Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

30th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2004

Program by Workshops: Saturday, May 29, 2004


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Workshop #W53
CE Offered: None
We're Here to Help Each Other through This ThingWhatever It Is: Teaching ABA Concepts through Literature
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Gardner
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bobby Newman, J.D.
BOBBY NEWMAN (Room to Grow)
Description: ABA concepts have been portrayed, with varying degrees of accuracy, in a variety of literary works. Some of the major literary works that have attempted to provide commentary on key ABA concepts will be explored. Tips for creating short works of fiction to teach ABA concepts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the different works that have made the most powerful impact on public perception of ABA. Teach undergraduate and graduate students ABA concepts via reference to classic literary works. Write short pieces of fiction to demonstrate ABA concepts. Analyze literary works to provide commentary on the ABA concepts explored.
Activities: The workshop will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, as well as a brief exploration of the workshop presenter's short fiction written for the purpose of the workshop.
Audience: Those teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in basic ABA, or those who are taking such courses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: None
Advances in Treating Children with Habit Disorders, Motor and Vocal Tics, Tourettes Syndrome, and Stuttering Using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon G
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: R. Gregory Nunn, Ph.D.
R. GREGORY NUNN (National University and San Diego City Schools)
Description: Maladaptive and undesirable habits, tics, Tourettes Syndrome (TS), and stuttering are extremely common problems which can seriously affect the personal relationships and self-esteem of individuals who suffer from them. Because these problems can cause acute psychological distress, many different types of treatments for them have been developed. Habit reversal is a behavioral treatment approach which has proven to be an effective, general treatment for habits and tics including TS (Azrin & Nunn, 1973; Azrin & Nunn, 1977; Nunn, 1978; Azrin, Nunn & Frantz, 1980; Azrin & Peterson, 1988a; Finney, Rapoff, Hall, & Christopherson, 1983; Franco, 1981; Zikis, 1983: Miltenberger, 2001).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify and diagnose children with maladaptive habits, tics, TS, and stuttering. Describe the various theoretical rationales that have spawned the many treatments for these types of problems. Develop treatments for children using the habit reversal and regulated breathing treatment procedures. Identify common pitfalls of treatment and ways of overcoming them.
Activities: We will discuss the identification, nature, and treatment of children and adolescents with these type of problems. Specifically we will cover the diagnosis and treatment of individuals using the habit reversal and regulated breathing treatment procedures of Azrin and Nunn as well as treatment variations that have evolved from their original work. Case studies are included where possible, and workshop participants are strongly encouraged to provide input.
Audience: All practitioners, educators, and other professionals working with children and adolescents presenting with these types of problems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: None
Changing Roles of Behaviorists in Schools: Roles, Responsibilities and Bedside Manner; Or What Teachers Really Think of Us
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly A. Smalley, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY A. SMALLEY (Behavior Support Advocacy Consultation)
Description: Applied behavior analysts working in schools with students with disabilities have unique and ever changing roles. We are faced with the challenges of our own learning curve and frustrated by what often feels like resistance. Many of the challenges we face we created ourselves, or were created by our colleagues before us. This session will present research and discussion revolving around facilitating social supports in schools as a means to create behavioral change in individuals with developmental disabilities, and the perceptions and actions of school based personnel. School systems and developmental disability organizations across central California were surveyed to establish a list of exemplary behavioral service providers. Interviews, record review, and direct observation of these providers indicated that behaviorists thought to be outstanding in their field, facilitated and manipulated ecological and molar variables and focused their efforts on antecedent management. This interactive session will discuss the roles and responsibilities assigned, accrued, and otherwise performed by behaviorists in public schools. Parallel jargons and team dynamics will be discussed with relation to the expectations and perspectives schools may have of us and our profession. Barriers to creating behavioral change and successful strategies to adapt our message to listeners ear will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify multiple strategies to facilitate social support as a means to create behavior reduction. Informally Assess molar and ecological variables. Reconceptualize their roles to provide active intervention. De jargonize themselves and approach.
Activities: Lecture format will generate and encourage audience participation to compare and contrast roles and performance of the behaviorists the in audience with those identified as exemplary from study. Small group activities, self-writing assignment.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts (BCBA, BCABA, professionals servings students with autism and or developmental disabilities) serving students with significant support needs in public schools; teachers, social workers, families, and self advocates.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: None
Combining Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching to Enhance Academic Programs
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Fairfax B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard M. Kubina Jr., Ph.D.
RICHARD M. KUBINA JR. (Pennsylvania State University), DOUGLAS E. KOSTEWICZ (.)
Description: This workshop will show participants how to combine one of the most powerful educational curricula, Direct Instruction (DI), with one of the most effective measurement tools, Precision Teaching (PT). Participants will learn how elements of Precision Teaching augment lessons from Direct Instruction. Materials from Direct Instruction curricula will be given in the workshop. Participants will examine the scope and sequence of DI reading programs and receive instruction on how to determine which skills will be selected for use with Precision Teaching. Once selected, specific skills will be identified for daily practice (to fluency). Using fluency aims, standard celeration charting, and other aspects of PT will be discussed to help rapidly accelerate students learning using Direct Instruction.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Examine a scope and sequence from a Direct Instruction reading program and determine which skills are pivotal. Allocate time both for Direct Instruction lessons and Precision Teaching measurement and practice methods. Observe and practice Direct Instruction lessons and Precision Teaching techniques. Understand how practicing to fluency enhances specific skills taught in Direct Instruction reading programs.
Activities: Activities will include observing a Direct Instruction reading lesson, practicing the delivery of a Direct Instruction reading lesson, analyzing standard celeration charts of reading behavior and look for learning trends, allocating time for lessons, and examining the scope and sequence from Direct Instruction reading programs.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers, administrators, aides, psychologists, and other individuals interesting in teaching.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: None
Developing and Implementing Behaviorally Based Interventions for Young Children with Down Syndrome
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Hampton
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen Feeley, Ph.D.
KATHLEEN FEELEY (Southampton College), EMILY A. JONES (Southampton College)
Description: Down syndrome is a developmental disability resulting from an extra copy of the 21st chromosome. This extra genetic material affects many aspects of development, including cognition, speech/language, social, and motor development. Although research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral interventions for teaching a variety of skills to young children with Down syndrome, there appear to be scarce applications within educational settings. This workshop will provide information regarding the unique characteristics of children with Down syndrome as well as the implications these characteristics have on the acquisition of skills. A series of case studies will be presented, demonstrating a functional relationship between skill development and behaviorally based interventions. For example, a multiple baseline design across behaviors was implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of discrete trial instruction in establishing verbal responses to nonverbal stimuli in a four-year-old boy with Down syndrome. Positive reinforcement was used to establish contingent eye gaze and contingent vocalization in two infants with Down syndrome. Across the series of case studies, response and procedural reliability were collected during 15 to 50% of the intervention sessions, with a range of agreement between 80 and 100%. Finally, in-depth procedures will be provided for developing and implementing a behaviorally based program.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify unique characteristics of young children with Down syndrome and describe the impact these characteristics have on skill development. Describe how discrete trial instruction, instruction embedded within an activity, and naturalistic teaching strategies can be implemented to meet the individual needs of children with Down syndrome. Describe behaviorally based interventions designed to address the specific deficits associated with Down syndrome. Identify essential components of a behaviorally based program for young children with Down syndrome.
Activities: The first portion of the workshop will be a presentation on the unique characteristics of young children with Down syndrome and how these characteristics effect acquisition across skill areas (expressive communication, receptive communication, fine motor, gross motor, cognition, and adaptive behavior). The participants will then be introduced to a series of interventions (via case studies) that specifically address the unique needs of children with Down syndrome. Within these case studies, strategies to conduct functional behavioral assessments will be presented, as well as step-by-step procedures for implementing the interventions. Interventions will be presented corresponding to skill areas (e.g., speech, pre-academics, adaptive behavior). During the workshop, participants will be provided with a framework for structuring learning opportunities, specifically discrete trial instruction, activity based instruction, and naturalistic teaching strategies. Participants will gain experience developing interventions that address the needs of children with Down syndrome within these three contexts. Finally, the participants will be introduced to a behaviorally-based model of service delivery, as well as the challenges they might expect while developing such a program.
Audience: Professionals from a variety of disciplines who work with young children (between birth and through early elementary school age) with Down syndrome. This workshop will provide methodologies to address needs across a variety of skill areas (communication, adaptive behavior, pre-academics). Additionally, it is an important workshop for parents, as it will provide them with resources they can use to advocate for appropriate programming for their children.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: None
Educational Applications of Relational Frame Theory
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Back Bay A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ian T. Stewart, Ed.D.
IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway), JOHN D. MCELWEE (Private Consultant)
Description: Relational Frame Theory is a modern behaviour analytic approach to human language and cognition. One important domain of human concern obviously relevant to human language and cognition and therefore eminently suitable for the application of RFT is education. The purpose of the present workshop is to briefly lay out the RFT approach, to explain some relevant experimental findings generated by this approach, and to discuss how these empirical findings might be applied in the educational arena, particularly in special educational interventions such as Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention. The first part of the workshop will involve defining and explaining the core concepts of RFT. The latter part of the workshop will explore how these core concepts and the basic research that has arisen from them, may be brought to bear in educational and special educational settings.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand the key theoretical concepts of RFT. Understand several of the areas of the RFT empirical research program that are relevant to education. Understand core principles of RFT as they apply in the educational arena. Apply RFT concepts, methods and findings in the educational arena.
Activities: Activities include didactic instruction, small group work and brief written exercises.
Audience: The audience will be those interested in applying modern behavioural principles in the educational arena, particularly in areas of special education such as EIBI (Early Intensive Behavior Intervention). A basic understanding of the methods and concepts employed in the experimental analysis of human behaviour will be assumed.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: None
Fluency-Based Instruction for Learners with Autism
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Conference Room 2
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Alison L. Moors, Ed.D.
ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SARA J. PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTIN N. SCHIRMER (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HOLLY ALMON (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: This three-hour workshop will introduce participants to Fluency-Based Instruction as applied to learners with autism. Fluency-Based Instruction, an instructional system derived from the field of behavior analysis, is a highly effective and efficient system for arranging instructional contingencies. Participants will learn the components of Fluency-Based Instruction, it historical and empirical underpinnings, as well as the support systems needed to effectively implement this model with learners with autism. The workshop uses a combination of slides, multiple video examples, and performance data from children with autism to illustrate key concepts. Participants will receive a copy of all materials presented in the workshop along with digital versions of the materials and copies of the videotape examples and charted performance data used.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: List and describe the components of Fluency-based Instruction for learners with autism. Describe the historical and empirical underpinning of Fluency-Based Instruction. Define rate of response and discuss the role it plays in Fluency-Based Instruction. Describe the support systems needed to implement Fluency-Based Instruction in both school and private clinical arrangements.
Activities: Throughout the workshop, participants will engage in interactive exchanges with the workshop presenters. The presenters will also use several different hands-on activities to help practitioners grasp the concepts taught.
Audience: Behavior analytic services providers who design or supervise intervention programs for children with autism and related disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: None
How to Teach a Course in Child Development: Theory and Applications
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon H
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Gary D. Novak, M.D.
GARY D. NOVAK (California State University, Stanislaus), MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University)
Description: Very few behavior analysts teach courses in child development. As a result, this important area is dominated by nonbehavioral viewpoints. This workshop will give you the knowledge and skills needed to be prepared to teach a course in child and adolescent development from a behavioral perspective. The workshop leaders will present the basic concepts of their behavioral-systems approach to child and adolescent development that are detailed in their new textbook. They will show how they organize and teach their undergraduate and graduate courses using this approach, with an emphasis on PSI-type methodologies. Participants will learn how to develop goals, objectives, lecture materials, and supplementary materials and readings for use in their own course.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Explain the basic principles of a behavioral systems approach to child development. Write a course proposal/syllabus for a behavioral course in child development. Take a chapter and write learning objectives for a unit of a child development course. Identify the pedagogical approach they will take in teaching a course.
Activities: Participants will be given a set of chapter objectives related as models. They will be asked to write their own set of objectives for one chapter. Participants will create sample quiz questions based on the objectives they create. Participants will create a syllabus for their own course in child development that can be used in the course proposal process. Participants will discuss the type of pedagogy that would work best for their individual teaching situations.
Audience: Graduate students, full-time and part-time faculty interested in learning about developmental theory and its applications; those teaching a course in child development at the undergraduate or graduate level.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: None
How to Train Caregivers in Functional Behavioral Assessment and Treatment Development
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon F
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Julia T. O'Connor, Ph.D.
JULIA T. O'CONNOR (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Description: As the functional behavior assessment methodology has expanded from the highly controlled research context to homes, schools, and community settings, more questions have arisen regarding how to incorporate the family and other caregivers of the client into the assessment and treatment process. Caregiver participation in behavioral assessments allows the clinician to establish a context that more closely replicates the conditions in the natural environment. This workshop is designed to train professionals how to collaborate with parents throughout the functional analysis and treatment development process. The primary focus will be to assist the professional in teaching parents and other caregivers of children with developmental disabilities how to analyze behavior and develop function based treatment strategies in a collaborative relationship. Participants will have the opportunity to practice in small groups. Materials will be provided to participants including how to define behavior, identify target situations, and identify potential reinforcers as well as sample data collection sheets and other handouts describing the principles of applied behavior analysis and conducting functional analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Train caregivers how to define target maladaptive behaviors. Train caregivers to conduct stimulus preference assessments and functional analyses in home and community settings. Train caregivers to identify appropriate alternative/adaptive behaviors. Train caregivers how to link functional analysis outcomes to possible treatment strategies. Assess caregiver integrity on implementation of the functional analysis and treatment.
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation, discussion, and interactive activities.
Audience: Clinicians working with parents with developmentally disabled children with behavior problems. Masters level therapists, psychologists, and family members are welcome. Participants should have a fundamental understanding of the principles of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: None
Incorporating Discrete Trial Teaching and Natural Language Paradigm Teaching within Early Intervention Sessions for Children with Autism
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Liberty B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Paul Coyne Coyne, Psy.D.
PAUL COYNE COYNE (Coyne and Associates, Inc.), ERIN RING (Coyne and Associates, Inc.), MELISSA L. EVANS (Coyne and Associates, Inc.)
Description: Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT) and Natural Language Paradigm (NLP) are evidence-based teaching techniques commonly used in early intervention for children with autism and other developmental delays. However, it is less common to find early intervention programs with curriculums that incorporate and intersperse DTT and NLP techniques (e.g., Pivotal Response Teaching) into teaching sessions. The workshop will offer methods designed to integrate DTT and NLP techniques within an early intervention program for children with autism. We will present the essential features of both techniques, and offer practical real-life suggestions. A video displaying examples of actual teaching sessions will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe the essential features of DTT and NLP (e.g., Pivotal Response Teaching). Converse about how DTT and NLP teaching techniques are similar and different. Model and role play NLP techniques related to attention, appropriate play, and language. Describe how to use NLP techniques within a DTT session. Model and role play using NLP techniques within a DTT session. Describe a method for data collection during DTT and NLP teaching sessions.
Activities: Participants will participate in an interactive lecture describing the essential features of DTT and NLP teaching techniques and how to incorporate the two into teaching sessions. This will include questions and answers. A video will be shown that provides descriptions of teaching techniques and examples from teaching sessions. Participants will break into small groups to role play and practice the techniques while receiving feedback and guidance from the instructors.
Audience: Practitioners, parents, students, and anyone who works in early intervention programs for children with autism and other developmental delays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: None
Intensive Early Intervention: Advanced Comprehension, Production, and Social Language Skills Program
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Independence East
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, M.Ed.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute for Early Intervention), KARA L. RIEDESEL (Lovaas Institute for Early Intervention), CHARRYSE FOUQUETTE (St. Cloud State University), MELISSA J. GARD (University of Kansas)
Description: In intensive early intervention with young children with autism, a great number of language skills are often taught. Such skills can be developed in a coherent conceptual framework, enabling productive treatment planning and program evaluation. In the case of language skills, a four-dimensional matrix of skills can be used to design an overall generative process of language development. The matrix of skills is addressed across generalization modalities, syntax forms, conditional discriminations, and functional communicative relationships. After receptive and expressive skills are developed, the matrix naturally flows into auditory comprehension and production skills. The organization of the language curriculum can be used to control the pacing of related social skills in a systematic manner. Data obtained from children in intensive early intervention will be presented to demonstrate how the generative curriculum can improve the progress of children with severely challenging language disorders. This is part two of a workshop in language intervention in which the advanced auditory comprehension skills, creative language production skills, and social language programming is introduced as it builds upon the part one skills. Previous attendance (this year or prior) at a basic language matrix programming workshop is recommended.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Detail information necessary to plan and program children�s language curriculums into a coherent whole. Implement conditions that promote the production and comprehension of generative language learning. Develop auditory comprehension and creative language production skills. Program genuine social language skills. Assess and evaluate program progress.
Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and interactive exercises. Participants will obtain specific program sheets provided by the instructors.
Audience: Parents, lead therapists, line therapists, consultants, and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavioral terms used in intensive early intervention. At least one-month's experience with intensive early intervention is preferable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: None
Life-Quality Programming for People Unable to Provide Preferred Experiences to Themselves
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Berkeley
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Martin Thomas Ivancic, Ed.D.
MARTIN THOMAS IVANCIC (Western Carolina Center)
Description: People who are unable to independently contact the things they enjoy in their lives are dependent upon other people for their life-quality. Behavior technologies have identified how to assess reinforcers, preferences, and happiness indices for people, but these procedures have been typically used only as a means to developing more complex skills. For people who are not expected to increase their current life-quality by acquiring new skills, this workshop offers programming for life-quality that considers contact with preferred stimuli as a terminal goal. The programming divides a participant's day into nine intervals. The task for the care provider is to generate predefined approval or satisfaction responses (approach responses, happiness indices, etc.) from the participant in each of these intervals. Higher percent intervals of these satisfaction responses are considered an indication of increased life-quality for that person. Data can be managed to identify and then schedule toward more preferred experiences and away from less preferred events. Quality assurance and validity for this programming is based on the on-going (i.e., across the day, every day) participant voice about the quality of his or her daily experiences. Such programming may be the essence of what many who work for people with disabilities call person-centeredness.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Learn to determine the programming technique with the highest potential for a participant by reviewing the parameters of habilitation found in skill acquisition programming, reinforcer assessment, preference assessment, happiness indices, and "Golden Rule Therapy." Identify individuals who may benefit from this form of life-quality programming based on their current skills. Review the behavioral techniques available for providing life-quality programming (single, paired, and multiple-stimulus choice; contingent vs. noncontingent experiences; increasing happiness indices; decreasing unhappiness indices or discomfort). State the "clinical conundrum" which forbids ever eliminating training opportunities, but maximizes immediate life-quality regardless of skill acquisition potential. Review Life-Quality Tracking Programs and Shopping Programs designed to provide immediate life-quality across the day, every day, to people who cannot bring the life they prefer to themselves. Study data provided by 32 individuals over the last three years in Life-Quality Programming for clinical and management issues. Receive copies of and practice the definitions, goals based on the self-direction domain of habilitation, written programs, data sheets, and data bases necessary to conduct Life-Quality Programming.
Activities: Well as critique suggested definitions of participant life-quality reports for their conventional validity (e.g., a smile) and make suggestions for supporting evidence for definitions considered less conventional (e.g., opened eyes). In addition, participants will assemble materials (definitions, programs, data sheets, summary sheets) necessary to implement Life-Quality Programming in their settings.
Audience: Persons responsible for providing life-quality for an individual or group of people who are unable to bring the things they like to themselves because of development (e.g., profound, multiple handicaps), accident (e.g., head-injury), or illness (e.g., advanced forms of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's Diseases).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: None
Overview of the Standard Celeration Chart
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Fairfax A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, Ed.D.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), CLAY M. STARLIN (University of Oregon), ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Learning Center), ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HENRY S. PENNYPACKER (University of Florida)
Description: This workshop will teach participants to monitor human performance on the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). Participants will learn important features of the chart, the rationale for monitoring rate of performance, charting conventions used with the SCC, how to chart performance across varying lengths of counting time, and how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The presenters will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of settings to illustrate key concepts taught in the workshop. Examples from the areas of university teaching, intervention with children with autism, educational intervention with students with learning disabilities, general public school education, and the monitoring of private events will be used. All participants will receive a copy of all materials used in the workshop including a CD-ROM containing additional copies of the presentation materials, forms, example videos, and an animation-based tutorial.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Read human performance data charted on all versions of the SCC. Chart human performance data charted on all versions of the SCC. Describe data on the SCC in terms of its frequency (level), celeration (trend), and bounce (variability). Describe performance management systems helpful in maintaining consistent use of the SCC in clinical and educational settings.
Activities: Applying principles derived from behavior analysis of well-designed instruction, our world-class group of workshop presenters will use a range of activities to ensure participants learn the key skills targeted in the objectives. Participants will engage in choral responding and paced practice, timed practice on key concepts and skills, and both small and large group discussion.
Audience: Anyone seeking an introduction (or refresher!) to the Standard Celeration Chart, including those persons interested in using the SCC to improve their own teaching or clinical practice, as well as individuals planning to take the BACB examination.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: None
Repairing a Behavior Plan That Isn't Working
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon E
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Theodosia R. Paclawskyj, Ed.D.
THEODOSIA R. PACLAWSKYJ (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Description: The process of conducting behavioral assessment and treatment for individuals with developmental disabilities and behavior problems can consume a lot of time and resources. Therapists often become frustrated when what seems to be a well-designed behavior plan fails to improve a problem behavior, or when a plan that previously worked well seems to fall apart. This often leads to further treatment attempts that, when prolonged, lead to significant negative impact on the target individual and their immediate community. This presentation is intended to help the clinician identify weaknesses within three domains of a behavior plan: design, materials, and implementation. Using a model drawn from critical incident investigation, the presentation reviews factors such as human error (e.g., treatment integrity, false assumptions, etc.), mechanical failure (e.g., satiation, competing schedules of reinforcement, etc.), and design flaws (e.g., lack of valid functional assessment, consideration of establishing operations, etc.). State-of-the-art behavioral research is translated into a practical model that can be applied to evaluate a range of behavioral scenarios and allows the clinician to develop an enhanced perspective on successful and systematic behavioral assessment and treatment.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Recognize, assess, and correct problems that affect the implementation of a behavior plan. Recognize, assess, and correct problems with specific materials or consequences used within a behavior plan. Recognize, assess, and correct problems in the design of a particular strategy used within a behavior plan. Develop a broader perspective of the necessary elements for the design of a successful behavior plan.
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation, discussion, and interactive activities; participants are encouraged to bring examples of problematic situations encountered in their own experiences.
Audience: Clinicians working in applied settings who develop and monitor behavioral treatment programs for individuals with developmental disabilities and behavior problems. Master's level therapists, supervising psychologists, behavior support staff, students, and family members are welcome. Participants should have a fundamental understanding of the principles of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: None
Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Back Bay C
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mark L. Sundberg, Ed.D.
MARK L. SUNDBERG (Behavior Analysts, Inc./STARS School)
Description: This workshop will cover the basic concepts of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior. We will also discuss how Skinner's analysis is conceptually different from other (traditional) analyses of language. Participants will learn how to define and exemplify the elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual, and transcriptive), and how to classify samples of verbal behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Explain how Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior is different from other analyses of language. Define the elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual, and transcriptive). Provide examples of the different types of verbal behavior. Classify samples of verbal behavior.
Activities: Workshop attendees will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and exercises in the analysis of verbal behavior. Handouts will be provided to each attendee that will provide information on each topic, as well as exercises and examples related to those topics.
Audience: Participants should have at least a working knowledge of behavior analysis and some interest in the topic of language.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: None
Teaching Behavioral Techniques to Violent Criminal Offenders
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Back Bay B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Cary E. Schwencke, Psy.D.
CARY E. SCHWENCKE (Select Support Services), SAMUEL OKECHUKWU OZUZU (Century Prison)
Description: Workshop instructors will present an overview of a basic treatment model and curriculum that teaches the practical application of traditional methods proven to be effective for behaviors associated with violence and aggression. The program is designed for use with offenders, both incarcerated and not, and those with minor misdemeanor convictions. These methods are organized into a practical standard format with five basic steps. Step 1: Background information gathering and individual interview. Step 2: Instruction on the ABC model, simple data collection, and basic behavior principles. Step 3: Group discussion that included techniques such as problem solving, role playing, role reversal, and practicing responses. The instructor will also be able to directly observe the participants behaviors. Step 4: Individual will design and put into writing his own intervention plan.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Design a basic framework to be applied within the criminal justice system. Complete a background and information profile for a violent offender. Instruct offenders in the use of the ABC model and functional analysis of behavior. Apply group behavioral activities with offenders. Implement a program that will help an individual manage his own behavior.
Activities: Didactic lecture; interactive exercises; creating an example treatment intervention with use of presented techniques; and questions and answers.
Audience: .
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: None
The Discrete Trial Tracking System: An Integrative and Analytic Approach to the Implementation of Discrete Trial Teaching Technology
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sara White, Psy.D.
SARA WHITE (Behavioral & Educational Strategies & Training), SALLY GREVEMBERG (Behavioral & Educational Strategies & Training)
Description: There has been a large amount of controversy within the field of discrete trial instruction over which prompting system produces the greatest gains in learning. Typically speaking, instructional agencies will advocate for one particular prompting method and use that method to the exclusion of all others. The Discrete Trial Tracking System (DTTS) provides a systematic method of integrating both most-to-least and least-to-most prompting strategies, allowing children to benefit from both means of instruction. DTTS is an integrated method of prompting, program implementation and data collection, which focuses on individualizing both the prompting hierarchy and instructional sequence to meet the needs of each child. Additionally, DTTS presents a written prompting hierarchy that is simple for staff to implement and easy for supervisors to monitor. Having a written prompting protocol also makes the training of new staff members easier and more efficient, and makes prompting more consistent and therefore less confusing for children. Finally, DTTS provides a method of making systematic data-based decisions in order to maximize speed of learning. Cumulatively, DTTS provides a systematic and analytic framework to aid in the implementation of discrete trial teaching technology across a variety of instructional settings.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand a framework for conceptualizing prompting methodologies. Demonstrate the Discrete Trial Tracking System method of prompting, program tracking, and data collection/analysis. Understand how to implement the Discrete Trial Tracking System. Understand how to use the Discrete Trial Tracking System to make data-based decisions Lecture/discussion on the prompting framework and the basic application of the Discrete Trial Tracking System. Demonstration of the Discrete Trial Tracking System using videotaped teaching sessions. Practice using the Discrete Trial Tracking System from videotaped teaching sessions and with other workshop participants
Activities: .
Audience: Any individual involved in or interested in discrete trial teaching technology. The material presented will be appropriate for an audience with varying knowledge levels; however, some prior knowledge of discrete trial teaching is essential. Participants should have a working knowledge of the basic terminology of discrete trial instruction and implementation procedures.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: None
Traumatic Brain Injury: Mechanisms, Management, and Training
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Back Bay D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael P. Mozzoni, Psy.D.
MICHAEL P. MOZZONI (Timber Ridge Group, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is for behavior analysts working as part of an interdisciplinary team who need to interact with other professionals to help patients participate and profit from therapy sessions. As well, this workshop is for behavior analysts who need to help therapist to modify and improve their training methods in order to meet projected outcome goals within the specified length of stay. The first part of the workshop will outline localized brain and behavior functions and mechanisms of injury. Participants will get an overview of what happens during a traumatic injury. The second part of the workshop will focus on acute rehabilitation issues of data collection, and redirection methods for patients in Rancho level 4-The third part will focus on specialized training methods and considerations used in rehabilitation. Trial presentation, prompting and reinforcement methods for use in physical, occupational, and speech therapy will be discussed using case studies. As well, pediatric issues in education will be demonstrated using data based training methods.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify mechanisms of injury and localization of function. Recall three of nine methods of redirection. Recall two of three methods of trial presentation styles. Recall the advantages of fluency training over %-correct training.
Activities: Workshop activities will center around lecture, case studies, demonstration, and question and answer periods.
Audience: Behavior analysts working in multidisciplinary brain injury rehabilitation programs and teachers working with children with brain injury.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: None
Using Microsoft Excel to Monitor and Graph Behavior Data
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Dalton
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John J. Pokrzywinski, Ed.D.
JOHN J. POKRZYWINSKI (West Tennessee Regional Office and Columbus Organization)
Description: Behavior analysts devote a great amount of time to the production of graphs. There are a variety of commercial computer software packages on the market that can be used to create graphs; however, they tend to be relatively expensive, and may vary in their degree of user friendliness. This workshop provides instruction in the use of templates for graphing data using Microsoft Excel. The workshop content will include: an introduction to basic Excel procedures, the use of these templates, how to modify them, and references to other sources that describe the use of Microsoft Excel to produce reversal, multiple baseline, and multi-element graphs (among others) that conform to many of the technical recommendations for publication in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Participants are invited to bring laptop computers with them to the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to use Microsoft Excel to: Navigate the basic functions of Excel required to create graphs. Use customized templates to create Excel workbooks to track behaviors. Modify Excel graphing properties to customize reports. Create behavior graphs in different configurations, print them, and insert them into other documents.
Activities: Lecture will accompany a PowerPoint presentation. Each participant will receive a disk with the behavior tracking templates, an instruction manual, and supporting materials. Participants who bring their own laptop computers may install the templates during the workshop.
Audience: Everyone who is interested in learning easy and flexible ways of tracking and graphing behavior data. Participants do not need prior experience with Excel. However, some familiarity with spreadsheets would be beneficial.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: None
What Does "ResearchBased" Really Mean? Evaluating and Predicting the Likely Success of Behavioral Programs
Saturday, May 29, 2004
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Beacon A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Janet S. Twyman, M.D.
JANET S. TWYMAN (Headsprout), T. V. JOE LAYNG (Headsprout)
Description: Current uses of the term research-based as applied to educational and behavioral programs range in meaning from claims that: Programs contain elements found by research to be effective; pretest vs. post-test or simple comparison studies have provided evidence of effectiveness; or the program has undergone some form of scientifically controlled study, often involving randomized control groups. Further adding to the confusion, all of these uses fail to distinguish between the scientific development of a program, and the scientific evaluation of outcomes after a program is developed. This latter use of researchbased might more properly be considered researchfiltered. That is, a program, regardless of how it was designed, is measured against an alternative form of instruction, or at times, no instruction at all. This use of the term researchbased would find in its referent an emphasis on summative evaluation. Yet another use of the term researchbased might be more properly considered as pertaining to a behavioral intervention or instructional program that has been scientifically developed. That is, it is designed and constructed often-following design test revise retest cycles until each individual is shown to succeed. This use of the term researchbased would find in its referent an emphasis on formative evaluation (after Scriven, 1974). This workshop will provide an overview of how the term research-based needs to be examined using criteria based on the type of formative and summative evaluation that has been conducted in developing behavioral intervention and instructional programs. The workshop will present and provide practice in using a method educators can employ 1) to evaluate claims made by consultants, vendors and program authors, 2) to judge data supplied by reading program publishers, and 3) to make predictions of the likely success of a program. A 3X3 Matrix will be used to describe the various levels of interaction between each subtype of evaluation and the effect it has on predicting the success of both individuals and groups using research-based behavioral and instructional programs.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Distinguish between three types of formative evaluation (experiential, evidence-based, and scientific), and three types of summative evaluation (experiential, evidence-based, and scientific). Use a provided 3X3 Matrix to describe the various levels of interaction between each subtype of evaluation and the effect it has on predicting the success of both individuals and groups using research-based behavioral or instructional programs. Use the seven characteristics of the formative evaluation process to better understand the important role formative evaluation may play in developing and evaluating student success in research-based behavioral or instructional programs. Make projections of the likely success of interventions based upon the "research-base" offered as evidence of effectiveness of selected programs.
Activities: Audio visual presentation involving computer projected slides, animations, and video; small group application of evaluation guidelines to a range of intervention examples.
Audience: All who use or consume behavioral or educational programs or products.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic

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