Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

CE by Content: Ethics


 

Workshop #W4
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Considerations: What Every Behavior Analyst Should Know About Augmentative and Alternative Communication Decision-Making
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc. )
Description: An overwhelming number of communication options exist for our learners with complex communication needs. Practitioners are not only faced with decisions related to the type of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) system, but are also tasked with choices related to the most effective teaching strategy. Behavior analysts must be familiar with the available options, critically review the current research and make informed recommendations; all while maintaining compliance with the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code and working collaboratively with other members of the educational team. This presentation will review several current and popular approaches in the field including aided language stimulation/modeling, prompting strategies, core vocabulary, presumed competence and the varying definitions of "robust" as related to AAC decision-making. Relevance to the Code will be explored and participants will be presented with related ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will leave the training with a framework for analyzing new communicative approaches while maintaining positive, ethical team collaboration.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) State specific guidelines from the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code in relation to AAC decision-making (2) Describe current popular approaches in the field of AAC, specifically including aided language stimulation/modeling, core vocabulary, prompting strategies; presumed competence and the term "robust" as it applies to AAC decision-making (3) Describe strategies for working cooperatively with other educational team members
Activities: Workshop objectives will be targeted via a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion and analysis of videos demonstrating key concepts. Ethical scenarios will also be presented for small group discussion and problem-solving.
Audience: This workshop will be presented by a dually-certified Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) and Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Content will be of particular relevance to behavior analysts and other team members working with learners who utilize AAC systems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): AAC, Communication, Ethics, Pyramid
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Standing up for Science: Ethical Challenges and Opportunities for Behavior Analysts Working in the Autism Community
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Association for Science in Autism Treatment), ERIN S. LEIF (Monash University )
Description: There are literally hundreds of interventions for autism, although the vast majority of these lack any scientific support. Unfortunately, approaches that are not grounded in science prevail in many schools and centers, fringe treatments are afforded widespread media coverage distracting consumers and separating individuals with autism from science-based intervention such as ABA, and the internet is filled with misinformation and unsubstantiated claims. This presents ethical challenges and opportunities for behavior analysts. Science and scientific methods are not only relevant to discussions surrounding autism treatment selection but should serve as the foundation upon which treatments should be chosen, implemented, and evaluated. This workshop will highlight the role that behavior analysts can play in helping consumers, consultees, supervisees and other colleagues choose interventions, implement those interventions with high degrees of fidelity and transparent, as well as in objectively evaluating outcomes. Strategies for promoting science and the scientific method in both practice and in communication will be discussed throughout the workshop as they interface with our ethical responsibilities and what is known about evidence-based practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, workshop participants will be able to: 1. identify and describe red flags in autism treatment, recurring media misrepresentations, and diverse perspectives on treatment selection and explain the ethical concerns that result; 2. demonstrate a broader conceptualization of how the tenets of applied behavior analysis can be both a model and a framework for delivering science-based education and treatment regardless of discipline and highlight the implications conceptually and procedurally; 3. describe challenges for behavior analysts related to interdisciplinary collaboration, consumer education, and interacting with members of the media community and describe strategies for avoiding or reducing the impact of these challenges; and 4. identify specific and sustainable contributions that can be made to promote science in the treatment of autism across disciplines, as well as within interactions with the media community and consumers
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, small group exercises, and follow up feedback and discussion. Original source material from the media will be incorporated in the workshop and discussion. Very brief role plays will be included as warranted.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate but would be suitable for behavior analytic teaching faculty, BCBAs involved in supervision and consultation, as well as BCBAs working with multi-disciplinary teams.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Right to Effective Treatment: Understanding and Incorporating the Scientific Literature in Your Practice
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Benjamin N. Witts, Ph.D.
BENJAMIN N. WITTS (St. Cloud State University)
Description: Clients have the right to effective treatment. The effectiveness of treatment is typically relegated to the academic side of the science where standards and safeguards are put in place to help identify what is and is not "effective." However, the publication system at large is rife with bias and error, and consumers of that science are often not prepared to judge where bias lies. This workshop will educate attendees on various sources of bias in research and provide tools to help determine if and how the literature should inform practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will be able to: (1) identify common biases and errors in research; (2) describe how these biases and errors can influence research and publication; (3) describe ways in which the behavior-analytic literature can be incorporated into practice given these biases and errors
Activities: The format combines lectures, targeted reading, discussion, and small group activities
Audience: Intermediate; clinic directors, employees, graduate students
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, research, service delivery
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
ABA Billing Codes Commission Presents: Is That Billable? Understanding How to Bill Ethically and Effectively
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sara Gershfeld Litvak, M.A.
JULIE KORNACK (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), BRYCE MILER (Trumpet Behavioral Health), SARA GERSHFELD LITVAK (Behavioral Health Center of Excellence)
Description: Led by members of the ABA Billing Codes Commission, this workshop will provide specific guidance for each of the CPT I billing codes for adaptive behavior. Elements of the workshop will include: • Review of billing code descriptors in the context of an ABA treatment plan • Best practices in clinical documentation for each billing code • Distinguishing the difference between supervision and direction of the technician • Billing for assessments • Medically Unlikely Edits – proper use and current status • Modifiers for complexity, telehealth • Potential changes to the codes • Minimizing claims denials • Additional codes to request in a contract negotiation • Valuing the codes • Ethical guidelines Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the intent of the billing codes and Medically Unlikely Edits; common billing obstacles; sustainable and ethical billing practices; the process and potential of valuing the codes; and changes to anticipate in the future.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Understand current ABA CPT coding requirements to minimize claims denials; (2) Understand issues with current ABA CPT coding in order to advocate for and participate in making necessary changes; (3) Identify critical elements in a contract regarding the billing codes; (4) Be aware of ethical requirements; and (5) Understand new resources available through the Commission to correct Insurance Carrier payment errors on a global level.
Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, discussion, and small group breakouts. Participants will learn general concepts and then have the opportunity to apply them to specific circumstances. To ensure that the workshop addresses all relevant billing code issues, participants will also have the opportunity to ask questions related to their personal experience with the billing codes, which may differ widely based on geographic regions, payor contracts, and state laws. Participants will receive a toolkit to apply what they learn to their own practices.
Audience: The target audience is behavior analysts and others who use the adaptive behavior codes to bill for ABA-based programs and those professionals who bill ABA on behalf of behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA codes, billing codes, CPT, insurance
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Working Together Effectively Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adrienne Hursh, M.A.
FUMI HORNER (Behavioral Perspective Applied Behavior Analysis; The Chicago School, Chicago), ADRIENNE HURSH (Pyles and Associates )
Description: Teamwork or collaboration is essential to produce the most effective outcomes when treating clients. This collaboration becomes more difficult when it involves other professionals from other disciplines (e.g., speech, OT, psychiatrist, etc.) and not all team members have the same philosophical perspective when addressing client challenges. Collaboration is not simply talking to other team members, it includes other variables that the field of ABA has yet to clarify. Despite the usefulness and importance of interdisciplinary collaboration, empirical research on interdisciplinary collaboration is almost non-existent. Research on interlocking behavior contingencies and behavior systems analysis helps to highlight the necessity of connecting treatment components across individuals of a group and analyzing their outcomes based on treatment goals. This workshop analyzes the common philosophical conflicts between BCBAs and other professionals, identifies where the gaps are, and proposes some solutions. Solutions proposed in this workshop are based on what is currently in the literature and information collected from treatment evaluations of current collaborations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: 1. Identify roles and responsibilities of various members of interdisciplinary teams, 2. Identify components and outcomes of effective collaboration, and 3. Create a plan to establish an effective collaboration model
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through presentation of information, group activities with guided practice, and group discussion.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are any professionals that work with clients including graduate students, BCBAs and other professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): BSA, interdisciplinary collaboration, Interlocking contingencies
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Comprehensive Program Evaluation of Individualized Intensive Behavioral Intervention for Autism in the Lovaas Model
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota)
Description: This workshop will present the four main purposes, methods, and outcomes of comprehensive program evaluation of a widely recognized EIBI program: the Lovaas model: 1) to ensure that each family is receiving the most appropriate level of individualized intervention; 2) to evaluate the organization’s programming in a manner that contributes to continuous quality improvement; 3) to convey the value of the treatment program to policy makers; and 4) to meet the obligation of the behavior analyst to the field by producing useful research. The evaluation is geared to efficiently identify and develop the most significant objectives for each different child in as short a time frame as possible. The most efficient objectives will entail genuine sustainable generalization in all natural environments. The performance of all team members, parents, and supervisors are managed on a daily, weekly, six-month, and overall basis. Key measures will be presented, including the dynamic program management system. The prescriptive assessment system is multi-modal. It includes criterion-referenced measures, norm-referenced measures, standardized measures, treatment integrity, resource utilization, reliability, social validity, and individualized behavior analyses. A substantial body of research on 246 children served over 15 years will be presented.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to describe: 1) the important context variables for giving parents the opportunity to give genuine informed consent to treatment. 2) a variety of assessments of child response to treatment. 3) a system for generating an individualized prescriptive prognosis for EIBI every six months. 4) measures that convey the value of the treatment program to policy makers. 5) the results of a comprehensive research program.
Activities: The format includes, lecture, video-taped models, models of evaluation materials, and question-and-answer discussions of challenges being faced by participants in their own program evaluation activities.
Audience: Advanced clinicians, administrators, and advocates.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): EIBI, Informed Consent, Outcomes, Program Evaluation
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Ethics of Self-Care: A Workshop in Building Your Own Practice
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley N. Fiorilli, Ph.D.
ASHLEY N. FIORILLI (Animate Behavior)
Description: Over the last few years, an increase of panels and presentations have surrounded self-care, mindfulness and being present in the moment. Many times, the topic is presented without tangible take homes for participants. As practitioners are often presented with stressful human service interactions, it is not only crucial that we understand the theory of self-care, but the practice of it as well. Often, when practitioners are faced with stressful days, the antecedents to self-care are not salient enough to support self-care. Through this workshop, participants will explore the ethics of self-care and our Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (PECC), review varied topographies of self-care, explore and analyze both their covert and overt behaviors in relation to self-care, and develop an individual self-care plan (SCP). Each participant will receive a follow up meeting (teleconference call, phone call etc…) with the instructor as a support to the implementation of their SCP.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. State how self-care relates to our PECC. 2. List the benefits of a self-care routine. 3. Define present moment and mindful practices. 4. Demonstrate present moment activities. 5. Explain the impact of private events on overt behavior. 6. Describe the analysis of their own private events. 7. Create a SCP individualized to themselves 8. Create a committed action of how they will implement their SCP. 9. Create a corresponding datasheet to SCP.
Activities: The workshop will start with a lecture to introduce the topic. Interspersed within the lecture, participants will be given worksheets that relate to the topic and their lived experience. Worksheets will include: an ABC thought journal for analysis of private events, a list of self-care actions, an example and template for creating their own SCP, and an example data sheet. Participants will practice varied present moment activities.
Audience: This workshop is for all certified behavior analysts. A personal self-care routine or present moment practice is not required for attendance. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who wish to increase a sense of work-life balance.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, mindfulness, present moment, self-care
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Help for BCBAs With Challenging Ethical Dilemmas: Avoiding Multiple Relationships, Confidentiality, and Limits to Confidentiality
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Similar to psychologists and other helping professionals, BCBAs have several ethical responsibilities including: avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others. Although BCBAs may be aware of what these ethical responsibilities are, they may not have had the training to deal with these complicated and sometimes threatening situations. The workshop presenter is a licensed psychologist in addition to a BCBA-D and has had much experience supervising professionals, including BCBAs, who are faced with these daunting situations. This workshop will provide BCBAs and other professionals knowledge of and practice with handling these situations. Workshop participants can bring real or hypothetical ethical dilemmas to process, as well as hear about case scenarios and participate in roleplay situations. Behavior Skills Training (BST), which is an evidence-based procedure recommended for use in supervision, will be used to aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling these challenging ethical dilemmas. Participants will be provided with specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, fidelity checklists, safety assessment form) and given information on how to use these tools.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the reasons why ethical dilemmas of avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others are so challenging 2. Describe the problem-solving process for dealing with challenging ethical dilemmas and how it was used in specific case scenarios 3. Describe the use of Behavior Skills Training (BST), including instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback, to aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling these challenging ethical dilemmas 4. Describe the use of specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, fidelity checklists, safety assessment form)
Activities: The participants will listen to lecture and case examples of ethical dilemmas. They will also have discussion, role play ethical dilemmas and receive feedback on how these were handled. They will also be exposed to current literature regarding ethical dilemmas.
Audience: BCBAs, psychologists, social workers, guidance counselors, teachers, administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): confidentiality limits, ethical dilemmas, multiple relationships, suicide ideation
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Beyond the Black and White: Ethics in Human Services
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ann B Beirne, M.A.
ANN B BEIRNE (Proud Moments)
Description: The field of behavior analysis continues to grow in response to the need for high-quality services, as does the need for training in responsible practice. In a world that grows increasingly morally complex, how can behavior analysts maintain a high standard of ethics and what does “ethical responsibility” mean? In this live, in person workshop, we describe the expectations of ethical practice in behavior analysis and address the challenges of maintaining high standards for ethical behavior in a world where the “right” answers to our ethical questions may be elusive. Drawing upon over 20 years of clinical experience around the world, this workshop will encourage you to ask better questions rather than looking for simple answers. We’ll discuss: “Levels of goodness”: what does “goodness” really mean? Relative and absolute ethics, and when the use of each is appropriate Professionalism as an objectively defined response class: how to engage in it and how to recognize it in others How to engage in ethical practice with colleagues and families.
Learning Objectives: Identify “levels of goodness” Define relative and absolute ethics The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code® as task analysis Describe the case for absolutism Describe the case for relativism Identify challenges of ethical practice with clients and families Identify ways to meet and overcome these challenges Identify challenges of ethical practices as individuals and with colleagues
Activities: Lecture Discussion Active student responding
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavioral Treatment of Sexual Offending
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Duncan Pritchard, Ph.D.
DUNCAN PRITCHARD (Aran Hall School), HEATHER PENNEY (Aran Hall School)
Description: Sexual offending behavior presented by people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDD) is a significant challenge for behavior analysts who provide assessment, treatment, prevention, and ongoing support for this vulnerable population. Psychological interventions have recently been shown to increase sexual offending in incarcerated adults in the UK (Mews, Di Bella, & Purver, 2017). Most programs used to treat sexual offending presented by people with IDD are based on these interventions, so behavior analysts need to be mindful of using these unsupported interventions, especially so given the seriousness of any episodes of treatment relapse. This workshop will provide a review of ABA-based behavioral treatments and an introduction to behavioral treatment programming, including risk assessment and safety planning, independent living and vocational skill training, sex and relationship education and behavior contingency contracting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the risks presented by sexual offenders with IDD; (2) design individualized safety plans; (3) use data to improve decision-making when planning to increase community participation (e.g., school, college, work experience, employment, public transport, leisure activities, etc.); and, (4) ethically manage sexual offending behavior across all contexts.
Activities: Lectures, large and small group discussions, review of case histories and critical incidents, developing risk assessments and safety plans, activity schedules, behavior support plans, behavior contingency contracts, risk-benefit analyses, and collecting and presenting data.
Audience: Behavior analysts who (a) work directly with sexual offender with IDD and (b) behavior analysts who train and/or manage and supervise direct care staff supporting sexual offenders with IDD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavioral Treatment, Developmental Disabilities, Sex Education, Sexual Offending
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Team-Based Learning
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
RICHARD WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) practice and refine strategies to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, (c) develop organizational level strategies to prevent ethical lapses and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, (4) implement team-based learning strategies that can be used to promote BACB ethics in work and educational settings.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: This workshop is most appropriate for BCBAs, practitioners (including those without BCBA credentials) and graduate students with some level of familiarity with the BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. It will help to have some experience with the delivery or management of ABA services, but that is not necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP — 
Ethics
Using Adaptive Assessments Ethically in Behavior Analytic Practice
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda Keating, Psy.D.
AMANDA KEATING (University of South Florida)
Description: Over the past several years, behavior analysts have been tasked by funders to provide a variety of outcome measures and assessments. However, most behavior analytic programs do not provide training in many of these assessments. In this workshop, the ethical use of two specific adaptive measures will be provided, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Third Edition (Vineland-3) and the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Third Edition (ABAS-3). Each of these instruments will be discussed along with guidance on administration. Case studies will be provided, and participants will practice providing semi-structured interviews with the goal of equipping behavior analysts to utilize the instruments to not only satisfy funders, but to gain valuable information about their behavior programming.
Learning Objectives: 1. List the different options the Vineland-3 and ABAS-3 can be administered and scored. 2. List several advantages of the semi-structured interview format for adaptive skills assessment. 3. Compare and contrast the utility of the Vineland-3 and ABAS-3 for use in behavioral programming.
Activities: This workshop will include lecture, demonstration, discussion, hands-on practice in utilizing the semi-structured interview format, practice with scoring, and case studies for practice with interpretation. Participants will be provided sample protocols.
Audience: Intermediate. The target audience would be practitioners who are seeking training to evaluate the outcomes of such assessments when provided by others or to ethically administer the ABAS-3 or Vineland-3 to consumers following the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABAS-3, adaptive assessment, insurance requirements, Vineland-3
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: BACB/NASP — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day long workshop will focus on the U.S. Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the many ethical issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal legal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Participants will learn how state law applies at the local level. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify the major components of US special education law, IDEIA, which protects the majority of clients served by a behavior analyst. 2. Identify the procedural areas of IDEIA that could result in ethical dilemmas for the practicing behavior analyst. 3. Identify the legal and ethical requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation completed by a behavior analyst. 4. Identify when a behavior analyst must complete an FBA vs when they should complete one under the IDEIA. 5. Identify when a BIP must be developed by a behavior analysts under the IDEIA 6. Identify what type of data must be collected under the IDEIA 7. Describe the difference between a procedural and substantive error and how ethical blunders could create these types of errors.
Activities: The format combines: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study Analysis, Online Responding, & Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): School Ethics, SPED Law
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Latency Based Functional Analysis: Application in the General Education Public School Setting
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Chardae Rigdon, M.S.
CHARDAE RIGDON (Rockwood School District)
Description: This workshop is designed to provide attendees with a replicable process on how to determine, train, and implement a latency based functional analysis within a general education setting (one teacher to 18 – 20 students) to obtain clear and reliable data that then becomes the foundation for a behavior intervention plan with staff buy in. The workshop will highlight the related components of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts to the entire process of implementing a functional analysis so that it is ethical and efficient with all stakeholders on board and well informed (i.e. 2.0 and 3.0). Attendees will learn skills that are needed within the school system specifically how to establish a hierarchy of the client in this circumstance (i.e. parent, administrators, teacher, student), effective methods for consulting with team members of different professions, and how to evaluate all ethical considerations in determining when a latency functional analysis may and may NOT be considered. Each participant will have hands on learning on how to provide training utilizing research based methods (behavior skills training) to allow familiar staff of the target student to implement the written conditions and to make data based decisions during and post the analysis so that the results are clear and explainable to all involved parties.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) describe all factors related to implementing a functional analysis with a student who is socially aware and potentially responsive to observers and/or additional people in the classroom; 2) explain related factors in selecting the type of functional analysis to conduct: considerations specifically for latency; 3) state the critical elements of implementing a latency functional analysis in the school setting with the general education staff (developing conditions, staff training, collaboration with buy in); 4) explain how to effectively present data results to an educational team
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a systematic approach of lecture of which the purpose and outline of the process will be provided. Guided practice will be utilized to teach each step of the process along with a small group practice to provide a realistic 'team meeting' with feedback and coaching from the instructor. Each exercise will build on the next.
Audience: BCBA, BCaBA, educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): education, functional analysis
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavioral Leadership
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
NATALIE A. PARKS (Behavior Leader)
Description: Leadership is a set of skills that effectively energizes followers to accomplish the mission of the company in an ethical manner. Unfortunately, many leaders are promoted due to their excellent technical skills without being provided any specific training in the skills of leadership. Behavior analysts have the specific skills necessary to motivate others, teach new skills, and maintain behavior over time; however, applying these skills organizationally can be difficult. Several questions emerge including: What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important? Who can be a leader? and How do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? This workshop will discuss the Leadership in Behavior Analysis (LIBA) model and provide an outline for the ideal behavior analysis leadership formula so that you can achieve a high level of prominence within our field, establish a long-lasting positive legacy for everyone in your organization, and grow your organization.
Learning Objectives: 1. State the different components of the Leadership in Behavior Analysis model. 2. Complete the LIBA assessment and identify current leadership skills. 3. Conceptually analyze leadership in behavior analysis. 4. State how to write a vision, mission, and values that align with the BACB Code of Professional Conduct. 5. Pinpoint strategies and behavior that will lead to best performance in followers. 6. Identify how to create a performance management system. 7. State how to identify performance problems.
Activities: Instructional Strategies Include: lecture, discussion, and completion of practice activities and assessments. Workshop objectives will be met through completions of practice activities, completion of worksheets and assessments, role plays and practice, feedback from presenters, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior Analysts (BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Cultures, leadership, performance management, Vision Mission
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
The Evolution of a Science: A Brief History of Behavior Analysis in the Twentieth Century
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: PCH/TBA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Description: This history of our science reviews its origins and the co-evolution of basic and applied research in the context of major world events. Precursors through 1900 include Darwin and Thorndike. 1900s: Behavior emerges as a subject matter; 1910s: Watson's Behaviorist Manifesto; 1920s: Learning theorists; 1930s: Skinner joins Keller at Harvard, later writes Behavior of Organisms; 1940s: World War II leads to shaping, Walden Two, other innovations; 1950s: The Cold War provides context for Science and Human Behavior, Verbal Behavior; SEAB and JEAB founded; 1960s: The science grows despite cognitive-behavioral culture wars; JABA founded; our own organizations develop; applications and basic work grow side by side (e.g., "psychotic children"; time out); 1970s: Applications foster founding of programs; international extensions grow; the field, with roots in psychology, sees a viable future outside it; 1980s: Treatments of autism, self-injury, etc., establish conditions for credentialing and professional extensions; 1990s: Behavior analysis thrives mainly in cultural niches, but an explosion of applications brings increasing recognition; The 21st Century: Where do we go from here? (This workshop is based on a book in progress with Nancy Neef and Victor Laties as co-authors. It will probably be Catania's last ABAI workshop.)
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants should be able to describe how basic concepts (reinforcement, the operant, the 3-term contingency) evolved and played a role in the expanding influence of behavior analysis. 2. Participants should be able to outline how basic and applied dimensions of behavior analysis evolved in combination in the early history of the field, then separated mainly for practical editorial reasons, and eventually came back together to provide reciprocal benefits in translational studies and in the basic questions raised by applications. 3. Participants should be able to identify the innovations of major founders of behavior analysis, especially including Keller, Skinner, Schoenfeld, Ferster and Sidman. 4. Participants should be able to describe how the work of the major founders contributed to education in general and the education of those on the autism spectrum in particular. 5. Participants should be able to identify the 20th century contexts within which the major features of behavior analysis were created and evolved. 6. Participants should be able to identify factors that led to negative views of behavior analysis within the general culture: from aircribs and timeout and use of punishment to issues of verbal behavior and human freedom.
Activities: This workshop will consist of lecture organized by decades of the twentieth century, with breaks (usually between decades) for discussion and for exercises in historical fact-checking.
Audience: The content should be of interest to all behavior analysts, and especially to those relatively new to the field. It should also be useful for those who teach either basic or applied courses or practica and who wish to enrich the discussion of our history and the origins of our behavioral tools and methods. The workshop will demonstrate the cumulative nature of central concepts and will also emphasize how basic and applied research developed side by side from the very beginning. Early behavior analysts didn't even make the distinction, which came relatively late as a consequence of managing the practicalities of journal editing. To the extent that the two approaches have moved apart, translational research is drawing them back together.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): application milestones, behavior-analysis founders, experimental milestones, theoretical milestones
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Writing and Reviewing Ethical Intensive Behavior Programs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc and TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: This workshop is intended to advance skills relating to writing and reviewing Individual Behavior Plans for recipients with challenging behavior. Starting with provider self-evaluation regarding accepting a recipient, moving through authoring plans, and then reviewing those written by others, this is an active-participant workshop. Among topics to be covered; The "rules" in various areas for addressing dangerous and challenging behaviors, researching relevant legislation and policy obligations, determining agency policy for the use of restraint and/or restrictive procedures, and reviewing journals for efficacious interventions will be covered. We will also review the ethical obligations of providing services to these difficult recipients, including the need for crisis management training when restraint "isn't used" in regular programming. Evaluating, training and supervising staff will be reviewed at length. Additionally, we will review obligations to the recipient, the family, the agency, and families who private pay. A peer-review system will be presented and evaluated by participants, as well as the need for experienced clinicians to have mentors of their own. Using a format for "old school" (non-computer generated) IBPs, and case studies, we will examine recommended components, organization, wordsmithing, effective data collection, and the importance of explicit, detailed, instructions.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to identify behaviors that meet criterion for dangerous and challenging, intensive behaviors. Participants will be able to systematically format IBPs to allow consistency for all implementers, without software. Participants will be able to differentiate legal and ethical requirements when addressing intensive behaviors. Participants will be able to efficiently and effectively review IBPs for individuals with dangerous and challenging behavior. Participants will be able to give appropriate feedback to clinicians who are incorrectly authoring IBPs for intensive behaviors.
Activities: Workshop activities will include; lecture, participant self-evaluation, identification of policies and rules regarding restrictive procedures in various (participant) areas, using sample programs and videos to review, evaluate, and revise interventions.
Audience: This workshop is for experienced clinicians who are struggling with service provision for recipients with dangerous and challenging behavior, those BCBAs who are looking to refresh/expand their own behavioral repertoires, and those who find themselves supervising pre-certificants and established staff who are writing behavior plans for this challenging population.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Challenging Behavior, Ethics Ethical, Intensive Behavior, Supervision Review
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Dotting the I's and Crossing the T's: Documentation Compliance
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thea H. Davis, M.S.
THEA H. DAVIS (Autism Bridges; MassCAP), EILEEN MENDES (MassCAP), BARBARA HUNT (Autism Bridges), CATHY J. BOOTH (Autism Bridges)
Description: Providing insurance funded services to individuals with autism requires more than just assessing the individual, developing the treatment plan, and providing direct instruction. Understanding state and federal laws related to service delivery, documentation, and billing; as well as understanding contract terms and distinctions in medical necessity criteria across payers can be challenging to navigate. Missing one small but critical regulation, policy, or sentence in a contract can make or break a business. This workshop will offer guidelines on ethical documentation practices, retention schedules for medical records, conformance to documentation expectations with respect to medical necessity criteria, preparing for an external audit, conducting internal audits, and how to navigate the back of the house needs.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to understand essential elements of a medical record The participant will be able to access relevant regulatory and payer policy information The participant will be able to design documentation forms that cover insurance regulated session notes and treatment plans developed from primary resources. (DSM5, CPT Manual, CPT Assistant, Insurance Contracts, and Federal guidelines)
Activities: Core content and examples will be taught through lecture. Their will be guided practice and group discussion
Audience: Level: Intermediate Target audience: Owners of ABA Companies, and BCBA's and clinicians providing Adaptive Behavior Services as defined int the CPT Manual
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Compliance, documentation, medical billing
 
Workshop #W67A
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Working With Adults With Severe Problem Behavior: Ethical Considerations and Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adrienne Hursh, M.A.
ADRIENNE HURSH (Pyles and Associates), DENNIS PALIWODA (Pyles and Associates), SHAI MAOR (Pyles and Associates)
Description: Severe problem behaviors can manifest into a variety of topographical behaviors but typically consists of aggression, self-injury, and/or property destruction. Unfortunately, this also means a decrease in opportunities for individuals who engage in this type of severe problem behavior because of the damage that these individuals can inflict. As legislature continues to push for community placements and the imminent closure of non-community-based placement opportunities for adults who display the aforementioned behaviors, the need for community supports that can safely, ethically, and successfully manage these individuals has significantly increased. Due to biological factors (e.g. height and weight) of these individuals, intervention strategies that are/were effective with children are not typically effective with these types of adults. Being an adult comes with an increase in freedom of choice (depending on conservatorship) that can make navigating support for these types of individuals extremely complex. Furthermore, at times an increased number of support services can provide a challenge in collaborating how to best support the individual. These support services include, but are not limited to psychiatrists, medical doctor’s, mental health therapy services, behavioral services, day programs and regional centers.
Learning Objectives: After attending this workshop, attendees will be able to (1) describe programmatic, ethical, and collaborative considerations for working with adults with severe problem behavior, (2) identify clinical situations that necessitate different approaches and (3) demonstrate understanding of information provided by creating a preliminary plan for an individual they serve.
Activities: This workshop includes presentation of information through lecture, presentation of evidenced based interventions, and guided group activities.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is anyone working with adults.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): adults, dual diagnoses, severe behavior
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. Dog bite prevention involves teaching others to recognize precursors of a possible bite. This workshop will first remind BCBA’s and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion if the workshop, attendees will be able to: - via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; - identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science - identify when and if you should intervene with a dog’s problem behavior; - identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral - learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Behavior of Dogs (FABD), an assessment created by the workshop presenter
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them and otherwise interact with them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: BPN/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be better controlled, and important new skills could be acquired, if the behavior analyst understands epilepsy. A brief review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics and classification of common seizure disorders will be briefly reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be covered. Developmentally disabled clients are often improperly monitored and over-medicated for seizures. These issues can be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEG, without sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure and control these relationships in an ethical manner.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, each participant will be able to: 1. Define an epileptic seizure. 2. Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures. 3. Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior. 4. Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions. 5. Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress. 6. Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures. 7. Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia. 8. Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures. 8. Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy. 9. Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis. 10. Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: The workshop activities will include lecture, group discussion, video observation, and interactive activities to test knowledge (using Kahoot). Students will have access to videos, peer reviewed articles and chapters on Research Gate before the conference. Research Gate link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill
Audience: Clinical behavior analysts and experimental analysts with an interest in learning effective methods for analyzing seizures and their immediate and long term effects on intellectual functioning, everyday behavior and behavior disorders.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): animal models, electroencephalography, epileptic seizures, pseudoepileptic seizures
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Help Me Help You: Key Strategies for Developing Effective Parent Training Systems
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laurie Tarter, Psy.D.
LAURIE TARTER (EnCompass Behavioral Health ), JANET VASQUEZ (Precision Chi), KARELIX ALICEA (Lotus Behavioral Interventions), PIYAPORN MOUA (EnCompass Behavioral Health)
Description: Parent training is a vital part of an ABA program. Utilizing best practices and evidence-based treatment plays a critical role in the efficacy of parent training. This workshop will equip practitioners with essential information to enable them to develop a quality parent training system that will promote efficacious ABA services. Presenters will provide a review of the current research and evidence-based protocols pertaining to parent training. With a focus on ethical considerations when working with parents and their families, participants will learn how to identify common ethical issues that may occur related to parent training and solutions for those issues. The workshop will also review methods for providing parent training via different modalities, including Telehealth, as well as how to take a family systems approach. Additionally, presenters will review the role on an organization in the development of parent training systems. Lastly, participants will learn methods to create their own parent training goals, methods of implementation, and data collection.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify evidence-based parent training protocols 2. Identify best practice methods for creating a parent training protocol, including the identification of goals, implementation procedures and data collection methods with a family-systems focus. 3. Identifying similarities and differences in parent trainings methods across modalities (i.e., in person, in-clinic, Telehealth). 4. Identify the role of an organization in parent training policies and procedures. 5. Identify ethical guidelines pertaining to parent training and identify ethical dilemmas related to parent training and its resolution. 6. Identify who should provide the parent training, supervision practices and consultation, and when to refer out to other providers.
Activities: The workshop will include: lecture, guided practice, and discussion. There will be opportunities for questions and answers.
Audience: The workshop level is for an intermediate audience.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Evidence-based, Parent Training
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Compassionate Collaboration Workshop
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Colleen Suzio, M.S.
JESSICA ROHRER (Center for Children with Special Needs; Endicott College), KIMBERLY MARSHALL (CCSN: Center for Independence; Endicott College), COLLEEN SUZIO (Center for Children with Special Needs; Endicott College)
Description: Behavior analysts are not well known for engaging in compassionate collaborative skills. Taylor et al., (2018) surveyed caregivers of individuals with autism to gain insight as to how they perceived behavior analysts’ compassionate, collaborative, and interpersonal skills. Many of the scores suggested deficits in collaborative repertoires of the clinicians. For example, when presented with a statement about whether their behavior analyst compromises when there is a disagreement, only 58.9% of respondents said that they agreed. When caregivers were asked if their behavior analyst asked them how they were doing regularly, the percentage of agreement was 53.68%. It is this type of data that has exacerbated the need for additional assessment and training in this area. The Compassionate Collaboration Tool was developed as a means to support in these areas of deficit. It is a guide to help with the assessment and training of compassionate collaborative skills of clinicians. In this workshop, attendees will participate in dynamic learning opportunities focused on the skills within the Compassionate Collaboration Tool. Attendees will have the opportunity to reflect on their clinical skills in this area and to improve their compassionate and collaborative interactions through evidence-based training methods.
Learning Objectives: • Attendees will identify skills related to compassionate, collaborative, and interpersonal interactions. • Attendees will participate in Behavioral Skills Training (BST) to implement the skills from the Compassionate Collaboration Tool. • Attendees will provide feedback to each other regarding implementation of compassionate, collaborative, and interpersonal skills.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, discussion, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: The target audience should include clinicians who are looking to further their knowledge and skill sets with compassionate collaborative care.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Risk-Benefit Analysis of Treatments for Severe Problem Behaviors
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nathan Blenkush, Ph.D.
NATHAN BLENKUSH (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), JASON CODERRE (Judge Rotenberg Center), DYLAN PALMER (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center and Simmons University), JOSEPH TACOSIK (Judge Rotenberg Education Center)
Description: Behavior analysts are often part of multidisciplinary teams that treat patients with severe problem behaviors that are refractory to typical interventions. Professionals within and between disciplines do not always agree on the most appropriate treatment approach for a given person. However, there is general agreement that those providing treatment should provide the most effective and least restrictive interventions available. Unfortunately, risk perception and bias sometimes influence decision making to the detriment of the person receiving treatment. Here, we review decision analysis tools that may help inform decisions made by behavior analysts and interdisciplinary teams when treating severe problem behaviors. We review ethical, legal, and regulatory policies that must be considered in relation to treating people with severe problem behaviors.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe the elements of at least two decision analysis tools associated with treatment selection. 2. Participants will identify at least three potential fallacies or biases associated with risk and clinical decision making. 3. Participants will evaluate at least two treatments using a risk benefit approach.
Activities: The format combines lecture, application of decision analysis, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, and other professionals who are often confronted with people who emit severe problem behaviors refractory to typical interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Decision analysis, Risk Perception, Treatment evaluation
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Treating Compassionately With Sound Clinical Judgement
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.A.
JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Massachusetts Preparatory Academy for Children), IAN MELTON (Endicott College, Journeys Behavior Learning Center), BRITANY MELTON (Endicott College, Logan Center), COURTNEY MAHER (Michigan State University )
Description: Over the past several years, many Behavior Analysts have acquired reputations of being uncaring and cold in their approach to care, interventions, and in interactions with stakeholders. Fortunately, many leaders in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis have recently begun to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of compassion and empathy in our work and its importance in improving clinical outcomes (Taylor, LeBlanc & Nosik 2018; ). Several companies are beginning to include positive interactions, empathy, compassion, cultural competence and collaboration skills in staff training programs. Additionally, companies are starting to measure how improving relationships with caregivers, parent’s perception of compassionate care, how compassionate care of our clients and ourselves can enhance our work as behavior analysts, and potentially improve clinical outcomes. What has not been formally discussed on a wide-spread basis are implementation strategies for this concept while using sound clinical judgement. In other words, when and how to “draw the line” and assert oneself as the expert. This workshop will discuss and provide participants with strategies to master compassionate care while ensuring high quality, clinically sound programming. Participants will discuss and practice guidelines and strategies to ensure timely decision making to guarantee state-of-the art and best quality programming.
Learning Objectives: Participants will: 1. Identify and practice essential communication skills 2. Identify and practice essential listening skills 3. Identify and practice essential active listening skills 4. Identify and practice essential communication skills 5. Identify and practice how to identify stakeholder’s goals and how to incorporate them into treatment plans 6. Identify and practice how to identify and honor diverse cultural practices into treatment plans 7. Identify and practice assessing situations and relationships 8. Identify and practice repairing damaged conversations and relationships 9. Discuss guidelines for ensure utilization of evidence-based interventions and procedures while being empathic to all situations 10. Discuss how the BACB Ethical Code applies to the current topic 11. Role-play situations utilizing skills in objectives 1-10
Activities: Instructional strategies include: Lecture, small group activities, role-play, video observation, small and large group discussions Workshop Objectives wil be met through: small group activities, role-play, video observation, small and large group discussions
Audience: Target audience is intermediate-advanced and will be best suited for staff working directly with staff, families, and clients with ASD or DDA. Professionals responsible for designing staff training programs will benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Cultural Concerns in the Development of Professional Ethics for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: PCH/AUT; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: William L. Holcomb, Ph.D.
WILLIAM L. HOLCOMB (The New England Center for Children)
Description: As the number of Board Certified Behavior Analysts® (BCBA)worldwide increases, the probability that an individual BCBA would be practicing in a novel or different culture continues to increase. This is particularly likely in the use of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities (given the proportion of BCBAs who practice in these areas and the world-wide demand for services). The presentation will review the general development of ethical standards and the differences between moral, ethical, and legal codes, especially as they apply to practicing ABA. Next, a behavior analytic concept of culture as defined by Skinner will be introduced and contrasted with non-behavior analytic models of the effects of culture on ethics (e.g., Hofstede’s cultural dimensions model, guidelines for cultural ethics in business, etc.). Throughout the presentation, examining how these variables affect and are addressed by the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts will be stressed. Scenarios encountered in applied settings will be presented illustrating potential ethical dilemmas across cultures. Participants will identify section(s) of the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts relevant to determining if an ethical conflict has occurred and what action should be taken.
Learning Objectives: The attendee will: 1. State the difference between moral, ethical, and legal dilemmas and identify an appropriate plan to resolve the dilemma. 2. State a behavior analytic-based definition of culture, and give at least one example of how cultural differences may affect practice. 3. Identify at least one personal value connected to the participant’s cultural history. 4. Recognize ethical conflicts and identify means of resolving these conflicts according to the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. 5. Identify potential conflicts in two scenarios and cite the applicable sections and elements of the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that address the conflicts.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, review of brief written material, and small group breakouts. Scenarios illustrating potential ethical dilemmas across cultures will be provided for participant practice in using the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts as a starting point for determining solutions.
Audience: Intermediate to advanced professionals involved with evaluation, treatment and monitoring of individuals diagnosed with autism and other developmental disabilities (Provides additional training for individuals with experience and training on the topic) at the post graduate training level. No one needs to be excluded.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Owning Your Competency: Parent and Caregiver Training and the Future of International Dissemination
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jacob Sadavoy, Ph.D.
JACOB SADAVOY (Global Autism Project), KAREN CHUNG (Special Learning, Inc. )
Description: Generalization of behavioural support strategies and techniques is critical for functional learning of skills across environments that are socially significant for the client. In order for this to happen, parents and caregivers need to be able to replicate outcomes of the clients skill acquisition and behaviour change programs with their loved one. In order for this to happen, the therapist must be cognizant of the needs, culture, and environment of both the client and the guardian. This becomes a challenge when working with families in cultures and communities that differ from that of the practitioner. Over 90% of BCBAs and BCaBAs practice within North America which accounts for less than 10% of the world’s population. As of 2023, the BACB will no longer be a licensing board for Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) practitioners outside of North America. The need for ABA clinicians is paramount internationally however literature and resource availability, non-existent credentialing agencies, and cost of programs and supervision are all barriers for prospective practitioners. Without adequate services prospective international clients often believe their family member with ASD are uneducable which leads to a life in isolation and, in some places, builds a reliance on available pseudoscientific therapies some of which are harmful or even deadly. This workshop will focus on ensuring practitioners have the skills to provide thoughtful intervention for clients that will promote parent and caregiver engagement and generalization of goals across the clinical teaching environment to the home environment.
Learning Objectives: (1) Identify repertoires that should be fostered in quality behavior analysts (2) Assess needs of supervisee and develop observable goals to support acquisition, mastery, and maintenance of goal; (3) Develop methodologies to assess the effectiveness of supervision; (4) Understand how to implement supervisory practices beyond “teaching-to-the-test” and develop supervisees’ problem solving fluency, verbal behavior of ABA methodology, communication skills with invested client stakeholders, ethical decision making, critical thinking and reasoning, sustainability, and cultural competency
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and role play.
Audience: Target audience includes those who currently or plan to supervisee RBTs, BCaBAs, and those hoping to sit for the BCBA exam, including practicum supervisors and Clinical Directors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): curriculum, hierarchical development, supervision, sustainability
 
Symposium #48
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
A Flat Earth or Behavioral Full Worldview: The Need for Behavior Analysts to Rely Upon the Fundamentals of Our Science
Saturday, May 23, 2020
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, University of D.C. / Catholic University
Area: PCH/TBA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Jonathan W. Ivy (The Pennsylvania State University - Harrisburg )
Discussant: Shawn P. Quigley (Melmark)
CE Instructor: Jonathan W. Ivy, Ph.D.
Abstract:

As access to information increases with internet searches and almost instantaneous global communication, behavior analysts become exposed to a wide-variety of perspectives and strategies for treatment implementation. This exposure can cause behavior analysts’ worldview to shift from applying the theoretical foundations of behavioral science to incorporating other worldviews (e.g., mentalistic, non-scientifically supported theories) into their clinical practice. Some behavior analysts have confused the technologies of behavior analysis (e.g., curricula, assessments, etc.) for behavior analysis itself or have not adopted a behavioral worldview. “If this were a theoretical issue only, we should have no cause for alarm; but theories affect practice… Confusion in theory means confusion in practice” (Skinner, p. 9, 1968). This symposium, which includes four presentations and a discussion, will examine the variables that impact the shift to or away from a behavior analytic "worldview", the necessity for incorporating a behavioral worldview into ethical practice, and the impact for not utilizing a behavioral worldview.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral philosophy, behaviorism, ethics, theory gap
Target Audience:

Practicing behavior analysts, students of behavior analysis, clinical supervisors.

Learning Objectives: 1) Define worldview and adequately describe the behavioral worldview. 2) State the impact of philosophical coursework on the evolution of worldview. 3) Differentiate between a “point-and-click behaviorist” and a “world view behaviorist”. 4) Differentiate between an open and closed worldview, and why the former is more likely to lead to scientific advancement than the latter.
 

One Worldview to Rule Them All

(Service Delivery)
RONALD LEAF (Autism Partnership), Thomas L. Zane (University of Kansas), Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College), Justin B. Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), Joseph H. Cihon (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College)
Abstract:

A worldview is the lens through which we look and make sense of the world. A worldview constructs the foundation of what we believe, and dictates how we explain, assess, and deal with the phenomena of interest. Behavior analysts, through their training, are exposed to and supposedly embrace the worldview of behaviorism and all that that means, such as adherence to scientific attitude and practice, that informs our assessment and treatment of behavior. However, there is accumulating evidence that behavior analysts are using and supporting treatments and interventions that are not based upon the behavior-analytic worldview or conceptualization of behavior. Such practice hurts consumers, hurts our field, and demonstrates ethical disarray on the part of the behavior analyst. Behavior analysts have an ethical and practical responsibility to adhere only to behaviorism as their worldview and behave according to only its tenets and philosophy.

 
Can a Science of Teaching Teach a Scientific Worldview?
(Theory)
KIMBERLY MARSHALL (CCSN: Center for Independence; Endicott College)
Abstract: It is evident that the concepts and principles of behavior analysis are well defined. However, it is less evident that behavior analysts have a thorough understanding of the philosophy of their science. Despite the wealth of resources available and coursework requirements in philosophy, it has been demonstrated that many behavior analysts do not hold a behavior analytic worldview (Bailey & Burch, 2016; Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015; Schreck, Karunaratne, Zane, & Wilford, 2016). A worldview, the standpoint through which one interprets their environment, influences treatment choice and the quality of intervention that clients receive. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board®, has announced upcoming changes that will hopefully improve adherence to a behavior analytic worldview, including revised course content requirements to include 90 hours on the philosophical underpinnings of behavior analysis with the implementation of the 5th Edition Task List in 2022 (BACB, 2017b). Consequently, research into the effectiveness of coursework targeted at teaching the philosophical underpinnings of applied behavior analysis in teaching a behavior analytic worldview grounded in a philosophy of science is necessary and timely. Preliminary data will be presented on the impact of philosophical coursework on the evolution of worldview in students of behavior analysis, and the results will be discussed with regard to additional training interventions.
 

The Point-and-Click Behaviorist or a Behavioral World View Behaviorist: Where is Our Field Heading?

(Service Delivery)
KIMBERLY A. SCHRECK (Penn State Harrisburg), Jonathan W. Ivy (The Pennsylvania State University - Harrisburg )
Abstract:

Despite ethical requirements that behavior analysts function under a behavioral world view, it appears that some behavior analysts have adapted more of a conspiracy theory – flat earth world view not based upon our science. In fact, evidence indicates that some behavior analysts believe that the behavioral world view only applies to specific populations and age groups – not the full earth. This may be due to a lack of understanding and application of the fundamental philosophy of the science or an over-reliance on marketing behavioral analysis to specific populations and commercialized guides as easy to use as a point-and-click google search. Marketing may have been appropriately conducted to disseminate to the public behavior analysis’ effectiveness for specific populations, it may have marketed too well – changing behavior analysts’ world view. Although curriculum and guides initially may have been appropriately developed to assist behavior analysts, but not replace the fundamental applications of the science, the over reliance on their simplicity may be replacing the comprehensive understanding and use of the behavioral world view and application of such. Without a thorough understanding and application of a comprehensive behavioral worldview, behavior analysts may evolve into superficial and unethical, point-and-click behavioral technicians and not analysts.

 
If You Want to Have a Worldview, You Probably Should Get Out to See the World
(Service Delivery)
JAMES T. TODD (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract: Until recently, it would have been typical to find behavior analysts trained in or at least heavily exposed to other fields of psychology, and other fields altogether. Because they had seen other things they had good reason to understand the conceptual advantages of the radical behaviorist worldview. Now we have behavior analysts trained entirely in dedicated applied behavior analysis programs, increasingly taught by people with similar training, using a largely proscribed syllabus, seeing little or nothing apart from what will be helpful for successfully remediating a fairly narrow range of behavior problems in a fairly narrow range of the population. That is, they might know a lot about certain kinds of contingencies, but they probably do not know about behavior as a general matter, its range and richness, full of things we cannot begin to explain (and hardly ever try to). That is, their worldview will not be so much about behavior generally, but about those things that their contingencies can encompass and do something about. Radical behaviorism, the philosophy of a science, will be replaced by “radical proceduralism,” the philosophy of a profession. An open worldview designed to broaden inquiry risks being replaced by a closed worldview, one focused on just those things it can deal with, falsely confident it has all the answers because it only knows to ask certain kinds of questions.
 
 
Panel #80
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
The State of Our Union: Current Issues and Future Directions of Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 23, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, University of D.C. / Catholic University
Area: PCH/DDA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Justin B. Leaf, Ph.D.
Chair: Joseph H. Cihon (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College)
JUSTIN B. LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College)
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services)
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Abstract:

The field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has grown faster than many of us have ever imagined. Current projections estimate there will be over 120,000 Behavior Analysts worldwide within the next 5 years. The panelists will provide the audience with their perspective about the current state of the field. In doing so the panelists will discuss areas in which ABA has excelled (e.g., functional analysis, certifying individuals, single subject designs) as well as areas requiring additional growth (e.g., marketing, collaborating with other fields, large scale outcomes). Additionally, the panelists will provide their perspective on the future directions of ABA (e.g., private equity, increasing number of technicians, licensure laws) and how behavior analysts can continue to promote quality behavioral intervention with the new challenges. All Board Certified Behavior Analysts have an ethical responsibility to our profession to “uphold and advance the values, ethics and principles of the profession of behavior analysis” (BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, Section 6.01). As such, the panelists will also discuss current and future ethical responsibilities to the field. Questions and comments from the audience will be encouraged throughout.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students, practitioners, researchers, and professors.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will identify the difference between certification and scope of competence. 2. Attendees will identify how they can comply with the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code, Sections 6.01 & 6.02. 3. Attendees will identify 5 strategies they can use in their everyday practice that will support ethical practice in Behavior Analysis.
Keyword(s): certification, ethics, Growth, quality intervention
 
 
Invited Tutorial #82
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
SQAB Tutorial: Back to the Lab: Human Behavioral Pharmacology Methods, Outcomes and Meanings
Saturday, May 23, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
BACB/PSY/QABA CE Offered. CE Instructor: William Stoops, Ph.D.
Chair: Derek D. Reed (University of Kansas)
Presenting Authors: : WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Abstract:

Human behavioral pharmacology methods have been used to rigorously evaluate the effects of a range of centrally acting drugs in human beings under controlled conditions. Methods like drug self-administration and drug-discrimination have been adapted from non-human laboratory animal models. Because humans have the capacity to communicate verbally, self-report methods are also commonly used to understand drug effects. This presentation will provide an overview of these traditional human behavioral pharmacology methods, as well as more novel measures that have been introduced to the field. Representative data will be shared and the benefits, challenges and translational relevance of each method will be discussed. This session will cover guiding principles in the design of human behavioral pharmacology studies (e.g., using placebo controls, testing multiple doses) along with ethical (e.g., avoiding enrollment of individuals seeking treatment, determining capacity to consent) and safety (e.g., dose selection, pre-screening of participants for exclusionary health problems) that must be addressed when conducting these types of studies.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand basic methods used in human behavioral pharmacology research; (2) know how ethical and safety issues are addressed in human behavioral pharmacology studies; (3) appreciate the clinical relevance of human behavioral pharmacology findings.
 
WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Dr. William W. Stoops, a Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Science, Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Kentucky, earned his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Davidson College in Davidson, NC and his Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky. His research evaluates the behavioral and pharmacological factors that contribute to drug use disorders, focusing primarily on stimulant drugs. Dr. Stoops’ research contributions resulted in receipt of the 2016 Psychologist of the Year Award from the Kentucky Psychological Association, the 2013 Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and the 2008 Wyeth Young Psychopharmacologist Award from Division 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse) of the American Psychological Association (APA). Dr. Stoops currently serves on the College on Problems of Drug Dependence Board of Directors and is Editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
 
 
Symposium #107
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Consent, Assent, and Decision-Making Capacity in Theory and Practice
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon A
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jennifer Lynne Bruzek (University of Alabama in Huntsville)
CE Instructor: Jennifer Lynne Bruzek, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Consent is embedded in the foundation of behavior analytic research and clinical practice. The processes of obtaining consent and assent require that researchers and practitioners share information regarding procedures in a way that is understandable to the recipient, which often appears to be a straight-forward process. Beyond the process of information sharing, though, are important matters related to whether or not someone has the capacity to consent or assent and whether that capacity has changed or will change over time. Additionally, it is often incumbent on researchers and practitioners to use their judgement when deciding whether or not assent has been provided noncoercively. This can be especially difficult when working with more vulnerable populations like individuals with developmental disabilities or dementia. This symposium will address issues related to decision-making capacity, commonly used capacity assessments and assent procedures, and socially valid methods for gaining assent that avoid coercive procedures. These issues will be discussed as they relate to older adults with dementia and children and adults with developmental disabilities.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBAs

 

Primer on Ethical and Practical Issues in Decision-Making Capacity Assessment

SAMANTHA JO ZOHR (Eastern Michigan University), Claudia Drossel (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract:

Determinations of decision-making capacity affect a person’s civil rights. When reasoning or decision-making capacity is in question, the onus is to balance autonomy and safety, maximizing self-reliance and independence while programming for assistance to prevent harm and maintain safety. Assessment of decision-making capacity is a research area, nevertheless, myths about decision-making capacity abound. Contrary to common belief, decision-making capacity is not unitary – it is specific to the task or domain in question (e.g., financial, medical, research consent or assent); cognitive difficulties do not automatically imply a lack of capacity; and individuals may lack capacity in one area of functioning while retaining capacity in other domains. Individuals may also transition from more to less assistance with decision-making, and capacity can be regained. This primer will review basic tenets of decision-making capacity and broadly introduce research and currently existing guidelines, considering the impact on a person’s life and advancing providers’ competency to navigate ethical and practical issues.

 

Capacity Assessments, Consent, and Assent in Behavioral Gerontology: Issues of Stimulus Control

REBECCA A SHARP (Bangor University), Zoe Lucock (Bangor University)
Abstract:

Behavior-analytic research with adults with dementia is often conducted with people who lack the capacity to consent on their own behalf. However, commonly used capacity assessments and assent procedures are often ill-defined and subjective. Although there are some objective behavioral measures of dissent (e.g., moving away from the area, indices of unhappiness), assent procedures requiring vocal responses may produce verbal behavior under stimulus control of past or unobservable events. For example, “Can I sit with you today and show you some activities?” might result in the topographically-irrelevant response, “I told him that the birds are blue.” Researchers must then judge whether assent has been given, which can be uncomfortable. We will discuss the utility and pitfalls of our ethics committee-approved assent and consent procedures, and the use of compassionate misinformation in relation to the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. We will present data showing the prevalence of vocal responses not under conditional control of discriminative stimuli used in assent procedures. We will discuss the need for socially valid, effective vocal and non-vocal methods for gaining assent from participants with dementia to enable people to be involved as much as possible in the consent process (i.e., have choice).

 

Consent and Assent Issues for Adults and Children With Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

STEPHANIE M. PETERSON (Western Michigan University), Cody Morris (Salve Regina University ), Jessica Detrick (Western Michigan University), Shawn P. Quigley (Melmark), Kelsey Webster (Western Michigan University), Julia Mays (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Whether conducting behavior analytic research or providing behavior analytic services to individuals with developmental disabilities, it is important to gain consent for the provision of the procedures in question. Several issues arise when considering how informed consent is obtained to ensure individuals with developmental disabilities who are their own guardians are not coerced into providing consent. There are also several considerations that must be made to ensure consent is effectively informed. When adults with developmental disabilities are not their own guardians or when children with developmental disabilities are involved, they may not be able to legally provide consent. However, the majority of the time, such individuals must still provide assent. Thus, similar issues apply. This presentation will provide an overview of the concerns that can arise when attempting to gain consent or assent from individuals with developmental disabilities. We will provide a behavior analytic perspective on these issues, as well as present potential solutions behavior analysts might consider as ways to evaluate assent and consent that avoid coercive procedures.

 
 
Panel #111
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Role of Principles in Ethical Decision-Making
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, University of D.C. / Catholic University
Area: PCH/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nancy Rosenberg, Ph.D.
Chair: Ilene S. Schwartz (University of Washington)
NANCY ROSENBERG (University of Washington)
ELIZABETH KELLY (University of Washington)
KAITLIN MARIE KLOES GREENY (University of Washington)
Abstract:

Principles are broad statements of values that can serve as guides for both ethical behavior and ethical decision-making. Many health-related professions, such as occupational therapy, speech-language-hearing, psychology, and counseling, have incorporated explicit principles into their codes of ethics. Behavior analysis currently has not. This symposium will explore the use of principles in the ethics codes of other organizations, examine how a statement of basic principles might help guide ethical behavior and ethical decision making within an organization, and outline a process we have utilized at our university to define principles for our Applied Behavior Analysis program.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will recognize the use of explicit principles in the ethical codes of other health-related professions. 2. Participants will recognize ways that explicit principles may help guide ethical behavior and ethical decision making within an organization. 3. Participants will understand one possible process for developing explicit principles for an organization interested in promoting ethical behavior in its behavior analysts.
Keyword(s): decision making, developmental disabilities, ethical principles, ethics
 
 
Panel #113
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
PDS: How to Win Friends From Other Disciplines: Successful Outcomes Through Collaboration
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: TBA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Evelyn Rachael Gould, Ph.D.
Chair: Kathryn Atkins (University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Kennedy Krieger Institute)
CLAIRE C. ST. PETER (West Virginia University)
EVELYN RACHAEL GOULD (McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School; FirstSteps for Kids, Inc.)
PETER GIROLAMI (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract:

Collaborating with professionals in other disciplines is vital to the success of those we serve but is also one of the most difficult parts of the job. Teachers, speech pathologists, occupational therapists, pediatricians, social workers, and psychiatrists bring unique areas of expertise, and collaboration means finding common ground. Successful collaboration may also require some persuasion and translating behavior analytic terms into their language to teach others what our science has to offer. This panel includes experienced behavior analysts from school, hospital, and mental health settings who have experience collaborating with diverse professionals from other disciplines. They will provide their perspectives on the benefits of working with others and provide strategies for how to navigate potential challenges. They will give insight into navigating ethical issues that may arise when working with multidisciplinary teams. They will offer recommendations on how to make friends and influence people to provide the best services possible for those we serve.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

The target audience in practicing behavior analysts who work in setting that require collaboration with professionals from other disciplines.

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe the benefits of working with professionals from other disciplines. 2. Participants will be able to use persuasion and negotiation skills in order to achieve their goals when working with professionals with other disciplines. 3. Participants will be able to identify ethical issues that may arise when working with an interdisciplinary team and use problem-solving strategies to address these issues to act in the best interest of the client.
Keyword(s): collaboration, multidisciplinary team, professional development, service delivery
 
 
Symposium #123
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Beyond Politically Correct: Practical Steps Toward a More Equitable and Culturally Diverse Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Translational
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Saint Joseph's University)
Discussant: Denisha Gingles (Signature Behavior Analytic Services)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, Ph.D.
Abstract:

In the last two years, diversity, social justice, and cultural humility have received a surge of interest in the applied behavior analytic (ABA) community, likely largely bolstered by social movements such as MeToo and BlackLivesMatter. This symposium brings together four presentations that provide practical action items for research and practice. The first presentation, by Elizabeth Fong, will bring a broader historical perspective to the conversation surrounding diversity in ABA and will engage the audience in some brief self-reflective and group activities. The second presentation, by Jacqueline Ramirez, reviews research on cultural humility training and provides specific actionable recommendations that the audience can put into practice today. The third presentation, by Robyn Catagnus, presents results of a review of research published in six behavior analytic journals and assesses the presence of cross-cultural research published in these journals. The fourth presentation, by Zoey Ulrey, presents a conceptual functional analysis of leadership behaviors relevant to preventing harassment in organizations. The symposium concludes with a discussion by Denisha Gingles.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): culture, diversity, harassment, social justice
Target Audience:

Any behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to provide a behavior analytic definition of culture. Attendees will be able to summarize the results of previous research on the effectiveness of cultural humility training programs. Attendees will be able to summarize the results of previous research on cross-cultural provision of ABA services. Attendees will be able to discuss the function of leader behaviors relevant to harassment prevention.
 
Diversity submission Examining Diversity and Culture in Behavior Analysis
(Service Delivery)
ELIZABETH HUGHES FONG (Saint Joseph's University)
Abstract: This discussion with begin with a brief history of ABA in regards to diversity and culture.  From there, ethics, supervision, interventions, as well as challenges and potential solutions will be examined. Participants will be asked to participate in a few self-reflective and group activities to challenge their views on diversity and multiculturalism. Finally, discussion around increasing culturally aware behavior analytic skills in practice as a practitioner and supervisors will be explored, as well as a discussion on some of the barriers that perpetuate the lack of diversity and equity in our field.
 
Diversity submission 

The Big Elephant in the Room: Culture

(Service Delivery)
JACQUELINE RAMIREZ (University of Southern California ), Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
Abstract:

The topics of cultural competence and cultural humility have received increasing attention in the behavior analytic profession. Although the terms are often taken as synonymous, they are not the same. The concept of cultural competence assumes that, after sufficient training, one might become competent in another’s culture. The concept of cultural humility asserts that one can never become fully competent in another’s culture, so a more realistic and productive goal is to become humble and open with respect to culture. The field of applied behavior analysis has done very little research addressing the topic. In fact, few training programs in behavior analysis include training in cultural humility as a requirement. A best practice for teaching these frameworks has not been identified and there is a critical need to outline the relevance of cultural humility and to expand on studies from similar disciplines that have a head start in identifying what works. Identifying best practices will enable practitioners to provide ethical, socially significant, and socially validated interventions to our consumers and families, thus remaining true to our ethical code and dimensions of applied behavior analysis.This presentation will make specific, testable recommendations for how behavior analytic training and research may be brought to bear on establishing culturally humble clinician repertoires of behavior.

 
Diversity submission Working in a Cross-Cultural Context? You Can’t Rely on the Research (Yet)
(Service Delivery)
Stacee Leatherman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), ROBYN M. CATAGNUS (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Thomas Wade Brown (Ball State University)
Abstract: If you are working in a cross-cultural context, you may not find many empirical studies to guide you… yet. Many US practitioners are providing cross-cultural behavior analytic supervision and services, often driven by the growing global demand for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) intervention. These practitioners should rely on empirical research regarding how to best serve a wide variety of cultures, especially when working with a new population. Yet, there are very few studies in US behavior-analytic journals of cross-cultural research with participants from minority groups, immigrant communities, or cultures outside of North America and Europe. A systematic review of 6 behavior-analytic journals (2009-2019), using various search terms related to diversity and culture, yielded just 20 studies reporting participants were from cultural groups such as these, and only two of these included participants with disabilities. This deficit in the literature is exacerbated by key term inconsistency and a (well-established) lack reporting of race and ethnicity in research. Still, there are risks associated with international dissemination and cross-cultural services with a lack of sufficient evidence to guide practitioners. We call for more reports with specific recommendations for diverse populations and suggest inclusive research and practice strategies.
 
Diversity submission Behavioral Conceptual Analysis of Leadership Behaviors for Harassment Prevention
(Theory)
ZOEY ISABELLA ULREY (University of Southern California), Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
Abstract: This presentation consists of a conceptual functional analysis of leadership behaviors. Under what conditions do leaders intervene in instances requiring someone to take a stand or act as a bystander and what are the maintaining consequences of those behaviors? Accordingly, what are the maintaining contingencies for less optimal behaviors, such as actively avoiding intervening in instances of potential harassment? Furthermore, how do leader behaviors relevant to harassment influence subordinates’ behavior, both in the presence and absence of the leader? This presentation will review literature on leadership behavior and analyze the contingencies maintaining leadership behaviors relevant to harassment prevention. We will then identify where interventions should target change for the improvement of leader behavior at the individual level and how this has the potential to affect organizational culture at a larger level, with the goal of bringing about more equitable organizational cultures that prevent harassment.
 
 
Symposium #131
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Collaborative Approach to Supporting Severely Impacted Adults
Saturday, May 23, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon A
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: David Pyles (Pyles & Associates)
Discussant: David Pyles (Pyles & Associates)
CE Instructor: Adrienne Hursh, M.A.
Abstract:

Collaboration amongst interdisciplinary teams to manage treatment outcomes should be a first line of defense in effective behavior support with adults. Most of the time, figuring out the function of the target problem behavior is an easy task. The difficulty arises when treatment objectives are targeted in isolation thus creating a significant barrier to effective intervention. Often times adults with disabilities are served by various providers including behaviorists, psychiatrists, mental health professionals and non-behaviorally trained direct support staff. More often the consultation model for behavior services is used and the behaviorist is charged to work with a team of professionals and paraprofessionals that may or may not be focused on the same objectives. Initial and ongoing collaborative treatment planning will allow for more effective interventions. The talks that are presented in this symposium show measurable effects of professionals and paraprofessional who use a collaborative treatment model to support various individuals.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): adults, collaborative model, problem behavior
Target Audience:

The target audience for this presentation includes any professionals working in the field alongside other professionals and paraprofessionals.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will identify when and how to collaborate with other providers Attendees will learn to determine when the collaboration is effective or ineffective Attendees will learn strategies to manage ongoing collaboration
 

Collaboration With Psychiatrists: Working With Dually-Diagnosed Adults

(Service Delivery)
ADRIENNE HURSH (Pyles and Associates)
Abstract:

When working with dually diagnosis adults, behavior analysts want to minimize the need for medication for behavior challenges. The treatment evaluations presented here include collaboration between a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) and a psychiatrist to achieve medication stabilization and behavior reduction. The targeted individuals include (1) a 59 year old woman diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder, Depressed type and Moderate Intellectual Disability, (2) a 41 year old woman diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder, Severe Intellectual Disability, and Autism, and (3) a 30 year old woman diagnosed with Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Moderate Intellectual Disability, Epilepsy and Pseudo-Seizures. All of the ladies live in a group home setting (not all in the same home) and have a history of frequent hospitalizations as well as residing in state-run facilities. A collaborative model was used with the psychiatrist and direct staff that included development and implementation of a behavior plan, as well as visual/graphical feedback for decision-making with medications. Across all individuals, behavior challenges reduced and medication changes due to increasing behavior problems was no longer needed.

 

Collaboration With Paraprofessionals to Decrease Severe Problem Behavior

(Service Delivery)
SHAI MAOR (Pyles and Associates)
Abstract:

Working with adults usually means utilizing a consultative approach where the BCBA is the consultant and paraprofessionals are the direct line staff. When this happens, collaboration with the service providers who employ the paraprofessionals and the paraprofessionals themselves is essential. In addition, the behavior program must include a strong staff training component to ensure accurate and consistent delivery of the behavior program. Without collaboration and staff training, the behavior program cannot be fully adopted to ensure effective support for the individual. This presentation includes treatment evaluations of collaborative models for three males, ages 23-28. All have dual diagnoses and have 2:1 staffing ratios due to the intensity of problem behaviors. Attendees will be presented with data that represent collaborative work with paraprofessionals that is focused on behavior plan implementation and overall behavior excess reduction.

 
 
Panel #135
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Addressing Ethical Violations When We Catch Behavior Analysts Behaving Badly
Saturday, May 23, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, University of D.C. / Catholic University
Area: PCH/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Kelly, M.S.
Chair: Emily Marie Lawson (Pennington Group)
SARAH RUSSELL (Sage Graduate School; ASPIRE LLC)
SUZANNA MYERS (Pennington Group ABA)
JESSICA KELLY (J Kelly ABA)
Abstract:

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board requires all certified individuals to be familiar with and adhere to the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (10.0, Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2016). Anectodal reports from various certified providers in Hampton Roads, VA indicates a pattern of escape/avoidance behavior in response to witnessing ethical violations by their fellow certified colleagues, some who also acted as their supervisor and employer at the time of the violations (J. Kelly, personal communication, 2018). Specifically, these Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Board Certified assistant Behavior Analysts resigned from their employment positions instead of attempting to resolve the issue with the individual who engaged in the violation as our code instructs us to do (Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts 7.0, BACB, 2016). Informal interviews conducted with supervisees also revealed that the majority of these individuals did not receive training on confronting individuals engaging in ethical violations nor did they receive training on submitting a notice of alleged violation via the Behavior Analyst Certification Board or submitting a report with the state’s licensure department if applicable. It is imperative that individuals representing behavior analysis follow through with their ethical obligations to maintain our science’s reputation.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBAs, BCaBAs, graduate level students completing their fieldwork towards eligibility to sit for the BACB exam, supervisors, supervisees

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand the importance of upholding the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code; (2) address / confront colleagues, supervisors, and supervisees regarding alleged ethical violations; (3) navigate the steps for reporting ethical violations to the appropriate authority.
Keyword(s): ethical responsibility, ethical violations, harm risk, timely reporting
 
 
Symposium #142
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission We ARE Acting to Save the World: Behavior Analysis Addresses Systems-Level Problems
Saturday, May 23, 2020
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty N-P
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Richard F. Rakos (Cleveland State University)
Discussant: Richard F. Rakos (Cleveland State University)
CE Instructor: Sarah M. Richling, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Skinner (1987) stressed that acting to solve the world’s problems required changing the environment of which the problem-solving behavior is a function. In the ensuing decades since he called on behavior analysts to become more involved in system level change, the relevant environment did change – e.g., the introduction of new or stronger journals, organizations, researchers, grant programs, etc. – and behavior analysis matured into a discipline that now applies its theoretical and methodological approach to the remediation of social and cultural problems. This symposium presents a sample of current behavior analytic work addressing systems-level change, with presenters drawn from chapter authors of the forthcoming book Behavior science perspectives on culture and community (Mattaini & Cihon, Eds.). Presenters will discuss behavior analytic advances in promoting environmentally sustainable practices, moderating problematic climate change via both community organizing models and working with the corporate sector, fostering social justice through research and clinical practice, and engaging in activism and advocacy efforts to promote progressive social change. The four topics are interrelated with each other and, combined with discussant remarks and 20 minutes for audience questions, will offer a rich introduction or update to cutting edge applications of behavior analysis to saving the world

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students and professionals

 
Diversity submission 

Taking Our Seat at the Table: Behavior Analysis and the Advancement of Global Sustainability

BRETT GELINO (University of Kansas), Tyler Erath (University of Kansas), Derek D. Reed (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

The humans of today are among the most important to share the Earth. The efforts that lay ahead—reducing our carbon footprint, preserving our natural landscapes, drastically changing our resource consumption—are likely to yield outcomes we may never directly experience. Although technological ingenuity will be critical, efforts by behavioral scientists to encourage sustainable lifestyles will be among the leading means by which to proactively maintain Earth’s habitability. In this vein, behavior analysis has a rich history of work promoting sustainable living. We conducted a systematic review of behavior analytic research in sustainability using key phrases derived from leading climate and Earth science reports (e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). We coded the resulting fifty-two empirical studies published across six primarily behavior analytic journals according to intervention methods and target behavior to reveal gaps in the existing literature. The goals of this presentation will thusly be to (a) summarize the efforts of behavior analysis to-date in the areas of sustainable living, (b) highlight areas for which empirical research is lacking, and (c) highlight areas where future behavior analysts can make the most meaningful contribution to advance global sustainability

 
Diversity submission 

Global Warming: Behavior Options Ahead As We Approach Two Degree Celsius Limit

MARK P. ALAVOSIUS (Praxis2LLC; University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

Global warming (GW) will continue to accelerate unless exceptional efforts are taken soon to reduce carbon emissions and greenhouse gases. Increasingly dire consequences are apparent now across the globe. GW is a behavioral problem at its root -- a "super wicked problem" whose solutions seem unsolvable within the time available for action. A science of the behavior of individuals is relatively clear about the contingencies that influence individuals to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and behavior analysis has made significant contributions to our understanding but has little impact on the problem, given the lack of evidence on strategies for influencing entire populations. This talk outlines a theoretical account of the behavior of individuals and the practices of organizations relevant to the trajectory ahead. The challenge for the behavioral science community is to identify, understand and manage the variables that will bring about massive, crucial changes in individual behavior and organizational action to prevent further warming or help prepare for what lies ahead. Prevention may be beyond behavior science community skill set, but successes in applications of behavior analysis suggest that this community may be orchestrated to address behaviors needed for adaptation to a warming planet and resilience during climate crises.

 
Diversity submission Creating Spaces for Social Justice
SHAHLA SUSAN ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Abstract: We are a collective of faculty and students in a community of practice designed to learn about social justice. Our disciplines are Applied Behavior Analysis, Women’s and Gender Studies, Applied Anthropology and Evolutionary Anthropology. Our personal identities are diverse and complicated. We gather formally about once a week to have conversations that are placed in the context of our daily lives and scholarship. In our conversations, we introduce and explore our conceptual, methodological and praxis perspectives. The conceptualizations we share are based within a fluid framework involving womanist, behaviorist and anthropological constructs. Our methods are participatory and include direct observation and qualitative strategies. The praxis is our daily effort, activism, and applied research. All these efforts have resulted in a collective shaping process that has progressed our understandings and actions in the realm of social justice. It is an uncomfortable and cherished space.
 
Diversity submission 

How Behavioral Scientists Find Their Global Voice: Activism, Advocacy, Accompaniment, and Policy Change

SARAH M. RICHLING (Auburn University), Jose Ardila (University of Nevada)
Abstract:

A wide array of populations and communities are trapped in complex, multi-level systems of interlocked behaviors that offer no clear path toward dignity and social justice. The impact behavior analysts can have with progressive social change is enhanced through the strategic adoption of three key repertoires: activism, advocacy, and accompaniment (AAA) and a thorough analysis of evidence-based policy change efforts. Understood as value-oriented practices whose effects are primarily observed at the systems level, activist activities involve building knowledge about issues impacting various social communities and engaging in on-going efforts to improve the quality of life on a large scale. Advocacy and accompaniment actions are functionally related to these values, which are discrete plans of action with specific operationalized outcomes. AAA efforts may be enhanced with support from the behavior analytic community, armed with evidence-based strategies that effectively produce policy change, and more importantly, improvements to quality of life for society at large. In this presentation we provide a conceptual analysis of social change efforts and provide suggestions for establishing systemic behavioral change as an aggregate product of the behavior analytic community.

 
 
Panel #149
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Challenges and Solutions in Delivering ABA Services to Underserved Communities Across Various Cultural and Socioeconomic Backgrounds
Saturday, May 23, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Fumi Horner, Ph.D.
Chair: Oswaldo Ochoa (Bloom Behavioral Health)
FUMI HORNER (Behavioral Perspective, Inc.)
MAGGI CARDENAS (Behavioral Perspective, Inc.)
MARI URAMOTO (Children Center Inc.)
Abstract:

Estimated 75,000 board certified behavior analysts (BCBAs) are needed in order to support the growing need for behavior analytic services in the United States (Hartley et. al., 2016) with only 32,000 current BCBAs (Behavior Analysis Certification Board, 2018). The United States employment demand for Behavior Analysts from 2010 to 2019 found that increases were observed for each state from 2010 (BACB, 2019). Furthermore, there are many other countries, such as Japan, where there are simply not enough behavioral service providers to serve people with developmental disabilities. With such rapid increases in the demand for ABA services within US and possibly even more in other countries, how can the field of Behavior Analysis and organizations work together to provide the services for people with varying socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds? How can we modify our traditional service delivery to better-accommodate to their various needs or level of resources? The panelists will discuss how behavior analytic services in the above-mentioned areas can be implemented and their experience on delivering services across socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Business owners, managerial level BCBAs

Learning Objectives: Learn some strategies on how to individualize ABA service delivery to families with various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Learn an application and some limitations of adapting English-written language curriculum using Discrete Trial Instruction in Japanese. Learn ethical considerations and cultural competency when providing services in foreign countries with limited funding for ABA services.
Keyword(s): cultural competency, developmental disabilities, service delivery, underserved communities
 
 
Panel #155
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Risky Business Reboot: Ethics, Interventions, and Consultation in the Area of Sexuality
Saturday, May 23, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon H
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sorah Stein, M.A.
Chair: Robin Moyher (George Mason University)
SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University)
DANI PIZZELLA (Special School District of St Louis County)
Abstract:

The field of behavior analysis acknowledges our responsibility to ethically provide services that support the autonomy of and maximize reinforcement for our clients, while also maximizing benefit to the community at large. Perhaps in no arena is this responsibility more pertinent than in that of sexual behavior. Cognizance around ethical issues as well as potential legal implications is of highest importance, especially in situations in which our clients have developmental disabilities. This panel will serve as a sounding board for common issues faced in the field as behavior analysts who address potential behavior change surrounding sexual behavior. Panelists will provide anecdotal information to inform best practices, surrounding the ethics of consultation and intervention, and the ethical considerations of each. Past Risky Business panels will serve as a brief touchpoint for this panel, as our panelists continue to bring us new and relevant information in the realm of sexual behavior.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBAs and BCaBAs

Learning Objectives: not required for BACB CEUs
Keyword(s): developmental disabilities, ethics, sexual behavior
 
 
Panel #160
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Role of Behavior Analysts in the Transition Process for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Saturday, May 23, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence F-H
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Edward Justin Page, Ph.D.
Chair: Edward Justin Page (Duquesne University)
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates)
TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates)
TRACY EILEEN SINCLAIR (The University of Oklahoma)
Abstract:

Students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), when compared to typical developing peers, continue to have lower post-secondary outcomes (e.g., employment rates, community integration) (Migliore & Butterworth, 2008; Papay & Bambara, 2014). As the transition pathways expand beyond employment (i.e., education, independent living, community integration), multidisciplinary teams are searching for ways to better prepare students with IDD for life after high school. Behavior analysts can support education personnel in all major facets of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; 2004). This panel aims to discuss how Behavior Analysts can collaborate with multidisciplinary teams on assessment, intervention, and thoughtful programming, highlight areas for improvement within the transition process, and discuss how to approach conflicting views on best practices.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The target audience for this panel are professionals who work as behavior analysts within school districts and consult with school staff members on transition programming. A secondary target audience are behavior analysts who have a vested interest in assessing students with IDD.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand how behavior analysts can contribute as part of a multidisciplinary team; (2) identify assessments and best practices which can be used to increase transition outcomes; (3) and state the transition pathway options for students with IDD .
Keyword(s): Post-secondary, Transition
 
 
Invited Tutorial #211
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Professional Competency: You May Have It Now, But Can You Keep It?
Sunday, May 24, 2020
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Edward J. Daly, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark D. Shriver (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Presenting Authors: : EDWARD J. DALY (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Abstract:

This presentation will examine what the sciences of expertise and professional judgment have to teach behavior analysts about cultivating, maintaining, and expanding professional competencies following training. The topic will be presented in the context of the field’s ethical standards with respect to (a) relying on scientific knowledge, (b) respecting the boundaries of competence, and (c) maintaining and continuously improving professional competence in the complex environments in which we work. This complexity makes our work environments highly conducive to judgment errors that compromise our ability to assure that our clients receive the best-possible treatment. But, the greatest potential source of error lies within the professional who assumes that prior training and experience assures competence. Although the research on professional expertise and judgment has largely been carried on outside the field, our very own principles of behavior and professional practice can be useful to us if we apply them to ourselves properly in managing our professional behavior. The implications for practice of the sciences of professional expertise and professional judgment will be examined in terms of how we behavior analysts can self-manage our professional behavior to assure that we are doing everything within our power to address the needs of our clients.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

All behavior analysts.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss what the science of expertise has revealed about how professionals grow and flourish or fail to grow in their competencies over time in their careers; (2) discuss practitioner sources of error in judgment and decision making and how they potentially harm our clients; (3) review how to self-manage their professional behavior to minimize judgment errors and grow in their competencies through the systematic application of principles of behavior.
 
EDWARD J. DALY (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Edward J. Daly III, BCBA-D, conducts research on functional assessment methods and school-based consultation. He has co-authored numerous chapters and journal articles on this topic. Dr. Daly is Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he teaches course work in Applied Behavior Analysis, school-based interventions, and single-case experimental designs.
 
 
Panel #223
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysts Treating Supervisees and RBTs Badly
Sunday, May 24, 2020
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 5
Area: PCH/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D.
Chair: Jon S. Bailey (Florida State University)
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
THOMAS L. ZANE (University of Kansas)
JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Abstract:

This panel is a continuation of previous presentations at ABAI regarding Behavior Analysts Who Are Behaving Badly. This year we will focus on the plight of the supervisees and RBTs who work under BCBAs who do not respect their work experience or the conditions under which they provide services. For this panel we have brought together three behavior analysis ethicists who are regularly requested to provide guidance through the ABAEthicsHotline, with regard to the treatment of supervisees and RBTs. To demonstrate the range of approaches used and opinions offered, recent ethics questions from both supervisees and RBT will be presented, each panelist will offer their guidance, we will then debate the merits of our various and sometimes differing approaches. Toward the end of the session we will open the floor to questions from the audience and again each ethicist will respond so that the range of tactics and strategies will be apparent.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The target audience is BCBA supervisors who need to learn about inappropriate and unethical practices with their supervisees and RBTs who need to know what to what to do in the case that they are a victim of unscrupulous supervision practices.

Learning Objectives: 1. Members of the audience will be able to list three common ethical violations that BCBA supervisors commit with their supervisees and RBTs. 2. Members of the audience will be able to describe the appropriate steps to take if they are the supervisee victim of unethical practices. 3. Members of the audience will be able to describe steps to be taken in an organization to prevent unethical BCBA supervision practices.
Keyword(s): Ethics, Supervisees
 
 
Symposium #226
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
ACTions Speak Louder Than Words: The Vast Utility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Inside ABA Agencies
Sunday, May 24, 2020
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Erin Elizabeth Bertoli (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
Discussant: Stuart E. Libman (PLEA)
CE Instructor: Erin Elizabeth Bertoli, M.S.
Abstract:

Acceptance and Commitment Training is a topic that has received substantial increased attention within the applied behavior analytic community in recent years. Among the most common concerns ABA practitioners have is about how to actually implement ACT inside of daily mainstream ABA service delivery. This symposium brings together four presentations that describe practical efforts at incorporating ACT into ABA agencies. The first presentation, by Michelle L. Zube, describes how to become versed in ACT and the ways in which organizations can expand professional development and scope of practice with ACT. The second presentation, by Ehren Werntz, describes the use of ACT as part of caregiver training. The third presentation, by Kate Harrison, describes the utility of ACT on a personal level and with colleagues to help reduce stress. The fourth presentation, by Erin Bertoli, describes the use of ACT with struggling youth, including when, why and how behavior analysts can do so while staying within their scope of practice. The symposium concludes with a discussion by Dr. Stuart Libman.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board Certified Behavior Analysts. Parents are also welcome!

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to identify ways to become versed in ACT, implications for personal and professional development, scope of practice, and to create cultural shifts within and outside of their organizations. 2. At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to describe strategies to support the use of ACT in a behavior analytic parent training program. 3. Participants will identify at least three actions rooted in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to proactively and reactively assist colleagues in navigating workplace stress and anxiety. 4. Participants will be able to identify when and why BCBAs should consider utilizing ACT with their clients; identify a few different ACT-based models that have been developed for youth; and identify ways to collect data to measure effectiveness.
 
ACT Now: Ways to Enhance Behavior Analytic Practice with Acceptance and Commitment Training
MICHELLE L ZUBE (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC; Caldwell University)
Abstract: Behavior analysts are in high demand and called upon to serve different populations, solve a variety of problems, and to be leaders in the field. Many issues we are faced with require a skill set beyond that of behavioral training. Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) offers a set of skills and solutions to be used in conjunction with behavioral skills to create meaningful change. ACT is not currently included on the Board Certified Behavior Analyst’s (BCBA) Task List however, more BCBAs are beginning to infuse ACT into their practice. There are a number of ways for BCBAs to become well versed in ACT. ACT affords the opportunity for both personal and professional growth. Additionally, ACT enhances behaviorists’ scope of practice while maintaining the integrity of our science. With the growing popularity of ACT, we can not only facilitate change at the micro level but at the macro levels as well.
 
Clinical Family Coaching: An Example of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Behavioral Caregiver Training
EHREN J WERNTZ (Arizona Autism United)
Abstract: Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) has gained attention among board certified behavior analysts (BCBA) in recent years as a potentially valuable technology to address a class of clinically relevant behavior, specifically caregiver behavior under the control of private events. Most behavior analysts treat the behavior of children affected by autism and developmental disabilities, a critical component of which is parent and caregiver training. Issues related to caregiver adherence represent a significant vulnerability to effective behavioral treatment and durable outcomes, and they are not new concerns to behavior analysts. What is relatively new is the growing body of evidence to support the incorporation of ACT in behavioral parent training as well as increasingly available training opportunities. While more and more BCBAs are accruing continuing education units in ACT, there remain questions about how it can be effectively and responsibly integrated into existing ABA treatment programs. This presentation will describe one example of an ABA program in which ACT is a prominent component, how it has been integrated, and what steps have been taken to maximize competence and remain in scope.
 
The Utility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Acknowledging and Addressing Stress, and Stress Management, with Your Team
KATE ELIZABETH HARRISON (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
Abstract: We embark on the great behavior analyst adventure with a vision to help others live fulfilling lives and to have a meaningful impact on the world around us. Throughout that journey, we face the hidden monster of workplace stress, whether caused by managing difficult relationships, unpredictability in schedules, lack of boundaries, emotional and physical fatigue, challenging case loads, or a myriad of other common hurdles. The World Health Organization recently added burnout to its International Classification of Diseases -- a diagnostic tool for medical providers. While comprehensive data on retention rates in the field of applied behavior analysis are difficult to find, anecdotal evidence indicates that burnout is a leading cause of turnover in the field. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) offers leaders the opportunity to cultivate change in their teams’ experiences with stress-related situations by combining acceptance strategies with committed actions, among four other core principles. In order to achieve our ambitious goals, it is imperative that behavior analysts equip their teams with the tools necessary to overcome obstacles and challenges -- ACT does just that.
 
The Use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Struggling Youth: Another Tool for Your Behavior Analytic Toolbox
ERIN ELIZABETH BERTOLI (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
Abstract: Skinner (1969) made this very clear: behavior analysis is supposed to be a comprehensive science of psychology; a comprehensive science of everything all organisms do, which includes private events. Yet many behavior analysts avoid addressing private events because it seems too mentalistic. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is a technology that is grounded in contextual behavior science and is available to utilize with youth who are struggling with rigidity, anxiety, social emotional challenges, mental health issues, and more. While more research is needed, various ACT-based models have been developed for youth, and have the potential to be an effective intervention when direct contingency management has not proven effective. As long as we remain within our scope of practice, this could be the missing link for ABA agencies who are working with struggling youth. Because as a wise man once said, “If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.”
 
 
Panel #278
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics of Effective Dissemination and Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration
Sunday, May 24, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty N-P
Area: CSS/TBA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Erin S. Leif, Ph.D.
Chair: Erin S. Leif (Monash University )
JOSE MOLINA (Irabina Autism Services)
KRISTIN E. BAYLEY (To The Moon & Back; Griffith University)
LISA KEMMERER (STAR Autism Support Inc.)
Abstract:

Applied Behaviour Analysis is rapidly gaining recognition in Australia as a result of new university training programs and the increased demand for behavioural supports in the context of the National Disability Insurance Scheme. A transdisciplinary approach is central to contemporary disability services, healthcare and educational policy in Australia, and there is an increased national movement towards the delivery of services for people with disability through transdisciplinary teams. For behaviour analysts to effectively disseminate applied behaviour analysis in Australia, they must learn to work effectively with team members from allied health and education disciplines. However, integrated and collaborative work across disciplines may be challenging, particularly when team members possess different knowledge and technical skills. This may result in ethically complex situations. In this session, a clinical psychologist, speech and language pathologist, and board certified behaviour analyst will discuss how they work as members of transdisciplinary teams when delivering applied behaviour analysis services in Australia. Each will present an ethically complex situation that they have encountered, and how they resolved it. Throughout the discussion, we will highlight how the inter-professional aspects of ethical decision-making may lead to both better teamwork and potentially improved client outcomes in diverse settings.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, BCaBAs, Allied Health Professionals, Teachers, School Leaders

Learning Objectives: 1.) Participants will describe opportunities and challenges for effective and ethical dissemination of behaviour analysis outside of the United States 2.) Participants will describe ethically complex situations that may arise in the context of cross-disciplinary collaboration, and potential solutions 3.) Participants will describe the inter-professional aspects of ethical decision-making
Keyword(s): Dissemination, Ethics, Staff training, Trans-disciplinary
 
 
Symposium #326
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Treatment of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 202A
Area: AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Catherine Lugar (Claremont Graduate University)
Discussant: Ruth M. DeBar (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Jenna Gilder, M.A.
Abstract:

Little research has been done with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Indeed researchers and practioner's have only recently began to identify participants and cases with their ethnicity and few have taken diversity into account when designing and delivering treatment. Yet recent research has found that inclusion of variables or a child’s culture or heritage language may be advantageous in their treatment (e.g. Lim & Charlop, 2018). The present symposium focuses on four studies that include CLD children with ASD and also choose CLD variables when designing and implementing treatment. In Study 1, CLD children with ASD are taught a labeling task through an echoic procedure that uses both English and Heritage language. In Study 2, CLD children with ASD participate in a parent implemented comparison study of an imitation protocol in both English and Heritage languages. In Study 3, CLD children with ASD are taught to verbally initiate play bids to their CLD peers and to their siblings, and finally, in Study 4, CLD children with ASD are assessed to determine their preference for English or Heritage language. The symposium is wrapped up by the Discussant who relates the current findings of these studies to the treatment of CLD children with ASD and the direction the field is going.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): bilingual, communication, culture, diversity
Target Audience:

practitioners and researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) be sensitive and aware of the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); (2) use evidence based research to inform treatment options for CLD children with ASD; (3) consider and apply socially significant targets of intervention for CLD individuals with ASD and their families.
 
Diversity submission 

Linguistically Diverse Echo Prompting With Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

(Applied Research)
ALANNA DANTONA (Claremont Graduate University), Marjorie H. Charlop (Claremont McKenna College), Caitlyn Gumaer (Claremont Graduate University)
Abstract:

Few studies have examined how the use of heritage language impacts receptive language skills of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD; Charlop & Lim, 2016; Lang et al., 2011). Charlop’s (1983) echo procedure is one method by which receptive language skills have been taught to echolalic CLD children in both English and heritage language (Leung & Wu,1997). Toward this end, incorporating both echolalia and heritage language in treatment may provide a natural and contextually relevant strategy to address receptive language skills of echolalic CLD children with ASD. Therefore, using Charlop’s (1983) echo prompting procedure, the present study used a multi-elemental design to assess the differential effects of language (English versus heritage language) on receptive labeling performance of four echolalic CLD children with ASD. Following baseline measurement of receptive labeling skills involving known and unknown items, Charlop’s (1983) echo prompting procedure was implemented in both English and heritage language. Preliminary results suggest that receptive labeling performance increased during treatment in both language conditions. Findings may yield implications for future language interventions for echolalic CLD children with ASD.

 
Diversity submission 

Assessing Language in Linguistically Diverse Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

(Applied Research)
CAITLYN GUMAER (Claremont Graduate University), Alanna Dantona (Claremont Graduate University), Marjorie H. Charlop (Claremont McKenna College), Nataly Lim (University of Texas at Austin)
Abstract:

Little research has been done with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in their heritage language. Practioners and parents fear that exposing a child with ASD to more than one language will cause further delays in language development and other core deficit areas (Kremer-Sadlik, 2005). Yet recent research has found that exposure to and the use of heritage languages can be advantageous (Lim & Charlop, 2018). However, research has yet to explore how exposure to both one’s heritage language and English can impact a child with ASD’s language abilities and verbal behavior. The present study used a multiple baseline design across four parent-child dyads to assess language acquisition using the Natural Language Paradigm (NLP; Laski, Charlop & Schreibman, 1987; Spector & Charlop, 2018). Following free-play baseline sessions, four caregivers were taught to implement NLP in both their heritage language (i.e., Spanish, Korean) and English. To control for treatment effects, NLP was counter-balanced across the four dyads. Upon the implementation of NLP, regardless of language condition, each child’s appropriate verbalizations increased during NLP treatment sessions and in free-play probe sessions. Findings from the current study may yield implications for language interventions for CLD children with ASD.

 
Diversity submission 

Diversity of Participants With Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Verbal Social Initiation Teaching Program

(Applied Research)
JENNA GILDER (Claremont Graduate University), Marjorie H. Charlop (Claremont McKenna College)
Abstract:

Ethnicity of participants’ is an important variable when designing interventions in evidence based research (Fannin, 2017). Specifically, when including culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in research it is important to consider community values, practices, and culture. For example, a strong familial unit, especially in terms of sibling relationships, is an important value held by both Hispanic (Updegraff, McHale, Whiteman, Thayer & Delgado, 2005) and Asian cultures (Ho, 1994). In the current study, social verbal initiations were taught to six CLD children and adolescents with ASD (67% Korean-American and 33% Mexican-American). In baseline, all six children did not consistently verbally initiate to their siblings and peers of mixed ethnicities. During intervention, using a verbal social initiation program, all of the children learned quickly to initiate. Five of the six children also generalized the skill to a new setting and across play partners. Maintenance of this skill was also seen at 6-months. Future research can expand on this study by also teaching the initiation in the child’s heritage language.

 
Diversity submission 

The Effects of Language Preference Among Bilingual Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorderor Other Developmental Disorders

(Applied Research)
KARLA ZABALA (University of Georgia), Kara L. Wunderlich (Rollins College), Lauren Best (University of Georgia), Joel Eric Ringdahl (University of Georgia)
Abstract:

Previous research has demonstrated that individuals with ASD who have been exposed to more than one language do not experience any additional language delays compared to their monolingual peers (Hambly and Fombonne, 2011). In addition, research has not noted any indication of negative outcomes associated with language abilities among bilingual/multilingual children with ASD (Drysdale et al., 2015). The majority of the research surrounding bilingual or multilingual individuals diagnosed with autism or other developmental disabilities has focused on conducting communication assessments to assess participants’ psychometric performance. Research related to language preferences exhibited by these individuals is scarce. The purpose of the current study was to assess language preference among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other developmental disorders who have been exposed to more than one language. The research study consisted of two parts: Study 1 evaluated language preference during play contexts and Study 2 evaluated language preference and compliance with instructions within instructional contexts.

 
 
Panel #362
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Considerations for Behavior Analysts Providing Supervision and Supports in Public Schools
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence F-H
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Selena J Layden, Ph.D.
Chair: Selena J Layden (Old Dominion University)
DARIA LORIO-BARSTEN (College of William & Mary Training and Technical Assistance Center)
LAUREN VETERE (Virginia Commonwealth University)
DANIS URBAN (New Horizons Regional Education Centers)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts working in public school settings may face ethical and logistical challenges. As an applied area of behavior analysis, practicing in education requires in-depth understanding and application of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board®. For behavior analysts, supervision in the public school setting can be broadly defined and can encompass a variety of roles and responsibilities. Behavior analysts may provide supervision to those who are both familiar and unfamiliar with ABA. It is often a behavior analyst’s responsibility to juggle administrative duties and supports, ethical standards, and education for staff, all while ensuring appropriate service delivery and effectiveness for students. Additionally, many roles filled by behavior analysts in public schools are not evaluative, thus creating additional challenges for effective supervision. Yet, success for students depends upon staff providing quality services, often supported or overseen by the behavior analyst. This panel discussion will specifically focus on behavior analysts providing supervision and supports in public schools. The targeted audience for this panel includes those currently working in public school settings, those who consult in these settings, or those teaching future behavior analysts who may work in the public school setting.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs or BCBA-Ds currently working in public school settings BCBAs or BCBA-Ds who consult in public schools BCBAs or BCBA-Ds teaching future behavior analysts who may work in the public school setting

Learning Objectives: 1. Identify at least 5 challenges to providing supervision as a BCBA in the public school setting 2. Create at least 3 with potential resolutions to issues identified in providing supervision as a BCBA in a public school setting 3. Determine at least 3 questions from the larger audience that need to be addressed related to this topic
Keyword(s): education, ethics, public school, supervision
 
 
Panel #378
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission May We Offer Another Perspective? Ethics and Cultural Considerations
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda N. Kelly, Ph.D.
Chair: Amanda N. Kelly (BEHAVIORBABE (Hawai'i); Distinguished Organization of Behavior Enterprises, Hawai'i Association of Behavior Analysis)
NICOLE M. DAVIS (Northeastern University)
ANTONIO M. HARRISON (Renaissance Behavior, LLC)
AMOY HUGH-PENNIE (Understanding Behavior, Inc.; TCI-VCS Program)
Abstract:

“The scientist may appeal to his own culture or history only when it resembles that of the subject he is studying. Even then he may be wrong, just as the layman's quick practical reaction may be wrong…” (B.F. Skinner, p. 302). Our attitudes, beliefs, values, and experiences shape how we perceive and respond to the world around us. As behavior analysts, often in consultative capacities, we find ourselves interacting with numerous individuals who have histories and behavioral repertoires that differ from our own. This panel aims to discuss ethics for analysts and to offer perspectives from behavior analysts whose backgrounds; both personal and professional have likely differed from yours, and perhaps from the majority of other analysts. Through our stories, we hope to create a conversation where we can begin to become comfortable with the discomfort, particularly when cultural differences arise. We invite you to join us and to hear varying perspectives about the roles behavior analysts play and the role behavior analysis plays in each of our lives.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Our target audience are newly credentialed and seasoned behavior analysts and any other mental health professionals.

Learning Objectives: 1. List two ethical code elements which were referenced by the panelists. 2. Name an ethical code that is commonly used when discussing difference in culture. 3. List two strategies for becoming more culturally competent/sensitive.
Keyword(s): culture, dissemination, diversity, ethics
 
 
Symposium #379
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Celeration and Crimes Against Humanity: Part 2
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty N-P
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Amy D. Wiech (ABC Group, Inc. Hawaii)
CE Instructor: Amy D. Wiech, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The authors use the standard celeration chart to examine behavioral phenomenon that are not only underappreciated in behavior analysis, but publicly world-wide. Police suicide, violence and killing and nefarious behaviors including terrorist attacks that are commonplace in America and the United Kingdom. But the application of science to analyzing these is far less common, making solutions to these elusive. While newspapers print trends of various crimes against humanity, these are not always listed in the most helpful and accurate terms for understanding what story the data are telling. Building on the positive audience response the authors received at the Annual Conference in 2019, the authors offer an update on current celebration trends of these behaviors. The second paper depicts a depiction of police aggression in the U.K., compared to the data available for Australia when gun control was instituted. By applying behavior analysis to these phenomenon, there is potential for the field of ABA to develop solutions. The authors use celeration to understand and interpret these trends over the last several years. Broader implications of these trends and possible solutions for public safety and prevention are discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Intermediate and advanced ABA professionals, particularly those interested in spreading ABA beyond autism

Learning Objectives: 1. Identify the BACB Task List Items relevant to this learning activity. 2. Explain the benefits of using celeration over traditional methods of illustrating data. 3. Describe how behavior analytics offer solutions for these widespread social problems.
 
Behavior Analysis: The Ideal Technology for Improving Critical Issues of the Unites States’ Law Enforcement Community
AMY D. WIECH (ABC Group, Inc. Hawaii)
Abstract: Behavior analysis is a valuable technology worthy of dissemination beyond autism alone. This presentation provides an update to current celeration patterns of people killed by police (regardless of cause) and law enforcement officers who have died by suicide. The real crime against humanity is the exclusion of ABA in Law Enforcement today. The authors suggest several behavior analytic solutions to bring ABA into Law Enforcement such as improving officer health and wellness, improving relations between police and the community at large, and helping law enforcement legitimize their field using evidence-based practices including single subject design research locally. Grassroots paths for behavior analysts to assist in dissemination efforts within the field of law enforcement will be proposed.
 
Growing Concerns in the United Kingdom
KRISTOPHER R KIELBASA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Murder, theft, guns, and now knives are growing concerns in the United Kingdom as they continue to implement more restrictive policies about what tools citizens are allowed to carry. Notably, firearm availability among law enforcement and private citizens are far more restrictive in the U.K. than in the U.S. The authors use the unique view offered by the standard celeration chart to analyze how effective these restrictions are. The analysis goes beyond examining the impact on the problems for which these punitive contingencies were intended. Using celeration, unforeseen side effects of the restrictions are also investigated, such as shifts in response allocation to other tools of crime. The author also describes how these celeration trends fit into the broader effects that other nations’ firearm restrictions have had. Social and public implications of these data are discussed.
 
Terrorism: Will it Ever End?
KENT A. CORSO (Xcelerate Innovations, LLC)
Abstract: Terrorism is a sinister phenomenon that has grown over the last two centuries across the world. It is defined as intentional violence against civilians motivated by political goals. It refers to violence during peacetime or in the context of war against non-combatants (mostly civilians and neutral people). The terms "terrorist" and "terrorism" originated during the French Revolution of the late 18th century, but gained mainstream popularity in the 1970s as popular media outlets and books covered the conflicts in Northern Ireland, the Basque Country and Palestine. The increased use of improvised explosive devises (IEDs) from the 1980s onwards characterizes the most recent forms of international terrorism including package type IEDs, suicide bomb IEDs and vehicle-born IEDs. This paper explores celeration trends in terrorism over the last several decades. Particular attention is paid to coinciding variables and societal conditions in history to help elucidate any patterns that might be contributing to these phenomena.
 
 
Panel #388
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics CEUs! Oh, and Also an In-Depth Discussion on Functional Perspectives of the BACB Ethics Code
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, University of D.C. / Catholic University
Area: PCH/TBA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Darren Sush, Psy.D.
Chair: Shane Spiker (Positive Behavior Supports, Corp.)
DARREN SUSH (Pepperdine University)
SARA GERSHFELD LITVAK (Behavioral Health Center of Excellence)
OLIVIA ONOFRIO (Trumpet Behavioral Health)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts have the potential to encounter ethical challenges on a daily basis. While the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (Behavior Analyst Certification Board; BACB, 2014), includes clear and concise guidance and direction, many behavior analysts find there is significant ambiguity, misunderstanding, and interpretation when applying the Code to real-life professional circumstances. Practitioners may find themselves in an uncomfortable conflict between adhering to the Code and integrating their own appraisal and perspective of challenging scenarios. Fortunately, behavior analysts are adept at assessment of the events surrounding targeted behavior and can directly apply this skillset toward understanding behaviors associated with ethically difficult situations. The panelists will discuss ethical decision-making models for incorporating and analyzing the function of ethically precarious behavior within context while remaining consistent with ethical standards of the field and ensuring quality care for clientele.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

The target audience for this presentation is anyone interested in the study or practice of applied behavior analysis including Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs), psychologists, psychiatrists, clinicians, graduate students, professors, teachers, and parents. The primary audience will be those practicing, teaching or studying in applied behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will be able to identify ethical challenges when they occur to reduce risk, as well as identifying potential ethically precarious situations before they become problematic. 2. Attendees will be able to describe ethical decision-making models that integrate relevant ethical standards and legal principles within the context of challenging circumstances. 3. Taking a functional approach to ethical and unethical behavior, attendees will be able to describe factors maintaining and influencing the ethical principles and standards of responsible professional conduct that apply to the implementation of ABA.
 
 
Panel #428
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
You Gotta Be Flexible to Save the World With Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Beth McKee, M.Ed.
Chair: Beth McKee (Guangxiu International Children's Center; Emergent Learning Academy )
BETH MCKEE (Guangxiu International Children's Center)
ANESA DOYLE (8 the Plate)
LI YING (Guangxiu International Children's Center)
Abstract:

In attempting to “Save the Word with Behavior Analysis” behavior analysts are tasked with implementation of evidence-based interventions across a variety of populations. One quickly finds them selves struggling between decisions regarding treatment fidelity vs. the need to respond to client preference and cultural needs and differences. Responding to environmental contexts of learners and families is crucial for success. An example, from an ABA clinic in China, of a reinforcement based feeding procedure that used a commercially available resource from the West will be presented. A review of research - backed treatment focused on reinforcement - based procedures will be presented.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: 3 objectives: 1) State at least 2 code of ethics which support the use of flexibility (BACB Code of Ethics eg. 2.0, 2.03, 2.09, 4.02) 2) Identify how a reliance on scientific knowledge supports thinking outside the box (BACB Code of Ethics 2.0) 3) Identify 2 food programs that can be implemented without the use of escape extinction
 
 
Panel #433
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Behavior Analysis in Service of Gender and Sexual Minorities: State of the Field
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen Kate Kellum, M.Ed.
Chair: Patrick Wade Richardson (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
KAREN KATE KELLUM (University of Mississippi)
MARIA LOUDERMILK (LittleStar ABA Therapy)
JEFFREY BOLIN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

Gender and sexual minorities (GSM) are estimated to comprise between 4% and 10% of the population, but are twice as likely to experience mental health problems. Social stigma and a lack of laws to protect their rights are some of the major contributors of increased stress, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal ideation for the LGBTQIA+ population. GSM can also be reluctant to seek treatment, as there is a mistrust of healthcare providers that has built up due to a history of discrimination, a lack of training, and shortage of understanding of the experiences of GSM. Behavior analytic and behaviorally-inspired interventions are amongst the most effective for treating depression, substance abuse, anxiety, and other psychological difficulties. Behavior analysis has only recently, however, begun to make a unique contribution to conceptualizing and addressing LGBTQIA+ issues. The purpose of this panel is to offer perspectives on the status of behavior analytic contributions to promoting GSM well-being, in terms of building a robust body of behavior analytic research and developing and making available behavior analytic services. Discussants will also address the contingencies that have slowed the progress of behavior analysis in this domain as well as ethical matters involving GSM.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

ABAI members interested in learning more about gender and sexual minorities' issues.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe perspectives on the status of behavior analytic contributions promoting GSM well-being; (2) Discuss the barriers that have slowed down progress of behavior analysis addressing GSM concerns; (3) Describe ethical issues involving GSM.
Keyword(s): diversity, gender minorities, LGBTQIA+, sexual minorities
 
 
Symposium #442
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics Under the Umbrella: Sexual Behavior Considerations for Client Intervention and Beyond
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Room 103
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Barbara Gross (Empowered: A Center for Sexuality; Special School District of St Louis County)
Discussant: Barbara Gross (Empowered: A Center for Sexuality; Special School District of St Louis County)
CE Instructor: Robin Moyher, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Sexual behavior is a complex and wide-reaching topic. And though sexual stimulation is considered to be a primary reinforcer for most, there is frequently shame and stigma associated with sexual behavior, leaving it under-discussed within our field. This symposium examines an array of ethical considerations pertaining to sexual behavior, from direct client interventions and supports around assent and noncompliance, to scholarship and theory on sex and risk, to legal considerations in sex education and censorship, to dissemination of behavior analytic analysis as it benefits pleasure-based sex education at large. Presenters will discuss resulting data and their implications as applicable, and will discuss recommendations for future research, instruction, and applied projects.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ethics, sex education, sexual behavior, sexuality
Target Audience:

Practicing BCBAs and BCaBAs

Learning Objectives: Not required for BACB
 
What Is Sexual Behavior Anyway: A Biopsychosocial Account of Conceptualizing Sex and Risk
(Theory)
BRYANT ANTOINE (Empowered: A Center for Sexuality; Special School District of St Louis County), Worner Leland (Empowered: A Center for Sexuality; Upswing Advocates)
Abstract: Because of the complexity of potential sexual repertoires and beliefs about sex at both the ontogenic and cultural level, it can be difficult to tact what “counts” as sexual behavior. Additionally, multiple factors impact the labeling of sexual behavior as “high risk.” Relational Frame Theory (RFT) provides an account of language as operant behavior (Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001). This presentation will examine different possible response classes and consequences which may be labeled as “sex” and which may be described as “risky” and will examine both derived beliefs and transfer of stimulus function when considering potentially risky sexual behavior. Relying on scientific knowledge both within and outside the field (BACB, 2019, 1.01), sex and risk will be examined as a biopsychosocial phenomenon, and the acquisition of these labels will comparably be examined through a contextual examination of selectionism at the phylogenic, ontogenetic, and cultural levels (Skinner, 1953). Harm reduction modalities will be considered as the impact of this language is examined.
 
Censorship, the Right to Effective Treatment, and Avoiding Legal Risk
(Service Delivery)
ALEXANDRA ZHESTKOVA (Moscow Centre of Pedagogy and Psychology)
Abstract: Behavior analysts must conform to the legal and ethical codes of their social and professional communities, and must resolve any conflict in their ethical obligations and legal obligations in accordance with the law (BACB, 2019, 1.04 d & e). When considering the law regarding sexuality and sexual behavior education, behavior analysts must be especially mindful of potential conflicts between the ethical code and the law. While behavior analysts must advocate for the most effective interventions - keeping in mind cultural differences, resources and practices - legal considerations must not be forgotten. While most countries have direct laws regarding censorship and/or sexuality, the writing of these laws often leave room for loopholes or ambiguity. One must often look to legal precedent to examine actual consequence of the law in addition to the law’s written intention. This presentation will provide examples of sexual behavior related treatments that can result in legal proceedings in different countries, highlighting legal ambiguity regarding sexual education and, finally, will offer some steps that could be taken to avoid or minimize risk of legal proceedings while pursuing ethical and effective intervention.
 
The Use of Preference Assessments in the Selection of Sex Toys in Adult Retail Environments
(Service Delivery)
LANDA L. FOX (Positive Connections)
Abstract: The utility of preference assessments in the discovery of powerful reinforcers is a vitally important technology within the field of applied behavior analysis. While preference assessments have been researched and used extensively in the area of developmental disabilities and autism their application outside of this area is more limited (e.g., Organizational Behavior Management; Applied Animal Behavior). As ethical dissemination of our science to novel environments is of value (BACB, 2019, 6.02), this presentation will explore the potential for the use of preference assessments (free operant, paired-stimulus, multiple stimulus without replacement) in adult retail stores. We will review important considerations in the application of preference assessments in adult retail stores. Considerations include: determining the type or types of preference assessment that are most appropriate; the ethics of implementation of an assessment in this environment; barriers and ethics related to effectively identifying potential reinforcers when the items in arrays cannot be directly experienced; and the potential temporal stability or instability of preferences with reference to knowledge about shifting preferences in sexual stimulation across time. Effectively assisting customers in an adult retail store in the selection of sex toys/pleasure products that will ostensibly serve as a reinforcer after purchase is a novel application of this technology.
 
When Should or Shouldn’t an Individual be Compliant to an Instruction?
(Basic Research)
ROBIN MOYHER (George Mason University)
Abstract: Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Delays (IDD) are victims, with alarmingly high rates, of sexual abuse and/or harassment (Sobsey & Varnhagen, 1989; Tyiska (1998). Compliance to instructions given to them from others, especially those in a position of authority, is often taught to individuals with IDD as part of their IEPs and home programming. However when considering our ethical obligation to our clients (BACB, 2019, 2.02, 2.05a) it is crucial to consider the benefit of direct noncompliance instruction, such in the case of a sexual harassment lure or sexual abuse lure. Presenting statistically significant data from a sexual harassment in the employment intervention to young adults with IDD (29 single subjects), the research will share data that demonstrates individuals are more likely to comply with instructions when presented from a person of authority versus a person of no authority. Data from this research study also shows that this population can be taught to recognize a sexual harassment lure, to respond appropriately, and report it accurately (Moyher, manuscript in progress). In the time of #metoo, it’s crucial to bring this topic to the IDD population. Instead of citing statistics of abuse that do not change decade after decade (Casteel, Martin, Smith, Gurka, and Kupper; 2008), this presentation will specifically discuss ways of teaching prevention skills to this population.
 
 
Symposium #463
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Behavior Analysis: A Guide to Being an Evidence-Based Practitioner
Monday, May 25, 2020
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: TBA/PCH; Domain: Translational
Chair: Audrey N. Hoffmann (Northern Vermont University)
CE Instructor: Audrey N. Hoffmann, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a commonly used term in the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA); however, disagreement or misunderstanding regarding what EBP is and how to engage in evidence-based decision making persist. In this symposium, we will attempt to clarify the definition of EBP in ABA and we will discuss the role that EBP plays in different domains of ABA and ethical practice. First, Dr. Bethany Contreras will discuss the definition of EBP and will offer specific suggestions on how practitioners can use EBP to guide their decision making. Next, Dr. Audrey Hoffmann will discuss how EBP may be embedded within coursework and supervision in order to improve ethical decision-making in novice behavior analysts. Finally, Dr. Shanun Kunnavatana will discuss challenges to EBP in clinical practice, and potential solutions to promote EBP.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Practicing BCaBAs, BCBAs, supervising BCBAs, and behavior analysts involved in higher education and the training of BCBAs.

Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to: 1. Define Evidence Based Practice (EBP) of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and describe the three components comprising EBP of ABA. 2. Identify ethical codes aligned with the EBP of ABA 3. Identify general strategies for engaging in EBP as part of ethical behavior analytic practice 4. Identify strategies for including EBP in teaching and training of novice behavior analysts 5. Identify barriers and potential solutions for engaging in EBP in clinical practice.
 
An Introduction to Engaging in Evidence-Based Practice
(Theory)
BETHANY P. CONTRERAS YOUNG (Middle Tennessee State University ), Audrey N. Hoffmann (Northern Vermont University), Timothy A. Slocum (Utah State University)
Abstract: Evidence-based practice of ABA has been defined as “…a decision-making process that integrates (a) the best available evidence with (b) clinical expertise and (c) client values and context” (Slocum et al, 2014; p. 44). While several articles and books discuss the importance of EBP for ABA, there is limited information on how a practicing behavior analyst can purposefully engage in EBP. In this presentation, we will discuss the definition of EBP for ABA and will offer suggestions as to behaviors practitioners can engage in to ensure that they are engaging in EBP. We will present specific suggestions for how behavior analysts can ensure that they are using the best available evidence to guide decisions, how to build and maintain clinical expertise, and how to incorporate client values and context into the ethical decision-making process that is EBP.
 

Evidence-Based Practice as a Framework for Training Novice Behavior Analysts

(Theory)
AUDREY N. HOFFMANN (Northern Vermont University)
Abstract:

EBP provides a useful framework for teaching decision-making skills and ethical practice to novice behavior analysts. This presentation will provide a brief introduction to EBP and go over the importance of including EBP within training programs for behavior analysts (both in higher education and in supervised practice). Suggestions for embedding EBP into course sequences and supervision practices will be provided as well as discussing potential barriers to training a complex behavioral repertoire such as ethical evidence-based decision-making. The presentation will highlight the importance of novice behavior analysts basing decisions on the best available research evidence, considering the client values and context, and improving and appropriately utilizing their clinical expertise as behavior analysts.

 

Challenges of Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Practice

(Service Delivery)
S. SHANUN KUNNAVATANA (Easterseals UCP of NC & VA)
Abstract:

Ethical and effective practice requires behavior analysts to be able to make complex decisions that evaluate not only the evidence for certain interventions but also determine whether critical components of the intervention will be possible given an individual’s context and values, as well as those of other stakeholders involved. This approach requires behavior analysts to be both analytical and flexible in their decision making. Although, EBP provides a framework for navigating these decisions, the process is often perceived as daunting and not utilized to its full potential. This presentation discusses the potential reasons why EBP is not yet common in clinical practice and how individuals and organizations may overcome some of the challenges to move toward EBP and better clinical decision making.

 
 
Panel #474
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Honey I Analyzed the Kids: Being Both Professionals and Parents of Neurodiverse Children
Monday, May 25, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ann B Beirne, M.A.
Chair: Bobby Newman (Proud Moments)
ANN B BEIRNE (Proud Moments)
ANDREA KOTLER (Proud Moments)
CELIA HEYMAN (Capella University; Above and Beyond Learning Group)
Abstract:

Empathy is perhaps the most important skill that a behavior analyst can possess. Though many behavior analyst struggle with understanding families, there are many of us who have, to borrow a phrase, waled a mile in their shoes. This panel consists of participants who have been in two roles: behavior analysts and parent of neurodiverse children. We will discuss the effect that this has had on our families and professional lives, the challenges and joys of raising neurodiverse children, and how our experience has impacted us professionally.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBAs in direct service with families

Learning Objectives: Identify challenges of avoiding multiple relationships when parenting neurodiverse children Identify tactics for working with families Describe learning history for families of neurodiverse children
Keyword(s): ADHD, ASD, ethics, parenting
 
 
Panel #477
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Throwing Sand in the Sandbox: Potential Conflicts Between Ethical Codes in Multidisciplinary Work
Monday, May 25, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence F-H
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jodie Soracco, M.Ed.
Chair: Jodie Soracco (University of Nevada, Reno)
ROSE IOVANNONE (University of South Florida/Florida Mental Health)
CHRISTIAN SABEY (Brigham Young University)
KACI FLEETWOOD (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

Providing tiered positive behavioral supports for students often requires working with multidisciplinary teams (Brodhead, 2015). Multidisciplinary teams include individuals with a variety of professional identities, including board-certified behavior analysts, special/general educators, speech pathologists, school psychologists, counselors and more working collectively. Most of these professions have ethical codes or guidelines that practitioners are expected to adhere to and in some cases may conflict. The panel will discuss how individuals governed by differing and potentially conflicting ethical codes can work together to provide effective behavior supports for all students. We will examine different ethical codes across various disciplines on how they are alike, and where they might conflict. Several ethical dilemmas will be addressed by presenting scenarios often faced by professionals developing and implementing behavioral supports while talking through relevant ethical codes and contextual variables that ought to be considered. Issues such as scope of competence, certification and licensure, evidence-based practice, effective treatment, philosophical differences, coaching, and more will be discussed. A web-based polling platform will be used to solicit questions/scenarios from attendees. The panel will answer questions and discuss scenarios presented by the audience by addressing the relevant ethical issues and propose possible resolutions and encourage alternative solutions from attendees.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Individuals across disciplines that work in schools.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will consider how multidisciplinary teams with multiple theoretical perspectives and ethical codes may encounter conflicts between professions and ethical codes. 2. Attendees will work through possible resolutions to potential conflicts in a way that promotes stakeholder participation. 3. Attendees will understand how a PBIS approach that promotes flexibility with respect to scientific practices can help multidisciplinary teams achieve meaningful outcomes for all students and those who work closely with them.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #478
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Countering Countability Culture: A Behavioral Systems Perspective on the Replication Crisis
Monday, May 25, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Byron J. Wine (The Faison Center)
CE Instructor: Donald Hantula, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DONALD HANTULA (Temple University)
Abstract:

In 2005 Ioannidis proclaimed “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False.” RetractionWatch has cataloged over 20,000 scientific papers that have been withdrawn since 2010. The “replication crisis” is not the result of a few bad actors but rather is a systems problem. This presentation reviews “replication crisis” from a behavioral systems analysis perspective, identifies the metatcontogencies of the “countability culture” in academia and research that maintain the problem, and proposes solutions based on open science practices, ethical standards and methodological pluralism, noting that OBM research has been a leader in this regard.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Researchers, scholars, scientists, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the metacontingecies and system variables that contribute to the replication crisis; (2) create a plan for complying with Open Science recommendations in their own research; (3) identify characteristics of poorly reported behavioral research; (4) analyze published behavioral articles for signs of inappropriate reporting; (5) describe the advantages and disadvantages and ethical implications of several current online archiving tools.
 
DONALD HANTULA (Temple University)

Donald Hantula earned undergraduate degrees from Emory University and graduate degrees from University of Notre Dame and is currently with the Department of Psychology, Decision making Laboratory, and Interdisciplinary Program in Applied Behavior Analysis at Temple University. He has previously held academic positions in Occupational Health Promotion at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Human Resource Management at King’s College and Management Information Systems at St. Joseph’s University, and also as Director of Decision, Risk and Management Sciences at the National Science Foundation. He is the immediate past editor of Perspectives on Behavior Science and presently serves as Coordinator of the ABAI Publications Board and on the ABAI VCS board. He has published over 100 articles and chapters and his research interests include finding rational explanations for seemingly irrational decisions, quantitative analysis of behavior, consumer choices for sustainable products and practices, integrating behavioral and digital technology and ethical implications of OBM.

 
 
Symposium #486
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Treating Dangerous Problem Behavior and Teaching Skills Without Physical Management: Enhanced Choice Model Extensions
Monday, May 25, 2020
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Room 103
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: John E. Staubitz (Vanderbilt University Medical Center, TRIAD)
Discussant: Nicole Heal (Margaret Murphy Center for Children)
CE Instructor: Nicole Heal, M.Ed.
Abstract:

The Practical Functional Assessment and Skill-Based Treatment process has been shown to reduce problem behavior by teaching individuals functional communication, toleration of delays to reinforcement, and contextually appropriate behavior during those delays. Teaching procedures typically involved some form of escape extinction. Some settings and circumstances, however, have necessitated the development of procedures that do not rely on escape extinction for their efficacy. One promising model, called the Enhanced Choice Model (ECM, Rajaraman, et al. 2019), involves the participant having the choice to (a) participate in treatment sessions, (b) leave the treatment sessions and access reinforcers noncontingently, or (c) leaving the treatment context altogether (e.g., going back to their regular classroom). This current symposium highlights extensions of this model to a public-school setting in which three educators learned and implemented treatment components as a means of generalizing treatment outcomes. The second presentation will examine specific mands as a generalized outcome of the public school application. The third presentation describes a distance-based telehealth case in which the caregivers implemented all assessment and treatment components. The final presentation will be a literature review on the tendency for individuals to prefer contingent reinforcement, a potential factor in the efficacy of the ECM model.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): choice, functional assessment, problem behavior
Target Audience:

The target audience for this session includes practicing behavior analysts who oversee behavior change programs that address severe problem and behavioral scientists who would like to learn more about the extent to which organisms will allocate their responding to contingent vs. non-contingent access to reinforcement when concurrent schedules of reinforcement are available.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the Enhanced Choice Model of Skill-Based Treatment (ECM-SBT), with an improved understanding of the procedures that would reduce severe problem behavior in a client without escape extinction (2) Describe and discriminate between the different training steps and techniques used to teach ECM-SBT assessment and treatment procedures for the purpose of treating severe problem behavior to caregivers without formal training in behavior analysis through teleconferencing and behavior skills training (3) Describe the outcomes of the ECM-SBT treatment with respect to trained functional communication, tolerance of denials, and engagement with contextually appropriate behavior, as well as the pre- and post-treatment prevalence of untrained function-specific mands.
 
Evaluating a Behavior Skills Training Package for School-based Implementers of Skill-Based Treatment
MARNEY SQUIRES POLLACK (Vanderbilt University), Johanna Staubitz (Vanderbilt University), Blair Lloyd (Vanderbilt University)
Abstract: Skill-Based Treatment (SBT) uses synthesized contingencies to teach alternative responses that will compete with problem behavior (Hanley et al., 2014). Though effectively implemented in home settings (e.g., Beaulieu et al., 2018), school-based application of these procedures has required modifications to mitigate the collateral effects of extinction (Taylor et al., 2018). One promising variation is the Enhanced Choice Model of SBT (ECM-SBT; Rajaraman et al., 2018), which involves programming two concurrently operating alternatives to problem behavior besides the trained responses. We present three school-based replications of ECM-SBT, in which the programmed alternatives include (a) entering a ‘hangout’ area where evocative conditions are suspended and the client may access all preferred items and activities as well as low-quality attention from the therapist and (b) leaving the session entirely to return to the classroom. We discuss methodological deviations from the Rajaraman study, as well as outcomes and implications of ECM-SBT in a public special day school for children who engage in severe and persistent problem behavior.
 

Specific Mands as a Generalized Outcome of an Enhanced Choice Model of Skill-Based Treatment

JOHANNA STAUBITZ (Vanderbilt University), John E. Staubitz (Vanderbilt University Medical Center, TRIAD), Michelle Mahoney Hopton (Vanderbilt University Medical Center, TRIAD), William P Martin (Vanderbilt University Medical Center, TRIAD)
Abstract:

Skill-based treatment (SBT) is a promising intervention package in which alternative responses to problem behavior, including an ‘omnibus’ mand (e.g., “excuse me, may I please have my way?”), are evoked and reinforced using synthesized contingencies (Hanley et al., 2014). A critical component of synthesized reinforcement in SBT is therapist compliance with (i.e., reinforcement of) all reasonable client mands. Thus, although specific mands are not explicitly trained via SBT, they may be strengthened as a byproduct of procedures for reinforcing explicitly taught alternatives to problem behavior. In this two-part study, 6 elementary students with emotional/behavioral disorders participated in an Enhanced Choice Model of SBT (Rajaraman et al., 2018). Novel therapists conducted specific mand assessments at baseline and post-treatment time points to evaluate the extent to which students emitted specific mands and problem behavior when single-contingency establishing operations were presented and the first response observed (i.e., specific mand or problem behavior) was reinforced. Results indicated problem behavior was more likely at baseline, while specific mands were more likely post-treatment. These preliminary data suggest specific mands may emerge or be strengthened over the course of ECM-SBT. Assessment and treatment procedures, proximal and generalized student outcomes, and implications for practice will be discussed.

 

Distance-Based Collaborations for Assessing and Treating Problem Behavior

RACHEL METRAS (Western New England University; FTF Behavioral Consulting), Gregory P. Hanley (Western New England University; FTF Behavioral Consulting)
Abstract:

Santiago, Hanley, Moore, and Jin (2016) showed that the interview-informed synthesized contingency analysis (IISCA; see Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014) and skill-based treatment process can result in socially validated outcomes when caregivers serve as interventionists during treatment sessions. However, many families who would benefit from receiving similar functional analytic services do not have access to professionals trained to implement functional analyses or function-based treatments. Advancements in teleconferencing technology may allow families without access to local professional support to receive functional analytic services. For example, Suess et al. (2016) demonstrated that when a BCBA provides implementation support via teleconference, parents can assess and treat their children’s problem behavior in their homes. We taught parents of children with autism to implement the IISCA and skill-based treatment process in their homes exclusively through teleconference support. To address additional safety concerns in the home setting, the enhanced choice model of treatment (Rajaraman et al., 2019) was used with one participant. Parents achieved differentiated functional analyses and a 100% reduction in problem behavior relative to baseline.

 
On the Generality and Implications of the Tendency to Prefer the Contingent Aspect of Reinforcement
HOLLY GOVER (Western New England University; FTF Behavioral Consulting ), Gregory P. Hanley (Western New England University; FTF Behavioral Consulting )
Abstract: Reinforcing events can be experienced either following responding (contingently) or independent of any particular response (noncontingently) in both the laboratory and in nature. Both human and non-human animals tend to prefer contexts involving contingent reinforcement, but the generality of this phenomenon and its implications have not yet been articulated. The purpose of this review is to summarize studies that have evaluated relative preference for contingent versus noncontingent reinforcement to provide a summary of the outcomes and then to (a) provide the details on the experimental subjects, reinforcer types, response topographies, and contexts included in these particular preference analyses, present implications for cross-disciplinary concerns regarding the use of reinforcement, (b) discuss the outcomes of the Enhanced Choice Model in light of the present studies, and (c) discuss implications of outcomes related to expanding behavior analyst’s ability to design preferred contexts involving programmed reinforcement.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #491
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Cultural Responsiveness, Social Justice, and Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 25, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: DEI/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Shahla Ala'i, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The voice and inclusion of people of diverse cultural identities is expanding within the world and within our discipline. This expansion presents both tensions and possibilities. Ideally, applied behavior analysts should be developing increasingly more cultural responsiveness in all aspects of research and practice. That is not the case. Cultural responsiveness is closely yoked with lived experience, social justice, and the kyriarchy. The purpose of this presentation is to explore worldviews in the context of coloniality and to then relate this to our disciplinary and personal responses to power and efforts to contribute to a more socially just world. This includes consideration of global trends, the aims and history of our discipline, womanist and determinist worldviews, and ethics. The presentation will close with a discussion of pathways to cultural responsiveness and social justice.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts interested in culture, social justice, applied research, practice

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the critical features of cultural responsiveness; (2) briefly identify the context for cultural responsiveness (global trends, coloniality, aims and history of our discipline, womanist and determinist worldviews, and ethics); (3) discuss pathways for advancement of cultural responsiveness in behavior analytic research and practice.
 
SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Shahla Ala’i received her B.S. from Southern Illinois University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at the University of North Texas (UNT) and the director of the North Texas Autism Project (NTAP). NTAP is a service, training and research program working in cooperation with several global partners, with applied anthropologists, and with Easter Seals North Texas. Shahla is also a member of a social justice collective at UNT. This is an interdisciplinary effort designed to create a space for applied research and activism in social justice and includes faculty and students from Woman’s and Gender Studies, Applied Anthropology and Behavior Analysis. Shahla teaches classes on ethics, autism intervention, parent training, applied research methods, and behavior change techniques. Shahla served on the governing board of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and as a subject matter expert on supervision and on ethics. Shahla currently serves on the ABAI Practice Board and the APBA Diversity Ad Hoc Task Force. She has published and presented research on ethics in early intervention, play and social skills, family harmony, change agent training, and evidence-based practice. Her research is applied and grounded in a commitment to love and science. She has trained hundreds of master’s level behavior analysts who have gone on to serve families and communities with honor. Shahla has over four decades of experience working with families, particularly those from non-dominant cultural backgrounds. She travels and presents her work nationally and internationally to both professional and lay audiences. She was awarded an Onassis Foundation Fellowship for her work with families, was the recipient of UNT’s prestigious student selected “Fessor Graham" teaching award, and received the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis Career Contributions Award in 2019.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #511
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Management of Well-Being in Organizations and Beyond
Monday, May 25, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: DEI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract: A growing body of scientific evidence suggests implicit biases influence ways our actions may affect others to the extent that may favor some and detract from others. Biases can be deleterious and throw decisions off course just enough to harm others (e.g., women and minorities) or unjustifiably protect special interests. Moreover, the numerous examples of ways diversity can promote organizational success and quality of healthcare have generated interests of organizational leadership in relation to bias and diversity across industries. In many ways, leaders’ communication and decision-making shape the interlocking behavioral contingencies, aggregate products (i.e. metacontingency), and the behavior topographies of consumers (i.e., cultural practices). Simply stated, leaders’ design and implementation of contingencies can bear positive or negative influences on the wellbeing of the organizational members plus the external environment (including the physical and social environment). This presentation provides an overview of ways behavior science can contribute to the design of healthy environments that promote well-being of workers and consumers in human service industry.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Leaders, managers, organizational members, and consumers in human service industry.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the foundation (concepts, principles, methodology) underlying contingency analysis at the cultural level of selection; (2) discuss the behavior analytic account of implicit bias as related to emerging socio-cultural issues; (3) list behaviors and associated outcomes that align with a behavior analytic discussion of wellbeing.
 
RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Dr. Ramona A. Houmanfar is Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She currently serves as the trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Chair of the Organizational Behavior Management Section of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, and editorial board members of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and Behavior & Social Issues. Dr. Houmanfar recently completed her seven-year term as the editor of Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. She has served as the former senior co-chair of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, Director of the Organizational Behavior Management Network and President of the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis.
Dr. Houmanfar has published over seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters, delivered more than 100 presentations at regional, national, and international conferences in the areas of behavioral systems analysis, cultural behavior analysis, leadership in organizations, rule governance, communication networks, instructional design, and bilingual repertoire analysis and learning. Her expertise in behavioral systems analysis and cultural behavior analysis have also guided her research associated with implicit bias, cooperation, situational awareness, decision making, and value based governance. Dr. Houmanfar has published three co-edited books titled “Organizational Change” (Context Press), "Understanding Complexity in Organizations", and “Leadership & Cultural Change (Taylor & Francis Group).
 
 
Symposium #526
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Applied Ethics: A Discussion of Rural Practice, International Dissemination, and Employee Reported Ethical Situations
Monday, May 25, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: TBA/CSS; Domain: Translational
Chair: Jeffrey Michael Chan (Northern Illinois University)
CE Instructor: Jeffrey Michael Chan, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Credentialed behavior analysts are expected to follow the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). The Code itself provides general and specific guidance on acceptable behavior. As the practice of behavior analysis continues to expand (i.e., number of credentialed behavior analysts, breadth of applications of the science, and depth of application within a practice area), discussion of how the Code applies to various situations and variables is important. An area of need is understanding how credentialed behavior analysts and support personnel (e.g., finance, human resource) perceive the application of the Code in practice. Understanding these perceptions can guide the profession, organizations, and individual practitioners in developing preventive and responsive ethical practices. Additionally, current practice situations (i.e., rural practice and international dissemination) warrant specific discussion and relevance to specific Codes. The purpose of this symposium is to share survey data of employees from a mid-sized human service agency regarding ethical perceptions, discuss practice of behavior analysis in rural areas, and the ethical international dissemination of behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, International Dissemination, Rural Practice
Target Audience:

Practice organization administration, practitioners, university personnel responsible for training behavior analysts, supervisors of students completing fieldwork requirements, and students.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will describe employees' main concerns of adhering to the Code when practicing. 2. Attendees will discuss considerations of disseminating behavior analysis internationally. 3. Attendees will discuss considerations of practicing in rural areas.
 
Evaluations of Ethical Perceptions in Applied Behavior Analysis
(Service Delivery)
David Cox (John Hopkins University School of Medicine), SHAWN P. QUIGLEY (Melmark), Matthew T. Brodhead (Michigan State University)
Abstract: Teaching and monitoring ethical behavior is an important aspect of training professionals and supporting practicing professionals (e.g., Brodhead, Cox, & Quigley, 2018). One method for improving the training and supports is to understand areas of concern experienced by trainees and professionals. This knowledge allows for refined training and support in areas of most need. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of people, who work in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis, have about Applied Behavior Analysis. In general, investigators sought to understand the needs of people working in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis in order to develop new training practices, or to improve upon current training practices.
 

Ethics in Rural Settings: Special Considerations and Implications

(Service Delivery)
R. NICOLLE NICOLLE CARR (University of Oklahoma)
Abstract:

The practice of Applied Behavior Analysis in rural communities provides ample fodder for unique situations and ethical code violations. Surveys were sent to Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) in the state of Oklahoma, a state with only 103 certified individuals, regarding ethical codes most observed to be violated. In addition to few practitioners in the state, almost 80% of Oklahoma’s certificants live within a 20 mile radius from two main hubs of service delivery. This leaves a small number to provide services for the rest of the state's mostly rural areas. Results of the survey indicate multiple relationships, poor supervision and boundary of competence as the greatest areas of concern. Aside from the short supply of supervisors putting a strain on the supervisee: supervisor ratio, other possible variables that contribute to these violations include a lack of resources within the schools, physical distance to other BCBAs for referrals, working in tight knit communities, and within a culture that defaults to the use of punishment procedures. Knowing the most violated codes within a particular community allows preventative strategies to be implemented. In this case, having a network of mentors, holiday gift reminders, and strict practices for social media are a few of those suggested for our rural practioners.

 
Ethics Internationally: The Need for Responsible and Sustainable Dissemination
(Service Delivery)
JACOB SADAVOY (PENDING)
Abstract: As of December 2018, 94.8% of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs) lived in North America according to the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) Registry. 95.3% of the world population is outside North America and the prevalence of Autism internationally is 1 in 160 (WHO, 2018). Here lies the challenge of disseminating the science internationally when the vast majority of credentialed clinicians, research, and course sequences are available to those living in North America. The challenge is further compounded in countries in which English is not widely spoken. Effective dissemination in foreign countries provides a unique challenge with respects to adhering to our ethical code with careful consideration to many implications such as: scope of competence, cultural humility, an effective and sustainable supervisory service model, resource limitations, stakeholder engagement and solicitation of clients, and conforming to a different set of laws and regulations. With access to pseudoscientific “treatments” online coupled with anecdotal information condemning Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) on the rise, sustainable dissemination of ABA internationally is of crucial importance for prospective clients seeking evidence-based treatment.
 
 
Panel #547
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Starting an Applied Behavior Analysis Practice
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 202A
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Theodore A. Hoch, Ed.D.
Chair: Theodore A. Hoch (George Mason University)
REBECCA GONZALES (ABC Behavior; Hi-5 ABA, Inc.)
DAVID MADDOX (ABC Behavior; Hi-5 ABA, Inc.)
STEPHANIE MADDOX (ABC Behavior; Hi-5 ABA)
Abstract:

Preface. A Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) holds the minimum credential necessary to offer Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) services within the certificant’s scope of experience/expertise. A BCBA wishing to offer services in their own name, by starting a private practice, faces substantial considerations beyond basic clinical competence. Ethical Considerations. Section 1.02 of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) Ethics Code provides that BCBAs only offer services within the boundaries of available competence. In addition to basic clinical competence, operating a private ABA practice requires expertise in various administrative areas including: insurance contracts and procedure, personnel management, billing and collections, business law, accounting and payroll, cashflow management, and general business administration. Personal/Market Surveys. To evaluate the practicality of establishing a practice, the prospective entrepreneur should survey: (1) personal resources and existing responsibilities, and (2) the ABA business conditions existing in the prospective geographic market (demand for services, competition, funding sources, population density, traffic, technician availability, pay rates, etc.). Business Plan. A business plan typically reflects: specific goals/expectations, timelines, key personnel, defined target market(s), pro-forma budgets, cost-analyses, detailed consideration of in-house vs. outsourcing of administrative functions, personnel recruitment and training plans, definition and assignment of specific management team functions, policy/procedural documentation, and clinical/administrative quality control.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs interested in starting or participating in the opening and/or operations of an ABA practice constitute the target audience.

Learning Objectives: 1. How BACB Ethics Rules impact clinical considerations in the operation and oversight of an ABA practice. 2. How BACB Ethics Rules impact administrative considerations in the operation and oversight of an ABA practice. 3. Supervisory considerations relating to both clinical and administrative concerns in the planning and structure of an ABA practice.
Keyword(s): Entrepreneurship, Franchise, Ownership, Start-up
 
 
Invited Tutorial #558
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Training and Treating Wholeheartedly: Identifying a Role for Compassion Practices in the Profession of Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Bridget Taylor, Psy.D.
Chair: David Bicard (Great Leaps Learning Center)
Presenting Authors: : BRIDGET TAYLOR (Alpine Learning Group)
Abstract:

Within certain areas of healthcare, it has been documented that treating patients with compassion and empathy can have important benefits, such as increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing adherence to treatment, and improving clinical outcomes (e.g., Beach, et al., 2006; Hojat et al., 2011; Weiss et al., 2017). Treating oneself and others with compassion is also believed to promote individual wellbeing and improve mental health (e.g. McClelland, et al., 2018; Neff, 2011; Scarlet et al., 2017). While current empirical support for these outcomes is mixed (Kirby, Tellegen & Steindl, 2017), there is increasing scientific interest in the benefits of compassion. That broad-based interest notwithstanding, the data-driven field of behavior analysis has only recently begun to advocate for the importance of relationship variables that could positively impact our work (e.g., Taylor, LeBlanc & Nosik, 2018; Leblanc, Taylor & Marchese, 2019). This presentation reviews survey data documenting parent perception of compassionate care by behavior analysts, as well as behavior analysts’ impressions of training in this area. Behavioral responses that may comprise compassionate care will be presented, along with considerations for how compassionate care of our clients and ourselves can enhance our work as behavior analysts and potentially improve clinical outcomes.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs, supervisors and trainers of behavior analysts, autism specialists.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the empirical research documenting the effects of compassionate care responses in other health disciplines; (2) identify relationship variables relevant to our work with family members; (3) identify current behavioral conceptualization of empathy and perspective taking; (4) identify components of the BACB ethical code related to relationship variables.
 
BRIDGET TAYLOR (Alpine Learning Group)

Dr. Bridget A. Taylor is co-founder and CEO of Alpine Learning Group and is Senior Clinical Advisor for Rethink. She holds a Doctorate of Psychology from Rutgers University, and received her Master’s degree in Early Childhood Special Education from Columbia University. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Licensed Psychologist. Dr. Taylor is President of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and serves on the Autism Advisory Group for the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. She is past Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. She also serves on the editorial board of Behavioral Interventions. Active in the autism research community, Dr. Taylor has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on effective interventions for autism. She is a national and international presenter and serves in an advisory capacity for autism education and treatment programs both locally and abroad. Dr. Taylor was recently recognized by the Association for Applied Behavior Analysis International for her outstanding contributions to behavior analysis and was given ABAI’s Fellow designation.

 
 
Symposium #568
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Positive Punishment of Severe Problem Behaviors
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Room 103
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Nathan Blenkush (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center)
Discussant: W. Joseph Wyatt (Marshall University)
CE Instructor: Nathan Blenkush, Ph.D.
Abstract: We conducted an empirical analysis of contingent skin-shock in the treatment of severe problem behaviors in 191 individual cases between 2002 and 2018. Overall, a 95% reduction was observed in the frequency of severe aggression and health dangerous (e.g., self-injurious) behaviors across a wide variety of psychological diagnoses. Findings provide support for the supplemental use of contingent skin-shock in conjunction with differential reinforcement of alternative and other appropriate behaviors. We present novel findings from (a) the largest clinical sample in the skin-shock literature, (b) planned versus unplanned fading of treatment, (c) reversal of treatment effects, and (d) follow-up data spanning 16 years. The evidence provides support for the assertion that contingent skin-shock is the least intrusive, most effective, efficient, and ethical treatment available for the severe problem behavior of some individuals.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): aversive, punishment, severe behavior, skin-shock
Target Audience:

Graduate students and practicing professionals interested in punishment procedures (e.g., BCaBA, BCBA, BCBA-D).

 
Positive Punishment of Severe Problem Behaviors: A Review of 191 Clinical Cases
JOHN O'NEILL (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), Nathan Blenkush (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center)
Abstract: We conducted an empirical analysis of contingent skin-shock in the treatment of severe problem behaviors in 191 individual cases between 2002 and 2018. Overall, a 95% reduction was observed in the frequency of severe aggression and health dangerous (e.g., self-injurious) behaviors across a wide variety of psychological diagnoses. Findings provide support for the supplemental use of contingent skin-shock in conjunction with differential reinforcement of alternative and other appropriate behaviors. We present novel findings from (a) the largest clinical sample in the skin-shock literature, (b) planned versus unplanned fading of treatment, and (c) follow-up data spanning 16 years. The evidence provides support for the assertion that contingent skin-shock is the least intrusive, most effective, efficient, and ethical treatment available for the severe problem behavior of some individuals.
 

Positive Punishment to Treat Self-Injurious Behaviors of an Individual With Arnold Chiari Malformation

ELIZABETH A. FITTER (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), John O'Neill (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), Nathan Blenkush (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center)
Abstract:

In this study, the use of positive punishment was examined with an individual diagnosed with Arnold Chiari Malformation (Type I), autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and personality change due to Viral Meningitis who displayed severe forms of self-injurious, destructive, and aggressive behaviors. Reports indicated the participant had a history of unsuccessful behavioral and psychiatric treatments of their problem behavior. The use of a positive punishment procedure involved a court-approved contingent skin shock in combination with differential reinforcement of alternative, incompatible, and other replacements behaviors. Treatment as usual was compared to treatment plus positive punishment. Results demonstrated clinically significant improvements in quality of life through substantial decreases in the monthly frequency of problem behaviors when positive punishment was in place. The evidence provides support for contingent skin-shock as the least intrusive, most effective, efficient, and ethical treatment available for the severe problem behavior of this individual.

 

Positive Punishment of Severe Problem Behaviors Associated With Anti-Social Personality Disorder

DYLAN PALMER (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center and Simmons University), John O'Neill (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), Nathan Blenkush (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center)
Abstract:

In an effort to decrease severe and persistent problem behaviors that substantially impeded the quality of life in an eighteen year old male, diagnosed with mood disorder not otherwise specified and anti-social personality disorder. The participant had a documented history of unsuccessful treatments (i.e., multiple psychotropic medications, changes of treatment locations, programs utilizing differential reinforcement, and antecedent manipulations) of their problem behaviors (i.e., aggression and self-injury that put their quality of life in jeopardy). A positive punishment treatment plan involved court-approved contingent skin shock in conjunction with differential reinforcement of alternative, incompatible, and other replacement behaviors. Through the course of treatment, a reversal design was implemented over a duration of 11 months and demonstrated the effect of the same treatment plan with and without the positive punishment component. Overall, the treatment demonstrated a substantial reduction of all targeted problem behaviors. When punishment was removed, the monthly frequency increased to pre-treatment equivalent levels. The evidence provides support for contingent skin-shock as the least intrusive, most effective, efficient, and ethical treatment available for the severe problem behavior of this individual.

 

Evaluating Risks and Benefits for Patients With Severe Behavior Disorders in the Present Day

NATHAN BLENKUSH (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center)
Abstract:

A severe behavior disorder is an umbrella term used to describe constellations of problem behaviors that are characterized by several factors such as the frequency, intensity, form, and treatment refractory nature. The effects of a severe behavior disorder are absolutely devastating. Severe self-injury can cause blindness (because of repeated head hitting, head banging, or eye gouging), deformation (because of biting, abrasions), bone fractures, hematomas, head injuries, infection (because of chronic open wounds), and death. Aggressive behaviors result in harm to caregivers, law enforcement involvement, emergency hospitalization, and can be a primary factor in placing a child outside of their natural home. The continued occurrence of such behaviors have devastating effects on quality of life. Thus, professional to consumer, professional to professional, and other statements about treatment efficacy are of tremendous importance. Here, the presentation of such information in science, government, and media are described. In addition, systematic methods to evaluate various statements about risk and benefit are reviewed.

 
 
Panel #575
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Cover Your Bases: A Compliance Framework to Help ABA Providers Ethically Navigate the Requirements of the Healthcare System
Monday, May 25, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 202A
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kristine Rodriguez, M.A.
Chair: Kristine Rodriguez (Autism Learning Partners)
DAN MATAS (Autism Learning Partners)
JENNIFER J JOHNSTON (Easter Seals of Southern California)
TYRA PAIGE SELLERS (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract:

Compliance programs were formally introduced into the healthcare space only 30 years ago. Historically, the focus of these programs has been mainly on hospitals, insurance providers, and nursing facilities; however, attention is rapidly turning to Applied Behavioral Analysis providers. As the incidence rate of Autism Spectrum Disorder rises, the cost of treatment by insurance companies, state programs, and federal funding sources increases exponentially. The government has several programs in place to monitor fraud, waste, and abuse, and maintains acute interest in those who are misusing funds. Applied Behavioral Analysis providers have recently come under scrutiny in matters of fraud, waste, and abuse; these allegations bring stigma for the industry and necessitate a call to action. Further, as funders become increasingly concerned with assessing value against costs, providers will need to develop increasingly robust systems in order to ensure proper documentation and outcomes-driven processes, in order to avoid devastating payment recoveries. This panel presents a full range perspective, bringing together both providers and funders to discuss healthcare compliance from multiple vantages, in order to provide participants with a path forward to ensuring quality care and upholding ethical standards.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

The target audience are providers, funders, and industries associated with the delivery of Applied Behavioral Analysis treatment.

Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will gain general knowledge of what Fraud, Waste and Abuse looks like in the Applied Behavioral Analysis industry 2) Participants will define 5 steps that attendees can use to initiate/improve upon a compliance program designed to protect clients, drive quality outcomes, and meet funder regulations 3) Participants will identify relevant items of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, as it pertains to personal responsibility for delivering care that is effective, efficient, and well-documented
Keyword(s): Ethics, Healthcare Compliance
 
 
Panel #583
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Breaking bad in behaviour analysis: The value of rebels to our field
Monday, May 25, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, Georgetown
Area: PCH/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Myra-Jade Lui, Ph.D.
Chair: Myra-Jade Lui (QcABA)
CHERICE R. CARDWELL (ACCELERATE BEHAVIOR INTERNATIONAL)
MERRILL WINSTON (Professional Crisis Management, Inc.)
RYAN LEE O'DONNELL (RYANO, LLC)
Abstract:

The term ‘rebel talent’ was coined by behavioral scientist and author Francesca Gino in 2018. Rebel talents are those who walk the line between expertise and experimentation and who, in the right conditions, can lead the way to innovation and creativity in any given field. Applied behavior analysis is a field that has produced powerful technologies, capable of significantly improving the lives of even the most vulnerable in our society. Yet, the field still lacks mainstream relevance. It may be, therefore, time for behavior analysts to consider novel strategies such as those employed by rebel talent in order to further the field towards innovation and achieving recognition in the mainstream. This panel discussion will bring together three behaviour analysts who are familiar with non-conformity and who will discuss walking that line between thinking-outside-the-box, abiding by the guidelines for ethical practice, and why B.F. Skinner might have been the original rebel talent of the field.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Primarily BCBAs

Learning Objectives: Following this panel discussion, the participants will be able to: 1) Describe an event from Skinner’s career that revolutionized the way people thought about human behaviour and how this challenged the traditional perspectives of the time. 2) Identify the productive aspects of thinking-outside-the-box and contrast this to potential destructive aspects in the dissemination of applied behaviour analysis. 3) Outline how they might teach supervisees to practice in ways that can be considered both ethical and innovative. 4) Provide a framework for approaching rules and the various types of rule-governed behavior in ethical practice, including tracking contingency relations and dogmatic rule-following.
Keyword(s): dissemination, Ethics, rule-governed behaviour
 
 
Invited Tutorial #590
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Introduction to a Behavioral Analysis of Cognitive Loss and Functional Decline
Monday, May 25, 2020
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
BACB/PSY/QABA CE Offered. CE Instructor: Claudia Drossel, Ph.D.
Chair: Cynthia M. Anderson (May Institute)
Presenting Authors: : CLAUDIA DROSSEL (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract:

Cognitive loss and associated functional decline can reflect many different physiological processes, some of which are progressive and neurodegenerative, others stable or even reversible. Behavior analysts, through their measurement-based practice, are uniquely positioned to detect fluctuations in proficiencies and skill levels that are potentially indicative of decline, and to implement assessment and intervention. The goals of this tutorial are twofold: (1) to provide an overview of neurocognitive disorders, such as those from Alzheimer’s, Lewy body disease, or stroke, and prominent risk factors, such as age and an already compromised nervous system due to prior traumatic brain injury, chronic disease, lifestyle factors, or particular preexisting neurodevelopmental disorders; and (2) to offer a practical step-by-step guide to ruling out reversible conditions, ascertain the appropriate level of social and physical support, and address potential behavioral and emotional changes. Video and audio examples will be provided for training purposes, to illustrate the heterogeneity of individuals’ reactions to functional decline, the difficulties of family members to follow behavioral plans or adapt to their loved one’s loss of skills or repertoires, and the need for medical care navigation. The tutorial will introduce cognitive loss and functional decline as a high-need specialty practice area, amenable to workforce development in behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students; behavior analysts interested in an introduction to the specialty area or in expanding their practice; behavior analysts encountering individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and decline; and family care partners.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) differentiate major neurocognitive disorders and their characteristics; (2) list two risk factors for the development of neurocognitive disorders; (3) broadly conceptualize behavioral changes in the context of cognitive decline from a behavior analytic perspective; (4) name one document that describes training benchmarks; (5) list three general steps involved in best practices for the assessment and management of behavioral changes and preventing/reducing excess disability.
 
CLAUDIA DROSSEL (Eastern Michigan University)
 
 
Panel #592
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Non-Compete Agreements in Applied Behavior Analysis: Prevalence, Impact, and Ethical Considerations
Monday, May 25, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 202A
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
Chair: Stephen Ray Flora (Youngstown State University; Progressive ABA Therapy Group)
KRIS BROWN (Youngstown State University)
MARY BROWN (Youngstown State University)
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University; Progressive ABA Therapy Group)
Abstract:

With its growth, the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) is encountering practice issues ranging from negotiating insurance reimbursement, developing formal treatment guidelines, and gaining the trust of consumers. One controversial practice issue is the use of non-compete clauses (NCC’s) in employment contracts. NCC’s have the potential impact how, when, and who practitioners can serve. NCC's are used in some fields and banned in others (i.e., law practice, some human services/medical fields in some states). Although widely used in ABA businesses, to our knowledge no discussion of NCC's has occurred in our own field. Results of a recent survey and personal experiences of the panelists and audience will be used to engage the attendees in discussing practical and ethical issues related to the use of NCC's in ABA.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

All BACB certificants (RBT's, BCaBA's, BCBA's, BCBA-D's), individuals who work in agencies services individuals with autism or other developmental disabilities, and owners of businesses providing services to individuals with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) state what a non-compete clause is; 2) state potential ethical implications involved with the use of non-compete clauses in ABA; 3) state potential practical/business implications of the use of non-compete clauses in ABA.
Keyword(s): employment practices, ethics, non-compete clause, professional practice
 
 
Panel #608
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Don’t Pigeonhole Me Inside a Hexagon! Acceptance and Commitment Training is Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 25, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Archives
Area: TBA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Michael DeLaet, Ph.D.
Chair: Michael DeLaet (PENDING)
ADAM DELINE HAHS (Arizona State University)
EMILY SANDOZ (University of Louisiana Lafayette)
ALYSSA N. WILSON (Saint Louis University)
Abstract:

The ways in which Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) is made accessible for individuals within mainstream ABA are predominantly couched in the ACT "hexaflex". The current panel discussion will highlight other, potentially viable conceptualizations of facilitating competence regarding ACT's core processes for practicing behavior analysts. Further, we aim to tether objective process and outcome measures to the core processes such that practitioners may be better equipped to confidently use ACT within their efforts to promote habilitation in the individuals with whom they work. Finally, we seek to demystify stigma around ACT as being unethical in behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Beginning-Advanced BACBs/behavior analysts; graduate students of behavior-analytic programs

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will be able to describe the ethical importance of remaining conceptually systematic in ABA, even when working with typically developing adult verbal behavior 2. Attendees will be able to describe how practical procedures from the ACT literature work in terms of behavioral principles 3. Attendees will be able to give practical examples of how intervening upon typically developing adults’ verbal behavior in the moment can affect that person’s socially meaningful overt behaviors outside of that session
 

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