Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis InternationalĀ® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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40th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2014

Event Details


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Symposium #392
Interventions for Improving the Literacy Skills of Older Adolescent Struggling Readers
Monday, May 26, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W195 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EDC/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Ralph Gardner III (The Ohio State University)
Discussant: Douglas E. Kostewicz (University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract: The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reported that over 25% of college freshmen require remedial coursework in at least one course, with literacy as the primary area of concern. College-age struggling readers are at a disadvantage due to their difficulty in comprehending information in expository textbooks. Recommendations for instructing reading to older struggling readers include five areas: Word study; Fluency; Vocabulary; Comprehension; and Motivation. Symposia participants will learn about two interventions used to improve the literacy skills of college-age learners with poor literacy skills. The students in this literacy project were placed in one of two interventions during a 7-week literacy program for college-age students. Students with the greatest reading deficits were instructed using a package intervention of Reading Excellence: Word Attack and Rate Development Strategies (REWARDS) Program, repeated reading using expository text from college textbooks (e.g., psychology, African American history, and high interest passages). Other students were instructed using Skills for School Success, repeated reading using passages from college textbooks. Standard Celeration Charts were used to record and evaluate instructional effectiveness. The data indicates that students in both groups made significant gains in reading achievement. Generalization measures demonstrated improved reading fluency and comprehension on novel passages.
Keyword(s): Literacy, PT
 

Improving the Literacy Skills of College-age Students with Severe Reading Deficits

JOSHUA GARNER (The Ohio State University), Morris Council (The Ohio State University), Kristall J. Day (The Ohio State University)
Abstract:

A college education is a goal for many adolescents and is important in promoting economic mobility. Unfortunately, many adolescents are not academically prepared for college success, often due to poor literacy skills. Many adolescents reach the twelfth grade unable to read at a basic level. While a multitude of research studies have focused on how to teach reading to young children (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development), less attention has been focused on older adolescents experiencing reading failure. This presentation will describe an intervention involving adolescents with severe reading deficits. An intervention package including the Reading Excellence: Word Attack and Rate Development Strategies (REWARDS) Program and repeated reading using expository text from college textbooks (e.g., psychology, African American history, and high interest passages) was implemented 2-3 times a week across a 6-week period. One-on-one instruction model was used to teach decoding skills for multisyllabic words, vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency. Curriculum based measures using college textbook passages and AIMSweb passages and mazes were used to assess instructional effectiveness. Students were given a pre- and post-test using Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised (WRMT-R) and AIMSweb oral reading fluency and Maze assessments. All students demonstrated improved oral reading fluency and decoding skills.

 
Using Expository Text to Improve the Literacy Skills of College-age At Risk Students
PAULA CHAN (The Ohio State University), Mary Sawyer (The Ohio State University), Moira Konrad (The Ohio State University)
Abstract: College students are often expected to learn academic content from reading expository textbooks. Expository text is typically more difficult reading than narrative text. Students with poor literacy skills are at an increased risk for academic failure due to inadequate skills in oral reading fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Further, due to a history of difficulty in reading text, many adolescents lack the motivation required to engage in reading textbooks for extended periods of time, in order to learn content. This presentation will provide information about a literacy intervention that used Skills for School Success, college textbook expository passages, and high interest passages to improve the literacy skills of older adolescents. The intervention occurred 2-3 times a week across a 6-week period. Students were placed in small groups (i.e., 2-3) for instruction based on baseline assessments and their schedules. Curriculum based measures using college textbook passages were used to assess instructional effectiveness. AIMSweb passages and mazes were used to assess generalization of literacy skills to untrained passages. Additionally, students were given a pre- and post-test using Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised (WRMT-R) and AIMSweb goral reading fluency and Maze assessments. Results indicate substantial improvement in fluency and comprehension by students
 

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