and expressions and how to apply this knowledge to improve their understanding of the military and veteran cultural frame of reference (i.e., reinforcement history). Finally, attendees will learn how to practice with family members in a culturally competent manner, which has particular importance for those working with spouses or children of military members (e.g.,TRICARE ECHO Autism Demonstration Program). Attendees may earn three ethics continuing education units for BACB certificants and/or licensed psychologists.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define terms that are frequently used in military and veteran culture, (2) list the values that are widely embraced by military service members and veterans, (3) list specific methods of delivering applied behavior analysis that reflect military and veteran cultural values, (4) explain the behavioral etiology of many of the current post-deployment symptoms, and (5) describe specific actions behavior analysts and assistant behavior analysts can take to practice in a culturally competent way when working in the TRICARE ECHO Autism Demonstration Program.
Activities: Instructional strategies consist of didactic lecture, video presentation, discussion, and small group breakouts to apply the didactic information.
Audience: Behavior analysts (master's and doctoral level), assistant behavior analysts, and licensed psychologists who work within the TRICARE ECHO Autism Demonstration Program; anyone wishing to pursue work with this population; and those who desire ethics continuing education credits.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, cultural competence, ethics, military/veteran
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
On Becoming Fully Verbal
Saturday, May 24, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Gladys Williams, Ph.D.
GLADYS WILLIAMS (Centro de Investigacion y Ensenanza del Lenguaje), RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Self-employed)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to walk through the hierarchy of language acquisition. Research has shown that basic prerequisites greatly enhance an individual's ability to develop functional language. These skills include discriminating voices, face recognition, eye contact, and visual tracking. In this workshop we will provide an overview of the teaching procedures designed to develop an echoic repertoire and strengthen observational learning. We will discuss several strategies developed to bring vocal emissions under stimulus control. A strong repertoire of tacts is the core of conversation. This discussion will include some basic strategies for teaching tacts as well as a detailed outline of the rapid tacting protocol. In addition, we will teach the steps to develop the skills required to sequence events, structure conversations, and relay stories. In discussing the specific procedures we will highlight their importance in increasing an individual's tact repertoire. Building on that knowledge, we will introduce a structure for gradually increasing the sophistication and complexity of language with the goal of becoming fully verbal.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the basic protocols of prerequisite skills, (2) describe strategies designed to teach echoics, (3) describe strategies designed to teach tacts, (4) describe the role of secondary verbal operants, and (5) describe a hierarchy of complex language.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, and small group activities.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, teachers, consultants, ABA therapists, administrators, speech-language pathologists, and school personnel.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional communication, language, prerequisite skills, social competence
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

What's The Motivation?

Saturday, May 24, 2014
1:00 PM–1:50 PM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Steve Martin, None
Chair: Susan G. Friedman (Utah State University)
STEVE MARTIN (Natural Encounters, Inc.)
Steve Martin has been a master falconer for more than 45 years, a parrot trainer for 50 years, and began his professional animal-training career when he set up the first-of-its-kind, free-flight, educational bird show at the San Diego Wild Animal Park in 1976. Since then, he has produced or consulted on educational bird shows at more than 80 facilities in 15 countries. In 1984, Mr. Martin began teaching the science of behavior change to animal keepers at zoos and aquariums to enhance the husbandry, medical care, and enrichment of exhibit animals. He has now served as an animal behavior consultant for more than 50 zoological facilities in more than 20 countries. He also has served as a core team member of the California Condor Recovery Team. Currently, he currently an instructor at the Association of Zoos and Aquariums' Animal Training School; an instructor at the Elephant Training and Management School in Hamburg, Germany; a trustee with the World Parrot Trust; and president of Natural Encounters, Inc. (NEI), a company of more than 30 professional animal trainers. He earned his certification as a professional bird trainer and continues to teach workshops for professional animal trainers at the NEI training facility in Florida.
Abstract:

In this presentation, the construct of motivation will be explored. A motivated animal is operationalized as one who engages in the training dialogue with quick response to discriminative stimuli. Historically, force and coercion were the tools used to motivate animals in zoological settings. Fortunately, those methods are being replaced with more positive approaches. But, even with the current groundswell of positive reinforcement training in zoos, much mythology and poor training practices surround the need to motivate animals. These include putting the blame on the animal, misrepresenting scientific principals, as well as lowering animals' weights to unacceptable levels. Mr. Martin's experience has shaped a training technology, based on antecedent arrangement and positive reinforcement that allows him to successfully work with highly empowered animals. This success depends on approaches such as sensitive reading of body language, high rates of reinforcement, and clear communication of criteria. With these approaches, welfare is increased as animals learn to use their behavior more effectively.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts working with or interested in animals in any training or management capacity.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Describe three skills in arranging the environment to make the target behavior easier for the animal to perform; (2)  List three ways to increase motivation in animals without reducing the animal's weight to unhealthy levels; (3) Observe and describe at least one antecedent stimulus or condition to account for poor animal performance so as not to place blame on the animal; and (4) Explain the effective use of conditional reinforcers in association with back-up reinforcers to reinforce desirable behavior.
Keyword(s): animal behavior, antecedent stimuli, motivation, training
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Pushing the Envelope: Just How Early can we Identify Anomalous Development in ASD?

Saturday, May 24, 2014
1:00 PM–1:50 PM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Jennifer N. Fritz, Ph.D.
Chair: Jennifer N. Fritz (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
PAULINE A. FILIPEK (The University of Texas Health Science Center)
Dr. Pauline A. Filipek is a professor of pediatrics in the Children's Learning Institute (CLI) and Division of Child and Adolescent Neurology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. She received her B.S. and M.D. from Georgetown University; and she completed a pediatric residency (including chief residency) at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester and a child neurology fellowship and MRI-based Morphometry Fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. She was recruited to the Children's Learning Institute because of her expertise in clinical and research aspects of children with autistic spectrum disorders and is the director of the CLI's Autism Center. Although her clinical practice is open to children of all ages with autistic spectrum disorders, her specific clinical and research interests surround the earliest identification of warning signs for autism and related disorders in very young infants, even before the first birthday. Dr. Filipek also is the ambassador for Texas to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Learn the Signs. Act Early. Initiative and recently received the Texas Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) and the Texas Autism State Planning grants, both from Health Resources and Services Administration.
Abstract:

The earliest identification of atypical development among very young infants at risk for a later diagnosis of an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) is important to facilitate the earliest possible intervention. Existing literature generally presents that anomalous development is not identifiable until the end of the first year of life. However, this is discordant with clinical anecdotes supporting the premise that, in at least some infants, consistent anomalous behaviors may be identified very early, as early as at ages 3-6 months or even before, that may reliably predict an eventual determination of ASD. Dr. Filipek will first present the course of typical development in the first year of life through video segments to focus on the development of social communication as the hallmark target of atypical development. The existing literature pertaining to findings of anomalous development in the first year of life will be briefly reviewed, with specific attention to study designs focusing on infants who are or are not "at risk" versus infants who eventually are or are not diagnosed with ASD. The newest findings will be presented to document the existence of anomalous development as early as at 3 months of age.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in autism.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Discuss the more “subtle” aspects of infant development, particularly those of social communication; (2) Identify signs of anomalous development in very young infants; and (3) Discuss the existing literature pertaining to identification of early signs of ASD in very young infants.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Culture Change in a Medical School: The Role of Behavioral Assessments

Saturday, May 24, 2014
1:00 PM–1:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Schwenk, M.D.
Chair: Lori H. Diener-Ludwig (Zimmet Group)
THOMAS L. SCHWENK (University of Nevada School of Medicine), Melissa Piasecki (University of Nevada School of Medicine), Timothy Baker (University of Nevada School of Medicine)
Thomas L. Schwenk, M.D., is a professor of family medicine, dean of the University of Nevada School of Medicine, and vice president for Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno. Before this role, he was chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan for 25 years. He earned a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering and an M.D. from the University of Michigan, and trained in family medicine, including a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Faculty Development Fellowship, at the University of Utah. He is board-certified in family medicine and sports medicine. His research primarily focuses on the care of depression and mental illness in primary care. His more recent work has addressed the issue of depression in special populations, including medical students and physicians. He served on the board of the American Board of Family Medicine and was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in 2002.
Abstract:

The nature of clinical practice, biomedical research, and medical education in a medical school rewards independent, entrepreneurial, risk-taking behavior by its faculty. These behaviors, while successful in many regards, also result in a fragmented, nonhierarchical, “flat” faculty structure and culture that is somewhat peculiar to medical schools. These cultural forces have been magnified at the University of Nevada School of Medicine (UNSOM) by years of economic and political assaults that left UNSOM with a particularly high level of disengagement, reduced faculty satisfaction anda highly centralized leadership structure that disempowered department chairs and detracted from faculty ownership and investment in UNSOM missions. The speakers will describe strategies used to assess and transform the culture of UNSOM using behavioral systems approaches in order to adapt to changing social demands on the organization (e.g., culturally competent physicians and community engagement). The goals are greater faculty engagement, an emphasis on faculty career development, explicit commitments to achieving individual career and institutional objectives, more decentralized leadership, and a focus on communication, investment, accountability, transparency, and partnership. The use of behavioral assessments will drive socially significant practices within and external to the organization.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students and anyone interested in how a culture can be changed by behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to (1) Describe the unique characteristics of medical school culture from a behavioral systems perspective; (2) Identify a behavioral analytic approach to assess faculty attitudes; and (3) Discuss the application of a relational response measure for implicit bias in medical students and opportunities for curricular intervention. 
Keyword(s): education, leadership, Leadership Seminar
 
 
Symposium #25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Azrin-Foxx Self-Initiation Legacy: Toileting Practices and Social Validity
Saturday, May 24, 2014
1:00 PM–2:50 PM
W192a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Amanda W. Doll (Hawthorne Foundation, Inc.)
Discussant: Peter J. Blechman (Hawthorne Foundation, Inc.)
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The initial Azrin-Foxx self-initiation training protocol was both a gift and a challenge to the field of behavior analysis. It provided a robust, highly-effective, and easily replicated treatment package with broad applicability to other populations, as evidenced by results obtained in institutional, school, and community settings across the United States and in other countries. However, it also raised expectations about the range of learners who could learn to self-initiate and challenged us to create environments that accommodated these newly acquired skills. Our symposium will consider the evolution of self-initiation training protocols since their initial applications in terms of developments in the field which have required overcorrection procedures to be dropped and request procedures to be added. Data from the original Willowbrook Cohort will be contrasted against those from two present community agencies; and a data collection tool for coding these data will be presented, together with reliability and validity data. We will discuss implications for practice.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): outcomes assessment, overcorrection, self-initiation, toileting
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students and anyone interested in self-initiation.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Identify data-collection systems to track toileting progress across programs serving large numbers of participants; (2) Describe intensive, behaviorally based toilet training procedures that have shown empirical support in the literature; and (3) Describe the current state of toilet-training outcomes for people with autism being served in several ABA programs within New York State.
 

Willowbrook Cohort Data as an Historical Frame of Reference for Toileting Self-Initiation Training

ALBERT PFADT (Quality Improvement Consultant)
Abstract:

The Willowbrook Sate School was an institution for individuals with developmental disabilities located on Staten Island and run by New York State. Willowbrook was made infamous as a snake pit and an incompetent environment through the reporting efforts of Geraldo Rivera and litigation and legislation by Senator Robert Kennedy and others. One of the many stipulations of the Willowbrook Consent Decree was that individuals residing at Willowbrook were to receive comprehensive toilet training. This talk will describe what conditions were like at the time of the Willowbrook Consent Decree and immediately thereafter; the presenter's experience as a team member administering and training others to administer the original Azrin-Foxx toileting protocol as part of the original intervention team; and outcome data from these efforts.

 

Forget "Readiness." Start Teaching Toileting by Assessing Toileting Skills with a Toileting Skill Survey.

AMANDA W. DOLL (Hawthorne Foundation, Inc.)
Abstract:

Reasonable people, even or perhaps especially professionals, can and do disagree (often vigorously, and usually beyond the available data) about the number, order, and necessity of various prerequisite skills for teaching toileting. This presentation will provide participants with a simple 16-item toileting survey that may be used to obtain a cross-section of toileting-related skills for groups of learners of any age (e.g., classes of students in schools; groups of individuals in residences or habilitation programs). Each learner is assessed for Self-Initiation, Requesting, Scheduled Elimination, and Accident Rate using a 4-point scale which is descriptive in nature and written in plain language in order to be equally accessible to paraprofessionals, direct-care workers, or professionals. Administration instructions, anecdotes about administration, inter-observer agreement data, and construct validity data will be presented, along with implications for practice.

 
Self-Initiation Status of Students at the Eden School
FRANK R. CICERO (Eden II Programs)
Abstract: The self-initiation toilet training protocols as originally applied at Willowbrook included overcorrection and did not include request training. The punitive nature of overcorrection has made this component of the original treatment package increasingly unacceptable over time; meanwhile, the reality of most school environments is that requesting is preferred over self-initiation for reasons of school safety and classroom management. In this presentation, program-wide cross-sectional data on the present self-initiation status of the students at the Eden School will be discussed. The Eden School is a community agency location that presently utilizes a mostly uniform set of protocols with respect to teaching toileting within its programs. Data from the present-day Eden School will be compared to the original Willowbrook Cohort data set, and also to the data from the present-day Hawthorne Foundation data set. Implications for practice will be discussed.
 
Self-Initiation Status of Students at Hawthorne Country Day School
DAREN CERRONE (Hawthorne Country Day School), Kim Arruda (Hawthorne Country Day School)
Abstract: Both the Willowbrook Cohort data set and the Eden II data set are cross-sectional outcome data reflective of populations exposed to uniform or relatively uniform treatment packages. The Hawthorne Country Day School is a community agency; while the agency provides a behavior analytic approach to lifelong care and uses entirely data-based practices, in the area of teaching toileting, present practice at the school allows for selection of teaching protocols for toileting based on each individual student's assessed skills and needs. In this presentation, program-wide cross-sectional data on the present self-initiation status of the students at the Hawthorne Country Day School will be discussed. The Hawthorne Country Day School is a community agency location that presently utilizes many different data-based protocols with respect to teaching toileting within its programs. Data from the present-day Hawthorne Country Day School will be compared to the original Willowbrook Cohort data set, and also to the data from the present-day Eden II School data set. Implications for practice will be discussed.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Behavioral Indicators of Welfare: A Balance-Based Approach

Saturday, May 24, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Jason Watters, Ph.D.
Chair: Lindsay Mehrkam (University of Florida)
JASON WATTERS (San Francisco Zoo)
Jason Watters received his Ph.D. in animal behavior from the University of California at Davis. His research interests have covered numerous topics in animal behavior. For example, he has studied mating systems, behavioral development, and the causes and consequences of behavioral syndromes' animal personalities. Dr. Watters' research program currently focuses on learning and behavioral indicators of welfare in zoo animals. His studies have investigated behavioral issues in numerous species including insects, fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals. In addition to his Ph.D. in animal behavior, he earned a certificate in exotic animal training and management and has held positions at zoos and aquariums. Currently, Dr. Watters oversees a program charged with measuring and ensuring animal wellness at the San Francisco Zoo and is also the executive editor of the journal Zoo Biology. [Photo by Jim Schultz, Chicago Zoological Society]
Abstract:

Individuals who manage the welfare of zoo animals seek practical approaches to caring for a diversity of species. In general, animal managers hope to understand animals' behavioral needs, how animals express their experiences of positive welfare, and how to ensure that positive experiences balance any negative ones. Research findings in several fields, including psychology, neuroscience, animal behavior, and zoo biology, indicate core behavioral needs. Combined, the evidence suggests that animals who can express these needs are psychologically and emotionally enriched. Here, Dr. Watters will describe the core behavioral needs of investigating, acquiring reward and exerting control. He will describe a developing "balance-based" approach designed to ascertain the frequency with which these needs are met and not met in an animal's life through behavioral observation. Various behaviors indicate the presence or absence of opportunities to meet the core needs and Dr. Watters will challenge the assumption that the behavioral repertoire of zoo animals should mirror that of animals in the wild. He will emphasize that animal welfare depends upon the balance individuals can obtain between meeting and not meeting their behavioral needs. Animals that are out of balance in the simple sense that they have few opportunities for positive experiences are in a state of welfare that can be improved.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts who have an interest in zoo animal behavior and welfare

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Understand a new approach to assessing animal welfare--one that is focused on evaluating animals' core needs and develops a new behavioral analysis to do this; (2) Explain the basic principles of constructing animal welfare "balance sheets;" and (3) Understand the issues associated with the classification of behavior. Specifically, participants will be exposed to the problems associated with misclassifying behaviors associated with animal learning.  
Keyword(s): animal behavior, animal welfare
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Key Themes in School-Based Mental Health

Saturday, May 24, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W196b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Cynthia M. Anderson, Ph.D.
Chair: Cynthia M. Anderson (Appalachian State University)
MARK D. WEIST (University of South Carolina)
Mark D. Weist is a professor and director of the Clinical-Community Program in the Department of Psychology at the University of South Carolina. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Virginia Tech in 1991. For 19 years, he was on the faculty of the University of Maryland, where he helped to found and direct the Center for School Mental Health, one of two national centers providing leadership to the advancement of school mental health policies and programs in the United States. He is currently leading federally and university funded research grants on Quality in School Mental Health, Assisting High School Youth with Emotional Disabilities, and Developing and Testing Integrated Health-Mental Health Promotion for Youth in Schools. He helped found the International Alliance for Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Schools (INTERCAMHS). Dr. Weist has edited seven books and has two more in progress. He has published and presented widely in the school mental health field and in the areas of trauma, violence, and youth, evidence-based practice, and cognitive behavioral therapy. With colleagues from the Clifford Beers Foundation and the University of Maryland, he edits Advances in School Mental Health Promotion with new publisher Routledge of Taylor & Francis.
Abstract:

School mental health programs and services reflect a "shared agenda" involving schools, families, and other community systems working together to promote student health and wellness and reduce nonacademic barriers to learning. With its emphasis on research-proven intervention strategies and low-inference decision-making, behavior analysis (and behavioral psychology more generally) plays a key role in school mental health. A main focus of school mental health programs is to help schools adopt and sustain evidence-based practices with a focus on prevention and intervention. School mental health has received increased attention in recent years, because of wider recognition of difficulties students can face and policy changes reflecting renewed interest in social behavior interventions and data-based decision-making. In this presentation, key themes facing the school mental health movement will be described. In addition, strategies for assisting schools in the identification, adoption and high fidelity implementation of evidence-based interventions will be described. Dr. Weist will review prominent policy directions and describe the National Community of Practice and its initiatives and resources.

Target Audience:

Master's and doctoral level behavior analysts conducting research or practice supporting typically developing students in school settings.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Identify key themes in school mental health. (2) Describe evidence-based interventions appropriate for use in school settings. (3) Identify federal and state-level policies affecting service delivery in schools. (4) Describe a research agenda to forward behavior analysis and school-based mental health.        
Keyword(s): intervention, prevention, shared agenda
 
 
Invited Paper Session #44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Creating the Organizations Needed to Evolve a More Caring Society

Saturday, May 24, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
Chair: Heather M. McGee (Western Michigan University)
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Anthony Biglan, Ph.D., is a senior scientist at the Oregon Research Institute. He has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and communitywide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure. In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. His recent review of preventive interventions concluded that diverse psychological, behavioral, and health problems can be prevented through the promotion of nurturing families, schools, and communities.
Abstract:

An emerging convergence in the human sciences can guide the evolution of more caring societies. Biological and behavioral research has produced an integrated understanding of the biological and social conditions needed to ensure the successful development of children and adolescents. A growing body of experimental evidence has identified family, school, and community interventions that are capable of nurturing development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Increasingly research is turning to how these interventions can be widely and effectively implemented. At the same time, research in economics, political science, and sociology has delineated key features of the larger social context, including especially the recent evolution of corporate capitalism, that are more distal, but nonetheless critical influences on the wellbeing of young people. This converging understanding provides a framework for intentional efforts to evolve societies that have fewer psychological and behavioral disorders, less crime, less academic failure and much higher levels of prosociality. This session will focus on how we can organize the educational, nonprofit, for-profit, and governmental organizations to evolve cultural practices that achieve a society that sees to everyone’s wellbeing.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in

 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to (1) Describe evidence-based programs, policies, and practices that can prevent most psychological and behavioral problems; (2) Describe a framework for bringing about significant cultural change relevant to human wellbeing; and (3) Describe a strategy for organizing a movement to change the practices that affect wellbeing.  
Keyword(s): Education
 
 
Invited Paper Session #46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Don Baer Invited Address: Outside the Box: Unique Applications of Applied Behavior Analysis

Saturday, May 24, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Judith R. Mathews, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark D. Shriver (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
JUDITH R. MATHEWS (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Dr. Judith Mathews received her BS in special education from Syracuse University in 1971. Her original foundation in ABA came from looking for an effective way to teach deaf and blind children. In 1988, she received her Ph.D. in developmental and child psychology from the Department of Human Development and Family Living at the University of Kansas with Don Baer as her primary adviser. She worked clinically as a pediatric psychologist at the IWK Children’s Hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia, for seven years and taught child clinical psychology at West Virginia University for three years. In 1994, she accepted a position in the Psychology Department at Munroe-Meyer Institute (MMI) at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, where she remained as a pediatric psychologist and associate professor of pediatrics until her retirement in October 2013. At MMI, her position combined clinical practice and research, and teaching graduate students, doctoral interns, and medical students. In 2009, she received her master’s degree in public health from the University of Nebraska, and in 2011 received a Fulbright Scholarship to teach psychology and ABA in Kenya and to conduct public health research with adolescent girls in Nairobi slums. In her retirement, she plans to continue to help establish child clinical training in Kenya.
Abstract:

Don Baer was a master at viewing applied behavior analysis as a philosophy of life. This was exemplified in his writings, in the manner in which he mentored students, and in his discussion of its application to varied topics, some of which were well outside the common behavioral realm of investigation. His model has guided Dr. Judith R. Mathews’ clinical practice and opened her to looking beyond the strictly behavioral literature to learn from other disciplines. This paper will discuss practical applications of applied behavior analysis in the field of pediatrics. It will present unusual clinical cases, including, problems of attachment and parenting skills, and unique challenges in medical adherence, habit reversal, pain management, and feeding disorders. More recently, this curiosity for the intersection between ABA and other disciplines has led Dr. Mathews to investigate the field of public health, in terms of social determinants of health, community-based participatory research and global public health. In this context, applications of ABA in the field of public health will then be discussed. The paper will conclude with discussion of the difficulties that practitioners and public health providers face in conducting practical research and finally will propose ways to disseminate unique ideas in need of empirical validation.

Target Audience:

ABA practitioners.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to: 1. Identify applications of applied behavior analysis to unusual clinical cases. 2. Identify applications of applied behavior analysis to public health issues. 3. Identify practical problems in clinical data collection and possible solutions. 4. Identify ways to disseminate unusual ideas in need of empirical validation.
 
 
Invited Panel #62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Leadership Seminar: Educating Future Generations: Behavioral Education in the 21st Century
Saturday, May 24, 2014
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Heather M. McGee (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Panelists: KEVIN GRIGSBY (Association of American Medical Colleges), KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy)
Abstract:

The quality of education is critical to producing knowledgeable citizens able to adapt to a changing world. Students’ education and cultural influences set the stage for their future professions, and as leaders or educators in an increasingly interconnected global community. By drawing upon their pioneering work in the area of education, panelists will provide comments regarding this theme of the Seminar on Leadership and Cultural Change. The seminar is designed to aid educational leaders to create new models of stewardship and open opportunities for innovation while adjusting to growing social upheaval, technological advances, and environmental concerns, as well as crises in the global economy, health, education, and environment. It will address how behavior analysis finds common ground with other sciences by investigating the behavior of leaders who influence organizations and society.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in creating new models of education through behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Describe the status of contemporary education practices and consider the impact behavior analysis has had on the education system; (2) Identify projects that depict effective instruction producing exemplary outcomes; (3) Describe pathways to follow that advance evidence-based instructional technologies and the contributions offered by behavior analysis; and (4) Identify themes in society and culture at large that influence leaders of behavior analysis to apply our science to education.  
KEVIN GRIGSBY (Association of American Medical Colleges)

R. Kevin Grigsby, MSW, DSW, is senior director of leadership and talent development at the Association of American Medical Colleges. He served as vice dean for faculty and administrative affairs from 2000–09 at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA, where he continues to hold an academic appointment as clinical professor of psychiatry. Dr. Grigsby’s clinical experience includes a history of program planning, implementation, and evaluation in the area of innovative home- and community-based health and mental health services. His clinical practice experience has been primarily in underserved rural and inner city areas and includes perinatal intervention with substance-abusing women, mental-health service delivery to children and adolescents in shelter care, provision of home-based services to parents and children with HIV-related illnesses, and the use of advanced telecommunications technology in health services delivery. During the past decade, the focus of Dr. Grigsby’s work shifted to organizational development in academic health centers including developing a future-oriented perspective in academic leaders and the alignment of resources with missions. Dr. Grigsby remains active in promoting effective interpersonal communication within academic health centers and in implementing alternative conflict resolution/management strategies at the department and institutional levels. The use of teams and other nontraditional organizational models in higher education settings is another area of scholarship. As an expert on the use of teams in academic health centers, Dr. Grigsby has presented at regional and national conferences and has consulted with a number of academic health centers and professional organizations. He and his colleagues published an account of the use of teams to unify the clinical, academic, and research enterprises in an academic health center. This approach was instrumental in breaking down barriers that typically separate academic departments and resulted in reducing traditional barriers between employees and management, promoting faculty and staff participation in decision-making processes, and solving organizational problems that seemed to be intractable in the past. At the AAMC, he and his team offer programs to improve organizational and leadership performance at medical schools and academic medical centers, address the needs of women and underrepresented minorities at academic medical centers, and link individual professional development to improved organizational performance.

 

KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy)
Dr. Kent Johnson founded Morningside Academy, in Seattle, WA, in 1980, and currently serves as its executive director. Morningside is a laboratory school for typical children and youth, investigates effective curricula and teaching methods, and has provided training and consulting to more than 125 schools throughout the world. Dr. Johnson’s many publications about research-based curriculum and teaching methods include The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction, and Response to Intervention and Precision Teaching with Dr. Elizabeth Street. More than 40,000 students and more than 1,000 teachers have implemented Morningside’s Generative Instruction. Dr. Johnson is also a co-founder of Headsprout, Inc., now Mimio, a company that develops web-based, interactive, cartoon-driven instructional programs, including Mimiosprout Early Reading and MimioReading Comprehension Suite. Dr. Johnson is recipient of the Award for Public Service in Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, the Anderson Award for Exemplary Contributions to Behavioral Education from the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, the Award for Excellence in Evidence-based Education from the Wing Institute, the Allyn and Bacon Exemplary Program Award from the Council for Exceptional Children, and the Lindsley Lifetime Achievement Award in Precision Teaching from the Standard Celeration Society.
Keyword(s): Leadership Seminar
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #140
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Examining the Relationship Between Subjective and Reinforcing Effects of Stimulant Drugs: Implications for Human Laboratory and Clinical Trial Research

Sunday, May 25, 2014
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: BPH; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: William Stoops, Ph.D.
Chair: Paul L. Soto (Texas Tech University)
WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky College of Medicine)
Dr. William Walton Stoops, an associate professor in the Departments of Behavioral Science and Psychology at the University of Kentucky, earned his bachelor's degree in psychology from Davidson College in Davidson, NC, and his master's degree and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Kentucky. His research utilizes sophisticated human laboratory methods like self-administration and drug-discrimination to examine behavioral and pharmacological factors contributing to drug-use disorders. He has written more than 75 manuscripts and book chapters as author or co-author. His recent work has centered specifically on evaluating laboratory models of pharmacological and behavioral interventions for stimulant-use disorders and determining the neuropharmacological effects of stimulants and opioids. This research has resulted in numerous awards from professional societies including the 2013 Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, the 2006 Outstanding Dissertation Award and the 2008 Wyeth Young Psychopharmacologist Award from Division 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse) of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Stoops is a Fellow of APA and the Midwestern Psychological Association and will serve as president of APA Division 28 in 2015.
Abstract:

Subject-rated measures and drug self-administration represent two of the most commonly used methods of assessing the behavioral effects of drugs in the human laboratory. Although the results from these methods are often consistent, dissociations between subjective and self-administration data have been observed. This presentation will first introduce basic human behavioral pharmacology methods for measuring subjective and reinforcing effects of drugs, focusing on representative data from commonly abused stimulants. Second, correlational and regression analyses that examined the relationships between subjective and reinforcing drug effects will be presented to demonstrate which subjective measures best predict stimulant self-administration. Third, examples of divergence between subjective and reinforcing drug effects will be explored to show how these measures provide different and complementary information about stimulant drug effects. Potential mechanisms underlying this divergence also will be considered. Finally, the implications of these outcomes as they relate to future human laboratory research and intervention development for managing drug-use disorders will be reviewed.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in methods of assessing the behavioral effects of drugs in the human laboratory.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) Know how subjective and reinforcing effects of drugs are assessed in human behavioral pharmacology studies; (2) Understand the different information provided by measures of subjective and reinforcing effects; and (3) Understand which human laboratory methods have the best predictive validity for screening putative treatments for drug-use disorders.
Keyword(s): behavioral pharmacology, reinforcing efforts, stimulant drugs, subjective effects
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #143
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Is There a Fix for Behavior Analysis’ Perception Problem

Sunday, May 25, 2014
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: David Freedman, B.A.
Chair: Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
DAVID FREEDMAN (Journalist)
David H. Freedman is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and at Inc. Magazine, a contributor to Scientific American, and a consulting editor for Johns Hopkins Medicine International. He is the author of five books, the most recent being Wrong, about the problems with the published findings of medical scientists and other experts. Much of his recent work is related to obesity, nutrition, and health-related behavior change. He received the 2011 ABAI Dissemination of Behavior Analysis-Special Interest Group’s B. F. Skinner Journalism Award and was awarded a Rockefeller Bellagio Residency to study global obesity. He is the author of an Atlantic cover story calling for a new appreciation of B. F. Skinner and behaviorism.
Abstract:

The public’s attitude toward the principles and practice of behavior analysis tends to range from complete unawareness to misguided hostility. The result is that the field is often marginalized, even as it becomes potentially ever more valuable as a means of addressing difficult, widespread problems in society in important behavior-related domains, including education, population, health, economics, and climate change. The public’s ignorance, misperceptions, and apprehensions about behavior analysis stem in part to a long history of prominent antagonism toward the field on the parts of those invested in alternative and generally less effective approaches to dealing with behavior. But the problem also has been exacerbated by a sharp failure on the part of the field, dating back to B. F. Skinner himself, to present itself in ways likely to resonate with the public. Meanwhile, leaders in what might be considered “rival” fields have often been, and continue to be, highly effective in doing so, sometimes to behavior analysis’s detriment. Ironically, behavior analysis’s fidelity to the rigors of scientific evidence has worked against the field in this regard. This rigor has produced effective treatments, but leaves lay people cold when it comes to understanding and appreciating this effectiveness, given that most of the public has little feel or empathy for scientific rigor, and is instead easily swayed by emotional and narrative appeal. The challenge that therefore lies before the field is this: Can and should behavior analysis present itself to an often gullible and easily misled public in a more resonant, less scientifically stiff way that wins it more appreciation and thus opportunity to achieve impact? It almost certainly could, and it’s worth considering possible approaches for doing so, as well as weighing the potential costs.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in learning about the perception of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Identify the nature, causes, and scope of the problem of behavior analysis being ignored or mistrusted by the public; (2) Understand why some presentations of alternative approaches to dealing with problem behaviors resonate with the public, especially as compared to behavior analysis; (3) Consider what sort of presentation of behavior analysis might achieve more positive recognition from the public, and to evaluate the possible drawbacks to such an approach.
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Tutorial #149
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Primer of Conceptual Issues for Applied Behavior Analysts
Sunday, May 25, 2014
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TPC/PRA; Domain: Theory
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Kennon Andy Lattal, Ph.D.
Chair: Marleen T. Adema (Senior TPC co-coordinator)
Presenting Author: KENNON ANDY LATTAL (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

Consider the activities during a typical day in the life of an applied behavior analyst: observing clients’ behavior, integrating those observations to develop a plan for treatment, implementing and assessing the treatment plan, explaining the client’s behavior and the treatment plan to those responsible for the clients’ well-being, confronting complicated issues related to the causes of behavior and its explanation, discussing with nonbehavior analysts the client as the agent of his or her own behavior and the client’s thoughts and intentions, and confronting a myriad of ethical issues that arise in the course of treatment. Many of these daily activities require a firm grounding in the science of behavior. Others require an equally firm grounding in the philosophy of that science, in issues that underpin the science of behavior and that rely on that science to provide a coherent framework for processes that do not lend themselves to experimental analysis. This tutorial introduces to practitioners some of the conceptual issues that they face in their interactions with clients and caregivers. Four broad issues will be considered: observations and their integration; cause and explanation; privacy; agency and intention; and responsibility and ethics.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Graduate students and master’s level practitioners of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to (1) Explain a radical behavioral perspective of science and its practice; (2) Identify the issues that distinguish a behavioral approach to the understanding of the scientific practices of observation and establishing cause; and (3) Describe a behavior-analytic position on agency, intention, and privacy.
 
KENNON ANDY LATTAL (West Virginia University)
Andy Lattal is the centennial professor of psychology at West Virginia University, where he has taught since 1972. He is the author of more than 150 research articles and chapters on a variety of topics in several areas of behavior analysis. He also is curator of the Behavioral Apparatus Virtual Museum (http://aubreydaniels.com/institute/museum.) Most germane to today's tutorial, Dr. Lattal has served as guest editor of a special issue of the American Psychologist commemorating the professional life of B. F. Skinner and, with Philip Chase, edited a volume entitled Behavior Theory and Philosophy, and has authored chapters and articles on several conceptual topics. A former editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (1999-2003) and president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (1993-94), he was the 2012 recipient of the Society for Behavior Analysis' Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis. During the 2012-13 academic year, he was a Fulbright Research Scholar at Universite Charles de Gaulle in Lille, France.
Keyword(s): ABA Practitioners, Cause/explanation, Conceptual Issues, Ethics
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #167
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Behavior Modification Through the Lens of the Polyvagal Theory

Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Hayne W. Reese, Ph.D.
Chair: Hayne W. Reese (West Virginia University)
STEPHEN PORGES (University of North Carolina)
Dr. Stephen Porges is a professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina. He is professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he directed the Brain-Body Center, and professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, where served as chair of the Department of Human Development and director of the Institute for Child Study. He was president of the Society for Psychophysiological Research and the Federation of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences. He is a recipient of a National Institute of Mental Health Research Scientist Development Award. He has published more than 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers across several disciplines. In 1994, he proposed the Polyvagal Theory, a theory that links the evolution of the mammalian autonomic nervous system to social behavior. The theory has stimulated research and treatments that emphasize the importance of physiological state and behavioral regulation in the expression of several psychiatric disorders and provides a theoretical perspective to study and to treat stress and trauma. He is the author of The Polyvagal Theory: Neurophysiological Foundations of Emotions, Attachment, Communication, and Self-Regulation (Norton, 2011) and is currently writing Clinical Applications of the Polyvagal Theory: The Transformative Power of Feeling Safe (Norton, 2014).
Abstract:

The Polyvagal Theory describes the role physiological state has in facilitating the expression of different classes of behavior. Applying the theory to behavior modification protocols leads to a refinement in the historical S-O-R model in which the state of the organism (O), now indexed by autonomic state, influences the accessibility of classes of behavior to stimulus control. Polyvagal Theory, based on evolutionary biology and comparative neurophysiology, identifies autonomic states that facilitate or impede the expression of specific classes of behavior. The theory identifies three stages of phylogenetic development that are characterized by parallel changes in behavioral repertoire and neural regulation of the autonomic nervous system: 1) an ancient autonomic system (i.e., unmyelinated "vagal" pathways) shared with most vertebrates that conserves metabolic resources (e.g., slows heart rate and breathing, decreases blood pressure) and supports immobilization behaviors (e.g., passive avoidance, fainting); 2) a system that increases metabolic output (i.e., sympathetic nervous system) and supports mobilization of the trunk and limbs (e.g., active avoidance, fight-flight behaviors); and 3) a uniquely mammalian system integrating the regulation of striated muscles of the face and head with the heart (i.e., myelinated "vagal" pathways) to create a functional social engagement system that regulates the phylogenetically older systems, often through social interaction, to promote physiological resilience and optimize health growth and restoration. Functionally, the theory proposes that modification of these "classes" of behaviors (immobilization, mobilization, and social engagement) will be optimized by monitoring autonomic variables and understanding the contextual cues that trigger transitions in autonomic state. Consistent with this model several variables, independent of stimulus manipulations, characterizing experimental conditions, and participants in behavior modification protocols (e.g., context, development, illness, medication, etc.) will influence the accessibility of different classes of behavior to stimulus control.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, practitioners, academics, and scientists.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the talk, audience members should be able to (1) Describe the polyvagal theory; (2) Identify the three stages of development leading to regulation of the autonomic nervous system; and (3) Describe at least two clinical/applied implications of the theory.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #171
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Leadership Networks and Dissemination of Behavior Science: A National Agenda in Italy

Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Fabio Tosolin, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark P. Alavosius (University of Nevada, Reno)
FABIO TOSOLIN (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis)
Since the 1980s, Fabio Tosolin has been introducing and spreading the Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) and Performance Management (PM) methodologies in Italy. In the 1990s, he began to apply the O. Lindsley’s Precision Teaching and Fluency Building Approach to the growing up e-learning and introduced and spread in Italy the Behavior-Based Safety process (B-BS). Since 1985, he has guided Fabio Tosolin & Associates, in Milan, his management consulting firm that deals with performance management, learning technologies and behavioral safety for many national and multinational companies. He is currently professor of human factor in the management of HSEQ at the Milan Polytechnic, Department of Engineering of the Industrial Processes. He has been the chair of the last seven editions of the European B-BS and OBM Conference. He is author of more than 100 scientific communications, experimental researches, articles, and books on behavior management, B-BS, leadership, psychology of learning, didactic communication, and learning technologies. He is the president of the Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis (AARBA), the Italian Chapter of ABAI, and adviser of the Cambridge Center for Behavior Studies.
Abstract:

Since the 1980s, Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) and Performance Management (PM) methodologies have been introduced and spread in Italy. Fabio Tosolin has been at the forefront of this dissemination. In the 1990s, he began to apply O. Lindsley’s Precision Teaching and Fluency Building Approach to e-learning and introduced Behavior-Based Safety process (B-BS) in Italy. Since 1985, he has led the Milan-based management consulting firm, Fabio Tosolin & Associates, which deals with Performance Management, learning technologies and behavioral safety for many national and multinational companies. This talk will highlight the role leadership networks and decision making play in the process of large-scale dissemination of behavior analysis across sectors of Italy.

Target Audience:

Forthcoming

Learning Objectives: Forthcoming
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Paper Session #175
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Going International: Behavior Analysis at the Global Level, a Success Story

Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Martha Hübner, Ph.D.
Chair: Martha Hübner (University of Sao Paulo)
RUBEN ARDILA (National University of Colombia)
Dr. Ruben Ardila is a Colombian research psychologist and a professor at the National University of Colombia. He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has conducted research on experimental analysis of behavior, history of psychology, and the application of psychology to socio-economic development. Dr. Ardila has published 32 books and more than 300 scientific papers in journals from several countries. Some of his books have been translated into English, German, Portuguese, and other languages. As a visiting professor in several countries, including the United States, Germany, Puerto Rico, Spain, and Argentina, he has promoted behavior analysis, international psychology, and history of psychology. Dr. Ardila has been president of the Inter-American Society of Psychology (SIP), the International Society for Comparative Psychology (ISCP), and the Latin American Association for the Analysis and Modification of Behavior (ALAMOC). He founded the Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia (Latin American Journal of Psychology) and edited the journal from 1969 to 2003. He was a member of the executive committee of the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) between 1992 and 2004. He is on the board of directors of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP, 2006-2014). In 2004, he received the Science Award from Colombia. His most recent recognition is the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology (2007). His most recent books are Autobiografa, un Punto en el Tiempo y en el Espacio (Autobiography, a Point in Time and Space, 2012) and Historia de la Psicologa en Colombia (History of Psychology in Colombia, 2013).
Abstract:

The roots of behavior analysis are found on empirical philosophers, on Pavlov, Pieron, and other thinkers. However, during the larger part of its history behavior analysis has been a discipline cultivated mainly in the United States and other English-speaking countries. The pioneers of behavior analysis as an area of research were part of the Anglo-Saxon culture (Watson, Skinner, and Baum) and was also the case with applied workers (Wolpe, Eysenck, Rachman, Keller, and Azrin). Probably the philosophical assumptions of the Anglo-Saxon culture were in tune with behavior analysis as a science and applied area. On the other hand, during the past few decades, an internationalization of behavior analysis has taken place. Work of high quality is carried out in Norway, Japan, Spain, Brazil, and other nations. The situation of behavior analysis and its international growth is analyzed, including the role of the Association for Behavior Analysis International in this process. At the present time, behavior analysts are "thinking globally and acting locally."

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students and anyone interested in learning about the international growth of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: -Explain the current state of behavior analysis at the international level, -Discuss the main areas of research and application at the global level. -Explain the contribution of different cultures and worldviews to behavior analysis.
Keyword(s): behavior analysis, historical development, internationalization
 
 
Invited Symposium #178
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How Machine Implementations of Simple Verbal Operants Demonstrate the Emergence of Complex and Diverse Verbal Behavior
Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Barbara E. Esch (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.)
Discussant: Greg Stikeleather (Palo Alto, CA)
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
Abstract:

More traditional computer simulations of human behavior have involved information processing models of the brain, whereby the brain is assumed to be modeled after the way computers are architected: lots of data stored in memory with programs that retrieve the data given certain inputs. Adaptive network systems are elemental computer learning programs that have enabled the simulation of behavior at an operant level, whereby that behavior which is followed by reinforcing consequences is more likely to occur again. This symposium explores how adaptive networks can generate simple verbal operants, and how more diverse and complex behavior can then be generated as a result. Implications for the interpretation of more complex human linguistic behavior and the development of effective teaching programs also are considered.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): adaptive networks, computer simulations, effective teaching, verbal behavior
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, and graduate students interested in exploring how adaptive networks can generate simple verbal operants, and how more diverse and complex behavior can then be generated as a result.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Explain how implementing operant principles in a robot enables analysis of puzzling cases of verbal behavior; (2) Identify one or more examples of verbal behavior whose interpretation can be investigated by adaptive network simulations; and (3) Explain what an ANS is and specify how they differ from a typical computer program.
 

An Overview of How Adaptive Networks Can Generate Simple Verbal Operants

WILLIAM F. POTTER (California State University Stanislaus)
Abstract:

Adaptive networks are in essence, computer programs that learn. This very fact places them squarely in the domain of behavior analysis, although few in the field conduct research with them, or develop them for commercial or other purposes. This talk will provide an overview of what Adaptive Network Systems (ANS) are and how they differ from typical computer programs; provide insight into how they work; and show how they can adhere to the behavioral principles that the experimental analysis of behavior has uncovered over the years. The basic components of such a network will be explored including the architecture, some simple learning algorithms, and design features which preclude hard-wiring responses, or using brute computer power to solve problems or to produce more complex behaviors. Finally, some simple examples of ANS will be illustrated, particularly related to the elementary verbal operants.

After obtaining a bachelor's degree in business administration and a minor in journalism, Dr. Potter worked briefly as a journalist for a small daily newspaper, then left that to work in a small advertising agency in New York City. After 4.5 years of this, his true passion emerged--the pursuit of science. He obtained a spot in the behavior analysis graduate program at Western Michigan University, which eventually resulted in a Ph.D. and much training in behavior analysis under the tutelage of Dr. Jack Michael and Dr. Alan Poling, both of whom he owes much. Throughout the years, he has dabbled in many things (VB, CBT, OBM, ANS, MOs, and a few other obscure acronyms), making him a jack of all trades but a master of none. He currently chairs the Psychology/Child Development Department at California State University, Stanislaus, and is director of the International Dual Behavior Analysis Degree in collaboration with universities in Warsaw, Poland and Bangor, Wales.
 

How Adaptive Networks Can Aid in the Interpretation of Complex Linguistic Puzzles

DAVID C. PALMER (Smith College)
Abstract:

Because the experimental analysis of verbal behavior is constrained by practical and ethical considerations, most of our understanding of complex cases arises from verbal interpretations. But such interpretations are limited by the sheer number of relevant variables and our ignorance of subjects' histories. In contrast, adaptive network simulations permit complete control over both complex contextual variables and historical variables. If such simulations are tightly constrained by behavioral principles, they offer powerful demonstrations of the explanatory adequacy of such principles. Dr. Palmer will discuss several examples that seem to defy verbal interpretation, examples such as the problems of novelty, nesting, generalization of neologisms according to apparent grammatical form, conditioning the behavior of the listener, mysterious structural regularities in verbal behavior, and the problem of acquisition of complex forms. He will suggest that adaptive network simulations of verbal behavior may be the best interpretive tool and in some cases the only one.

With bachelor's degrees in geology and English, Dr. David Palmer was devoting his post-graduate years to avoiding the draft when he chanced to pick up a copy of Walden Two from a friend's bookshelf. It changed the direction of his life. He promptly read the rest of the Skinner canon and spent the next decade trying to start an experimental community and preaching radical behaviorism to anyone who would listen. Eventually, he took some classes with Beth Sulzer-Azaroff, who urged him to apply to graduate school. Thanks to a dyslexic secretary, who entered his undergraduate GPA backward, he was admitted and began working with John Donahoe. He was happy in grad school and would be there still if the University of Massachusetts had not threatened to change the locks. He has spent the past 25 years as the token behaviorist at Smith College. During that time he co-authored, with John W. Donahoe, Learning and Complex Behavior, a book which attempts to integrate adaptive network simulation with experimental analysis and verbal interpretation of complex cases. He continues to puzzle over the interpretation of memory, problem-solving, and, particularly, verbal behavior. He still thinks Skinner was right about nearly everything.
 

A Demonstration of Teaching Verbal Behavior to an Operant Robot

WILLIAM R. HUTCHISON (Behavior Systems)
Abstract:

The presentation will describe a robot whose behavior is learned via an adaptive network based on behavior analytic principles, embedded in a body with sensors including vision and hearing and with responses including spatial movements and vocalizations. The demonstration will first show how that robot learns elementary verbal operants, then more complex verbal behaviors based on them. We will examine in detail how some of the puzzling verbal behaviors described in the preceding papers in the symposium are learned, illustrating how using a robot makes it possible to examine moment-to-moment changes in the conditions that control the behavioral sequence.

William Hutchison earned his bachelor's degree from Kansas University with majors in psychology and mathematics, then entered the Ph.D. program in clinical psychology at State University of New York at Stony Brook, the first purely behavioral clinical psychology program. His major adviser was Leonard Krasner, one of the pioneer generation of researchers in behavior modification, token economies, and verbal conditioning. Equally influential on his career was his work as teaching assistant to Howard Rachlin, a leading figure in quantitative analysis of behavior. He then taught at one of the hotbeds of radical behaviorism, West Virginia University, in its Ph.D. program in behavioral systems analysis. In 1983, he developed a behavioral alternative to cognitive artificial intelligence, a computer system based on the equations from quantitative experimental analysis of behavior. That system became one of the first adaptive ("neural") networks and was the foundation for one of the first companies, BehavHeuristics, applying that methodology to commercial software. The company's focus was on resource allocation in changing environments, but a subsequent company, Applied Behavior Systems, embodied the adaptive network in robots and developed software for computerized training of verbal behavior to the robot and to children. Hutchison continued the robotics direction in a 4-year stint with the government's Intelligence Technology Innovation Center.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #191
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Childrearing as the Behaviorist Viewed It: John B. Watson's Advice in Perspective
Sunday, May 25, 2014
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DEV/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Martha Pelaez, Ph.D.
Chair: Martha Pelaez (Florida International University)
Presenting Author: EDWARD K. MORRIS (The University of Kansas), Kathryn M. Bigelow (The University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Other than research on behavior's basic principles, the analysis of child behavior is the longest sustained program of research in behavior analysis. It includes replications of the basic principles (e.g., reinforcement), analyses of behavior of societal importance (e.g., cooperation), applications to behavior of individual importance (e.g., temper tantrums), and extensions of these applications to parent training (e.g., child socialization). This program's brief history, however, has a long past that includes the histories of behavior analysis (e.g., childrearing practices in Skinner's Walden Two, Bijou's Institute of Child Development, Bijou and Baer's theory of child development), behaviorism (e.g., Watson's classical behaviorism), psychology (e.g., child and developmental psychology), and childrearing and child welfare in America (e.g., Child Welfare Stations). A common connection among these histories is Watson and Watson's 1928 book of childrearing advice, The Psychological Care of Infant and Child. Now more infamous than famous (e.g., "pathological," "punitive") the book is, in part, Watson’s legacy to research, application, and theory in the behavior analysis of development. As such, its fame and infamy bear close examination. In this presentation, Dr. Bigelow will describe Watson’s childrearing advice in the context of the culture, the childrearing, and the advice of his day--and our day; address the criticisms of it in those contexts--and at present; consider the nature and existence of “behavioristic” childrearing advice--then and now; and comment on the legacy of Watson’s advice for the behavior analysis of development today.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Graduate students, practitioners, research scientists, and educators.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to (1) Describe the history of the study of child behavior in behavior analysis; (2) Describe Watson's influence on childrearing practices; and (3) Describe Watson's influence on contemporary issues in childrearing.
 
EDWARD K. MORRIS (The University of Kansas), Kathryn M. Bigelow (The University of Kansas)
Edward K. Morris (University of Illinois, M.A 1974, Ph.D. 1976) has been a faculty member in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science (ABS), formerly the Department of Human Development and Family Life, at the University of Kansas since 1975. He has been the ABS chairperson since 2000. In the profession, he has been editor of the The Behavior Analyst, The Interbehaviorist, and the APA Division 25 Recorder. In governance, he has been president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), Division 25 for Behavior Analysis of the American Psychological Association (APA), and KU's chapter of Sigma Xi. He is currently president of the Kansas Association for Behavior Analysis, president of the ABAI Special Interest Group for the History of Behavior Analysis, and a member of the Executive Committee of Cheiron--the International Society for the History of the Behavioral Sciences. He is a fellow in ABAI, APA Divisions 25 and Division 26 (Society for the History of Psychology), and the Society for Psychological Science. His current research and scholarship is on the historical and conceptual foundations of behavior analysis and its complementarities with the psychological sciences. His professional interests include the teaching and dissemination of behavior analysis.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #196
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Leadership and the Science of Behavior Change

Sunday, May 25, 2014
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Maria E. Malott, Ph.D.
Chair: Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
MARIA E. MALOTT (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
Dr. Maria E. Malott is CEO of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), which she has administered since 1993. During this time and within a few short years, ABAI has risen from near-bankruptcy to become a financially stable, growing scientific and professional organization. Her past experience includes serving as vice president of manufacturing at a Midwestern injection molding company and president and founder of Malott and Associates, through which for 14 years she consulted for advertising agencies, restaurants, retail and manufacturing companies, hotels, banks, governmental organizations, and nonprofit institutions. Her clients included Meijer, Inc.; Kellogg’s; Pharmacia & Upjohn; and General Motors Corp. Throughout her career, Dr. Malott has combined the analysis of metacontigencies and behavioral contingencies in managing complex systems and, in the process, has taught dozens of corporate executives to appreciate the power of organizational behavior management technology. Dr. Malott has presented nearly 200 papers, taught 34 workshops, and lectured in 37 universities in 18 countries, and is an affiliated faculty at three universities. She has served on four editorial boards and is the author of the book Paradox of Organizational Change, published in Spanish and English and co-author of Elementary Principles of Behavior. She is a fellow of ABAI and was the recipient of the 2003 Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, the 2004 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Organizational Behavior Management from the Organizational Behavior Management Network, the 2002 Outstanding Alumni Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University, and the 2013 Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis.
Abstract:

Throughout history and more recently, countless people have changed the world in significant ways. They forged new paths and demonstrated a remarkable ability to inspire others to follow. Margaret Mead suggested: Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Was she right that the actions of not one but a few individuals under special motivating circumstances are what account for profound change? Or is it the case that leaders possess incomparable and unique repertoires that enable them to affect change single-handedly? Are there common traits and systems-based strategies that effective leaders use to bring about change? As behavior analysts, we must reflect on these questions and wonder if our scientific approach can account for the change.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in leadership and the science of behavior change.

 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Illustrate why effective change is rarely the result of the actions of a single individual; (2) Understand the behavioral systems strategies used by successful leaders to affect the actions of others; and (3) Show how complex social systems are not replicable and have no lineage, yet they must be subject matter for behavior analysts.
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Paper Session #201
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Hoped-for Demise of Significance Testing: Why and How

Sunday, May 25, 2014
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Marc N. Branch, Ph.D.
Chair: M. Jackson Marr (Georgia Tech)
MARC N. BRANCH (University of Florida)
Marc N. Branch was introduced to behavioral approaches while an undergraduate at Stanford University in the 1960s. After graduate-school stints at Arizona State University and the University of Maryland, followed by a post-doctoral year at the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Dr. Branch took a position as a faculty member in the Psychology Department at the University of Florida in fall of 1973. During his time there he served, among other duties, as editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, as chairman of the Psychology Department, and as president of ABAI. He retired from teaching in the summer of 2012 and is now professor emeritus of psychology.
Abstract:

Despite more than 60 years of published information clearly showing that null-hypothesis significance tests (NHSTs) and the p values associated with them provide essentially no information about the reliability (i.e., probability of replication) of research outcomes, they remain at the core of editorial decision-making in the behavioral sciences, including psychology, with statistical significance serving as the major gateway to publication of research results. Two reasons appear to contribute to the continuing practice. One, information available suggests that a majority of psychological researchers incorrectly believe that p values do provide information about the reliability of research results. Two, among the minority thatare aware that p values do no such thing, a position sometimes taken is that even though p values do not provide the information many think they do, using them to make decisions about whether to believe in research results is and has been essentially benign. This paper addresses both reasons. Because the first has been pointed out many times, it is briefly covered, because of the apparent persistence of the misunderstanding. The second, that NHSTs have no significant negative effects on behavioral sciences, is the focus of the major portion of the paper, which describes seven “side-effects” of NHSTs that continue to retard effective development of psychological science. The paper makes an appeal to journal reviewers and editors to de-emphasize or eliminate the role of NHSTs, and it closes by offering a few suggestions about alternatives that could be considered and with a challenge to psychological researchers to develop new methods that more fully assess the reliability and generality of research findings.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in data-analysis techniques.

Learning Objectives: 1. Define a p value. 2. Indicate why a p value provides no information about the probability that research results are "due to chance." 3. Indicate at least one way in which significance testing has hindered the development of behavioral science.
Keyword(s): Null-hypothesis, P-value, Reliability, Statistical significance
 
 
Invited Paper Session #210
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Some Musings on Automatic Reinforcement: Central Concept, Controversial Status

Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Jessica L. Sassi, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica L. Sassi (New England Center for Children)
WILLIAM H. AHEARN (The New England Center for Children)
William H. Ahearn, Ph.D. and BCBA-D, joined The New England Center for Children (NECC) in August 1996, and currently serves at NECC as the director of research. He is also an adjunct faculty member for Western New England University's master's and doctoral programs in applied behavior analysis. Currently, Dr. Ahearn serves as the president of the Board of Directors for the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts. Formerly, he served as president of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy. He was named the 2009 American Psychological Association--Division 25 awardee for Enduring Contributions to Applied Behavioral Research. Dr. Ahearn's research interests include social skills in children with autism, verbal behavior, assessment and treatment of stereotypy, severe problem behavior, and pediatric feeding difficulties. He also is interested in resistance to change, behavioral economics, and conditioned reinforcement. His work has been published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavioral Interventions, Behavior Modification, The Lancet, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and he has written book chapters on teaching children with autism and pediatric feeding problems in children with autism. He is currently the editor-in-chief for Behavioral Interventions and is on the editorial boards for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, and The Behavior Analyst.
Abstract:

Automatic reinforcement is a controversial topic. Skinner (1957) described automatic contingencies in Verbal Behavior as an important concept relative to complex human behavior. However, empirical evidence relative to the existence of automatically reinforced behavior is scant. Vaughan and Michael (1982) described automatic reinforcement as referring to three types of functional relations and practitioners have operated on the assumption that automatic reinforcement, as in producing sensory consequences, provides a helpful context for crafting more effective intervention. However, problem behavior that is automatically reinforced is thought to be persistent and challenging to alter across the lifespan. This presentation will explore whether automatic reinforcement actually provides a useful account of behavior that clearly offers pragmatic value to behavior analysis and its successful application. Whether behavior, referred to as automatically reinforced, is operant, respondent, or adjunctive in nature also will be discussed.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in autism and behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Describe the concept of automatic reinforcement as having three usages (i.e., describes three types of functional relations); (2) Describe whether there is evidence that automatically reinforced behavior is operant in nature; (3) Describe whether automatic reinforcement is a useful concept in behavior analysis.
Keyword(s): autism, best practice, treatment
 
 
Invited Panel #219
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Leadership Seminar: Charting a Course for Behavior Analysis: Signposts of Future Directions
Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Mark P. Alavosius (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Panelists: JULIE SMITH (Continuous Learning Group), SIGRID S. GLENN (University of North Texas), MARK A. MATTAINI (Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract:

The field of behavior analysis and related disciplines offer much to promote behavioral solutions to socially significant practices. How our discipline is led and becomes more influential is a challenge we can apply our science toward. By drawing upon their pioneering work in behavior science, panelists will provide comments regarding this theme of the Seminar on Leadership and Cultural Change. The seminar is designed tohelp educational leaders to create new models of stewardship and open opportunities for innovation while adjusting to growing social upheaval, technological advances, and environmental concerns, as well as crises in the global economy, health, education, and environment. It will address how behavior analysis finds common ground with other sciences by investigating the behavior of leaders who influence organizations and society.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in the future of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) State broad themes to be explored in basic and applied research that may revitalize interest in our discipline; (2) Describe any methodological refinements likely to develop to enable future research; and (3) Identify themes in science, society, and the culture at large that influence leaders of behavior analysis and discuss how these frame the future of our field.  
JULIE SMITH (Continuous Learning Group)
Dr. Julie M. Smith is the co-founder of Continuous Learning Group, the world’s largest behavior-based consultancy. She and her team have devoted the last quarter-century to pioneering the most powerful and practical behavior-centric business management system available today. Working with her global clients, Dr. Smith has created an extensive track record that proves CLG’s behavior-centric approach leads to superior strategy execution and dramatic performance improvement. As a world-class business management consultant, Dr. Smith is noted for her astonishing energy and ability to help leaders achieve “mission impossible” while navigating their organizations’ inevitable cycles of challenge and change. Dr. Smith’s engaging, motivating style makes her a sought-after speaker to address organizations, professional conferences, and forums on change and global leadership. Incorporating her extensive experience, humor, and real-world examples into her presentations, Dr. Smith brings a masterful clarity to even the most complex issues. She has a gift for taking complex behavior-change methods and making them simple, so leaders at all levels can achieve positive, measurable, and repeatable results while simultaneously improving employee engagement. Dr. Smith lives with her husband, Mickey, in Morgantown, WV, where they enjoy spending time with their family building Heston Farm, which includes Heston Farm Winery, Pinchgut Hollow Distillery, and Foxfire Restaurant. Identified as one of the fastest start-ups in West Virginia, Heston Farm already has won national awards for marketing, packaging, and product quality. In recognition of her visionary entrepreneurism, Dr. Smith was recently inducted into the West Virginia Business Hall of Fame.
SIGRID S. GLENN (University of North Texas)
Sigrid S. Glenn, regents professor emeritus at the University of North Texas (UNT), is a past president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and was elected as one of ABAI’s five founding fellows. Dr. Glenn’s published work includes empirical and theoretical articles, as well as books and book chapters, targeting audiences within and outside behavior analysis. Her articles and chapters developing the concept of metacontingenies are used by behavior analysts all over the world in analyzing cultural problems and developing avenues of cultural change. She is widely recognized by behavior analysts as incorporating cultural phenomena in the behavior analytic worldview. Dr. Glenn was the founding chair of the nation’s first Department of Behavior Analysis and the primary author of its master’s and bachelor’s degree programs. She is a charter certificant of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board and for 10 years she founded and directed UNT’s online academic certificate program. Dr. Glenn travels nationally and internationally, lecturing on behavior theory and philosophy as well as cultural processes from a behavior analytic perspective.
MARK A. MATTAINI (Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago)
Mark Mattaini, DSW, is an associate professor in the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Editor of the journal Behavior and Social Issues, Dr. Mattaini is also the author/editor of 10 books, including Peace Power for Adolescents: Strategies for a Culture of Nonviolence (NASW Press) and Finding Solutions to Social Problems: Behavioral Strategies for Change (American Psychological Association, with Bruce Thyer), and more than 80 other publications. Since the mid-1990s, Dr. Mattaini has focused his research and practice on behavioral systems analysis for violence prevention with youth, and analyses of the dynamics of nonviolent struggle. His new book, Strategic Nonviolent Power: The Science of Satyagraha, published by Athabasca University Press and available in open access format online, analyzes potential contributions of behavioral systems science to nonviolent social action and civil resistance supporting justice and human rights. He also is consulting with the American Friends Service Committee on peace building projects.  
Keyword(s): Leadership Seminar
 
 
Invited Symposium #221
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
What Does Evidence-Based Practice Have to do With Applied Behavior Analysis?
Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
Discussant: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The term "evidence-based practice" now appears in the professional literature of every discipline that attempts to change human behavior in some dimension (e.g., health, social, communication, etc.). In recent years, behavior analysts have begun discussing the role of evidence-based practice within our field. Differing views about the definition of "evidence-based practice of ABA" have been raised as well as the question of how the evidence-based practice of ABA should influence practitioners. This presentation invites leading scholars within ABA to define evidence-based practice and to discuss the implications of their definition on the practice of behavior analysis. By answering questions like "What is a practice?" "What constitutes evidence?" and "How should the evidence-based practice of ABA influence practitioners' decision-making in their daily work?", Tim Slocum and Tristram Smith will demonstrate that the answers are essential to our field but more murky than they appear on face value. In addition, they will identify the role researchers must play if an evidence-based practice of ABA is to be realized in a meaningful way. They conclude by providing recommendations about how we should proceed as practitioners, researchers, and as a field if we expect to fully adopt the evidence-based practice of ABA.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The primary target audience is practitioners who are required to make decisions regarding evidence-based practice as a part of their daily work. A secondary audience is researchers who conduct research and/or submit for federal funding in this area.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to (1) Provide different definitions for the evidence-based practice of applied behavior analysis; (2) Answer the question "What is a practice?"; and (3) Answer the question "What constitutes evidence?"
 

Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Professional Problem Solving

TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Dr. Slocum will suggest that evidence-based practice of behavior analysis (EBP-BA) be defined as a decision-making process that integrates (A) the best available evidence with (B) clinical expertise and (C) client values and context. This definition corresponds with definitions of EBP in other professions including medicine and psychology, supports the foundational principles of applied behavior analysis, and provides a framework that can be applied to virtually all of one's professional practice as a behavior analyst. In this definition, behavior analysts' practices are understood to encompass all of their professional behavior. It states that behavior analytic practice should be based on the best available evidence. The quality, volume, and relevance of evidence varies greatly across the decisions that behavior analysts make--what is constant is that behavior analysts should seek out and use the best of what is available. This approach to EBP-BA suggests that ABA researchers (A) advance best available evidence through primary intervention research, (B) investigate how clinical expertise, client values, and context can be most effectively integrated into professional decision making, and (C) develop ways to make the best available evidence functionally accessible to practitioners.

Dr. Timothy A. Slocum earned his doctorate in special education at the University of Washington in 1991 and has been a faculty member at Utah State University (USU) in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation since then. He has been involved in reading instruction and reading research for more than 25 years. He has conducted research on phonological skills, vocabulary, and school-wide implementation of research-based reading instruction, and evidence-based practice. He teaches courses at the undergraduate, master's, and doctoral levels on topics including evidence-based reading instruction, research methods and statistics, advanced topics in behavior analysis, and language. Dr. Slocum was recognized as 2011 Teacher of the Year by the USU College of Education, and he received the 2011 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association.
 

What is Evidence-Based Behavior Analysis?

TRISTRAM SMITH (University of Rochester Medical Center)
Abstract:

Although behavior analysts often say we engage in evidence-based practice, we express differing, sometimes contradictory views on what constitutes "evidence" and "practice." In order to provide useful guidance to consumers, providers, third-party payers, and researchers, we need to be clear on what is or is not a practice and what is or is not suitable evidence. This talk will critique applied behavior analytic interventions that behavior analysts have identified as evidence-based practices. It argues that establishing such practices involves more than analyzing the effects of discrete intervention procedures on behavior; it requires synthesizing findings into a package that is demonstrably usable by independent providers and useful to consumers. Recognizing the need for synthesis offers behavior analysts many promising opportunities to build on our existing research in order to increase the quality and quantity of evidence-based practices.

Tristram Smith, Ph.D., is a professor of pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), where he leads federally funded studies comparing the efficacy of different interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders. He is also a clinician in URMC's Community Consultation Program, serving students with ASD and other intellectual disabilities in schools and other agencies. His commitment to the study and treatment of children with ASD began in 1982, when he had the opportunity to volunteer as a buddy for an adult with autism who lived near his college. This experience inspired him to apply to graduate school at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he studied clinical psychology and worked as a therapist and researcher with O. Ivar Lovaas, Ph.D., in the UCLA Young Autism Project. Before moving to Rochester in 2000, he directed clinics for children with autism and their families in the states of California, Iowa, and Washington. He has authored or coauthored several of the most widely cited studies on treatment outcomes for children with ASD.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #242
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Leadership Lessons from Behavioral Science: Bringing the Best Out of Yourself and Others

Sunday, May 25, 2014
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: E. Scott Geller, Ph.D.
Chair: Timothy D. Ludwig (Appalachian State University)
E. SCOTT GELLER (Virginia Tech)
E. Scott Geller, alumni distinguished professor at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and senior partner of Safety Performance Solutions, Inc., has authored or co-authored 39 books, 56 book chapters, 38 training manuals, 234 magazine articles, and more than 350 research articles addressing the development and evaluation of behavior-change interventions to improve quality of life. His most recent books are Actively Caring for People: Cultivating a Culture of Compassion and Actively Caring at Your School: How to Make it Happen. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Association for Applied Behavior Analysis International, and the World Academy of Productivity and Quality Sciences. He is past editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (1989-1992), current associate editor of Environment and Behavior (since 1982), and current consulting editor for Behavior and Social Issues, the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and the Journal of Safety Research. In 2005, Dr. Geller was awarded the Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award by the State Council of Higher Education. He has received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the International Organizational Behavior Management Network and the American Psychological Foundation. At the May 2009 graduation ceremonies at the College of Wooster, his alma mater, Dr. Geller was awarded the honorary degree doctor of humane letters.
Abstract:

From dawn to dusk, psychology affects every aspect of our lives. For example, success in educational settings, at the workplace, on the athletic field, and at home is influenced dramatically by interpersonal and intrapersonal leadership. Are teachers facilitating motivation and learning among their students? Do supervisors empower workers to go beyond the call of duty to achieve organizational goals? Do coaches bring the best out of their players by enhancing self-motivation and cultivating interdependent teamwork? Do parents discipline their children so undesirable behaviors are not only eliminated but desirable behaviors and attitudes are promoted? This presentation will offer research-based principles and techniques teachers, coaches, supervisors, and parents can use to instruct and inspire others to perform at optimum levels of effectiveness. This is transformational leadership. Within this context, the vision of an Actively Caring for People Movement will be introduced--large-scale applications of behavioral science and leadership principles to cultivate cultures of compassion worldwide, thereby preventing interpersonal conflict, bullying, and violence.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in instructing and inspiring others to perform at optimum levels of effectiveness.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Define the advantages of a success-seeking over a failure-avoiding mindset; (2) List five levels of interpersonal listening; (3) Increase the perception of empowerment and self-motivation in yourself and others; (4) Define self-transcendence and its connection to actively caring for people (AC4P); and (5) Define five dispositions that enhance one’s propensity to perform AC4P behavior and explain how to influence these five person states.
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Tutorial #263
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Tutorial on Delay of Reinforcement
Sunday, May 25, 2014
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EAB/TBA; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Mark P. Reilly, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark P. Reilly (Central Michigan University)
Presenting Author: A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Mark P. Reilly (Central Michigan University)
Abstract:

Delayed reinforcers are ubiquitous effects of operant contingencies. In psychology's early days, they were mostly viewed as impediments to learning: the more time between an act and its consequences, the slower the learning. Technical problems complicated studies of delay gradients (the functions relating rate of responding to delay): e.g., can we ignore additional responses occurring between a response and its scheduled delayed reinforcer? When several successive responses are followed by a reinforcer, all are followed by that reinforcer, the most recent with the shortest delay. Peter Dews, recognizing the significance of this observation, showed how it could clarify our understanding of performances maintained by reinforcement schedules and pointed the way to surmounting the technical difficulties in determining delay gradients. This tutorial considers the relevance of that experimental history not only for the foundations of our science but also for its applications. For example, in a vast array of instructional applications, correction procedures guarantee that correct responses eventually follow errors; those errors, followed after some delay by reinforcers produced by the subsequent corrects, may persist for that reason. Improving our understand