Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

CE by Content: Supervision


 

Workshop #W13
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Conducting and Supervising Functional Behavior Assessment and Functional Analysis Across Environments
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
ERIN SPARACIO-ARCHIBALD (Eden II/ Genesis Programs), JILLIAN BRACCOLINO (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs), JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II/Genesis Programs), JAMES CORRIGAN (Eden ll/Geneisi Programs), KATHLEEN ROTAN (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs)
Description: This workshop will address the supervision of the methodology of functional behavior assessments and the empirical approach to a functional analysis across various environments. The basic components of a functional analysis can be adapted across environments to facilitate the assessment of maladaptive behaviors. The components of a functional behavior assessment, such as parent and care caregiver interviews, direct and indirect observations, questionnaires, and anecdotal data collection will be reviewed. Staff, students, and teachers can be supervised to acquire the necessary skills to conduct the various components of a functional analysis through effective supervision with behavioral training strategies. Best practices in supervision of staff who would be conducting assessments will be reviewed. Case studies, examples, and problem resolution will be discussed across various environments such as school settings, home environments, Day Habilitation programs, residential settings, and applied behavior analysis clinics. Implications and limitations of conducting a functional analysis outside of a clinical setting will be openly discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned: The components of functional behavior assessment and the empirical approach to a functional analysis. Participants will learn ways to apply supervision strategies and skills training to staff across various environments, and learn to trouble shoot and adapt supervision strategies across different environments given various scenarios.
Activities: Specific activities will include: 1. Choosing appropriate assessment and data collection systems when conducting a functional behavior assessment and functional analysis. 2. Analyzing data through various visual displays. 3. Problem solve and create improved behavioral skills training strategies for supervised staff given various scenarios. 4. Open discussion of applied supervision issues will also be reviewed.
Audience: Psychologists, Special Educators, Social Workers, Speech Pathologists, and Behavior Analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Functional Analysis, Functional Assessment, Supervision
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Quality Behavior Analyst: A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of Supervision
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yendri Diaz, M.A.
YENDRI DIAZ (Skillometry Inc.), JANET VASQUEZ (Precision Chi)
Description: The BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code requires behavior analysts that assume a supervisory position to take full responsibility for all dimensions of this undertaking (BACB, 2016). Although the BACB provides a professional and ethical compliance code, a system for evaluating the quality of supervision is at the discretion of the individual supervisor or by the ABA company the supervisor is employed with, if such protocols exist. The presenters of this workshop will provide a systematic method for evaluating the quality of supervision, which includes assessment protocols with content areas that are aligned with the BACB’s code, as well as a mastery criteria for each area. Collectively, these protocols are called The Quality Behavior Analyst (QBA). QBA is a set of criterion-referenced proficiency standards, assessments, and a scorecard tracking system for practitioners in the field of applied behavior analysis. QBA provides practitioners with detailed instructions, measurement protocol for tracking progress towards skill development, and mastery criteria for obtaining accuracy, fluency, generalization, and maintenance of the listed skills, which are critical to all of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) credential levels. This workshop will discuss the technical and professional skills behavior analysts should assess and train across credentials. Behavioral Skills Training will be conducted to train practitioners on how to utilize the QBA protocol, including how to assess the Registered Behavior Technicians’ current professional and technical skill repertoire and track information for the further development of those skills throughout the practitioners’ career. The Quality Behavior Analyst protocol includes the following materials: 1. List of skills (based on a corresponding instructional manual and on credential level) 2. Scorecard system used to measure and track the behavior analyst’s proficiency level in various professional and technical skills 3. Behavioral objective for each skill 4. Instructions for training and mastering each skill
Learning Objectives: 1. Assess, score, and track the Registered Behavior Technician’s technical skills while working in the field of applied behavior analysis through the implementation of the QBA protocol with 100% accuracy. 2. Assess, score, and track the Registered Behavior Technician’s professional skills while working in the field of applied behavior analysis through the implementation of the QBA protocol with 100% accuracy. 3. Discuss value systems when creating scorecards for RBT performance on technical skills. 4. Discuss value systems when creating scorecards for RBT performance on professional skills. 5. Provide reinforcing and corrective feedback to RBT’s based on performance and score on the QBA technical skills. 6. Provide reinforcing and corrective feedback to RBT’s based on performance and score on the QBA professional skills.
Activities: 1. Instructional strategies include: Behavioral Skills Training in which the authors will provide instructions on how to conduct the protocol to assess staff performance, model how to implement the protocol, roleplays will be conducted during which workshop attendees will rehearse implementing the protocol, and the authors will provide feedback to the attendees on their performance during implementation. 2. Author and attendees will hold discussion on value systems for scorecards. 3. Workshop objectives will be met through instruction, modeling, practice, feedback and ongoing rehearsal opportunities. 4. Supplemental materials will be provided and active student responding will be implemented to support participant learning and ensure mastery criterion is met. 5. The format of the presentations includes lecture, BST, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: The target audience are BCBAs providing supervision in the field of applied behavior analysis and clinical directors or ABA company owners seeking a curriculum for assessing RBT staff performance.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Assessment, Quality Leadership, Staff Training, Supervision
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Employee of the Month, the Compliment Sandwich, and Mandatory Fun: What Works When Supervising Direct Service Staff
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jacquelyn M. MacDonald, Ph.D.
DIANA PARRY-CRUWYS (Regis College), JACQUELYN M. MACDONALD (Regis College), CATIA CIVIDINI-MOTTA CIVIDINI (University of South Florida)
Description: Challenges in supervising human services staff can include high turnover and emotional burnout. Recent research has helped to clarify how best to use performance management to provide training and feedback for direct service providers; however, logistical and environmental arrangements may continue to produce challenges in the proper implementation of these techniques. Those supervising direct service staff may also be considering how to incorporate reinforcement programs into their efforts toward staff retention. In this workshop, participants will review and practice strategies for training direct care staff and providing meaningful feedback. Additionally, recommendations on the use of reinforcement (both group and individual contingencies) will be reviewed and participants will have opportunities to devise potential reinforcement plans for their organizations based on current research.
Learning Objectives: Participants will summarize evidence-based training practices for direct service staff. Participants will practice providing effective feedback to direct service staff. Participants will identify recommended reinforcement practices for effecting change and retaining staff in a human services setting.
Activities: The format of this workshop will include a review of the current research through lecture and video examples. Participants will also complete small group activities such as brainstorming, scenario review, and problem solving. Behavioral skills training will be used to teach participants to provide feedback according to best practice.
Audience: The level of the workshop is intermediate and it for supervisors of direct care staff.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Direct Care, Staff Burnout, Supervision
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Missing Pieces: Creating Successful Practitioners Through Comprehensive Supervision Practices
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Calandra E. Plattner, M.S.
CALANDRA E. PLATTNER (Endicott College), SHANE T. SPIKER (Positive Behavior Supports, Corp.)
Description: Given the exponential growth within the field of behavior analysis, the need for improved training curriculum for early career BCBAs is critical. Graduate training programs establish baseline conceptual and scientific skills but often do not offer an opportunity for individuals to learn a sufficient level of professional skills outside of technical abilities. Many early-career BCBAs are working within the service delivery model, which requires they frequently and effectively interact with clients, families, and staff. Establishing a sufficient professional skill set that allows a practitioner to successfully supervise, collaborate, facilitate meetings, handle challenging conversations with parents and staff, and maintain sufficient work-life balance often take years to ascertain. This workshop will discuss these critical professional skills including how to self-assess current abilities, operationally define the behaviors that make up each skill and offer opportunities to practice. The purpose of the workshop is to provide instruction on the most essential skills that a practicing BCBA needs to be a strong clinician, collaborator, supervisor, and leader.
Learning Objectives: 1. Provide an operational definition for 8 critical professional skills. 2. Understand the importance of these professional skills and how they can improve quality of service delivery to clients. 3. Explain the potential contingencies maintaining as well as the barriers for practicing professional skills. 4. Identify how to critically evaluation your own professional skill set through ongoing self-assessment.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a variety of components including lecture with supporting materials (i.e., task analyses, self-assessments, videos), role-play opportunities and small and whole group discussions.
Audience: The intended audience includes students as well as early and middle career BCBAs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): "Professionalism", "Staff Development", "Supervision", "Training"
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Practice What You Preach: Using Behavioral Principles to Design an Effective Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
ASHLEY WARLING-SPIEGEL (Behavioral Health Division - MN Dept of Human Services), MICHELE R. TRAUB (St. Cloud State University)
Description: This workshop will apply techniques common to the assessment and treatment of clients to the supervision relationship. Participants will work collaboratively to identify processes that are effective for all skill acquisition, whether by a client or a behavior analyst in training. Specifically, we will address common issues and concerns, including how best to assess and quantify supervisee skills, how to deliver effective feedback, how to shape critical thinking and other "intangibles," how to set reasonable expectations for supervisees at different points in their training, and considerations for supervisors using telemedicine and other remote strategies. Attendees will leave with sample tools and templates, including a comprehensive Supervisee Skill Assessment.
Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will describe strategies for assessing supervisee skills. 2. Attendees will develop plans for supervision logistics. 3. Attendees will describe methods of planning for and addressing ethical concerns within the supervision relationship. 4. Attendees will demonstrate methods of delivering supervision feedback.
Activities: The workshop will incorporate several small-group discussions around prompted themes and questions, followed by a large-group guided discussion of strategies and solutions. Minimal lecture will introduce topics, and participants may be asked to role-play supervisory interactions to demonstrate specific skills.
Audience: BCBAs who supervise or want to supervise student-trainees, BCaBAs, and RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): assessment, ethics, supervision, telemedicine
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Training Caregivers in Schools and Human Services: From Research to Practice
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: 1. Behavioral Skills Training (BST) has been widely adopted in educational and residential services as a method to train socially significant, evidence-based skills that result in improvements in the skills of typical children and adults and with children and adults with developmental disabilities. 2. There are hundreds and small N experiments and tens of randomized controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness, efficiency and acceptability of BST. 3. These studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals, such as JABA. 4. The content relates to ethical, legal, statutory and regulatory guidelines and standards such as: (1) ABAI's and BCBA ethical guidelines that practitioners should be competent and use effective evidence-based practices; (2) legal requirements to do no harm or minimize harm by having trained caregivers; and (3) strategies used by services to mitigate risks and liabilities by having competent staff and use evidence-based practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)describe how to conduct a training needs assessment for their organization; (2)describe the components of behavioral skills training (BST); (3) conduct an adequate task analysis of a teaching skill; (4) describe a training procedure that incorporates role play scripts using strategies to promote generalization of skill; (5) describe strategies to develop pyramidal training; describe strategies to develop and evaluate system-wide caregiver training programs.
Activities: The workshop will include (1) didactic / lecture presentations on research that forms the basis for skills training; (2) written exercises to write tasks analyses, training procedures, general case and multiple case training analyses of caregiver performances; (3) varied videomodels of BST; and (4) group discussions of applications and development of plans.
Audience: This intermediate workshop will be appropriate for advances graduate students, Masters and Doctoral level practitioners, program administrators and faculty teaching classes in ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): parent training, pyramidal training, staff training
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Private Practice Model: Including Leveraging Time With RBTs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terence G. Blackwell, M.Ed.
TERENCE G. BLACKWELL (Chimes International Limited)
Description: As ABA services are now reimbursed through commercial major medical insurance plans in 49 of 50 states; practitioners wrestle with business operations questions. There are also concerns and questions about "risk exposure" for fraud allegations and investigations. This session details how to position yourself as a small business, including the required oversight for supervising staff (e.g., RBTs) and reducing risk by setting up basic internal compliance controls. This content is proven by the author's operational experience in running both small and very large human services and educational agencies.
Learning Objectives: 1) The learner will demonstrate creation of a basic operational budget for a small business. 2) The learner will discriminate and demonstrate knowledge of the basic elements of committing billing fraud. 3) The learner will write their own "USP", unique services proposition, to support their service model. {marketing} 4) The learner will be able to demonstrate in a written quiz, the required criteria for supervision of an RBT.
Activities: lecture format including worksheets for budgeting Quiz: on the basics of the element of fraud and on the supervision requirements of RBTs. Small group discussion on the creation of marketing Copy of BACB ethical standards for discussion as applicable to small business entities (and sole practitioners)
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs and BCBA-D, who are experienced in the field for at least 3 years and who are considering entering the business of delivery of ABA services will find value in attending.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Supervising Safely, Assessing Risks, and Expanding Our Functional Assessments in Trauma Related Environments With Teams
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Teresa Camille Kolu, Ph.D.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
Description: As demand for behavior analytic services grows, we are increasingly asked to provide services compatible with national and local “trauma-informed” emphases. While an ethical, appropriate and individualized analysis of behavior may already be “trauma-informed”, board certified behavior analysts often report being uncomfortable when tasked with providing behavior analysis in a trauma-informed environment or team. Such behavior analytic practice must be conceptually sound while interfacing supportively with an increasing number and type of community providers who identify as trauma-informed. Recent data suggest board certified behavior analysts lack tools to assess or document the trauma related histories and the related risks that an increasing number of clients bring to treatment. This workshop educates attendees in a set of tools to supervise others and treat behavior in rich trauma-informed interdisciplinary settings (the Supervision, Risk Assessment, Functional Assessment, Environmental Assessment, and Trauma Relationships package). Handouts of assessment, risk analysis, and checklist tools are provided to assist participants in practicing skills during the workshop’s intensive instruction, modeling, roleplay, and feedback coaching sessions. Feedback from previous workshops in this series is implemented by engineering small group exercises to facilitate fluency using the take-home tools in the workshop and applying them to participants’ practice settings.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify behavior analytic principles applicable to supervising trauma supporting teams 2. Practice identifying trauma related risks in trauma supporting teams 3. Roleplay assessing the functions of behavior in trauma supporting teams 4. Update behavior plan and assessment templates with behavior analytic features related to trauma-related risks and functions of behavior
Activities: Workshop activities are completed in small groups and large group formats, and include instruction through lecture and demonstration, roleplay using tools provided, feedback, and group discussion. Tools will be provided to use during the workshop and take home, while supplemental tools and resources will be available to download related to the workshop activities and content.
Audience: Advanced audience members, such as those who have been supervising board certified behavior analysts for at least two years, are appropriate.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, supervision, trauma, trauma-informed
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Navigate Challenging Behavior Better: How to Supervise and Train Individuals to Comprehensively Address Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
MEGAN MILLER (#dobetter Pod)
Description: This workshop focuses on going beyond the typical training provided on functions of behavior and behavioral assessment to provide attendees with a more comprehensive understanding of how to supervise and train others to navigate challenging behavior. This workshop provides an overview of how to truly conduct functional assessment and analysis and reviews research in support of advancements in functional analysis technology (e.g., Hanley, 2015). It then provides a deeper dive into considerations relating to ethical and flexible application of extinction and maintaining analysis when designing behavior intervention plans.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to describe how to provide supervision relating to the primary purpose of functional assessment Participants will be able to identify at least 1 benefit to including advancements in functional analysis technologies during supervision Participants will be able to explain at least 1 ethical consideration regarding extinction to incorporate during supervision Participants will be able to describe at least 1 general guideline to follow when addressing challenging behavior during supervision Participants will be able to describe the importance of maintaining analysis in developing behavior intervention plans when supervising others on the development of such plans
Activities: This workshop combines interactive exercises designed to provide opportunities to reflect upon the experiences of trainees and clients when addressing challenging behavior with a behavioral skills training packet designed to demonstrate how to provide supervision to trainees on comprehensively addressing challenging behavior.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BCBAs with at least 2 years of experience and who are responsible for providing BACB fieldwork supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): alternatives extinction, challenging behavior, comprehensive assessment, effective supervision
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Mentorship to Improve Retention and Decrease Burnout
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen Nohelty, M.Ed.
KAREN NOHELTY (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), BEVERLY DOWNING (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), VERONICA HINOJOSA (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), JULIE LEMON (Center for Autism and Related Disorders)
Description: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) provide supervision to a range of individuals, including Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT), Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts BCaBAs, BCBA candidates, and junior BCBAs. Different from supervision, mentorship can contribute to reduced burnout and increased retention through a supportive relationship. Practical strategies based on research, including research from the broader medical field, as well as case studies from the presenters, will be discussed. This workshop will prepare participants to use a variety of methods to assess mentees existing skills, use behavioral skills training (BST) in supporting mentees in learning new skills (including interpersonal skills such as problem solving, communication, conflict resolution), and assess the impact of changes in mentorship. Additionally, strategies for using feedback to support mentees will be reviewed. Opportunities will be provided for attendees to practice these skills and develop self-management goals to enable tracking of their own progress.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify evidence based practices for mentoring staff. 2. Participants will identify how BST can be used to support the skill development of mentees. 3. Participants will identify how they can examine the effects of changes in their mentorship strategies.
Activities: The format combines lecture, group discussion, and breakout groups. After information is shared with participants, opportunities will be provided to practice skills discussed.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BCBAs who are supervising others, including those who have recently received their credential, are new to supervising others, and/or want to improve this skillset.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, feedback, mentoring, supervision
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Efficient and Effective Supervision for Registered Behavior Technicians in Non-Clinical Settings: Challenges and Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: BCBAs who supervise and train RBTs are time-challenged to assist the RBT to acquire and maintain the essential skills to be successful implementing data-based practices. RBTs working in non-clinical settings require additional support and training as current ABA terminology and technology may not be supported in those environments. This workshop is designed for BCBAs who require additional strategies to support and supervise RBT’s in non-clinical settings utilizing time efficient and effective strategies to accelerate the RBT’s learning and skill acquisition. The workshop will present numerous evidence-based practices to add to the supervisors’ tool belt in order for the RBT to acquire the necessary skills. These individualized training protocols feature supervision documentation, vocabulary acquisition, skill demonstration, and feedback. All of these activities will aid the RBT to satisfactorily demonstrate competency to implement the task acquisition strategies and master the BACB task list to ensure delivery of current standards of care.
Learning Objectives: The participants will be able to use shaping. The participants will be able to use modeling. The participants will be able to use prompting and fading procedures. The participants will be able to provide naturalistic teaching strategies to provide instruction to the RBT. The participants will be able to individualize additional instruction for the RBTs. The participants will be able to collect data and evaluate success using data-based strategies. The participants will be able to monitor the client’s progress and treatment integrity. The participants will be able to use self-management strategies. The participants will be able to use data-based decisions to determine the need for additional training and support.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs, Special Education Teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Balanced Behavior Analyst: The Personal and Professional Balancing Act
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kate Elizabeth Harrison, M.Ed.
KATE ELIZABETH HARRISON (Brett DiNovi & Associates, BCBA), REBECCA CORRELL (The Language and Behavior Center)
Description: Balance, as a practitioner, and in managing personal and professional life, is essential to expanding the field of applied behavior analysis. If behavior analysts engage in actions that seclude the field from differing perspectives, they may inadvertently cause damage to the lives of those served by the field as well as the growth of the field itself. Behavior analysts must actively choose to conduct themselves in a manner that encourages humility, respect, and inquiry as it relates to supervision and collaboration. In conjunction with this position, behavior analysts must learn to, and actively practice, set and model professional boundaries, to avoid burnout risk, poor supervision, and diminished quality of service.
Learning Objectives: 1) State two actions that can be taken within 24 hours that will move participants towards balance as a behavior analyst; 2) Describe three characteristics of a Balanced BCBA; 3) Describe and demonstrate how to provide feedback in a constructive manner to those outside of the ABA field; 4) Identify one way in which to evaluate their effectiveness as a supervisor; 5) Identify one method in which to seek mentorship from a positive role model in the field of ABA; and 6) State two benefits of collaborating with professionals in other fields.
Activities: The format will combine lecture and discussion, a values exercise, small group breakout, and large group discussion
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Collaboration, Self-Care, Supervision, Values-based Supervision
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Putting the SUPER in Supervision: Evidence Based Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeremy H. Greenberg, Ph.D.
JEREMY H. GREENBERG (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Description: This three-hour intensive workshop will include evidence-based teaching, learning, and supervision strategies ad tactics from the Applied Behavior Analysis research literature. The content is aimed at behavior analysts and supervisors who are charged with the supervision of RBTs, Board Certified Assisitant Behavior Analysis, and BCBAs working with students having various special education needs.
Learning Objectives: Introduction to Supervision [Strategies & Tactics for Supervisors] The Learn Unit Data-Based Decision Making The TPRA (Ingham & Greer, 1992)
Activities: Participants will become literate in the The Learn Unit and supporting literature through Active Student Responding (ASR). Participants will learn the rules included in the Data Decision Protocol (Keohane, 1997; Greer, 2002; Greenberg, 2007) through hands-on presentation and exercises Participants will learn about the TPRA procedure, supporting research, and practice data collection and IOA using video models.
Audience: Supervisors of RBT, Board Certified Assisitant Behavior Analysts, and Board Certified Behavior Analysts, or other practitioners or therapists working with students with special education needs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): data decisions, learn units, supervision, tpra
 
Workshop #W89
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
OASIS-S: A Tool to Help Supervisors Meet the Ethical Obligations of Effective Supervision
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
KATRINA OSTMEYER-KOUNTZMAN (Behavioral Technologies Consulting Organization; Beyond the Individual, LLC), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: Effective behavior analytic supervision practices are of concern. In 2011 the BACB® developed a Supervision Task Force (BACB newsletter, 2011). This task force is focused on establishing “(a) more clearly defined approved experience activities, (b) supervisor qualification, and (c) guidelines for the format of supervision” (BACB® newsletter, Sept. 2011, p.1). The behavior analytic field acknowledges areas of deficiencies and the need for more tools and research in the practice of supervision and training of behavior analyst students (LeBlanc & Luiselli, 2016). The Online and Applied System for Intervention Skills – Supervision (OASIS-S) was developed to provide a modular curriculum specifically for distance-based supervision. Initial data show positive outcomes with trainee increases in knowledge, skill application, and higher passing rates on certification examinations (Heitzman-Powell et al., 2013). OASIS-S incorporates the current supervision requirements outlined by the BACB while making the program easy to use via integration into a comprehensive learning management system that includes modular curriculum, video integration, and paperwork management. This workshop will outline the ethical considerations for providing an effective, evidence-based supervision experience, barriers and solutions, and provide an overview of OASIS-S to provide an effective, evidence-based supervision experience using didactic instruction, guided practice, and group discussion.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1). Accurately answer questions about supervision ethical and practice guidelines set forth by the BACB as evidenced delivered via a post-workshop post-test, 2). List at least three barriers and solutions to providing effective, evidence-based supervision for BCBA candidates, and 3). Define and describe the components of OASIS-S and how they address barriers to effective, evidence-based supervision, 4). Show the ability to navigate the OASIS-S system with provided support prompts.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture integrated with active student responding and discussion to outline BACB supervision practices, identify barriers and solutions to effective supervision, and describe the research conducted to develop and support the use of OASIS-S. Guided practice will be utilized to teach participants to navigate OASIS-S including the use of supervisee and supervisor views of the system. Finally, a pre and post-test assessment will be utilized to support success of learning objectives.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is behavior analysts providing supervision to individuals pursuing the BCaBA, BCBA, or BCBA-D credentials.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Competency-Based Training, Programmed Instruction, Supervision Ethics
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Simplivise: Training the Trainer to Simplify Training and Supervision Through the Use of Evidence-Based Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yendri Diaz, M.A.
YENDRI DIAZ (Skillometry Inc.), MARIA BROWN (Skillometry Inc. ), ZUHE C ARNESEN (Skillometry Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to develop effective trainers and supervisors within ABA organizations. This workshop will demonstrate how to incorporate Behavioral Skills Training, Precision Teaching, and digital technology into a simplified training and supervision program that develops and maintains critical skills for effective ABA services in online and in-person environments. Phase 1: Instructional design segment where attendees will learn how to create an evidenced-based training program. Phase 2: Teach attendees how to train and supervise staff utilizing a unique blend of BST, PT, and digital tech. Phase 3: Prepare attendees to maintain skill repertoires through simplified supervision and digital technology.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Identify and define evidence-based training and supervision strategies. 2. Develop an outline for training and supervision content using evidence-based strategies and digital technology. 3. Identify and set goals for trainers, supervisors, and their learners. 4. Identify how to measure quality and effectiveness of their training and supervision. 5. Plan for maintenance of skills through supervision.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using behavioral skills training through the following activities: 1. Instructor led presentation and group discussion. 2. Instructor will model target skills. 3. Individual and small group guided practice. 4. Individual and small group competency building exercises. 5. Instructor will provide individual feedback to each attendee based on performance of target skills. 6. Visual aids and worksheets will be provided as supplementary materials.
Audience: Workshop target audience is ABA Clinical and Training Managers, Supervisors, and BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, Digital Technology, Staff Training, Supervision
 
Invited Paper Session #105
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Effective Leadership and Supervision
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Ellie Kazemi, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts are expected to lead treatment teams by training and supporting staff. However, many behavior analysts were not formally trained for such leadership positions. In this talk, I will address some of the common barriers supervisors face in their leadership roles and provide practical tips for efficient, effective leadership and supervision of staff.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the primary functions of effective supervision; (2) explain how to give tough feedback effectively; (3) describe the importance of performance feedback in supervision.
 
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)

Dr. Kazemi is a Professor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis for the past 10 years. She founded the Masters of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. She currently has two different lines of research. Her applied research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. Her laboratory research involves leveraging technology (e.g., robotics, virtual or augmented reality) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She is currently working on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award.  She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.

 
 
Symposium #147
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Fostering a Researcher-Practitioner Model in Autism Intervention in China: Two Study Examples
Saturday, May 23, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Room 102
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Chengan Yuan (Arizona State University)
Discussant: Matthew O'Brien (The University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Matthew O'Brien, Ph.D.
Abstract:

There exists a continuous discussion on the role of research training for applied behavior analysis practitioners in their professional development (Critchfield, 2015). However, practitioners who work in applied settings often have limited access to research training and participation. This is especially the case for practitioners located in China. Isolating practitioners from research may lead to a lack of updated evidence on the intervention that practitioners expect to undertake and result in selecting an intervention that may be less effective (Kelly et al, 2015). Training practitioners to embed research in their intervention may lead to their increased awareness of research, critical analysis of existing studies, and empirical contribution to the behavioral literature. In this symposium, the presenters will discuss two studies using different research methodologies to demonstrate how to actively involve practitioners in China in rigorous applied research to help improving intervention efficacy for their clients with autism and solving clinically significant problems based on empirical evidence.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, China, Researcher-Practitioner
Target Audience:

Graduates, researchers, and practitioners in the field of behavior analysis

 

Effects of a Group Contingency on Reciprocal Conversation and Social Preference of Children With Autism

LIQI CHEN (Jingdezhen Kindkids Autism Rehabilitation and Training Center), Chengan Yuan (Arizona State University)
Abstract:

Individuals with autism often have difficulties initiating and maintaining reciprocal conversations with others. Among the few studies that examined reciprocal conversations with children with autism, Koegel, Park, and Koegel (2014) proposed a reciprocal conversational framework that include the basic components that may facilitate continued conversational exchanges. In this study, we used an interdependent group contingency to improve reciprocal conversation responses of children with autism based on Koegel et al. framework. We paired the children with autism as conversational partners. Given that the interdependent group contingency may also promote cooperation and interaction between children (Smith et al. 2019), we further assessed children’s social preference through their choices between spending time with their peers or by themselves. In a multiple baseline design, we found that the group contingency immediately produced independent reciprocal conversation responses and increased preference for peers across all participants. In addition, the framework allowed children to sustain their conversation. Improvements were further maintained even after the group contingency was removed and novel peers were introduced. Practitioners in China implemented the study and participated in data collection. Verbal reports from the practitioners further indicate that they plan to include this intervention during their daily behavioral interventions.

 

Improving Delayed Recall of Children With Autism Through Instruction on Rehearsal Strategy and Reinforcement

LANQI WANG (University of Iowa), Chengan Yuan (Arizona State University), Qing Zhang (Arizona State University)
Abstract:

Challenges in delayed recall of events and stimuli are common in individuals with autism (Naoi, Yokoyama, & Yamamoto, 2007). However, few studies have evaluated the interventions that can improve recall with children with autism. Previous studies have found that individuals who used a rehearsal strategy during the delay are more likely to recall past stimuli than those who do not rehearse the recall (e.g., Bebko, Rhee, Ncube, & Dahary, 2017). This study is to examine if teaching rehearsal strategy to children with autism and providing reinforcement for recall would improve their delayed recall. Children with autism will be randomly assigned into three groups: control, rehearsal, and rehearsal + reinforcement groups. Thus, we will also assess if reinforcement for the correct recalls is necessary to improve participants’ performance. Practitioners will participate in this study as instructors who will implement the procedure and collect data. In addition, they will also collect data on treatment fidelity and interobserver agreement of each other. We will discuss fostering the role of researcher-practitioner during this presentation. Data collection will start in November 2019 and be completed by January 2020.

 
 
Symposium #239
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Super Supervision: Ethical, Impactful, Essential
Sunday, May 24, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Noelle Balsamo (Florida Gulf Coast University)
CE Instructor: Noelle Balsamo, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior analysts work in various roles with diverse responsibilities, each posing unique ethical quandaries. This symposium combines three presentations emphasizing issues that arise when finding and securing practicum sites for graduate students, common ethical issues that arise when supervising in the community, and how to develop ethical and effective school-based supervision programs. The first presentation will highlight challenges that university programs face when negotiating terms with a potential practicum placement. Examples of what some sites in a metropolitan area are asking for and strategies to navigate these negotiations in an ethical manner to the benefit of the placement, your students, and your university will be explored. The second presentation will examine supervision practices certified practitioners utilize when working in home-based programs and review common ethical issues resulting from inadequate supervision. Practical strategies for alleviating these issues and promoting the provision of adequate supervision will be shared. The last presentation will explore common ethical issues encountered by school-based behavior analysts providing supervision to individuals pursuing board certification and identify practical ways to address these issues without compromising their professional and ethical obligations.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Supervision
Target Audience:

This even would be targeting behavior analysts that are supervising people seeking their BCBA credential across settings.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: Better negotiate with placement sites, and maintain ethical principles Identify characteristics of adequate supervision and practice when working in home-based programs. Describe common ethical issues that arise when providing supervision in school-based settings and identify ways to alleviate these issues.
 
Securing Placement Sites
EDWARD JUSTIN PAGE (Duquesne University)
Abstract: As a new VCS, we are in the process of finding and securing practicum sites for our graduate students seeking to complete their field work hours. Finding appropriate placements that offer high quality BCBA supervision can be challenging, but the greater difficulty sometimes lies in negotiating terms between a university and potential practicum placement. How do we navigate this area ethically, maintain our required standards as set forth from the BCBA, and keep the sites & our students happy? This presentation will provide examples of what some sites in a metropolitan area are asking for, and provide strategies to navigate these negotiations in an ethical manner to the benefit of the placement, your students, and your university.
 
Ethical Consideration for Behavior Analysts Providing Supervision in School-Based Settings
JESSICA NAOMI CADETTE DUNN (The Victory Center for Autism and Related Disabilities)
Abstract: School-based behavior analysts providing supervision to individuals seeking board certification encounter unique challenges that must be carefully navigated to avoid potential ethical pitfalls. School-based behavior analysts may encounter issues related to managing a reasonable supervision workload, designing effective and ethical supervision activities, ensuring supervisees get a range of supervision experiences, delegating supervisee responsibilities appropriately, and providing effective, ongoing feedback and opportunities for evaluation. This presentation will describe common ethical issues encountered by school-based behavior analysts providing supervision to individuals pursuing board certification at a small private school for students with autism and related disabilities, many of which can be generalized to those working in public and charter schools. This presentation will also identify practical ways school-based behavior analysts can address these issues without compromising their professional and ethical obligations.
 
Increase Adequate Supervision to Decrease Ethical Violations
ELISA M. CRUZ-TORRES (Florida Atlantic University)
Abstract: According to the BACB, between 2016 and 2017, one of the most frequently violated Ethical Compliance Codes is that of “improper or inadequate supervision or delegation.” Specifically, this category reflects ethical deviations to Compliance Codes 5.0 (Behavior Analysts as Supervisors) and 10.05 (Compliance with BACB Supervision and Coursework Standards). When working in homes, supervisors must prepare precertification candidates how to prevent, identify, and report situations that may be potentially compromising. This presentation will review commonly reported ethical deviations that occur when working in homes and provide practical strategies for alleviating these issues while promoting the provision of adequate supervision.
 
 
Symposium #264
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Training Caregivers, Part I: Working With Young Children
Sunday, May 24, 2020
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 202B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Peter Sturmey (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Discussant: Gina Feliciano (Quality Services for the Autism Community (QSAC))
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Training caregivers to apply evidence-based Applied Behavior Analysis is an essential component of professional work and a key component of effective services. Research over the last 30 years has demonstrated the effectiveness, efficiency and acceptability of Behavioral Skills Training (BST) to teach skills, promote generalization of teaching skills and sometimes produce important changes in child behavior. As research in this area becomes more differentiated, one important aspect has been the application of BST to young children, including training family members and staff in integrated settings. This workshop will present three papers on applying BST to train parents of a child at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders via telehealth, training parents to teach joint attention skills to their children, and training special education teachers to improve the integrity of function-based interventions to increase child classroom engagement. These studies demonstrate that BST can readily be extended to working with caregivers of young children with disabilities, improve caregiver behavior and produce socially important changes in child behavior.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, joint attention, pyramidal training, young children
Target Audience:

Masters and doctoral level practitioners; advanced graduate students; psychologists; service supervisors;

Learning Objectives: Participants will (1) describe the application of behavioral skills training to family members; (2) describe the application of behavioral skills training to varied young children; (3) describe child outcomes of training caregivers.
 
Parent-Mediated Targeted Intervention via Telehealth for a Young Child At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder
(Applied Research)
ALICIA AZZANO (Brock University), Rebecca A. Ward (Phoenix Centre for Learning), Tricia Corinne Vause (Brock University), Maurice Feldman (Dept. of Applied Disability Studies, Brock University)
Abstract: Some early screeners can detect ASD signs in the first year of life (Feldman et al., 2012), opening the potential for pre-diagnostic early intervention. With the growing body of research demonstrating the feasibility of using a telehealth model to provide parent training of behavior analytic teaching strategies to parents of children with ASD (Lindgren et al., 2016), more research is needed to explore the efficacy of this model and early intervention in general for parents who have pre-diagnostic young children at-risk for ASD. In this current study, parents of one child aged 30 months first identified potential target problem behaviors on the Parent Observation of Early Markers Scale (POEMS; Feldman et al., 2012) that were confirmed during baseline observations. All observations occurred through videoconferencing once a week for one hour. A multiple baseline design across parent and child behaviors was used to evaluate a parent-mediated behavioral intervention to increase target developmental skills (pointing to request, verbal manding, motor imitation) using the telehealth model. Both parents participated in training. Data was collected for the percentage of correct responses from contrived trials for each child behavior, and for the percentage of correct parent teaching implementation according to the Parent Teaching Skills Checklist. Child skill teaching strategies taught to the parents included components of applied behavior analysis and natural environment teaching (Weiss, 2001). Parent training consisted of a modified behavioral skills training to accommodate the telehealth model (read and discuss written instructions, watch pre-made model videos, coach the parents to rehearse the teaching strategies with each other, and give feedback). As seen in Table 1, parent training increased parent teaching skills that maintained at over 80% teaching fidelity for both parents, with concomitant increases in child target skills (motor imitation is currently is training, accounting for the empty bottom row in Table 1). These results highlight the promise of a cost-effective telehealth parent training early intervention model to reduce early ASD signs in at-risk young children.
 

Parent and Sibling Training to Increase Joint Attention Behavior in Young Children With Developmental Disabilities

(Applied Research)
SARAH GRACE HANSEN (Georgia State University), Tracy Jane Raulston (Penn State), Jessica Demarco (Georgia State University), Hannah Etchison (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

Children with developmental disabilities are at increased risk for social communication deficits, including early and pivotal social communication skills. One such skill, response to joint attention, is a behavioral cusp for later developing social communication and play. Joint attention is coordinated shared attention between two individuals and an object or event. The current study investigated the effects of a train-the-trainer approach where parents were trained to teach siblings to be proficient interventionists on the response to joint attention behavior of their siblings with developmental disabilities. Results indicate an increase in parent task fidelity following a modified behavior skills training procedure during home visits, as well as an increase in sibling task fidelity following parent training using a social narrative and prompting procedure. Target child data indicate an increase in level of response to joint attention behavior following parent training and parent training of sibling. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

 

The Effects of a Teacher’s Behavior Skills Training in Strategies for Students With Exceptionalities in a General Education Classroom

(Applied Research)
Dustin Platter (Hawaii Department of Education), JENNIFER NINCI (University of Hawaii at Manoa), Shari Daisy (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

Special education teachers are often implementers of behavior intervention plans; however, a shortage of teachers in any field is only magnified in special education. Studies have looked at the use of behavior skills training (BST) in training teachers and caregivers in the intervention techniques prescribed for individuals and groups. This study extends research on teacher training using the BST model. This study was also designed to evaluate the relation between teacher integrity to a functional assessment-based interventions (FABI) suite of strategies and the effect on student on-task performance. The participants were a special education teacher and two elementary-aged students, each classified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The students engaged in off-task, often disruptive behavior while receiving special education services in a general education classroom. This study was conducted in three phases. Each phase consisted of BST to teach a subset of interventions. A single-subject changing criterion design was used to evaluate the effect of BST on teacher integrity and student performance. Results showed that BST improved teacher integrity through each phase and teacher integrity improved student on-task behavior. Limitations to this study will be discussed as well as directions for future research.

 

Evaluation of a Caregiver Training Intervention to Teach Safety Skills to Children With Autism

(Applied Research)
SARAH DAVIS (Brock University), Sarah Kupferschmidt (ONTABA), Kendra Thomson (Brock University ), Carly Magnacca (Brock University)
Abstract:

Alarmingly, nearly half of children with autism elope or bolt, and more than half of these children go missing for a concerning duration of time and/or enter into dangerous situations. Caregivers often do not feel prepared to address these serious concerns. This study evaluated the effectiveness of behavioural skills training (BST) for teaching caregivers how to also use BST in conjunction with a tactile prompt to teach their children with autism help-seeking behaviour. Participants included a total of six dyads, caregivers and their children with autism ages 5-10. We used a concurrent multiple baseline design across two dyads with three replications. The children’s safety responses were measured using a point system: (1) calling out for their caregiver in a louder than conversational voice, (2) locating a store employee, and (3) informing the employee that he/she was lost. Results indicate that four children met mastery criteria (a safety score of 3 across two consecutive trials), and the caregivers were able to successfully fade the tactile prompting device. Data collection with the final two dyads is currently in progress. This study contributes to the limited empirical research on caregiver training using BST to teach help-seeking behaviour to children with autism.

 
 
Symposium #288
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Behavior Analysis in Higher Education: Basic Principles Teaching and Supervision
Sunday, May 24, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Capitol/Congress
Area: TBA/PCH; Domain: Translational
Chair: Andresa De Souza (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Discussant: Darlene E. Crone-Todd (Salem State University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Abstract:

With the current high demand for BCBAs, we have also seen an increase in university programs offering applied behavior analysis (ABA) programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. To ensure quality education and preparation for clinical services, program curriculums should be aligned with the theoretical background of ABA as well as best practices for training essential skills. This symposium will explore important aspects that should be considered when teaching and supervising undergraduate- and graduate-level students in ABA programs. First, Isvânia Alves will present the conclusions of a project that identified controversies and disagreements related to basic principles and concepts among behavior analytical textbooks and field experts. In addition, Isvânia a will present a decision-making model to assist in selecting objectives when teaching and providing supervision to undergraduate students. Next, Maegan Pisman will discuss potential strategies and guidelines for effective and ethical remote supervision for students in university practicum courses. Maegan will conclude with possible areas for research related to online teaching and supervision. Darlene Crone-Todd will serve as the discussant.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavior-analytical principles, remote supervision, theoretical controversies, university practicum
Target Audience:

Instructors, BCBAs providing remote supervision, VCS of ABA programs

 

Concept and Principle Analysis, Controversies in Critical and Variable Features, and Decision-Making Model for Basic Behavioral Principles

(Theory)
ISVÂNIA ALVES DOS SANTOS (Universidade Federal de Alagoas; Programa de Pós-graduação em Educação), Ana Carolina Carolina Sella (Universidade Federal de Alagoas; Programa de Pós-graduação em Educação), Jackeline Santana Santos (Universidade Federal de Alagoas; Programa de Pós-graduação em Educação)
Abstract:

One of the roles a supervisor might have within applied behavior analysis regards the assurance that the decision-making process for interventions is conceptually sound. In the past few years our group has developed, implemented, evaluated, analyzed and redesigned a decision-making model aimed at content and behavioral objectives selection for teaching undergraduate students. In our last analysis-redesign iteration, we found inconsistencies, controversies or disagreements in regard to what defines some basic behavioral concepts and principles, such as environment, behavior, operant behavior, respondent behavior, antecedent, among others. Additionally, when we submitted these concepts and principles analysis to be reviewed by behavior analysts (i.e., content experts), the conceptual controversies appeared in some of the suggestions they made. The purpose of this paper is to present our decision-making model in its latest form, present and discuss a few of the controversies we found during our analysis, and highlight the importance of performing a concept or principle analysis when selecting content in areas in which conceptual disagreements might hinder or decelerate student learning and affect the decision-making process for interventions, if these disagreements are not explicit or discussed.

 
Considerations for Designing and Implementing Online Instruction and Remote Supervision for Students of Behavior Analysis
(Service Delivery)
Maegan Pisman (Imbueity; Pepperdine University), ANDRESA DE SOUZA (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Abstract: There appears to be a growing demand for university programs with coursework that qualify students to sit for the BACB® certification exam. Many universities offer courses in an online format to meet this demand; however, there are few to no empirical studies evaluating online instructional methods and practicum design within applied behavior analysis (ABA) programs. Hybrid and online programs present additional opportunities for accessing education and training in ABA, but they also occasion some challenges that should be deliberately addressed when designing courses and supervisory activities. We will provide suggestions for training and supervision for remote students based on the available literature in behavior analysis and other collaborative fields. Specifically, we will review considerations for curriculum development, strategies for implementing behavioral skills training, available technology for asynchronous and synchronous instruction, and ethical and professional practices for instructors and supervisees. We conclude with possible areas of research to evaluate the effectiveness of remote training and supervision.
 
 
Symposium #313
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Quality and Quantity is Related to Outcome of Early Intensive Beahvioral Intervention for Children With Autism
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon H
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Translational
Chair: Greg Elsky (Behavioral Learning Network)
CE Instructor: Sigmund Eldevik, Ph.D.
Abstract:

For the past thirty years Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) has been implemented in Norway and other European countries. In most countries it has been a challenge to deliver EIBI according to suggested minimum standards. The most common challenges have been to have properly trained staff implement the intervention, to get parents involved, and to provide intensive intervention (a minimum of 20 hours per week). As a result of this, outcomes have generally been moderate. However, outcomes of EIBI have been much better than “treatment as usual”. We will present two-year outcome data from a group of 30 children that were provided 10 hours a week and a group of 30 children that were provided 20 hours a week. We will also present data from another site were user satisfaction was evaluated in a reversal design across seven cases that received video-based supervision.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): EIBI, Quality, Video-based supervision
Target Audience:

BCBAs, supervisors in EIBI programs.

Learning Objectives: Explain how weekly intervention hours affects outcome of EIBI Discuss measures of EIBI quality Explain pros and cons of videobased supervision
 

Measuring Quality of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention

(Service Delivery)
SIGMUND ELDEVIK (Oslo Metropolitan University), Silje Nikolaisen (Centre for Early Intervention, Oslo, Norway), Christine Lie (Center for Early Intervention, Oslo, Norway), Hanne Skau (Centre for Early Intervention, Oslo, Norway), Astri Valmo (Centre for Early Intervention, Oslo, Norway), Roy Tonnesen (Autism Team, Bergen, Norway)
Abstract:

We have developed a quality standard based on the logic of the Periodic Service Review to evaluate and improve quality of individual EIBI programs. The programs are provided through in the two largest cities in Norway, Bergen and Oslo. Based on the core elements of EIBI we have made a 36-item checklist that we consider to represent an optimal EIBI program. Some of the items are given a higher weight (such as intensity of intervention and therapist training). The standards have measurable targets (done/not done) for all involved parties (supervisors, therapists, parents, community staff). We report quality data from 60 individual programs collected over a two year period and discuss what we have found to be the most common challenges we face in providing EIBI of high quality.

 
Community Implementation of Early Beahvioral Intervention: Higher Intensity and Quality Gives Better Outcome
(Applied Research)
HEGE AARLIE (Western Norway University of Applied Sciences), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo Metropolitan University), Roy Tonnesen (Autism Team Bergen, Norway), Kristine Berg Titlestad (Western Norway University of Applied Sciences), Silje Nikolaisen (Centre for Early Intervention, Oslo, Norway)
Abstract: We evaluated outcome of early behavioral intervention for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as it was provided through public service providers in Norway. One group of children received lower intensity and therefore lower quality intervention (10 weekly hours). A second group received higher intensity and and higher quality intervention (20 weekly hours). We compared outcomes on adaptive behavior, ASD severity, aberrant behaviors and intellectual functioning across the groups after two years of intervention. The higher quality group did better on all outcome measures than the lower quality group. Confirming a dose-response relationship between important variables such as weekly intervention hours and gains made. We discuss the pros and cons of the publicly funded behavioral intervention model.
 

Video-Based Supervison of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Programs: Percieved Quality, Time Saved and Implications for Caseload

(Service Delivery)
AINA HAY-HANSSON (Oslo Metropolitan University), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo Metropolitan University)
Abstract:

We compared the use videoconference with on site supervision of EIBI cases in a reversal design. Supervision was provided either on site or using video conference every second week. Questionnaires were developed to evaluate to what degree videoconference influenced the perceived quality of supervision. The questionnaires consisted of 12 items that were scored on Likert scales and measured program supervision, registrations/data collection, preparedness, and technical quality. Both the supervisor and the supervisees evaluated their experiences across the supervision modes. We discuss our findings in terms of the perceived quality of supervision, potential for saving travel time saved and implications for caseload capacity.

 
 
Symposium #330
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Training Caregivers, Part II: Enhancing Treatment Integrity
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon G
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar (Quality Services for the Autism Community (QSAC))
Discussant: Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar (Quality Services for the Autism Community (QSAC))
CE Instructor: Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Delivering effective ABA services requires caregivers to deliver interventions with sufficient integrity to result in socially meaningful changes in client behavior. Yet, many services often struggle to maintain the integrity of applied behavior analytic interventions in applied settings. Thus, practitioners must have behavioral technologies available to them to assess, and increase treatment integrity and evaluate interventions to do so. This symposium presents three papers addressing this important issue. These papers include a systematic review of training natural change agents implementing functional analytic procedures, a telehealth intervention error analysis and identify to remedy the implementation errors and an intervention study to improve treatment integrity during functional communication training

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): error analysis, systematic review, treatment integrity
Target Audience:

Advanced graduate students, Masters and Doctoral practitioners, research students, instructors and professors teaching ABA classes, and psychologists including school psychologists.

Learning Objectives: Participants will describe (1) current developments in behavioral skills training; (2) current developments in pyramidal training; and (3) the effects of BST and pyramidal training on client behavior .
 
Natural Change Agent Implemented Functional Analysis: A Systematic Review and Quality Appraisal
(Applied Research)
EMILY GREGORI (University of Illinois at Chicago), Christine Drew (University of Oregon), Stephanie Gerow (Baylor University), Leslie Neely (The University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: Functional analysis (FA) is the most accurate method for identifying the operant function of challenging behavior. Although trained therapists typically implement FAs, previous research has shown that variables, including the assessment agent, may impact the results of a FA. Given that the assessment agent can impact FA results, there is a need to determine the impact of natural change agent training on fidelity of FA implementation. The purpose of this review was to (a) summarize the available literature on natural change agent implemented FA, (b) determine methods for training natural change agents to implement FAs, and (c) determine the effects of training on change agent implementation fidelity of FA. Thirty-seven studies were identified and evaluated against the What Works Clearinghouse Quality and Evidence standards. Most of the included studies were found to have strong methodological rigor and moderate or strong evidence of effectiveness. Common training components across studies including instructions, modeling, role play, feedback, and coaching. Results suggest these components can be effectively utilized to train parents, teachers, residential staff, and students to implement FA in a variety of applied settings. Recommendations for practitioners and directions for future research will be discussed.
 
An Error Analysis of a Telehealth Intervention for Teaching Behaviour Technicians Common Behavioural Protocols
(Applied Research)
JOEY ROBERTSON (Brock University), Kendra Thomson (Brock University ), Mary Hume (ONTABA), Carly Magnacca (Brock University), Amanda Marcinkiewicz (Brock University)
Abstract: The relation between treatment integrity and client outcome has been empirically supported. Further evaluation of whether types of integrity errors (omission/commission) affect client outcomes is needed. We evaluated the efficacy of behavioural skills training delivered through telecommunication for teaching three behaviour technicians how to implement an errorless learning protocol to an actor role playing a child with autism spectrum disorder. Additionally, we assessed generalization to teaching an untrained skill, a child, and assessed corresponding effects on the child’s skill acquisition. We conducted a follow-up analysis of the behaviour technicians’ rate of errors of commission (ECoM; i.e., behaviours not prescribed by the protocol) and errors of omission (EOM; i.e., excluding components of a protocol). Participant 1 demonstrated more ECoM with the actor and the child than EoM. Both types of errors decreased post-training and in follow-up. We are currently analyzing the remaining behaviour technicians’ performance to assess whether the same pattern exists. Implications of the effect of BST training on the rate of EOM and ECoM and the relation to child responding will be discussed in relation to training.
 
Effects of Treatment Integrity Errors during Functional Communication Training
(Applied Research)
MARIE DAVID (Purdue University), Mandy J. Rispoli (Purdue University)
Abstract: Functional communication training (FCT) is an evidence-based practice for reducing challenging behavior and increasing communication skills of individuals with developmental disabilities. However, due to the procedural complexity of the intervention, practitioners may find difficulty in implementing the intervention with high integrity. Practitioners express the need for evidenced-based practices to be modified in such that it addresses the complexities of the natural environment and barriers to implementation. Fortunately, recent research on treatment integrity has indicated a potential tolerance for implementing behavioral interventions with lower integrity. Further research is needed to determine the threshold in which reinforcement can be delivered to challenging behavior but still lead to a meaningful outcome. For this study, we are evaluating the effects of systematic changes in treatment integrity by altering errors of commission during reinforcement delivery procedures as part of FCT. We utilized an alternating treatments design to compare varying levels of reinforcement delivered to challenging behavior. Preliminary results of the study, implications for practice, and recommendations for future research will be discussed.
 
Training Interaction Skills to Caregivers: A Systematic Literature Review
(Applied Research)
LORI L FINN (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis, The Sage Colleges)
Abstract: Interactions between caregivers and individuals with disabilities may have far-reaching effects, including impacting caregiver-client relationships, caregiver stress levels, and client outcomes. Research has shown, however, that caregiver interactions are not consistently optimal. As such, caregiver training on interaction skills may improve quality of services and quality of life. A systematic literature review of empirical peer-reviewed published studies from 2000 to 2018 was conducted to examine the impact of training interaction skills to caregivers of individuals with disabilities. Thirty-four papers met inclusion criteria. Training methods varied, most including some combination of didactic instruction, role play, demonstration, video modeling, coaching, and performance feedback. Caregivers participating in training included parents, teachers, and direct-support staff. Client participants included children and adults with various disabilities, including intellectual/developmental disabilities, autism spectrum disorder, and emotional behavioral disorders. Behavior-specific praise was a training focus in more than half of the papers, while the focus of the remaining papers was broader, including positive parenting, responsive interaction, and positive interactions. Findings suggest that training can improve interactions between caregivers and clients with disabilities and positively affect client outcomes. Papers will be discussed in terms of demographic and methodological features, including results, generalization, maintenance, limitations, implications and future directions.
 
 
Symposium #334
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
An Organizational Behavior Management Approach to Learner-Centered Instruction for Supervisors, Teachers, Teaching Staff and Clients
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence E
Area: EDC/OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Angela Moran (Touchstone)
Discussant: Matthew C. Howarth (Verbal Behavior Associates)
CE Instructor: Matthew C. Howarth, Ph.D.
Abstract:

We present the effects of an Organizational Behavior Management approach to Teacher and Clinician training in school and clinic settings resulting in increased supervisor, teacher and clinician expertise and student and client learning. We analyze the organizational components, discuss relevant measures within the organizational matrix, and present meaningful client and staff outcomes using data-driven procedures and interlocking contingencies. The data show that the implementation of a systems approach to supervision was related to increases in academic literacy, communication and social skills for elementary and high school students’ diagnosed with autism and related communication disabilities as well as increases in the foundations of early language acquisition and social skills for pre-school children diagnosed with autism. Teachers and clinicians were trained through PSI modules providing in situ opportunities specifically related to the accurate implementation of programs, choice of strategies and tactics, program materials and selection of new objectives. TPRA (Teacher Performance Rate and Accuracy) observations were used to insure IOA (Interobserver Agreement), of the delivery of intact learn units and errorless implementation of VBD (Verbal Behavior Developmental) protocols.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis interested in an OBM approach to supervision as related to outcomes for staff and clients across all aspects of learning, Clinical Directors, Providers of Supervision for Schools and Clinics, School personnel involved in Teacher Training and Administration, Providers of Clinical Supervision and Management.

 

Supervision Through a Personalized System of InstructioninSchool Settings

Dolleen-Day Keohane (Nicholls State University, Touchstone), KELLY KING (Touchstone and The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Grant Gautreaux (Nicholls State University, Touchstone)
Abstract:

We tested the effects of Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) modules documenting increasing levels of verbal complexity for Mentors and Mentees and decreases in students’ learn units to criterion in two school parishes across eight school settings in Louisiana. One mentor, nine teachers and nine teaching staff who served students diagnosed with autism participated. The module components included Verbal Behavior about the Science (the vocabulary of the science), Contingency Shaped behaviors (in situ best practice) and Verbally Mediated Behaviors (review of published research studies and conceptual articles, research, and tactical and strategic analysis of instruction). The supervision was based on the CABAS® (Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling) model and provided yoked contingencies for the teaching staff, teachers and mentors through the completion of module components. The mentor modeled strategic questions as scientific tacts and intraverbals andprovided model answers to questions using a dynamic algorithm to address students’ instructional problems across communication, social and instructional objectives. The Decision Protocol (Greer, 2014) and TPRA’s (Teacher Performance Rate Accuracy observations, Ingham & Greer, 1992) were implemented to monitor progress for all participants across the completion of module components.

 
The Effects of the Application of OBM Strategies on Overall Effectiveness of Service Delivery
MARA KATRA OBLAK (Seattle Behavior Consulting & Therapy)
Abstract: The application of organizational behavior management (OBM) to the workplace is an effective method to enhance the delivery of behavior analytic services. Effective service delivery directly impacts student learning and thus it is important to ensure the delivery of services provided are effective. We sought to determine the effects of implementing OBM based strategies at our organization on our staff and clients. We utilized strategies including performance modules for each employment, position, staff reinforcement systems and pay raises tied to performance modules. We also embedded behavior contingencies in our daily operating procedures to increase staff punctuality, timeliness of paperwork completion and adherence to company policies and procedures. This paper describes the OBM strategies used at our organization and the effects on staff performance, client progress, parent compliance and overall company efficiency. We found that the OBM strategies we implemented had positive effects for our organization including increases in completion of performance modules for our staff, student progress and parent compliance.
 
Training Clinicians to Assess Early Verbal Developmental Cusps and Capabilities and Implement Early Language Protocols
DANICA REAVES SAVOIE (Touchstone Center), Jayven J Encarnacion (Touchstone), Tricia Clement (Touchstone, LaBAA)
Abstract: We tested the effects of a systems approach to training clinicians to implement the VBDA (Verbal Behavior Developmental Assessment) and VBD (Verbal Behavior Development) protocols to induce cusps and capabilities associated with the early foundations of language and social skills for six young children. The clinic’s supervision was based on the CABAS® (Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling) systems approach to learning. Clinicians completed PSI (Personalized System of Instruction) module components as part of the clinic wide training system. The ELCAR (Early Learner Curriculum and Achievement Record) screenings for preferences/reinforcers, early observing responses associated with the foundations of language and early speaker behavior as well as the VBDA list of cusps and capabilities were used to measure each child’s pre-verbal, listener and speaker cusps pre and post intervention. TPRA (Teacher Performance Rate and Accuracy) observations and strategic analysis of decisions using a rule governed algorithm were used to ensure errorless implementation of probes, screenings and protocols and accurate measurement of learning.
 
Effects of a Performance Management Portfolio System on Changes in Critical Variables for Clinical Staff
GRANT GAUTREAUX (Nicholls State University, Touchstone), Angela Moran (Touchstone), Tricia Clement (Touchstone, LaBAA), Derek Jacob Shanman (Nicholls State University, Touchstone)
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the importance of using Organization Behavior Management (OBM) in the design of effective clinical staff supervision framework. Identifying the organizations mission and extensions of that mission is critical in ensuring every aspect of the organization is operating effectively and efficiently. Each job within the organization has a mission that contributes to the organizational mission. Once you have defined the mission, measures of quantity, quality, timeliness and cost naturally follow. This systems approach uses the principles and tactics of behavior analysis and applies them to all aspects of the organization. We implemented a performance management portfolio system for all behavior technicians working in an ABA treatment center. We analyzed correlations with retention, training module completion, performance accuracy and shift attendance. The results are reported in by sampling subsets of key groups of staff. We discuss the implications for future use of and continued research on our performance management system.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #342
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Evidence-Based Supervision and the Use of Technology as an Effective Tool for Training Values-Driven Professionals Across Cultures
Sunday, May 24, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 5
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau (Seattle Children's Hospital)
CE Instructor: Katerina Dounavi, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: KATERINA DOUNAVI (Queen's University Belfast)
Abstract:

Supervision of trainees and service providers is crucial in guaranteeing that clients receive quality services that match their needs and respect their wishes and preferences. This presentation will focus on evidence-based strategies for the effective training and supervision of service providers across cultures. Emphasis will be put on the importance of protecting supervisee’s well-being as a means to achieve optimal outcomes for the clients they serve. An outline of how technology can enhance the process of disseminating our science internationally, in particular in countries where there is a dearth of behaviour analysts and training opportunities, will be offered.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Students and entry-level professionals who wish to improve their cultural competence and knowledge of how technology can improve client outcomes; clinicians and researchers with intermediate and advanced understanding of evidence-based practice who wish to increase their cultural awareness and knowledge of how technology can facilitate access to quality services.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define effective supervision; (2) name at least two evidence-based strategies that effective supervisors use with trainees; (3) describe why cultural competence is important; (4) incorporate the use of technology for the supervision of service provision.
 
KATERINA DOUNAVI (Queen's University Belfast)
Dr. Dounavi is a Senior Lecturer in Behaviour Analysis and Autism at Queen's University Belfast, where she serves as the MScABA Director (includes an ABAI VCS) and supervisor of Ph.D. students. Her research focuses on behaviour analysis, developmental delays including autism, values-driven professional training, verbal behaviour, evidence-based education and wider behavioural applications for improving health and well-being. Dr. Dounavi has extensive clinical experience across numerous countries overseeing services offered to children and their families, supervising professionals and conducting research with the aim to improve educational outcomes. She is the Founder and Clinical Director of Magiko Sympan (Greece), the Clinical Director of Melody Learning Centre (Germany), the Senior Supervisor of Futuroschool Centre (France) and the Coordinator and Associate Supervisor of at-distance practice for ABA Spain (Spain and Spanish speaking countries). Her overall aim, which she seeks to achieve through a number of activities internationally, is to improve the delivery of services offered to families of children with autism and other developmental or learning disorders internationally through the provision of highly trained professionals and empowered parents.
 
 
Symposium #356
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
ABA Billing Code Utilization for Comprehensive Assessments and Effective Supervision in an Early Intervention Clinic
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon H
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Translational
Chair: Laura-Katherine K Barker (The University of Southern Mississippi )
Discussant: Christopher M. Furlow (Canopy Children's Solutions )
CE Instructor: Christopher M. Furlow, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior Analysts face numerous challenges with respect to managing time in an effective and efficient manner. Some of the greatest challenges are faced when considering conducting assessments within the time constraints of insurance companies and providing training and ongoing supervision to Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs). In this symposium, data will be presented on an evaluation of indirect and direct assessment methods designed to increase the time efficiency of conducting comprehensive assessments. In addition, data will be presented on an evaluation of training methods designed to increase the time efficiency of training staff and ensuring effective ongoing supervision in clinical settings.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Autism, Language Assessment, Staff Training, Supervision
Target Audience:

BCBAs and BCBA-Ds who provide direct supervision to RBTs and trainees

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will define and describe indirect and direct assessment methods that may be used to conduct comprehensive language assessments 2. Participants will define and describe behavioral skills training (BST) with in-situ feedback. 3. Participants will describe clinical applications of BST for staff training and ongoing supervision
 
An Initial Evaluation of an Assessment Method for the PEAK Relational System Direct Training Module
(Applied Research)
LANA WARREN (Canopy Children's Solutions), Robyn Brewer (Canopy Children's Solutions), Mark Garrett Yeager (Canopy Children's Solutions), Laura-Katherine K Barker (Canopy Children's Solutions )
Abstract: When considering the best available treatment, it is crucial that assessments yield valid and reliable measures to produce effective treatment options. Currently, this research is limited, giving behavior analysis a platform to evaluate the psychometric properties and content validity of assessment tools used across settings. One major issue that practicing behavior analysts face is conducting the most comprehensive assessment within the time constraints put in place by insurance companies. Utilizing a method of assessment that includes indirect and direct descriptive methods and experimental manipulations could aid in cutting down assessment time, especially if those methods have known correspondence with each other. The purpose of the present study was to assess the components of the Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge Relational Training System: Direct Training Module (PEAK-DT) for children with autism. More specifically, this study evaluated the correspondence between the PEAK indirect assessment (PEAK-IA) and PEAK preassessment (PEAK-PA) for the Direct Training Module. Comparisons were also made to determine which method offers the best predictive validity of actual performance on the PEAK-DT module. Results indicate that PEAK-IA completed by parents and PEAK-PA share moderate correspondence, with the PEAK-PA offering the strongest predictive validity of direct testing outcomes. Implications for behavior-analytic practice, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.
 
Clinical Applications of a Staff Training and Supervision Model to Newly Hired Registered Behavior Technicians
(Service Delivery)
MADELINE POTTER (Canopy Children's Solutions), Laura-Katherine K Barker (Canopy Children's Solutions), Robyn Brewer (Canopy Children's Solutions), Breanna Newborne (Canopy Children's Solutions), Mary Nicole Thomason (Canopy Children's Solutions)
Abstract: Competency training and ongoing supervision of Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) can present numerous challenges for practicing behavior analysts. Efficient and effective training methods offer valuable tools that could offset the numerous time and monetary demands placed on clinicians. As such, the utilization of the Adaptive Behavior Treatment with Protocol Modification billing code (i.e., CPT code 97155) which can include simultaneous direction of an RBT may be beneficial to clinicians seeking to provide ongoing training and supervision to their staff while continuing to make meaningful changes to a client's programming. This study serves as a clinical application of the findings of Barker et al., 2019 to a sample of newly-hired RBTs who received behavioral skills training (BST) and ongoing supervision for 5% of the hours spent providing behavior-analytic services per month as required by the BACB. Results indicated that in-situ feedback during initial training and during Adaptive Behavior Treatment with Protocol Modification sessions was the only training method that resulted in significant acquisition of mastery-level skills that also maintained after the trainee received their RBT designation
 
 
Symposium #368
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Compassion and Self-Compassion Among Supervising Behavior Analysts and Direct Care Staff
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–6:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 206
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kate E. Fiske Massey (Rutgers University)
Discussant: Bridget A. Taylor (Alpine Learning Group)
CE Instructor: Kate E. Fiske Massey, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Recent research has highlighted the importance of compassion in ABA. A survey of parents of children with ASD indicated that parents often rated behavior analysts poorly on their demonstration of behaviors that indicate compassion and empathy for the family (Taylor et al., 2019). Further, LeBlanc and colleagues (2019) noted that the majority of surveyed behavior analysts had not received training on relationship-building skills during their graduate studies. As noted by these authors, compassion is required for behavior analysts working with families of individuals with autism and other related disabilities. Additionally, compassion is necessary when behavior analysts oversee direct care staff working with these same populations. Research indicates that staff members working in the field of ABA report high levels of burnout associated with variables that include the support they receive from supervisors (Gibson et al., 2009; Plantiveau et al., 2018). In the current symposium, we will first examine the qualities of exemplary behavior analysts, including those that center on compassion for others. We will then examine factors within ABA settings—such as supervision—that contribute to employee burnout, and consider steps behavior analysts can take in the workplace to promote compassion by altering supervisory practices and focusing on staff self-care.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): compassion, self-care, supervision
Target Audience:

The target audience is current board certified behavior analysts, including and especially those who are currently serving in supervisory roles.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the qualities of an exemplary behavior analyst that are directly related to supervising others; (2) describe organizational factors, especially those related to supervision, that can contribute to staff burnout; (3) describe compassionate approaches that can be taken by behavior analysts in interactions with supervisees to reduce burnout.
 
The Composition of Exemplary Practitioners: Perspectives of Behavior Analysts
JESSICA E. FRIEDER (Western Michigan University), Ryan M. Zayac (University of North Alabama), Thom Ratkos (Berry College), Madison Williams (University of North Alabama), Ashton Geiger (University of North Alabama), Amber Paulk (University of North Alabama)
Abstract: What characteristics and behaviors makeup an exceptional behavior analyst? We should be well prepared to answer this question with our field’s emphasis on objective definition, description, quantification, and experimentation. However, many of us may struggle to identify distinguishing differences between exemplary and average behavior analysts. The current multiphase study, asked BCBAs and BCBA-Ds to identify their top five qualities and attendant behaviors of individuals they considered exemplary behavior analysts. Two hundred seventy-four participants completed the survey which yielded 180 different identified qualities. Similar qualities (e.g., compassionate, thoughtful, caring) were consolidated into one category (“Empathetic”), and the authors narrowed the list to 35 qualities and corresponding behaviors, which we named the Exemplary Behavior Analyst Checklist (EBAC). An initial 392 BCBAs and BCBA-Ds rated the extent to which exemplary behavior analysts displayed each quality and corresponding behaviors from the previously developed list, using a 1 (never exhibits this quality) to 5 (always exhibits this quality) Likert-type scale. Participants also ranked their top 10 qualities in order of importance. A discussion of the EBAC and participants’ ratings will be presented, including implications related to training, study limitations, and future research.
 

Burnout in Providers Serving Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Multi-Method Examination of Organizational Causes

SUMMER BOTTINI (Binghamton University; Marcus Autism Center ), Colin S. Muething (Marcus Autism Center), Kaylie Wiseman (Binghamton University), Jennifer M. Gillis (Binghamton University)
Abstract:

Providers serving individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are at high risk of experiencing burnout. Burnout is of serious concern as it negatively impacts one’s physical/psychological health and quality of services. Research has focused on individual predictors of burnout; however, understanding organizational causes may elucidate targets for prevention. Study 1 surveyed 149 individuals providing direct-care services to individuals with ASD to examine the relation between areas of work-life and burnout using standardized measures. We found a high percentage of providers experience burnout. Workload, reward, fairness, and values emerged as the best work-life predictors of burnout but predicted little variance in burnout, suggesting existing measures do not sufficiently capture organizational aspects that contribute to burnout. To better understand the unique experiences of this population, we recruited 11 providers to interview regarding experiences of burnout and organizational factors that affect burnout. Qualitative analysis revealed nine core themes. Workload, coordinating providers, supervision, and colleagues were frequently reported to contribute to burnout; whereas, social support from colleagues and supervision were frequently reported to mitigate burnout. Findings suggest areas for prevention within organizations servings individuals with ASD and avenues for better measuring relevant work-life factors.

 

Evaluating the Effects of Behavioral Skills Training With Behavior Analysts to Increase Essential Supervisory Skills

ALLISON HAWKINS (Rutgers University), Kate E. Fiske Massey (Rutgers University)
Abstract:

Many individuals with autism spectrum disorders are enrolled in specialized private schools due to challenging behavior or specific learning difficulties. Job responsibilities in these settings can be stressful for staff employed in direct-care positions. Previous research suggests that high-quality supervisor relationships can moderate staff stress and burnout for direct-care staff in specialized applied behavior analysis schools (Gibson et al., 2009). Literature suggests that improving Board Certified Behavior Analysts’ (BCBA) use of corrective feedback, empathetic statements, and reinforcement could contribute to improved supervisory relationships. To date, no research has presented the use of behavioral skills training (BST) to teach BCBAs supervisory skills, and the current study sought to fill this gap in the research. Two BCBAs were taught two essential supervisory skills: corrective feedback and empathetic statements. Both participants mastered each skill following BST. A third skill, reinforcement, met mastery criteria for both participants before BST was implemented. Staff ratings of perceived supervisor support did not support the hypothesis that ratings would improve following BCBA mastery of target skills. Staff ratings were initially high during baseline and remained stable following BCBA training. The results of the present study suggest that behavioral skills training is an effective tool for teaching supervisory skills to BCBAs.

 

CANCELED: Effects of Short-Term Self-Care Training on the Well-Being of Staff in an Applied Behavior Analytic Setting

KATE E. FISKE MASSEY (Rutgers University), Margaret Swarbrick (Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care), Susan Gould-Fogerite (Rutgers New Jersey Medical School), Catriona Beauchamp Francis (Rutgers University), Debra Paone (Rutgers University)
Abstract:

In past research, professionals working in ABA report high levels of burnout affected by factors such as supervisory and social support (Plantiveau et al., 2018) and employee exposure to aggressions (Hastings et al., 2000). Taylor and colleagues (2018) called for a focus on self-care for ABA professionals. We examined the effects of a short-term self-care program on 14 ABA staff members working with adolescents with ASD and severe challenging behavior. Three 1-hour trainings focused on teaching self-care skills such as focused breathing techniques and tips for healthy eating and sleep hygiene. Staff members practiced skills in session. All staff members completed the Professional Quality of Life: Compassion Satisfaction and Fatigue Version 5 (ProQOL), a 30-item measure of burnout, compassion fatigue, and traumatic stress, before and after the program. Contrary to expectations, staff reported low levels of burnout prior to trainings, and reductions in burnout and related measures were not observed following training. However, 100% of staff reported that the program was relevant to their needs and that they planned to use the skills they had learned in the future. While these findings are preliminary, the importance and evaluation of future self-care programs with this population will be discussed.

 
 
Panel #389
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Things Supervisors do that Supervisees Hate: Improving BCBA Supervision through Feedback from RBTs and BCaBAs
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Archives
Area: TBA/VRB; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Diah Askari, M.S.
Chair: Diah Askari (Behavior Man; Mighty Heroes at Pediatric Behavior Therapies)
DERIC E. TONEY (The Dozen; University of Nevada, Reno)
KRISTEN LANCASTER (BH3, INC; Capella University)
LINA MARIA KANEDA (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Quality supervision is imperative to ensure consistent improvement in the services we provide, as well as guiding the development of the next generation of behavior analysts (BCBAs). The manner in which BCBAs provide supervision, to both students and technicians, is thought to be partly molded by their own experiences with their personal supervisors. As such, supervision styles are likely to be passed down to future generations of BCBAs. Being such a critical feature in one’s development as a BCBA, supervisors should be sensitive to the various contingencies surrounding their responsibilities. While there are an increasing number of resources available for supervisors, an often overlooked source of feedback is directly from those who BCBAs supervise. The purpose of this panel discussion is to review and respond to submissions provided by students, behavior technicians, and BCaBAs regarding their experiences with supervision. Furthermore, the panelists will discuss, as a group, potential solutions and/or changes that might improve the nature of supervision by BCBAs to further encourage the quality of this essential feature of our development as professionals and scientists.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Those who provide supervision to RBTs and BCaBAs.

Learning Objectives: After this presentation, attendees will be able to: 1. Identify quality supervision practices. 2. Effectively provide feedback and/or request feedback to improve their performance in their respective role(s). 3. Use strategies based in behavioral principles to enhance their effectiveness as both a supervisor and a supervisee. 4. Assess inter-professional communication styles to note areas in which they could improve in their role of providing or receiving supervision.
Keyword(s): Ethics, Feedback, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #447
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Behavior Systems Analysis to Address the Issues Arising from Our Quickly Expanding Field
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jenna Marie Rabe (Capella University; CCBS)
Discussant: Jenna Marie Rabe (Capella University, CCBS)
CE Instructor: Jenna Marie Rabe, M.S.
Abstract:

As our professional numbers grow in size, it is imperative that we plan and support this growth and ask ourselves crucial questions pertaining to how to set up individuals and behavioral agencies for success. Specifically, what systems are necessary to be in place for all of these newly certified behavior analysts and registered behavior technicians? It’s a well-known fact that a large majority of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) have been certified for two years or less. This creates a pyramid effect with a smaller number of more experienced BCBAs supervising and supporting a greater number of BCBAs with less experience. This symposium will explore various topics pertaining to this question including: 1) A mentorship system that agencies can duplicate; 2) A system of reinforcement aimed at clincians who exceed expectations, thus reducing turn-over and increasing employee satisfaction; 3) Competency based systems for reviewing performance and aligning salaries and bonuses based on competency achievements, and 4) How each component listed above integrates together to create a behavior system. Keywords: Organizational Behavior Management, Behavior Systems Analysis, Supervision, Mentorship

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Mentorship, OBM, supervision
Target Audience:

BCBAs

Learning Objectives: 1) Learn about and define a behavior systems analysis 2) Acquire tools and resources that are evidence-based to support the supervision of BCBAs, BCaBAs, and RBTs 3) Define key components of a behavior system as it relates to staff retention and quality of services
 
Mentorship: How to Build a Supportive System to Foster Clinical Growth
PAIGE MARIE RITARI (CAL ABA; CCBS)
Abstract: As the field of behavior analysis grows with more and more individuals becoming certified as Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), we must ensure that systems are in place to support the continued skill development of BCBAs. Additionally, the expectation must not be that once certified you now are competent and fluent enough to be set off on your own. Of course there will be areas of strength, but what happens when the BCBA is tasked with doing a Functional Analysis they've never done before, or if they receive a client who engages in behaviors that they've never worked with before? Or, what if they have done the FA and treated the behaviors, but lack confidence in taking the lead? This symposium provides a system for setting new BCBAs up for success using structured and competency-based mentorship with practical strategies and resources offered to those supervising. Key Words: Mentorship, OBM, Supervision, BCBAs
 
Reinforcement and Incentives Work on Clinicians, Too: A Process for Implementing Reinforcement Systems
JAMMIE JONES (ASU; CCBS)
Abstract: Turnover, clinicians bouncing from agency to agency, poor morale and quality of treatment are all issues that can arise due to clinician burnout, ratio strain, and lack of support. Over and over again we see that we reserve reinforcement systems for our clients and forget about using the exact same science with our staff. Some barriers one may face once they do commit to setting up a system of reinforcement include, the bandwidth to monitor and collect data on every employee on a frequent (weekly to bi-weekly) basis, and ensuring that the system supports each individual’s motivations and reinforcers as these are idiosyncratic and may change. This symposium aims to offer attendees resources and tools to support clinical systems of reinforcement that can be easily monitored and implemented. Thus, increasing staff job satisfaction, achieving or even exceeding a company’s key performance indicators, and ultimately leading to higher rates of staff retention and lower rates of attrition.
 
Competency Based Assessments: A Process for Assessing Clinicians and Supporting Skill Development
ELISA YONJI KIM (CCBS)
Abstract: Salaries shouldn’t be solely dependent on the budget just as years of experience must not be the measurement for a clinician’s competency. That’s not to say that these two things shouldn’t be taken into account as well, but as behavior analysts we can do better. So, what is a person to do when in charge of assigning wages, awarding pay increases or bonuses, and ensuring that salaries align with one’s fluency in their role? Take data, of course! This symposium will offer a process and system for reviewing staff’s performance and assessing one’s competencies in their role, whether Registered Behavior Technician, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst or Board Certified Behavior Analyst, both initially and ongoing. Case studies will be reviewed showing the effects of competency based assessments on performance and audience members will leave this symposium with both a system to replicate and resources to support the system. Key Words: Assessment, OBM, Supervision
 
Behavior Systems: How Reinforcement, Mentorship, and Competency Based Assessment Work Together
CHRISTINA M. COUNTIE (Simmons University; CCBS)
Abstract: As we know, behavior is complex. Therefore, we must not solely look at one potential variable to address issues such as staff retention and satisfaction, or increasing clinician skillset. It requires a system of integrated components
 
 
Panel #457
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Evaluating the Effects of Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity Within the BCBA/RBT Supervision Model
Monday, May 25, 2020
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS/TBA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Mawule A. Sevon, Other
Chair: Shawn Capell (Covenant 15:16 LLC )
MAWULE A. SEVON (The Key Consulting Firm, LLC)
KIMBERLY EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC)
SHANEERIA K PERSAUD (United Behavior Analysis Inc.)
Abstract:

The field of Applied Behavior Analysis has experienced tremendous growth since its inception. According to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board®, between the years 2016 and 2018, the total number of certified behavior analysts has increased by over 30%, and the total number of registered behavior technicians® has nearly doubled. An essential component for obtaining and maintaining these certifications include supervision hours. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board® has provided task lists regarding the items and topics required for adequate supervision; however, no components of cultural responsiveness and awareness are included. With the increase of behavior analysis within culturally diverse populations, it is imperative that our field develop new and innovative ways of including cultural competency into the Board Certified Behavior Analyst® and Registered Behavior Technician® supervision experience. Many behavior analysts have reported not receiving sufficient training within the areas of diversity and cultural responsiveness and feel unprepared to serve diverse clients and communities adequately. This workshop is designed to address the gap in formal training specific to the lack of diversity and cultural responsiveness across the supervision continuum.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Registered Behavior Technicians; Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts; Board Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: 1. Define cultural responsive practice 2. Understand and apply the impact of cultural responsive practice on the supervision continuum 3. Apply cultural responsive practices to the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and Task List
Keyword(s): Certification, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Sensitivity, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #482
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Training Pre-Service Behavior Analysts: A Review of Multiple Training Systems
Monday, May 25, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence D
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Lloyd D. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Lloyd D. Peterson, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Board Certified Behavior Analysts are credentialed through education, fieldwork, and an exam. The fieldwork portion is an opportunity to learn and utilize behavior analytic principles for future independent practice under the supervision of an already credentialed behavior analyst. Although fieldwork guidelines are provided by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board, the implementation of the fieldwork varies across organizations and behavior analysts. The latitude of implementation within the fieldwork guidelines is helpful for implementing quality pre service training in various different contexts and to meet the needs of the trainee. The purpose of this symposium is to provide a review of different organizational practices to training pre service behavior analysts. Each presentation will provide an overview of a training practice that is applicable to the entire fieldwork requirements or to a specific portion. Attention is given to training professionalism as part of the fieldwork requirements. Each presentation will also provide barriers to implementation to provide attendees complete information for evaluating context fit within their organizations or individual supervision practices.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Fieldwork, Supervision, Training
Target Audience:

This symposium is for practitioners supervising pre-service behavior analysts. Additionally, individuals seeking certification may benefit from learning different approaches to supervision.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will state the definitions for scope of practice and scope of competence based upon Brodhead, Quigley, and Wylczynski (2018). 2. Attendees will describe how the Confidence and Competence Checklist (Brodhead, Quigley, & Wylcznski, 2018) can support a professional in defining personal scope of competence. 3. Attendees will describe the processes and outcomes of organizational BCBA supervision project. 4. Attendees will describe how to incorporate practices for teaching professionalism into supervision. 5. Attendees will describe a process for teaching visual analysis to pre-service behavior analysts.
 
Creating an Organizational Pre Service Supervision System: A Review of Melmark's Learning Series
JENNIFER RUANE (Melmark), Shawn P. Quigley (Melmark), Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College)
Abstract: Scope of practice is a range of activities authorized for an entire profession based upon a credential or license (Brodhead, Quigley, & Wilczynski, 2018). Scope of competence is a subset of practice activities defined by a professional based upon education, training, and supervised experiences BACB, 2019a). As the number of and demand for behavior analysts continues to grow (BACB, 2019b; Carr & Nosik, 2017; Deochand & Fuqua, 2016) there is an increased need for discussion regarding scope of competence and its relationship to training new behavior analysts. As stated by Carr & Nosik (2017), two-thirds of all behavior analysts have obtained the BCBA credential since 2011, even though the credential has been available since 1999. Although much experience can be obtained prior to a credential (and likewise little experience might occur post credential), the recent growth of BCBAs indicates practitioners are young, with limited breadth and depth of clinical experiences. The purpose of this presentation is to describe an organizational approach to creating a fieldwork process for pre service behavior analysts. Data for evaluating scope of competence in relation to supervising behavior analytic trainees will be shared. Barriers to implementation will also be discussed.
 
Evaluating the Softer Side of Supervision: Recommendations When Teaching and Evaluating Behavior-Analytic Professionalism
MICHAEL KRANAK (Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), Natalie Andzik (Northern Illinois University )
Abstract: One welcomed addition to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board Fifth Edition Task List and Supervisor Curriculum (2.0) is the duty of supervisors to not only teach, but also evaluate “soft skills,” or rather, behavior-analytic professionalism. With this addition, supervisors must teach and evaluate the professional skills of their trainees. However, findings from surveys of supervisors in the field indicate that supervisors do not feel it is their job to train or evaluate these skills, and that they also do not know how. The presenter will discuss a recommended training model rooted in behavior skills training. The presenter will also provide recommendations for getting buy-in, operationally define these skills, provide examples, and how to ensure trainees have adequate practice so that timely and constructive feedback can be given.
 

Teaching Graduate ABA Students to Utilize Single Subject Design in Applied Settings

SUSAN AINSLEIGH (Bay Path University)
Abstract:

In the practice of ABA, the use of experimentation and hence, experimental analysis is often overlooked. Consequently, graduate students studying applied behavior analysis and working in applied settings have fewer opportunities to practice utilizing single subject/ single case designs during a supervised fieldwork experience. The implications for the practice of ABA are significant; less experimentation and experimental analysis results in clinical decisions that may incur more error and less effective treatments. This presentation overviews the use of behavioral skills training (BST) to teach graduate students the use of single-subject design for conducting experimental analyses. Two case examples conducted by graduate students are presented.

 
 
Panel #498
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Teaching and Supporting Professional Behavior in Academic and Clinical Settings
Monday, May 25, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Capitol/Congress
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Danielle L. Gureghian, Ph.D.
Chair: Danielle L. Gureghian (Garden Academy)
LAURA L. GROW (Garden Academy)
TIFFANY KODAK (Marquette University)
SARAH A. LECHAGO (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Abstract:

There are a number of applied studies demonstrating how to effectively supervise and teach clinical skills in autism service provision such as data collection, behavioral assessment, and intervention (e.g., behavioral skills training). However, there is a paucity of research on how to teach professional behavior such as communicating effectively to different audiences, establishing healthy boundaries, and prioritizing time-sensitive tasks. As professors and clinical supervisors in the area of autism spectrum disorder, we use principles of behavior analysis and applications from organizational behavior management to teach our supervisees clinical and professional skills. A panel of faculty from academic programs and directors from an autism service provider will discuss the following topics: (1) the critical skills and behaviors of supervisors and supervisees used to support professional behavior, (2) how applications from organizational behavior management can be used to establish effective supervisory systems and processes, and (3) how the panelists have established, evaluated, and maintained effective supervisory systems in their own organizations.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Practitioners in autism service provision, professors in academic settings, leaders of organizations providing autism services

Learning Objectives: At the end of the panel, the audience will be able to: 1- Describe critical professional skills in the area of autism research and service provision 2- Describe the systems and processes that supervisors can use to support professional behavior 3- Identify strategies for implementing, evaluating, and maintaining systems that support professional behavior
Keyword(s): Organizational behavior, Professional behavior, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #500
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Everyone Eats: Behavior Analysis Applied to Eating and Meal-Related Behaviors
Monday, May 25, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence D
Area: TBA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Margaret Pavone Dannevik (Lindenwood University)
CE Instructor: Margaret Pavone Dannevik, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium presents three applications of the science of human behavior to the improvement of eating and health-related behaviors. First, a social media-based group contingency related to meal preparation will be discussed, followed by a conceptually-systematic model of how to use online video to change meal preparation behaviors. Finally, the presenters will demonstrate how supervisors can adapt the 5th edition BACB task list to help supervisees serve individuals with ineffective eating and activity repertoires.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Eating, Health, Nutrition
Target Audience:

The target audience for this event is advanced practitioners, supervisors, and teachers of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will learn how to adapt the 5th edition task list to supervise students accruing behavior analytic experience with learners who struggle with eating and activity-related behaviors 2. Attendees will discuss eating and activity-related topics in behavior analytic terms and be able to disseminate them to appropriate audiences 3. Attendees will consider the ethical guidelines of the field as they relate to the provision of supervision and instruction for individuals struggling to engage in healthy eating behaviors
 
Utilizing an Online Video Series to Increase Frequency of Home Cooking
(Service Delivery)
TONY CHAMBERS (Special School District St. Louis MO), Margaret Pavone Dannevik (Lindenwood University)
Abstract: Taking the time to prepare and cook meals at home, regardless of diet plan or restrictions, has shown to better your overall health (Wolfsen & Bleich, 2014). People who eat meals at home with friends and loved ones report an overall happier and healthier life than those who do not (Harbec et al., 2018). Established interventions such as video modeling (Kellems et al., 2016,), chaining (Shrestha et al., 2013) and task analyses (Kanfush & Jaffe, 2019) are conducive to teaching multi-step processes of preparing and cooking food (Cooper et al., 2007). The growth of social media and individual devices such as cell phones and tablets has allowed the author created a video dissemination system to combine behavior analytic methods and teach individuals how to cook at home regardless of their current skill level. The proposed model includes videos which will teach detailed steps through modeling, task analyses, chaining, and verbal instruction. Approaching culinary education by teaching the selection of individual ingredients, preparation skills, and cooking methods rather than following a single short demonstration or written recipe for one dish will allow for more opportunities to access tangible, primary reinforcement increasing the likelihood of meal preparation in the future.
 
Why Do Behavior Analysts Eat What They Eat?
(Applied Research)
CLINT EVANS (Behavior Therapy Specialists of Illinois and Missouri), Margaret Pavone Dannevik (Lindenwood University)
Abstract: Using social media, connection to other professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis is a click away. A social media group was created to solely discuss the dietary needs and habits of professionals in Applied Behavior Analysis. A poll was taken of 100 participants in the group to get a small cross section of the dietary habits of professionals that directly work in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. The results revealed that most professionals in the field neglect or overlook their own dietary needs. A protocol was created using this information as a basis for self-monitoring of tracking one’s eating habits and an attempt to increase value-based dietary habits to enhance a healthy lifestyle within the ABA community and possibly beyond. The survey and subsequent group contingency served to replicate the findings of other socially mediated contingency management such as Kurti, & Dallery, (2013), and Meredith, Grabinski, & Dallery, (2011).
 

Everybody Eats! A Model for Supervisors Assisting Students in Acquiring Experience Working With Problematic Eating and Activity-Related Behaviors

(Theory)
MARGARET PAVONE DANNEVIK (Lindenwood University), Nicole Vaux (Lindenwood University)
Abstract:

The number of students enrolled in behavior analysis programs has been increasing exponentially over the past ten years. As part of the educational preparation for the BCBA exam and certification, these students must accrue supervised experiences in which they apply their classroom-based skills to real world behavior change. As previously noted (Luke, Carr, & Wilder, 2018), many instructors and students have mistakenly interpreted the supervised experience requirements to be specific to the field of Autism service provision. This paper presents a model of how supervision of fieldwork and concentrated fieldwork could include experiences that address problematic eating and activity-related health behaviors in neurotypical populations. The model is intended to assist supervisors of behavior analysis students by giving specific suggestions for how students could accrue supervised experience in this growing subspecialty (Behavior Analysis in Health and Fitness, 2019; Normand, Dallery, & Ong, 2015).

 
 
Panel #501
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
PDS: I Graduated and Now I’m a Supervisor: How do I Manage My Time Effectively and Become an Awesome Supervisor?
Monday, May 25, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Archives
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Shawn P. Quigley, Ph.D.
Chair: Avner Fraidlin (Western Michigan University)
JENNIFER N. FRITZ (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
SHAWN P. QUIGLEY (Melmark)
KATHY FOX (Haugland Learning Center)
Abstract:

Students in graduate level training programs for behavior analysis may be required to serve in supervisory roles as soon as they graduate and become certified as BCBAs. To date, university that provide graduate level training programs in behavior analysis include limited opportunities for students to practice behaviors that are essential to building their supervisory skill set. These skills may include delivering effective feedback, assessing and monitoring supervisees’ progress, modeling effective professional, interpersonal and ethical behaviors, the ability to manage time effectively, plan a head and organize their own and their supervisees’ schedules to name a few. Students who graduate from programs for behavior analysis may find themselves overwhelmed by the workload and ill-equipped to handle the supervisory responsibilities that often are an integral part of becoming a BCBA. This panel seeks to provide behavior analysis graduate students and current supervisors in the field the opportunity to listen to experts share their experience and learn from them how they manage their time effectively while providing high quality supervision for a team of supervisees. The audience is invited to ask the panelists about their strategies and systems they have developed over the years to support their work as supervisors.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students in programs for behavior analysis and behavior analysts who serve as supervisors in the field

Learning Objectives: The audience will be able to describe the responsibilities of supervisors in the field of behavior analysis The audience will be able to apply strategies for effective supervision as described by the panelists The audience will be able to apply strategies for effective time management as described by the panelists
Keyword(s): Supervision, Time management, Training
 
 
Symposium #522
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Behavioral Systems Approaches to Staff Training: Effective Orientation, Onboarding, and Training Systems
Monday, May 25, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Capitol/Congress
Area: OBM; Domain: Translational
Chair: Ivy M Chong (May Institute)
CE Instructor: Ivy M Chong, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior analysts work in diverse settings including clinics, centers, schools, hospitals, and other large, community-based "systems". Behavior analysts also work with a diverse population of clients (e.g., those with developmental disabilities, mental health disorders, comorbid diagnoses) and employees (e.g., direct care staff, nurses, doctors, teachers, behavior technicians, behavior analysts, administrators). Providing high-quality orientation, onboarding, and training experiences to employees with diverse experience and education requires significant development, implementation, and evaluation of these "staff training" systems to ensure the best outcomes for clients and their staff. Using a behavioral systems approach, each of the authors in this symposium will describe the orientation, onboarding, and/or training systems within their large systems while discussing the evaluation required to further inform system development.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): onboarding, orientation, staff training
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts, Supervisors, Administrators

Learning Objectives: See Abstract and LOs on day of presentation
 
Evaluation of An Agency-Wide Training System to Enhance Functional Behavior Assessment Skills by Clinicians
(Applied Research)
SARAH M. DUNKEL-JACKSON (Centria Autism Services), Jessica Hynes (Centria Autism Services)
Abstract: Functional Behavior Assessment is an evidence-based practice used within high-quality ABA therapy programs to assess and help treat challenging behaviors exhibited by individuals. The specific pinpoints associated with performing these skills require training and supervision of clinicians, especially in large agencies providing geographically diverse applied behavior analysis services. Several effective staff training formats exist including behavioral skills training, video modeling, and performance feedback. The efficiency with which large agencies (and even educational institutions with geographically diverse learners) provide effective staff training opportunities is of great importance to our field and the clients we serve. Using a group experimental design, the current study will explore the effectiveness of various staff training formats on the functional behavior assessment skills of clinicians who provide ABA therapy to individuals with ASD. Results will include changes in observed performance of FBA skills across indirect assessments, descriptive assessments, functional analyses, data summarization and analysis, and reporting. Clinician feedback on preference for training formats and client data will also be discussed.
 
A Systems Evaluation of Staff On-Boarding: Efficiency, Outcomes, and Design
(Applied Research)
AMY KENZER (Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center), Alexis N. Boglio (Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center), Sienna VanGelder (Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center)
Abstract: Organizational growth can reveal under-developed and inadequate systems that functioned effectively when very few individuals were involved but pose challenges with larger teams. Within the applied realm, the combined need for continued growth and high turnover results in increasing demand for an effective and efficient staff on-boarding and training process. Specifically, the implementation of clear systems, staff structure, and implementation support can have a meaningful impact on the success of new employee training plans. Furthermore, when staff are introduced into an organization in a structured way and adequately trained long-term retention is increased. This presentation will provide an overview of the design and implementation of a service delivery model for conducting new staff on-boarding from the initial interview to completion of their first 90-days of employment as a Registered Behavior Technician. Following a Behavioral Systems Analysis approach, the staff on-boarding and training process was evaluated for coordination across Clinical and Human Resources departments, including feedback loops to maintain process compliance and inform further system development, and evaluation of staff performance and organizational fit to drive retention.
 

Melding Approaches: A Staff Training Model for Orienting Psychiatric Nursing and Support Staff to the Role of Applied Behavior Analysis on an Acute Inpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit

JAMES W. JACKSON (University of Michigan Michigan Medicine)
Abstract:

While much of the early research in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) focused on individuals with mental health disorders and individuals with developmental disabilities, more recent history in ABA with individuals with developmental disabilities has flourished while its active role with those with mental health diagnoses has diminished. Additionally, there is a proliferation of comorbid diagnosis of mental health conditions for individuals with developmental disabilities such as ASD. There is also a focus on utilizing psychotropic medication as either a primary or supplementary treatment component for behavioral excesses. The current paper describes an in-service staff training model aimed at orienting psychiatric nursing and support staff to the field of Applied Behavior Analysis, and how ABA can be an integral part of a multidisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment in an acute in-patient psychiatric unit for children and adolescents. Melding a psychiatric nursing model aimed at both acute behavioral stabilization and medication assessment and management with a functional behavioral approach and the resulting barriers to integration will be discussed.

 
 
Panel #548
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Effective, Streamlined, and Low Supervisor Response Cost Mentor Programs for Companies With BACB Students
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207B
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Hana Jurgens, M.A.
Chair: Hana Jurgens (Positive Behavior Supports)
PATRICK O'LEARY (Positive Behavior Supports Corp.)
SHANNON O'LEARY (Positive Behavior Supports, Corp.)
BEVERLY WATSON POLINTAN (Positive Behavior Supports, Corp.)
Abstract:

First impressions and experiences are everything to BCBAs, and their experience starts when they sign that first contract at a fieldwork or practicum site. When BACB students look for places of both current and future employment, it begins with their practicums and independent fieldwork experience outcomes, which ultimately shape them as an analyst. The response cost (both physical and financial) on a company of taking a student in and training them is high. When those students leave for employment elsewhere once they reach that pivotal point of credentialing, the reinforcement of taking in students is diminished across the company and the supervising BCBA. So, how do we get them to stay? If students feel supported, engaged, challenged academically and practically, and that they have the opportunity to flourish during their student experiences, they are more likely to stay and begin their analytic career at the sites that they do their fieldwork hours. We seek to discuss our current mentor program, both content and structure, and to assess its ability to produce competent, critical thinking, driven, and ethical future BCBAs, and the rate at which those BCBAs ultimately remain to begin employment with our company.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

This event targets BCBAs who supervise or are interested in becoming supervisors.

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will learn easy and effective systems for quantifying and tracking for quality supervision. 2. Participants will learn how to reduce response cost and increase quality of their BCBA's who provide supervision to students. 3. Participants will learn how to identify immediate structural components to enhance supervisory experiences at their worksites.
Keyword(s): OBM, Students, Supervision, Sustainability
 
 
Panel #550
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Expanding Our Competence and Collaborations: Behavior Analysis in Mental and Medical Health
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon A
Area: CBM; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Teresa Camille Kolu, Ph.D.
Chair: Evelyn Gould (McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School; FirstSteps for Kids, Inc.)
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
JEFF KUPFER (University of Colorado Denver)
KEN WINN (Firefly Autism)
Abstract:

Behavior analysis can bring together multidisciplinary teams responsible for effective programming for diverse clients with concurrent mental health and medical diagnoses. Even so, the early experiences of many ABA program participants and supervisees are characterized by exposure to only a small slice of the many client populations who could benefit from ABA. This panel assembles professionals, professors, and practitioners spanning community practice, medical and university environments to address audience questions on the intersection between behavior analysis and treatment of behavior related to mental health. Discussion points will include answers to recent questions posed by community members and students to university professors and those disseminating behavior analysis on social media, including: What ethical considerations are involved as I treat behavior in a person with concurrent mental health diagnoses? How do we form effective collaborations in mental health and medical hospital settings? How does behavior analysis look in an interdisciplinary environment, and how can I expand my boundaries of competence related to more diverse settings?

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Intermediate skill behavior analysis level

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will state actions that behavior analysts can take to collaborate more effectively in multidisciplinary contexts 2. Audience members will give examples of ways behavior analysis applies to supervision settings where mental health diagnoses interact with behavioral health 3. Participants will state ways to expand boundaries of competence in practicing in mental and medical health settings
Keyword(s): competence boundaries, medical health, mental health
 
 
Panel #559
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
How Do We Ensure Treatment Integrity in International Markets With Less Than 4,000 BCBAs Attempting to Serve the Needs of Nearly 20 Million People With Autism Spectrum Disorder?
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Archives
Area: TBA/CSS; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Jennifer M. Gillis, M.A.
Chair: Karen Chung (Special Learning, Inc. )
KIM MADAR KLEMEK (Global Autism Project)
JENNIFER M. GILLIS (Binghamton University)
SVETLANA IYER (Stepping Stones Center, Bangalore, India)
Abstract:

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 1 in 160 (0.6%) children around the world has Autism. Based upon prevalence rates published by a small number of countries around the world, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the autism prevalence rate for international markets may range from 1% to 2%. Applying the conservative WHO estimate of 1 in 160 to the 2.2 Billion children in the world (per Unicef), there are nearly 14 million children in the world with autism. Adding adolescents and adults to that figure may be as high as 20 to 30 million people in the world living with autism. Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is the globally agreed-upon gold standard for autism intervention. There are less than 40,000 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA), who are experts in implementing behavior analysis in applied settings in the world. According to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), the international credentialing body that governs practitioners of Applied Behavior Analysis -- BCBAs (including BCBA-D and BCaBA) and RBTs -- less than 10% of BCBAs (et al.) practice outside the U.S. The current reality is that there are less than 4,000 BCBAs available to serve the needs of nearly 18 to 19 million people with autism living outside the United States. Faced with these seemingly insurmountable numbers, it would be very easy for international BCBAs to throw treatment integrity out the window. However, a great majority of international BCBAs are committed to preserving the integrity and efficacy of ABA services. International BCBAs with a dual objective of maintaining treatment integrity while helping the masses are faced with a herculean task, some of which can be tackled with a scalable Global Supervision Framework. During this panel discussion, we will introduce the Global Supervision Framework, the foundation of which relies on a group supervision model designed to maximize existing resources to scale while maintaining treatment integrity. The panel, comprised of BCBAs whose primary practice is located in India; a BCBA who builds sustainable clinical capacity with fifteen pre-existing centres in thirteen different countries as well as two international verified course sequences;; and a faculty member whose primary body of work includes providing support to BCBA practitioners who support individuals with autism across the lifespan. As part of the discussion, we will present results of a research study conducted in partnership with Stepping Stones Center and Bingham University on the positive impacts of systematically incorporating structured journal assignments (i.e. Journal Club) in group supervision settings with behavior technicians / RBTs as a means to increase clinical competency. We will close the discussion by presenting examples of group supervision models with demonstrated efficacy in center-based (in-person) and remote (telehealth) settings. Upon the conclusion of this panel discussion, learners will be able to: (1) Explain the demand for ABA services in international markets; (2) Discuss 3 to 5 key challenges to maintaining treatment integrity when providing ABA services in international markets; (3) Discuss 3 to 5 key barriers to providing effective supervision in international markets; (4) Explain the Global Supervision Framework; (5) Discuss the benefits of incorporating a Journal Club to group supervision; (6) Become familiar with effective group supervision models used in international markets for both in-person supervision and telehealth supervision.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCaBA, BCBA, BCBA-D

Learning Objectives: (1) Explain the demand for ABA services in international markets; (2) Discuss 3 to 5 key challenges to maintaining treatment integrity when providing ABA services in international markets; (3) Discuss 3 to 5 key barriers to providing effective supervision in international markets; (4) Explain the Global Supervision Framework; (5) Discuss the benefits of incorporating a Journal Club to group supervision; (6) Become familiar with effective group supervision models used in international markets for both in-person supervision and telehealth supervision.
 
 
Symposium #582
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Organizational Behavior Management in ABA-Based Service Delivery Agencies
Monday, May 25, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Capitol/Congress
Area: OBM/DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Lauri Simchoni (Halo Behavioral Health)
CE Instructor: Lauri Simchoni, M.S.
Abstract:

Organizational behavior management research has collectively documented that feedback is critical to creating behavior change in staff performance that drives organizational effectiveness (Daniels & Daniels, 2017). Moreover, self-management strategies help structure the work environment, increase self-motivation, and facilitate behaviors that contribute to the achievement of performance standards (Breevaart, Bakker, & Damerouti 2014). Furthermore, an emphasis on improving staff performance may contribute to their overall satisfaction, which is critical, as the effects of staff turnover include variability and decreased consistency for the consumers, perceived threats to company culture, and the financial costs inherent in recruiting and replacing lost staff. Fortunately, previous research has reported that satisfaction with training, supervision, and pay predicted the employees’ intent to turnover (Kazemi & colleagues, 2015). This symposium presents recent research related to the use of organizational behavior management within ABA-based agencies in an effort to improve their performance and satisfaction. The first paper analyzes the effects of a performance development system on the acquisition of direct intervention staff goals using a multiple baseline across behaviors design. The second paper analyzes the effects of a self-management intervention utilizing rules and self-monitoring on work-related organizational and planning skills using a multiple baseline across behaviors design. The third paper analyzes the effects of an intervention on self-reported staff satisfaction, relative to baseline reports, using a multiple baseline across service locations, within the same organization, design that additionally differentiates mediating variables (e.g., employee position and rank, weekly supervision, goal setting).

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): OBM, Self-Management, Staff Performance, Staff Satisfaction
Target Audience:

Individuals working in community-based ABA-agencies who provide supervision to direct intervention service delivery staff, as well as all direct service delivery staff themselves.

Learning Objectives: Learning Objective One: Participants will be able to identify and describe a performance development plan that states staff performance strengths, improvement goals, and current progress directly related to BACB® “BCBA / BCaBA Task List (5th ed.)” items and / or the “Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts,” across supervisory sessions wherein feedback is delivered in a collaborative fashion. Learning Objective Two: Participants will be able to identify and describe how to integrate the benefits of self-management procedures in individualized staff improvement goals related to pre-planning and organization (e.g., latency in minutes for getting on task, desk organization, arriving to work on time). Learning Objective Three: Participants will be able to describe how to measure employee satisfaction and state the specific variables that may affect reported satisfaction.
 

Collaborative Staff Performance Improvement

LAURI SIMCHONI (Halo Behavioral Health), Megan Michelle St. Clair (Halo Behavioral Health), Adel C. Najdowski (Pepperdine University; Halo Behavioral Health), Victoria Daniela Castillo (Endicott College; Halo Behavioral Health), Peter Farag (Halo Behavioral Health), Bryan Acuña (Halo Behavioral Health; Pepperdine University )
Abstract:

Organizational behavior management research has collectively documented that feedback is critical for creating behavior change in staff performance that drives organizational effectiveness (Daniels & Daniels, 2017). However, often feedback is dictated, rather than collaboratively determined. Additionally, direct intervention staff performance is critical to maximizing the quality of services provided. Typically, the more the intervention implementation integrity, the more effective and efficient overall outcomes are likely to be. As such, exceptional supervision entails the application of performance development plans (PDPs) strategically designed to collaboratively (i.e., supervising BCBA and RBT together) identify performance strengths, improvement goals, and current progress, across each supervisory session. A concurrent multiple baseline across behaviors design is being utilized to evaluate the effects of individualized PDPs on the acquisition of direct intervention staff goals. Current data represent baseline performance across six goals, with the initiation of intervention for the first four. Given the significant change in level across goals, data thus far indicates that the PDP effectively increased staff acquisition of performance improvement comparative to baseline. Future data will be collected to determine if intervention continues to yield such promising acquisition via stability across active goals and consistent change in level, increasing trend, and limited variability across novel goals to be introduced. Moreover, two additional goals have been generated, are currently in the baseline phase, may soon be introduced. Finally, any mastered goals are to be monitored in a maintenance phase to follow the PDP intervention.

 
Using Self-Management Procedures to Improve Staff Performance in an ABA-Based Service Agency
BRYAN ACUÑA (Halo Behavioral Health; Pepperdine University), Victoria Daniela Castillo (Endicott College; Halo Behavioral Health), Adel C. Najdowski (Pepperdine University; Halo Behavioral Health), Lauri Simchoni (Halo Behavioral Health)
Abstract: Self-management strategies help structure the work environment, increase self-motivation, and facilitate behaviors that contribute to the achievement of appropriate performance standards (Breevaart, Bakker, & Damerouti 2014). Moreover, it is an empirically-based intervention that has widely been shown to be effective in remediating a variety of skill deficits. Specifically, this study uses a multiple baseline across behaviors design to evaluate the effects of a self-management treatment package using rules, self-monitoring, self-recording, and contingent performance-based feedback on work-related organizational and planning skills of staff in a community-based service delivery agency. Current data represent baseline performance for one participant across three behaviors: (1) latency in minutes to getting on task, (2) percentage of desk cluttered, and (3) minutes late arriving to work. Intervention has been initiated on the first goal of latency in minutes to getting on task and initial data demonstrate an immediate decrease in level, with limited variability, relative to baseline performance. Future data will be collected in order to determine if the intervention continues to yield a decreasing trend. Finally, future data will display the effects of intervention on the desk clutter and punctuality to work.
 

A Closer Look at Employee Satisfaction Within a Behavior Analytic Service Organization

GINGER R. RAABE (The ABRITE Organization), Janice Frederick (The ABRITE Organization), Valerie R. Rogers (The ABRITE Organization)
Abstract:

Employee turnover has many side effects within a service organization. Some likely effects of turnover include variability and decreased consistency for the consumers, perceived threats to company culture and the financial costs inherent in recruiting and training replacements. In the presence of such effects, examination of the factors that decrease employee turnover is an important investigation. It is a logical extension that highly satisfied employees remain and thus organizations with high levels of reported satisfaction are likely organizations with decreased levels of employee turnover. Previous research has reported that satisfaction with training, supervision and pay predicted the employees’ intent to turnover (Kazemi & colleagues, 2015). This presentation will discuss the results of employee reported satisfaction on the aforementioned variables, measured throughout implementation of specific interventions aimed to increase satisfaction. Data were collected on satisfaction throughout baseline and intervention phases and intervention was evaluated with the use of a multiple baseline across service locations within the same organization. Our data will be discussed in the presence of observed trends and position specific variables. For example, this investigation highlighted the need to separate out the data based on clinical position as the highest dissatisfaction was reported by those in the behavior interventionist (BI) position and the highest satisfaction was reported by more senior team members. These results will be discussed in detail while discussing other data that were collected on other measures of interest, such as weekly supervision and goal setting. Future directions for those examining employee satisfaction will also be detailed.

 
 
Panel #587
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
PDS: The Supervision Experience: Utilizing Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Relational Frame Theory Approaches to Create Effective Dialogue Within the Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship
Monday, May 25, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Archives
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica M Hinman, M.S.
Chair: Jessica M Hinman (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale)
DANA PALILIUNAS (Missouri State University)
BECKY BARRON (Southern Illinois University)
ZHIHUI YI (Southern Illinois University)
Abstract:

The relationship between a supervisor and supervisee is complex and dynamic and plays an important role in the training of behavior analysts. Supervision provides students with the opportunity to develop their skills as a behavior analyst with the support of someone with experience and expertise. While the supervision relationship is intended to be one of support and guidance, the imbalance in knowledge and experience can create a power differential between the supervisor and supervisee. This power imbalance can lead to an inauthentic relationship and the supervisee disregarding supervisor feedback. In an attempt to address these potential issues within the supervision relationship, supervisors can create a flexible context for supervision by making space for effective dialogue using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT) approaches. By noticing and allowing space for the differences, biases, and experiences that exist between the supervisor and supervisee, the supervisor can foster a bidirectional learning experience which allows the supervisor and supervisee to learn from one another. The panelists in this talk will speak to their supervision experiences and discuss how they have been able to integrate ACT and RFT approaches within supervision. Speakers will also answer questions about how supervisors can begin integrating these approaches in their own supervision.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students, BCBAs, BCaBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) have a better understanding of how to create an effective supervision dialogue; (2) be able to create meaningful supervision relationships; (3) apply ACT and RFT approaches within supervision.
Keyword(s): ACT, RFT, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #609
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Train-the-Trainer: Achieve Best Training Outcomes Using Evidence-Based Procedures for Staff Training and Supervision
Monday, May 25, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Maria Brown (Skillometry Inc.)
CE Instructor: Yendri Diaz, M.A.
Abstract:

Building and maintaining an ethical training company or training department is paramount to the effectiveness and success of any Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) practice. Trainers are responsible for training staff to fluency and mastery and ensuring readiness to work in the field. Supervisors are responsible for ensuring generalization of such skills in the natural environment and maintaining skills repertoires. In this talk, we will discuss the development and growth of a train the trainer program, best training practices such as Behavioral Skills Training (BST), Precision Teaching, acoustical guidance (clicker training), and digital technologies to train and supervise, trainers and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) staff.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Clicker Training, Digital Technology, Staff Training, Supervision
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts conducting supervision of applied behavior analysis services and staff training.

Learning Objectives: 1. Identify and define evidence-based training and supervision strategies. 2. Identify technologies to reinforce appropriate responses during session without interrupting learner outcomes. 3. Identify how to measure quality and effectiveness of training and supervision. 4. Identify the importance of staff training and increase effectiveness of train-the-trainer programs.
 
Implementation of Behavioral Skills Training in Train-the-Trainer Programs
ZUHE C ARNESEN (Skillometry Inc.)
Abstract: In this talk, we will discuss the development and growth of a train the trainer program, starting from recruitment of trainers, to edit the development of trainer skills, behavioral skills training, ongoing supervision, adherence to BACB standards. Also, implementation of evidence-based training methodologies, providing continuous training for all trainers across different levels or credentials, utilizing technology to achieve training goals, and implementing the train-the trainer- program across different agencies.
 
Evaluating the Use of Acoustical Guidance as an Immediate Method of Reinforcement for Staff Training
MARIA BROWN (Skillometry Inc.)
Abstract: Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is a treatment package used to teach a variety of skills to different populations. Feedback is an essential component of BST. When conducting a training, during the rehearsal component of BST, delivery of feedback can interrupt sessions or cause confusion. During in vivo training of staff, acoustical guidance can be used to provide reinforcement for correct responses without interrupting session or confusing the learner. We will discuss the results of using acoustical guidance on staff training in a classroom setting with 'Lead Trainers' training 'Assistant Trainers', and 'assistant trainers' training 'trainees', and its effect on 'assistant trainer' procedural fidelity.
 

Utilizing Digital Technology to Train and Supervise Staff

YENDRI DIAZ (Skillometry Inc.)
Abstract:

The talk will cover training and supervision in an online platform and in-person environments. It will include instructional design segment where attendees will learn how to create an evidenced-based training program and supervise staff utilizing a unique blend of Behavioral Skills Training, Precision Teaching, and digital technology.

 

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