Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

30th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2004

Program by Workshops: Friday, May 28, 2004


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: None
A Curriculum for an Intensive, Early Intervention Program for Children with Autism: The First Two Years
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Dalton
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Barbara Metzger, Ph.D.
BARBARA METZGER (Winston Salem/Forsyth County Schools)
Description: A curriculum for teaching children with autism across the following skill categories will be presented: language, play/socialization, imitation/observational learning, school readiness, and self-help skills. The entire curriculum has been divided into six phases. This presentation will cover the skills in the first three phases, with an emphasis on language and play skills. This presentation will cover the following related topics: necessary prerequisite skills, vertical and horizontal curriculum development, foundation skills vs. combination skills and ideal time guidelines for completion of each curriculum phase. The difference between the initial acquisition of a skill and the subsequent generalization of that skill will also be covered.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the first three phases of the curriculum and an ideal time guideline for each. Read the curriculum flow-chart to determine the sequence of skills. Discriminate between vertical and horizontal curriculum development. Discriminate between foundation and combination skills in curriculum development. Discriminate between the initial acquisition of a skill and the subsequent generalization of that skill. Identify the purpose of and the steps of teaching early language skills. Identify the purpose of and the steps of teaching early play skills.
Activities: Materials will be presented in a lecture format with time for practice in developing curriculum for sample children.
Audience: Parents and professionals who are teaching young children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: None
Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: Assessment and Treatment from a Behavioral Perspective
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Gardner A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Many children with developmental disabilities and children in the child welfare system develop several of the symptoms of various childhood psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, bipolar disorder and reactive attachment disorder, due to early abuse/neglect, multiple placements and multiple caregivers. Differential diagnosis becomes a critical issue in providing appropriate treatment and services for these children and their families. However, these children are often diagnosed based on behavior exhibited during office visits and personality assessment instruments with questionable reliability and validity. Additionally, the treatment focus follows the medical model with the assumption that behavioral symptoms are the result of underlying psychopathology. Behavior analysts are in a unique position to provide more comprehensive diagnosis that includes observations of behavior in a variety of settings to determine the effect of various stimulus conditions and setting events, functional assessments to determine the causes and maintainers of various behavioral symptoms, and careful analysis of learning histories to determine the efficacy of various reinforcers and punishers. Behavior analysts are also able to provide assessment-driven treatment approaches, to design therapeutic environments that support the learning of appropriate replacement behaviors and to facilitate typical development rather than psychopathology.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Explain the differences between the medical and behavioral approaches to the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of psychopathology in children. Name some of the symptoms used in the differential diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, and reactive attachment disorder. Describe the unique learning histories of children with psychiatric disorders and how feelings serve as establishing operations in these children. Tell why children with this learning history often are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, and conduct disorder in different developmental stages of their lives.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories, take notes, ask questions, view a power point presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: None
Educating through Movement: Using Physical Activity to Support Learning Skills, Social Skills, and Self-Control
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Berkeley
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ed.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Zinman College, Wingate Institute, Israel)
Description: The presented model is based on the principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis while emphasizing the uniqueness of movement and game as an ideal context for supporting, instilling, and reinforcing learning skills, social skills, and affective ability. Such a context enables teachers and clinicians to design challenging learning content and atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real-life situations, pre-planned and programmed for achieving specific goals. It can support specific clinical goals such as developing self-control, a yearly curriculum at the kindergarten and school, or an extended behavioral program for individuals or small groups. The rationale behind the development of the model will be discussed, specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited, the structure of the model will be described, followed by different examples of its optional implementation, and the components of the model, modified during the past 15 years, will be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of education and clinical settings and in various populations.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as learning contexts. Cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts. Identify the general structure of the model. Design various physical activities as clinical scripts, serving specific behavioral goals. Describe and explain the components of the model. Use and modify observation forms in order to evaluate students� progress. Adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs.
Activities: Activities will include a presentation of the rationale, theoretical background and the components of the model; an open discussion related to physical activity as a learning context; a video presentation demonstrating the implementation of the model; active demonstration games with the participants; and planning drills � participants will practice activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers, consultants, lead therapists, line therapists, and students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: None
Examination of the Intermediate Bridge, with Applications
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Fairfax A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kayce Cover, J.D.
KAYCE COVER (Syn Alia Training Systems), DEBBIE WINKLER (Dog Ears and Paws Assistance Dog Training)
Description: The Intermediate Bridge (IB) is a tertiary reinforcer that can reduce training time by 25 - 75%. This workshop explores the features and benefits of the IB, and its applications. In particular, an IB mediated communication system will be demonstrated, showing acquisition of a concept and related vocabulary, in as little as five minutes. Instructors can harvest direct feedback from pre-verbal children, non-verbal, or sub-verbal adults, or the temporarily non-verbal, such as stroke patients, as well as from animals. However, the IB has myriads of applications in teaching people with normal verbal skills, as participants will have the opportunity to experience. As time permits, participants can put forth cases for review and demonstration. Participants will receive a PDF (on disk) copy of The Syn Alia Series, Volume I: An Introduction to Bridge and Target Technique, by Kayce Cover (see http://www.synalia.com for additional information), and an article detailing the features and applications of the IB, as well as a hard copy of the course syllabus.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand and apply the Intermediate Bridge (IB). Condition bridges in a seven-step process. Teach targeting in a four-step process. Use targets for communication. Isolate concepts. Teach matching, discrimination, and vocabulary. Test acquisition of matching, discrimination, vocabulary. Use these components to harvest non-verbal feedback. Coach clients via the IB. See the IB applied to their applications, as time permits.
Activities: A series of explanations and demonstrations of the process, with descriptions of applications, interposed with hands on practice by all participants. Video tape of applications with humans and animals will demonstrate the breadth and ease of application of these skills. Participants will view animals making choices, giving information, answering questions, and cooperating in tasks. We plan to also show recent work with an autistic child using the IB to communicate with his assistance dog.
Audience: All instructors including therapists, clinicians, special needs teachers, pre-school teachers, researchers involved in animal studies, laboratory personnel, zoo keepers, animal trainers, and anyone interested in communication and motivation.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: None
Intensive Early Intervention: A Comprehensive Staff Training System for Behavior Therapists
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Back Bay B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ed.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute for Early Intervention), KARA L. RIEDESEL (Lovaas Institute for Early Intervention)
Description: In order to deliver effective early intervention services to a child with autism, the staff must possess a complete set of behavior analysis skills. The purpose of this workshop is to identify the comprehensive variety of required skills and present specific training programs that have been developed and validated to establish these skills and to manage the staff's behavior so that they are used consistently throughout the child's program. A particular challenge is to train staff to use independent clinical judgment and make the dynamic programming decisions on a daily basis that support optimal rates of child behavior development. In addition, the team leaders must possess the skills to organize and maintain consistent staff programming as the child's behavior rapidly develops. The skills necessary in the third year of programming are much more complex and varied than are those in the first year of programming. This workshop will present the competencies needed for effective child behavior therapy, and the methods used to train staff. The workshop will make extensive use of videos of actual staff training activities. The workshop will also present a data-collection system for staff management at the child and programmatic levels.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to identify: A comprehensive array of staff competencies. Effective methods for teaching these competencies. A system of management to integrate consistent staff behavior across a group of teams. An evaluation system for staff training. A system of dynamically self-adjusting staff training. Essential competencies for behavior therapists. Essential competencies for clinical supervisors.
Activities: .
Audience: Parents, lead therapists, line therapists, consultants, and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavioral terms used in intensive early intervention. At least one-month's experience with intensive early intervention is preferable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: None
Learning and Teaching Mathematics with the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Gardner B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Psy.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy), JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), SUSAN K. MALMQUIST (Private Practice)
Description: For the past decade, professional mathematics educators have advocated problem solving and inquiry based approaches to teaching mathematics to children and youth. Their approach has crowded out the teaching of more fundamental competencies in math. The Morningside Math framework rebalances the objectives, bringing more basic math tools and computation into play with inquiry and problem solving. In this workshop you will learn to implement our curriculum and methods. Learners in K-12 general education classrooms as well as learners with developmental disabilities and autism have profited enormously from our program Our data typically show substantial academic gains on state and national tests. Morningside Mathematics occurs in three levels. Each day students practice math tool skills to fluency. Our tool skill sequence begins with reading and writing numbers, identifying the place value of digits in numbers, and math facts; and progresses to solving 3-term equations with one unknown, and finding multiples and factors, among other pre-algebra too skills. We will teach you how to apply Precision Teaching and peer coaching to teach learners these math tools. The second level of each day's work involves learning basic concepts and computation skills using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, measurement, statistics, geometry, and advanced number work. We will introduce a curriculum ladder with over 100 objectives, scripted instruction to establish these skills, and practice materials to build fluency. We will teach you Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching methods to teach learners these objectives. We will also teach you a diagnostic/prescriptive approach to teaching the curriculum, allowing you to individualize instruction to include only those objectives that need instruction or practice. The third level of each day's work involves reasoning and problem solving. We will teach you a protocol for solving all kinds of problems called Thinking Aloud Problem Solving. Morningside Math also includes a Precision Teaching approach to Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM). CBM provides short weekly measures a teacher can administer to plan additional instruction and practice needs, make predictions about year- end performance results, and avoid surprises when state and national tests are administered in the Spring. We will teach you how to implement our CBM approach. We implement Morningside Math with Saxon Math; we will teach you about Saxon Math and how to integrate it with Morningside Math. Morningside Math can also be implemented jointly with any modern math curriculum to supplement its weaknesses and create a better balance of math learning.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Learn and practice methods for teaching math tool skills. Learn and practice methods for teaching concepts and computation operations. math learning. Learn and practice methods for teaching problem solving. Learn and practice CBM methods. Experience our methods of feedback and coaching. Practice implementing our system. Learn to incorporate mathematics into your treatment plans.
Activities: Lecture, demonstration and discussion methods; Direct Instruction; and Precision Teaching will be used to teach you Morningside Math. Our faculty and staff will also coach you and give you feedback as you practice.
Audience: Teachers, administrators, clinicians, direct-care staff, tutors, and instructional designers who want to learn how to teach mathematics to children and youth, as well as adults in literacy programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: None
Professional and Research Ethics for Behavioral Psychologists
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Liberty B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: R. Wayne Fuqua, Ed.D.
R. WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), C. RICHARD SPATES (Western Michigan University)
Description: This workshop is designed to introduce students, practitioners, and researchers to the professional and ethical standards that impact the practice of psychology and the conduct of psychological research. With the help of case studies, participants will become familiar with critical ethical codes including: the APA's Ethical Standards for Psychologists and Ethical Principles for Research with Human Participants. The first part of the workshop will focus on ethical issues in the practice and teaching of psychology. The second part of the workshop will focus on ethical issues in research including: HSIRB guidelines, scientific misconduct, conflicts of interest, mentor/mentee relationships and social responsibility of researchers. Participants will be encouraged to offer examples of ethical dilemmas (with appropriate concern for confidentiality) for discussion with workshop participants and leaders.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe ethical standards for the practice of psychology, including the application of behavior analysis and behavior management strategies. Identify ethical concerns in case scenarios involving the practice of psychology. Describe appropriate corrective action for practices of questionable ethicality. Identify best ethical practices in the conduct of research with human participants. Identify ethical issues involved in intellectual property/plagiarism, conflicts of interest, mentor-mentee relations and scientific misconduct. Using behavior analytic principles, explain why ethical violations occur and what strategies might be applied to reduce and prevent such violations.
Activities: This workshop will rely heavily on real and hypothetical cases to illustrate major ethical principles. Participants will be encouraged to identify the ethical dilemmas posed by various cases and to suggest appropriate courses of action. Participants will be encouraged to offer real world examples of ethical conflicts (with appropriate concern for confidentiality) for discussion and analysis.
Audience: Behavioral practitioners, behavioral researchers, and advanced students who are engaged in professional practice, research, and/or the study of ethics.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: None
Professional Conduct and Ethical Decision Making in the Delivery of Behavioral Services
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Fairfax B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Pamela G. Osnes, M.D.
SARAH ROBINSON (Florida Department of Children and Families), PAMELA G. OSNES (The Ohio State University), HAYDEE TORO (Florida Department of Children and Families)
Description: This introductory workshop provides an overview of ethical principles and their application to the clinical practice of behavior analysis. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas in their work. However, many received limited training in this area or received training relevant to other professions that do not routinely practice in the diverse settings and circumstances encountered by behavior analysts. This workshop will cover ways to recognize ethical issues and how to make decisions about them when they arise. It will also highlight some key ethical concerns including competence, confidentiality, multiple relationships, business practices, and special education issues. Ethical principles will be discussed in terms of situations that arise in real settings including communities, family homes, schools, and residential facilities and with a variety of client populations. A significant part of the workshop will be spent on discussion of examples provided by the presenters and the participants' own ethical dilemmas. Participants will also receive copies of a number of professional codes, guidelines, and other relevant materials.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Use a variety of professional ethics codes and guidelines including those of the American Psychological Association and the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Identify some ethical principles common across several professions. Understand and apply the ethical principles related to professional competence, confidentiality, multiple relationships, and misuse of influence. Understand and apply ethical principles to situations that commonly arise in business practices, such as record keeping, financial arrangements, and honoring commitments. Understand and apply ethical principles to issues encountered in special education, such as those related to due process and IEP's. Take steps to avoid common ethical problems. Recognize ethical issues and use strategies to resolve them as they arise.
Activities: Workshop activities will include large group and small group exercises in which participants will discuss ethical dilemmas. Through this process participants will enhance their abilities to identify ethical issues and use ethical decision-making skills. Exercises are the product of experiences and dilemmas encountered and researched by the presenters through their years of practice in diverse settings as well as published and unpublished teaching cases. Participants will also have the opportunity to suggest for discussion ethical dilemmas that they have encountered in their own
Audience: Practitioners, supervisors, and other professionals working in educational, developmental disabilities, mental health, and home and community settings, including behavior analysts, special education and regular education teachers, and psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: None
Promoting Speech and Language in Children with Autism: Integrating ABA and Speech-Language Pathology
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Independence East
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, M.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (The Genesis School), JOANNE GERENSER (Executive Director - Eden II Programs), BONNIE M. FORMAN (Eden II Programs), RANDY I. HOROWITZ (Eden II Programs)
Description: Children with autism typically demonstrate deficits in speech, language, and communication. There have been significant gains made in the past fifteen years using the principles of applied behavior analysis to address these deficits. Despite intensive behavioral intervention, for some children, these deficits remain severe and complex. Almost 30 percent of children with autism do not develop functional speech. Still others continue to demonstrate significant challenges with abstract language or the social use of language. Although children with autism demonstrate these complex deficits in the area of speech and language, speech-language pathologists are often not included in the behavioral intervention team. Historically, this has been due to the speech-language pathologists reluctance to rely on behavior analysis as the model for intervention, preferring to utilize developmental or social pragmatic approaches. Therefore, traditional behavioral programming often lacks critical input in areas such as the neuro-anatomy of speech production or complex augmentative communication systems. This workshop will provide a model for integrating research in the area of speech production, voice, language development and disorders as well as communication within behavioral programming for children with autism. Specific programs to target oral motor development, verbal skills, vocabulary development, abstract language and social use of language will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe the unique deficits in speech, language, and communication across children on the autism spectrum. Understand how developmental, neurological, and psycholinguistic information from the speech-language research literature relates to the speech-language and communication deficits present in learners with autism. Incorporate this information in programming for children with autism using the principles of applied behavior analysis. Develop basic programs to address oral motor deficits in children with autism. Develop basic programs to address deficits in speech production in children with autism. Identify word learning strategies in typical development and be able to apply this information to the development of programs for children with autism. Describe different augmentative systems and how they can be used to promote communication in children with autism.
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation as well as discussion. All programs presented will be accompanied by videotapes and written programs. Demonstration of specific prompting procedures and programs will be provided. Participants will practice some teaching techniques and programs. Participants will practice using assessment tools and data collection procedures.
Audience: Speech-language pathologists, behavior analysts, psychologists, and special educators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: None
Relational Frame Theory: Implications for Clinical Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Liberty C
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ed.D.
DERMOT BARNES-HOLMES (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), YVONNE BARNES-HOLMES (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), JOHN TANNER BLACKLEDGE (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: Relational Frame Theory (RFT) is a modern behavior-analytic approach to the study of human language and cognition. The workshop will focus on the main concepts of RFT and how they are currently being used to develop conceptual and empirical analyses of areas such as symbolic meaning, analogy and metaphor, problem solving, rule-governance, and perspective-taking. The workshop will also explore how RFT may be used to guide and inform research in clinical psychology, and experimental psychopathology in particular. The first part of the workshop will involve defining, and explaining the core concepts of RFT, focusing in particular on the operant nature of the theory. The second part of the workshop will explore some recent examples of how RFT has been employed in research in experimental psychopathology. The third and final part will consider possible future directions for RFT research in clinical psychology.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand and appreciate the key analytic concepts of RFT. Appreciate the fundamentally operant nature of RFT. Understand how RFT defines and approaches the study of meaning, reasoning, problem solving rule-governance, and perspective-taking. Understand and begin to apply RFT concepts, methods, and findings in clinical behavior analysis. Appreciate the scope and potential for future RFT research in experimental psychopathology.
Activities: Activities will include didactic instruction, paper and pencil exercises, and question and answer sessions.
Audience: Behavior analysts working in academic and clinical psychology settings with an interest in human language and cognition. A basic understanding of the methods and concepts employed in the experimental analysis of human behavior will be assumed.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: None
The Client-Therapist Relationship in Psychotherapy: The Pot of Gold at the End of a Functional Analysis
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Clarendon
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jonathan W. Kanter, J.D.
JONATHAN W. KANTER (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), REO NEWRING (University of Washington), CHRISTEINE M. TERRY (University of Washington), URSULA S. WHITESIDE (University of Washington), ROBERT J. KOHLENBERG (University of Washington)
Description: This workshop is for students, behavior analysts and practicing clinicians who want to incorporate functional analytic principles into their outpatient mental health treatment. For many years, the tools and techniques of behavior analysis primarily have focused on work in controlled settings, while adult, outpatient psychotherapy with cognitively-intact individuals has been left behind. We overview the basic principles of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP), which provides behavior analysts a foundation and set of techniques for the client issues commonly presented in adult, outpatient psychotherapy, such as anxiety and depression. We explain how a functional analysis of psychotherapy leads to a focus on the client-therapist relationship and present strategies and techniques that help use the client-therapist relationship as a therapeutic tool, including functional assessment of clinically relevant behaviors, case conceptualization, and the identification, evocation, and modification (i.e., natural reinforcement) of in-vivo behaviors. Participants will have time to discuss ways of tailoring FAP to their needs and to address challenges and concerns about focusing on the client-therapist relationship. Clinicians that are new to functional analysis or FAP are welcome and we aim to present topics that go beyond the basics.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Communicate the basic principles of FAP for adult, outpatient psychotherapy with cognitively-intact individuals. Understand and practice: How to conduct functional assessments to target clinically relevant behaviors. How to conceptualize cases in FAP and develop treatment plans. How to focus on the client-therapist relationship through identification, evocation, and modification (i.e., natural reinforcement) of in-vivo behaviors. How to use client and therapist emotional responding in psychotherapy. How to facilitate the generalization of in-vivo improvements to daily life. How to assess the effects of interventions.
Activities: This workshop is a combination of didactic presentation, videotaped clinical case material, and a variety of exercises and activities. Participants will be encouraged to discuss ways to tailor FAP principles to their own clients. Attendees will have the opportunity to practice with materials frequently used in or adapted for FAP. In addition, materials will be provided to help participants apply the workshop strategies to their own practice. FAP is unique in that the treatment is tailored to the needs, history, and abilities of each client; the workshop presenters will use FAP strategies and techniques to tailor the workshop to the needs, history, and abilities of the attendees. Although the focus of the workshop will be on working with adult, mental health outpatients with generally intact cognitive functioning, we welcome discussion of how these methods may apply to other populations.
Audience: Behavior analysts interested in an introduction to adult, outpatient psychotherapy techniques and a behavior analytic interpretation of the therapeutic process; and therapists interested in applying functional analysis in their approach to treatment. Because clinical material is being presented, the workshop is open only to faculty, graduate students, or professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: None
The Smart & Sensitive Parenting Program (SSPP): Teaching Parents Behavior Analytic Skills
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Back Bay D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Amos E. Rolider, Ph.D.
AMOS E. ROLIDER (Emek Yezreel College)
Description: In this workshop, a unique parent group training model entitled SSPP (The Smart & Sensitive Parenting Program), which emphasizes teaching parents to rearrange significant context variables and to discover the triggers and functions of their children's most-burdensome behaviors will be presented. Parents subsequently learn to identify the function of their own responses to their children's inappropriate behaviors and are trained to select and apply effective and doable interventions based on their discovery of triggers and maintaining consequences.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify behaviors and typical parental responses associated with the termination of a preferred activity or reinforcer, demand situations, wait situations, transition from preferred activity to a non-preferred activity, and elicited emotional outbursts. Identify the function of children's inappropriate behaviors and the function of typical parental incorrect responses. Identify and describe the essential ABA foundations parents need to acquire in order to intervene effectively. Familiarize themselves with effective and simple data collection tools to be used by parents in home settings. Select effective package intervention based on the identified evoking triggers and behavior function. Know how and when to use effective DRO and DRL motivational systems at home. Design effective interventions for problems such as non-compliance, temper tantrum, sibling rivalry, and school related problems.
Activities: The following will be discussed and practiced: How to identify behaviors and typical parental responses associated with the termination of a preferred activity of reinforcer; refusal or inability to provide a preferred activity or reinforcer; demand situations; Transition from preferred activity to non-preferred activity; and elicited emotional outbursts. The importance of preparing an established weekly schedule and set of expectations, and the role of daily and weekly family meetings. Preparing children for challenging triggers and difficult situations. Selecting an appropriate response based on the function of the inappropriate behavior. Using the model to deal with children's most common inappropriate behaviors, including bickering and refusal; tantrums and aggression; over-dependence and school-related problems.
Audience: Teachers, psychologists, behavior analysts, and parents who work with/ raise children and adolescents who exhibit a variety of antisocial behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: None
Using Organizational Behavior Management Skills to Develop Programs for Human Services
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Beacon H
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, M.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Devereux Florida Network), JOSEPH D. CAUTILLI (Children's Crisis Treatment Center), CRAIG THOMAS (The Childhood Learning Center)
Description: This workshop will provide a theoretical framework for utilizing behavior analysis principles of organizational behavior management, combining it with methods from TQM and statistical process control, as applied to human services provider organizations (Hantula, 1995; Babcock, Fleming & Oliver, 1999). Organizational management and human resources (HR) applications are a growing area for behavior analysts, who have the unique skills and experience to utilize principles of behavior analysis to improve processes and functions in human services organizations. One particular area of interest for behavioral practitioners will be organizational behavior management (OBM). OBM conceptualizes and empirically solves organizational problems. This workshop will provide participants with the concepts and knowledge to increase their potential for professional behavioral consultation to human services organizations. Operation issues plague most mental health and service industry professions. It is our experience that organizational behavior management has much to offer traditional operations in job design, analysis, and HR management. In addition, OBM readily lends itself to improve the quality of treatment services in human service organizations that provide services to people with mental retardation, developmental disabilities, autism, and emotional/behavioral disorders. This presentation will focuses on applying the basics of OBM to the development of successful service operations, and provide data from a demonstration research project conducted in a residential treatment facility serving these populations. Management involves the acquisition and use of resources. OBM redefines management from control of the person to control of the context/environment in which the person works. It has developed powerful techniques for a range of management areas, and can be used to improve the integrity and quality of treatment approaches being used in a human service organization. (Cautilli & Clarke, BAT, 2000, Weinberg et. al., BAT, 2001).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Develop management by team objective programs. Analyze performance problems from a traditional operations perspective. Identify ways that OBM can enhance this approach. Understand operations and HR approaches to enhance employee performance, and to achieve a company's strategic goals. Use OBM in operations to enhance treatment integrity. Use statistical process control to determine when to intervene. (P Chart) Set up functionally based programs with the supervision of all staff as the cornerstone. Set up benchmarks and define outcomes for successful interventions. Understand the essential skills of an effective manager. Understand key skills to devise performance objectives linked to evaluation, mission of the organization, and performance-contingent salary increases.
Activities: Participants will work in breakout groups to devise performance objectives for professionals and staff linked to the organization�s mission.
Audience: Behavior analysts, human resources professionals, program directors or administrators of human services organizations, OBM professionals, and students in OBM track programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: None
Values, Defusion, and Mindfulness in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Hampton
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D.
KELLY G. WILSON (University of Mississippi), LAURA ELY (University of Mississippi)
Description: Behavioral treatments often expose clients to extraordinary distress. Symptom reduction, as a goal of treatment, may not be a sufficiently potent reinforcer to cause a sufferer to bear the pain of this exposure. An explicit focus on the larger why of treatment can both direct and dignify treatment. The focus of this workshop will be on practice. Two major categories of interventions will be described. First, we will introduce a variety of values-centered interventions. A new instrument for assessment and generation of values-driven exposure and behavioral activation will be introduced. Second, we will introduce a variety of defusion strategies and we will examine the relationship between defusion, exposure and mindfulness and how they can be used to facilitate values-centered clinical work. Case examples will be used to illustrate the use of these interventions. Although the core of the values work presented in the workshop are components of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, suggestions for the systematic integration of values into other cognitive-behavioral treatments will be made.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Administer and score the Values Assessment Instrument to reveal discrepancies in valued life domains. Use the Values Assessment Instrument to generate therapy targets. Use the values interventions to create a powerful therapeutic relationship. Harness behavioral activation and exposure-based interventions to core valued domains. Harness behavioral activation and exposure-based interventions to specific values interventions.
Activities: Activities include lecture and experiential exercises.
Audience: Students, mental health professionals, clinical supervisors, and treatment researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: None
Verbal Behavior Practices Applied to Children with Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Independence West
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sebastien Bosch, Psy.D.
SEBASTIEN BOSCH (CARD, Inc.), MARLA SALTZMAN (University of Nevada, Reno & CARD, Inc.), DOREEN GRANPEESHEH (CARD, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide an overview of the CARD, Inc. approach to teaching verbal behavior to children diagnosed with autism. The audience will see a humorous introduction highlighting donts in ABA treatments. The workshop is organized into two content areas: The first area targets techniques for building repertoires. Specifically, we will focus on language repertoires such as mands, tacts, intraverbals, echoics and receptives. The second area targets curriculum and programming issues. There, we will present a comprehensive, functional, cumulative and hierarchical language program excerpted from the CARD, Inc curriculum. We will present the curriculum content (the specific programs) as well as its structure (the underlying verbal functions targeted within each programs).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Demonstrate basic language programming skills for echoics, mands, tacts, intraverbals, and receptive skills. Develop an understanding of the cumulative-hierarchical nature of programming. Understand the detail of the task analyses necessary to generate �spontaneous� language. Increase reinforcer effectiveness in the context of mand training. Increase reinforcer effectiveness in the context of prompt and fade prompts for various language functions.
Activities: The instructors will present the training objectives through lecture, guided observation, and guided practice.
Audience: Parents, therapists, consultants and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavior analytic terms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: None
Behavior Intervention Plans: Guidelines, Clinical Accuracy, and Implementation
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Beacon E
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jose D. Rios, Ph.D.
JOSE D. RIOS (Private Practice), EVANGELINA HURTADO (Pathways), JOHN YOUNGBAUER (North L.A. County Regional Center)
Description: Support staff and teachers can best assist individuals with problem behaviors when they have the guidance of a well-designed and effective intervention plan. Unfortunately, functional assessments and the behavior plans derived from such assessments are often poorly designed. They often lack clinical accuracy for the individuals specific behavior problems and are often difficult to implement. This workshop will address plans that are clinically challenged and review problems and the necessary steps needed to remedy them. In particular, a plan must entail well-defined description of procedures, it must be clinically accurate and it must be implemented with integrity. Beginning with the importance of an accurate functional assessment, this workshop will review how to design and implement plans in residential and educational settings. Poorly designed plans are discussed and evaluated in this workshop. The workshop will address staffs concerns and barriers in the implementation of treatment plans and will also provide some steps to remedy these problems. We also will look at issues concerning the importance of effective staff training and appropriate supervision.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Evaluate treatment intervention plans for individuals with behavior problems. These guidelines include how to define procedures effectively, implement clinical accuracy, and treatment integrity. Address environmental factors that affect the accurate implementation of treatment plans in residential facilities and educational settings. Remember helpful tips used in consulting with staff and supervisors to improve the effectiveness of treatment plan implementation. Learn the importance of treatment implementation protocol to improve quality of services. These protocol guidelines include the importance of standardization to increase evaluation and accountability, and to provide staff training and treatment implementation plan. Review how to include clinical effectiveness and treatment integrity in the development of an intervention plan. Understand how the clinical accuracy is an important component of an effective behavioral treatment plan. In addition, participants will learn the essential characteristics of an effective treatment plan, which entail that a plan should be applied, behavioral, analytical, technological, conceptually systematic, effective, and used to promote generalization.
Activities: This workshop will be primarily didactic with a review of some handouts and sample intervention plans. Three sample cases will be reviewed and evaluated as a small-group project.
Audience: Individuals who are or will soon be designing, evaluating or implementing functional assessment and intervention plans. The primary focus is the use of behavior plans within residential settings although examples involved in educational settings also will be addressed. This workshop would be helpful for QMRPs, special and regular education teachers, residential administrative staff, behavior specialists/analysts, social workers and case managers as well as anyone involved in the assessment and treatment of persons with behavior disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: None
Clinical Management of Tourettes Syndrome and Other Repetitive Behavior Disorders
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Beacon E
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Douglas W. Woods, Ed.D.
DOUGLAS W. WOODS (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee), MICHAEL B. HIMLE (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)
Description: It is well understood that Tourettes Syndrome (TS) and repetitive behavior disorders such as trichotillomania and chronic self-injurious skin picking are more common than previously believed. Unfortunately, data suggest that very few applied behavior analysts are actually familiar with these problems and their clinical management, even though these problems may cause a great deal of social, occupational, and emotional impairment. This workshop will focus on describing the complexities of TS and other repetitive behavior problems, and will describe the etiological and maintaining variables for the problems. Finally, assessment strategies will be discussed and comprehensive treatment strategies will be outlined for managing various aspects of the problems.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Recognize TS and other repetitive behavior disorders. Understand the etiological and maintaining variables of the problems. Understand the various assessment technologies for TS and other repetitive behavior disorders. Learn a variety of treatment strategies to reduce TS, repetitive behaviors, and related problems.
Activities: Through the use of videotapes and didactic presentation, participants will learn to recognize TS and repetitive behavior problems. Research will be discussed regarding the effects of various environmental variables on the exacerbation of TS and repetitive behavior problems. Through the use of didactic presentations, case demonstrations, and role-plays, participants will learn the clinical strategies necessary to manage a variety of the behavioral difficulties including tics, other repetitive behaviors, social acceptance concerns, and educational difficulties.
Audience: Individuals who are in positions where people with TS and repetitive behaviors may be contacted. Typical settings include hospitals, inpatient/outpatient clinics, schools, or universities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: None
Consulting the Behavioral Way: The Pyramid Approach to Shaping Performance in Autism Educational Services
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Beacon F
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, M.D.
BETH SULZER-AZAROFF (Pyramid Educational Consultants), ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: This workshop focuses on how be an effective consultant to programs for children with autism and related disabilities. We will address how to use behavioral strategies to shape the performance of people providing services within school, community, and home-based settings. Critical topics will include identifying key antecedents to both the behavior of the consultant and of those being advised. Important behavioral targets for various people responsible for serving children will be noted. Finally, we review reinforcement strategies designed to help maintain the performance of service providers. We also plan to discuss our views on appropriate ethical conduct for consultants. Each of these elements is based upon our work, The Pyramid Approach to Education in Autism (Bondy & Sulzer-Azaroff, 2002).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to provide written examples of: Appropriate antecedents associated with the performance of the service provider as well as the consultant. Critical target behaviors of the service provider, support personnel, as well as the consultant. Strategies for identifying and using powerful reinforcers for service providers and support personnel. Ethical issues associated with providing behaviorally-based consultation.
Activities: Participants will receive a copy of The Pyramid Approach to Education as well as other supportive material. We will review the basic structure for this approach to organizing educational factors for children with autism and related disabilities. We summarize the rationale for introducing the Pyramid elements in a sequential fashion. Participants will go over forms designed to help implement the model as well as help service providers plan to use central principles of applied behavior analysis. Participants will have an opportunity to begin to plan how to use the structure in their current consultancies. Forms are provided that are designed to help service provides plan their day around functional activities while embedding functional communication goals. Participants will begin to identify critical reinforcers associated with the service providers they consult, including key personnel with regard to the service provider.
Audience: Consultants, supervisors, or advisors to staff working with children with autism or related disabilities, or individuals about to embark on such activities. Participants should be well versed in the fundamentals of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: None
Evaluating the Efficacy of Autism Programs: Making Evidence Based Decisions
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Beacon A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Suzanne Letso, Ed.D.
SUZANNE LETSO (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), ERICA ROEST (Institute for Educational Planning, LLC)
Description: As recently as five years ago, parents and professionals were faced with the task of single-handedly creating an applied behavior analytic program for a child in need of educational services. Today, a host of programs and services are available throughout the country in both public and private settings. The more challenging question now is to determine whether or not any particular program is actually based on the educational principals of applied behavior analysis. Secondarily, parents and professionals need to assess whether the potential behavioral services and learning environments are appropriate to meet the specific needs of a given child. This workshop will provide information and resources to assist parents and professionals making educational placement decisions. Key programmatic components, environmental considerations, and staff competencies will be discussed. Methods of collecting data to support the decision making process will be described, and samples provided.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand a general description of behavior analytic services for children with autism encompassing a wide range of environments. Identify assessment tools to determine a particular student�s readiness for active participation in different learning environments. Determine basic program criteria including credentials of staff, staffing ratios, training, supervision, and access to peers and the community. Create a customized check-list of critical features in relation to a student�s individual educational needs.
Activities: Didactic lecture, group discussion and guided notes will be utilized. Handouts will include identification of additional resources, sample data collection systems, and sample IEP objectives.
Audience: Behavior analysts, program administrators, parents, and other educational service providers working in applied settings with children with autism or related disorders. Participants should have some knowledge of applied behavior analysis and autism treatment.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: None
Graphing with Excel
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Beacon D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly A. Schulze, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY A. SCHULZE (St. Cloud State University), SARAH E. ROBERTS (St. Cloud State University), ERIC RUDRUD (St. Cloud State University), MARK MONN (St. Cloud State University)
Description: Participants will be provided with systematic instruction to graphing single subject research designs with Microsoft Excel. Single subject designs covered include: ABAB, multiple baseline, alternating treatments, and cumulative records. Participants will also learn to graph learner acquisition data (session by session). Participants will be provided with a CD providing detailed instructions and a streaming video.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Enter data on Excel spreadsheet for appropriate single subject research design. Graph data for single subject design. Edit graph content (titles, axis, background, condition). Graph learner acquisition data.
Activities: Participants will be provided instruction in graphing single case design. We encourage participants to bring lap top computers to enter data and graph results.
Audience: Practitioners and researchers who need to graph data in an efficient manner. Faculty and graduate students who teach behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: None
Writing a Quality Behavioral Intervention Plan Based on a Functional Behavior Assessment
Friday, May 28, 2004
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Liberty A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Laura A. Riffel, M.D.
LAURA A. RIFFEL (Behavioral Intervention Program)
Description: Using a direct method of functional behavior assessment, participants will actually work through a real data sample provided in workbook format. The Behavioral Intervention Program has developed a keyed Antecedent, Behavior, Consequence (ABC) data collection tool that simplifies data collection in the natural environment. Using previously recorded data, the participants will be able to analyze this data using keyed analysis tables looking for the function of the target behaviors. After completing the analysis tables, participants will be able to fill out a competing pathways chart for each targeted behavior. This will help participants understand the relationship of the behavior chain and how to break the behavior chain by teaching replacement behaviors that satisfy the same function. Finally, participants will be able to use the competing pathways chart to fill in any district required behavioral intervention plan and implement the plan.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand the difference between direct and indirect methods of functional behavioral assessments. Understand the importance of defining target behaviors using objective descriptions that are observable and measurable. Use antecedent, behavior, and consequence (ABC) data collection tools to collect data samples. Analyze a ten-day data sample by plotting the data into tables provided in the workbook. Use the data in table format to complete a competing pathways behavior chain. Write a behavioral intervention plan based on data specific to each function of the target behaviors, utilizing the completed competing pathways behavior chain.
Activities: Using a provided workbook, participants will walk through a real ten-day sample of ABC data, analyze it, fill out a competing pathways chart, and discuss behavioral interventions that could be implemented to meet the functions of the student�s behaviors. The workbook also includes blank forms that may be used in the field. This workbook is currently used for post-graduate students taking Applied Behavior Analysis at Georgia State University and presented in workshop format to teachers in the state of Georgia who are responsible for collection FBA information. However, the workbook is so well written that a parent could attend the workshop and leave knowing how to complete an FBA on home behaviors.
Audience: Anyone who is interested in learning an easy method of collecting ABC data and what to do with it once they have it.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: None
Capacity Building: Expanding Autism Services
Friday, May 28, 2004
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Beacon A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Suzanne Letso, Ed.D.
SUZANNE LETSO (Connecticut Center for Child Development)
Description: The demand for services based on empirically validated instructional strategies for learners with autism has dramatically increased in recent years. Both public and private agencies are striving to increase enrollment and expand educational programs to meet this growing demand. This workshop will provide information about when, where, and how to create new services without compromising the quality of existing programs or the economic viability of the agency. The strategic planning and financial planning process will be outlined. The importance of administrative support, clinical development programs, and requirements for physical and human resources will be described.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify community, constituency, and organizational imperatives for growth and development of new and expanded services. Use a template to write a rationale for program expansion. Use a template to create a financial planning document. Identify critical elements of administrative and clinical responsibilities in the program planning process.
Activities: Didactic lecture, group discussion, and guided notes will be utilized. Handouts will include identification of additional resources, sample elements of a strategic plan, and planning templates.
Audience: Program administrators, behavior analysts, and other service providers or parents interested in increasing services for individuals with autism in their communities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: None
Creating Academic Programs for Children with Autism and other Disabilities Using Microsoft PowerPoint
Friday, May 28, 2004
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Beacon D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: William A. Flood, Ph.D.
WILLIAM A. FLOOD (May South, Inc.)
Description: When creating academic programs (school or home-based) for children with Autism and other developmental disabilities, it is challenging to develop programs that are reinforcing to each child. In an effort to find higher reinforcing activities, a greater number of classrooms are using computers for either teaching academic skills or as pure reinforcing activities. Recent advances in technology have allowed for the creation of extremely innovative electronic educational software that many children find reinforcing. Unfortunately, many of these programs are designed for typically developing children and do not use the principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis. This workshop will teach you how to create low-cost academic programs on the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint with the intention of teaching and/or generalizing skills. The workshop will give a basic overview of how to use the program Microsoft PowerPoint. You will learn how to integrate behavioral principles and procedures into the computer program to ensure the most effective teaching. Finally, the instructor will display examples of academic programs created and successfully implemented with children with autism. Participants are encouraged to bring their personal laptops and develop academic programs alongside the instructor.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Operate the basic functions of the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint. Identify common mistakes from traditional multimedia teaching programs. Create basic academic programs in PowerPoint. Integrate behavior principles (e.g., prompting, prompt fading, reinforcement, extinction, etc.) into their academic programs. Recognize various academic programs (e.g., match-to-sample, receptive object identification, reading comprehension) that can easily be taught with PowerPoint.
Activities: The workshop will begin with a brief lecture about the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint. The remainder of the workshop will consist of interactive hands-on teaching in which the participants are systematically guided through the creation of academic programs in PowerPoint. The participants will be encouraged to use their personal laptop computers and create academic programs concurrently with the instructor.
Audience: Teachers, parents, behavior analysts, or anyone in charge of creating curriculum for children with disabilities/autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: None
Everyday Ethics of Behavior Analysts Serving People with Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities
Friday, May 28, 2004
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Beacon B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: R. M. Schell, Ed.D.
R. M. SCHELL (Western Carolina Center)
Description: Most discussions of ethics in the practice of psychology and/or behavior analysis focus on the misconduct of the professional providing services. Behavior analysis, as a methodological perspective, tends to be distanced from ethical issues because it is a science-based approach, but it is not immune from personal and cultural contingencies that create unethical behavior. This workshop will describe not only the effects of ethical and unethical behaviors on the people being served, but also will focus on the everyday ethical behaviors of clinicians that enhance habilitation and life
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe how the historical concepts of ethics, values, and morals are viewed within behavior analysis. Determine everyday behaviors of clinicians that can be viewed as ethical or unethical and also those behaviors that are less readily placed at either end of the continuum. Describe how the dimensions of behavior analysis can be used to reinforce ethical behavior. Review and analyze their behavior and the culture of their clinical setting to recognize where ethical issues may arise and how to resolve them.
Activities: A brief review of historical information will be followed by casebook-style discussions based on experiences of the presenters as well as composite examples that raise ethical issues. Participants are encouraged to bring their own case histories for discussion with the group.
Audience: Individuals involved in the development and supervision of behavioral teaching and treatment procedures and applied research with people with mental retardation and related disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: None
Improving Quality of Life for People with Profound Multiple Impairments
Friday, May 28, 2004
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Beacon E
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard R. Saunders, Ed.D.
RICHARD R. SAUNDERS (University of Kansas), MURIEL D. SAUNDERS (University of Kansas)
Description: Individuals with profound multiple disabilities (PMI) generally have almost no voluntary motor movement and are nonverbal and unable to make requests or signal needs. Hearing, vision, and cognitive impairments are likely, but difficult to verify with standard assessments. Seizure disorders, digestive disorders, and other chronic health problems are common. Most exhibit no skills that represent purposeful responding or learning. Thus, determining the desires and preferences of individuals with PMI, and thus improving their quality of life (QOL) is a challenge. Perhaps for behavior analysts, QOL is a measure of control over reinforcers. For people with PMI, one method of enabling control over reinforcers is through adaptive switch technology. Unfortunately, advances in adaptive switch technology have not been accompanied by advances in measurement technology and thus, most applications have not been evidence-based. Without data on switch use, and thus without evidence that use is volitional and learned, switch equipment often falls into disuse. This data-based workshop will demonstrate how the development of field-based measurement devices merged with an EAB approach can improve the QOL of people with PMI. All facets of establishing and maintaining a switch-based program to improve QOL will be covered, with emphasis on the essential ingredientbehavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: List and explain at least five ways that an adaptive switch program can improve the QOL of people with PMI. List and justify at least six essential prerequisites for maintaining a successful switch program. Explain at least four ways in which response rate may mislead rather than inform analyses of learning in switch-use programs and how protocol design and measurement of switch-closure duration can solve for those problems. Discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of two alternating-treatments designs for detecting evidence of learning (in other disciplines, it is evidence of intentionality, contingency learning, or contingency awareness). Discuss the relationship between characteristics of switch construction, reinforcement contingencies, and interpretation of switch-use data. Rank order the switch operation modes with respect to the complexity of the contingent relationship between reinforcer and response they produce. Describe the function of bin analyses and cumulative records in the analyses of switch-use data. Parse and bin data from text files of real-time data records. Explain how to construct a reinforcer preference test for individuals unable to use more than one switch in one position. Explain how to test for preferences within reinforcer domains, such as music volume. Describe four autonomic and behavioral correlates of switch use that may indicate changes in QOL with switch use.
Activities: In addition to receiving didactic instruction, the audience will participate in data analysis exercises with actual subject data presented by the instructors. The audience will have an opportunity to examine a variety of switches, measurement devices for use in the natural applied settings, and devices that produce stimulation as a function of switch closure. Some participants will volunteer to produce switch use data so that the entire audience can see its transformation and reduction by computer and by hand (pencil and paper).
Audience: Behavior analysts working with children or adults with profound multiple impairments should attend this workshop, particularly those with an interest in leisure activities, communication, and improving QOL. People with PMI includes individuals with developmental disabilities or those with profound limitations in motor and communication skills due to brain injury, stroke, and other neurological insults. Others who may be interested are those that conduct or supervise preference assessments in applied or research settings. In many respects, the discussion of the analyses of switch data may serve as a review of basic EAB methods, as switch data are much like other simple key-press data from animal research. Thus, a speech pathologist or occupational therapist would likely find the portions on switches and switch programs introductory to intermediate, but would likely find the data analysis portions to be advanced. Conversely, behavior analysts will find the data analysis introductory to intermediate, but find the portions on the switch equipment and related issues to be intermediate to advanced.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: None
Using CyberRat Effectively: Instructor Workshop on Assignment Designs and Student Progress
Friday, May 28, 2004
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Liberty A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Roger D. Ray, Ed.D.
ROGER D. RAY (Rollins College)
Description: This workshop is for instructors using or interested in using the CyberRat animal laboratory simulation software system. CyberRat adds highly realistic and interactive Operant Conditioning and Multi-Behavioral Systems Analysis experiences for students taking courses where such skills and principles are relevant. Such courses include, but are not limited to, Introductory Psychology, Learning, Principles of Behavioral Analysis, Descriptive Research Methods, Behavioral Systems Analysis, Educational Psychology, and Behavioral Modification courses. This workshop focuses on ways to enhance the effective use of CyberRat and its supplemental tools. We will be 1) sharing with instructors our direct experience with the CyberRat system, 2) reviewing the support systems in place to assist instructors and their instructional process, and 3) covering various exemplary assignments along with reflections on what these assignments relevance might be for supplementing or illustrating course content. Participants will take home a free copy of a CyberRat CD and will be given a URL for downloading the course administration tools for exploratory use. They will also be given an address for subscribing to the CyberRat instructor listserve where discussions of assignments and special applications are frequently shared. Adoption procedures for establishing a courses presence on the CyberRat course administration servers will also be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Add new subjects. Select a subject from their personal colony. Set experimental parameters. Conduct experimental sessions both in video and fast-simulation (black box) modes. Use effectively various graphing options to review a session�s results and associated video playback of behaviors. Conduct a multi-behavioral analysis of one of their experimental sessions and will experience a computer-based tutorial on multi-behavioral coding of rat behaviors. Use the CyberRat course administrative and student assignment management system that has recently been added to CyberRat.
Activities: After a brief multi-media overview presentation of CyberRat and its supporting resources, including CyberRat�s web site resources, the CyberRat instructor listserve, and CyberRat�s course administration software system, participants will have an opportunity to practice with CyberRat by using one of several small-group shared laptop computers that will be made available during the workshop. Following an overview presentation of features, participants will be able to practice setting up an assignment for student viewing and execution.
Audience: College and University instructors of undergraduate and/or graduate courses where interactive animal laboratory simulations are desired, such as (but not limited to) Introductory Psychology, Learning, Principles of Behavioral Analysis, Descriptive Research Methods, Behavioral Systems Analysis, Educational Psychology, and Behavioral Modification courses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: None
Using Skinners Verbal Behavior to Analyze Pure and Impure Verbal Operants to Improve Communication-Training Interventions
Friday, May 28, 2004
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Beacon F
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Psy.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants), LORI FROST (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: This workshop focuses on how to use Skinners Verbal Behavior to analyze common communications objectives and intervention plans for individuals with disabilities. We will briefly review Skinners core verbal operants (i.e., mand, tact, intraverbal, etc.) but will add strategies to identify multiply controlled verbal operants (which are more common than pure verbal operants). We will review common language goals and objectives from representative IEPs and other formats. We will review videotaped examples of language training sequences and practice identifying the multiply controlled verbal operants that are in use (as opposed to the intended operants). Examples will vary across modalities, as verbal behavior does not pertain to any one or preferred expressive modality. We will also review how an understanding of autoclitics and how they are acquired and modified over time can improve training strategies with individuals with various disabilities.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Distinguish between pure and impure verbal operants. Identify compound verbal operants. Analyze videotape examples of compound verbal operants. Define and identify common autoclitic operants (both vocal and non-vocal). Suggest strategies to promote the development and understanding of autoclitics.
Activities: Participants will review Skinner�s fundamental verbal operants and review examples across several modalities. We will then describe impure verbal operants and suggest a way of using an ABC analysis to identify sources of multiple control over such operants. Participants will review written examples of impure operants and then review videotape examples of them. Participants will review and suggest modifications to sample IEP objectives, including identifying pure and impure operants as well as potential teaching strategies. We will then discuss autoclitics and the many functions that Skinner identified associated with them. We will review several key factors associated with easy versus difficult acquisition of such verbal operants as well as discuss how Skinner�s views can impact on our understanding of various disabilities, including autism.
Audience: Teachers, speech/language pathologists, psychologists, and behavior analysts. Participants should be well versed in the fundamentals of applied behavior analysis as well as be familiar with Skinners fundamental operants described in Verbal Behavior. Participants should be ready to share examples of language targets with which they are familiar.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: None
Correcting Student Errors during Instruction
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Fairfax A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, Ph.D.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KELLY J. FERRIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), AMY KING (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTA ZAMBOLIN (University of British Columbia), SARA J. PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: This workshop will teach participants the skills they need to correct greater than 90% of the errors their students make during instruction by teaching participants four key components in correcting student errors: identifying error patterns, aligning error patterns with error correction procedures, implementing the error correction procedures, and evaluating the effectiveness of the procedure. Participants will learn two powerful algorithms for correcting student errors: an algorithm based on Tom Gilberts work in the area of Mathetics and an algorithm for rapidly establishing necessary conditional discriminations. Both of these algorithms support instructors ability to teach their students new responses quickly and effectively. The workshop will also teach participants how to evaluate error corrections and select which procedures are most effective at correcting errors with various skills with their specific learners. Such evaluation allows the selection of error corrections to be based on empirical data rather than clinical impression. In addition, we will spend part of the workshop time teaching participants to train others in effectively correcting student errors and to evaluate their trainees performance in this very important area in instructional delivery. Each workshop participant will receive a copy of all the materials presented during the workshop, including all videotape examples and forms.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to describe and implement: Modified Mathetics error correction procedures across a range of skills often used in instructional programs. Discrimination error correction procedures across a range of skills often used in instructional programs. Plans for the evaluation of error correction procedures within their own clinical practices. Training activities to teach others to correct student errors effectively.
Activities: Activities will include interactive lecture participation, evaluation of videotaped examples and nonexamples, hands-on practice implementing error correction procedures, and evaluating student performance data to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of prescribed error correction procedures.
Audience: Individuals designing, supervising, monitoring, or implementing behavior analytic instruction with learners with special needs. While the workshop will use children with autism in the videotaped and data examples shown, the procedures participants will learn are applicable to a very wide range of learners.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: None
Designing Organizational Change Initiatives
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Liberty C
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jamie Pagliaro, Psy.D.
JAMIE PAGLIARO (Melmark, Inc.), STEPHEN LUCE (Melmark, Inc.)
Description: Organizations are often composed of professionals from different disciplines, particularly in human service settings. In order to affect change, professionals responsible for organizational design are expected to become knowledgeable in all of the disciplines contained in the organization. The behavior analytic literature provides a toolkit of best practices for assessing and changing organizational behavior. Acceptance of these practices differs, however, based on a number of organizational variables often referred to as organizational culture. For example, some effective intervention strategies (e.g., performance-based training and the use of task-analyzed checklists) may be viewed as practical in one setting while intrusive in another. These considerations influence whether practices are adopted, intervention effects are maintained, and change is successful. This workshop will direct participants to select appropriate objectives and interventions while building consensus within the organization to influence change. Participants will review procedures extracted from an empirical literature, not normally reviewed by behavior analysts, which have a direct impact on increasing the success of organizational change initiatives. Specifically, the instructor will expose participants to a series of organizational development tools and exercises that have been adapted to incorporate behavior analytic principles. Each participant will leave with a framework for initiating change in his/her organization.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Cite research-based strategies for changing employee behavior contained in the behavior analytic literature (e.g., Reid, Page, Christian, etc.) and relate it to the organizational development literature. Identify issues related to paradigm shifts in organizations. Define the eight steps of �Leading Change� (Kotter, 1995). Define the components of Interactive Planning. Define the components of the Circular Organizational Structure (Ackoff, 1989). Select and operationally define performance indicators for his/her organization (Daniels, 1989). Develop behavioral feedback loops for assessing his/her own performance as a leader.
Activities: Activities include developing criteria to form a coalition for leading change; assessing opportunities for change within his/her organization; selecting tentative performance indicators for his/her organization; designing an intervention strategy for at least one performance indicator; and contributing to a behavioral feedback loop.
Audience: Managers, administrators and educators with an interest in leading change at any level of an organization. Participants should have knowledge of behavioral terminology and be familiar with basic data collection procedures. In addition, each participant should come prepared to discuss challenges currently being faced by his/her organization.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: None
Developing ABA Programs for Children with Autism in the Public Schools
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Clarendon
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel Cohen-Almeida, Psy.D.
DANIEL COHEN-ALMEIDA (Melmark New England), ARTHUR RICHARD CAMPBELL (Melmark New England), MAUREEN C. HURLEY (Acton, MA Public Schools)
Description: Behavioral Intervention for children with autism has the most scientific support of the available treatment options. This research, coupled with the increased incidence of the disability, has resulted in many public schools seeking to develop their own ABA treatment programs. Public schools are turning to behavior analysts to help in this process to serve either as consultants or as program supervisors. In either case, the successful development of an ABA program requires a consideration of the unique challenges that are a part of the public school environment. This workshop will provide participants with a comprehensive introduction to the key elements necessary for successful program development including: program advocacy and political considerations, program design, staff training, interfacing with regular educators and specialists, program implementation and monitoring, and parental involvement and training. Workshop presenters include consultants who have worked with public schools to develop new ABA programs and behavior analysts employed by public school systems as ABA program supervisors.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify key political concerns and advocacy issues in public school settings. Identify the basic elements of an ABA program in the public school setting. Develop systems to train staff and monitor performance. Identify strategies to successfully work with regular educators and specialists.
Activities: Activities include lecture, group discussion and case studies.
Audience: Behavior analysts who are interested in providing consultation to public schools, specifically around program design and development or those interested in supervising ABA programs in the public schools.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: None
Developing Effective Teaching Strategies Using The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (The ABLLS)
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Back Bay C
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (The ABLLS), based on Dr. Skinners analysis of verbal behavior, provides a mechanism to analyze learner skills, develop a comprehensive language-based curriculum, and track skill acquisition for individuals with autism or other developmental disabilities. Once the assessment is completed on a learner, it is important to develop a strategic teaching plan (IEP) that will guide the intervention to produce the most effective outcomes. However, program teams frequently find that they are successful in developing certain skills but are ineffective in developing other skill areas. Skill acquisition is dependent upon trainers ability to identify not only what skills need to be taught, but also how motivational issues are directly related to the implementation of the teaching strategies. This workshop is designed to provide individuals who are familiar with the ABLLS with skills to analyze problems with the development of certain skill areas (e.g., spontaneous use of language and social interactions skills) and to provide individuals who are responsible for the development of programs with strategies for addressing those problems. Discussions regarding the analysis of problems in the acquisition of skills, evaluation of educational priorities, and determination of IEP objectives for several students will be conducted.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify at least two common problems that are related to the failure of students to make adequate progress in the development of critical learner skills. Identify how motivational issues are related to the acquisition of language skills. Describe how social reinforcement variables are related to the development of spontaneous verbal behavior.
Activities: During this workshop, participants will review data from students' ABLLS assessments, review proposed learning objectives, and observe videotapes of learner skills. The video reviews will include both early phases of assessment and intervention, and later phases of treatment interventions. Pre- and post-ABLLS scores of the learners' performance will be reviewed.
Audience: Professionals who develop and/or implement programming for children with an autism spectrum disorder.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: None
Discrete and Sequential Data Collection and Analysis Strategies Using Computer Technology: Hands-On Application of the BEST System Including Hand-Held Computer, Video Synchronization, and Remote Data
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Beacon E
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Psy.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), DANIEL W. BALDERSON (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide hands-on application of a sophisticated software package designed to collect and analyze discrete and time-based behavioral data. The program is particularly useful to advanced graduate students and behavioral psychologists interested in analyzing complex configurations of behaviors that are emitted at high rates, often overlap in time, and which are context dependent. Discussion includes an introduction to (a) recommended procedures when collecting time-based data in the live setting and from videotape records, and (b) computer generated discrete and sequential descriptions, graphic and statistical analyses, and reliability comparisons of discrete and sequential data. Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the complete software package on CD ROM, and a .pdf file summary copy of a compatible research methods text published by Sage Publications as a function of workshop participation. While some computer hardware will be provided, it is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions. Workshop participants will exit with software-based data collection and analysis competencies, including the ability to (a) construct and apply systemic observation systems, (b) generate a time-based behavioral record using an inclusive overlapping category system, (c) perform traditional and sequential analyses using multiple measurement methodologies and interpret Z score transformations, (d) create and edit graphic data representations and apply relevant visual and statistical analyses, (e) conduct reliability and treatment fidelity analyses, and (f) apply a variety of data record edit and merge functions when operating with complex multiple event category systems.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Discuss in conceptual and applied ways the principles and practice of discrete and sequential behavior analysis methods. Apply a range of computer-based data collection, reliability, and measurement techniques to their particular behavior analysis interests. Understand and apply a range of computer-based descriptive and statistical data analysis techniques in relation to discrete and sequential measurement sets. Construct a variety of behavior graphs and apply appropriate analysis techniques to the graph types covered.
Activities: Activities include (a) review of traditional behavior analysis recording methods, (b) introduction to, and hands on application of, a computer-based package designed to enhance behavior analyses of complex interactive settings, and (c) detailed hands-on demonstration of data collection features, discrete and sequential analysis capabilities, within and across data-file graphic representations, and a variety of reliability, treatment fidelity, and data manipulation and editing functions.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in experimental and applied settings who are interested in research and development related to the interactive nature of behavior in situations where study of multiple behaviors and events, multiple participants, and changing setting variables are present. Those working in educational and social science settings and who are challenged with how to describe and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary software particularly appealing to a wide range of research and assessment applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: None
Doing the Research: Strategies and Designs for Conducting RFT within Intensive Early Intervention Programs
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Back Bay D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Psy.D.
RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide participants with the materials and process analysis strategies needed to track and/or research the effect of relational frame programming (generalized conditional discrimination training) within intensive early intervention curricula.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Map the progression of the curriculum they use. Identify relational families within and across that curriculum. Overlay research/tracking designs appropriate to the establishment, generalization, and integration of relational families within and across curriculum stands and levels (beginning, intermediate, and advanced). Develop a own tailored packet of RFT-based curriculum enhancement and integration tools.
Activities: Each participant will map out the overlay of relational families within and across traditional "Sd" progressions utilized within many intensive early intervention curricula. Areas where conditional discriminations are taught and expected to emerge will be identified. Research/implementation designs that track the emergence of generalized conditional responding within and across relational families will be mapped to each curriculum. Each participant will identify two potential research projects that could be conducted and submitted for publication within their curriculum map.
Audience: Practitioners who oversee the design and implementation of intervention early intervention (IEI) curriculum and who are familiar (or who want to become familiar) with Relational Frame Theory and the contributions it can make to improving the efficacy of IEI programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: None
Ethical Issues in Home-Based Behavioral Intervention
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Back Bay A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Vicki Madaus Knapp, Psy.D.
VICKI MADAUS KNAPP (Summit Educational Resources Early Autism Program), AMY L. JABLONSKI (Summit Educational Resources)
Description: Certified and licensed professionals are mandated to follow the ethical standards of their respective professions. Additionally, other professionals, including those in training, are expected to follow ethical guidelines when delivering services. Clearly delineated standards exist, but the application of these standards to clinical practice may still be a subjective process. Guidelines for ethical treatment procedures exist in many settings, yet the implementation and ongoing evaluation of ethical clinical practice, in general, may be lacking. Various circumstances arise in the home environment (e.g., infrequent direct supervision, lack of environmental control, temptations to cross professional boundaries) which may jeopardize the ability of professionals to apply ethical standards in a consistent manner. Because of the nature of home-based instruction, adequate descriptions of how to behave ethically in those settings appear to be deficient. The purpose of this workshop is to provide strategies for ethical practice to individuals who deliver home-based behavioral intervention to young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders. Issues concerning direct service delivery, confidentiality and record keeping, consultation, professional boundaries, crisis intervention in the home and the extension of services into community settings will be addressed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the APA codes of ethics most relevant to home-based behavioral intervention for young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders. Identify and evaluate literature that guides the ethical practice of home-based behavioral intervention for young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders. Apply the ethical standards to home-based intervention for young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders. Outline ethical standards for the implementation and on-going evaluation of home-based behavioral intervention for young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders.
Activities: Participants will review current standards of ethical practice and existing guidelines for ethical practice in the behavioral intervention literature. Participants will also discuss issues that involve ethical practice in the field of home-based behavioral intervention for young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders.
Audience: Participants with experience delivering home-based behavioral intervention to young children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders. Those supervising, evaluating, or establishing home-based behavioral intervention programs, including: Teachers, paraprofessionals, psychologists, behavior analysts, and speech and language professionals. Administrators and parents may also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: None
Implementation of Behavior Strategies Through Team-Building
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Dalton
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bruce Davis, Ed.D.
BRUCE DAVIS (Team Evaluation Center), JOHN Q. ZHANG (Team Evaluation Center), BROOKE ALLEN (Team Evaluation Center), MARIE LAVASQUE (Team Evaluation Center), JEANETTE A. BUNT (Independent Provider)
Description: Team building is an effective process to establish relationships that promote the application of applied behavior analysis in community settings. By using this vehicle, behavior analysts, as clinicians and facilitators, conduct functional assessments, provide recommendations regarding problem behaviors, evaluate current programs, collaborate with other professional service providers, enable service provider implementation, and empower consumers in achieving personal goals. This workshop will provide simple methods for recognizing accomplishments, identifying effective strategies, planning for staff implementation, and ongoing evaluation of effectiveness. The participant will have the opportunity to practice team building facilitation and sharpen skills with feedback from the trainer and other participants.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Prepare for and facilitate team meetings in a way to maximize the use of available time. Recognize and reinforce the accomplishments of meeting participants. Present behavioral data for lay persons in an understandable fashion. Shape problem solving skills of the support team. Translate behavioral strategies into functional terms for communication.
Activities: Participants will receive instruction on team building methodology, and have the opportunity to practice specific components of team building. Trainers and peers will shape skills to competency through verbal feedback.
Audience: Behavior analysts who provide services in an applied setting. This workshop will be particularly helpful for behavior analysts who provide services
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: None
Implementation of Stimulus Preference Assessments for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Berkeley
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Francis J. Ciccone, M.D.
FRANCIS J. CICCONE (New England Center for Children), THERESA M. CLEVENGER (New England Center for Children), STEPHEN MADDEN (New England Center for Children), HEATHER MORRISON (New England Center for Children)
Description: The technology of identifying effective reinforcers is important to the field of applied behavior analysis. Identified reinforcers are presented contingent on appropriate behavior to increase the future probability of that behavior, or may be removed or withheld contingent on inappropriate behavior to decrease the future probability of that behavior. The effectiveness of these interventions depends on the potency of the reinforcers used. Identifying reinforcers for individuals with developmental disabilities can be difficult. Several systematic methods have been developed over the past several years to identify preferred stimuli for these individuals. These methods have been validated by subsequent reinforcer assessments, which demonstrated that highly preferred stimuli function effectively as reinforcers. In this workshop, participants will learn about several methods for systematically identifying potential reinforcers and will have the opportunity to practice and receive feedback on the use of these methods. Participants will receive information about how to select an appropriate type of assessment for his/her needs and how to incorporate the assessment results into applied settings.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Learn the history of preference assessment procedures for individuals with autism and related developmental disabilities and will understand the rationale for conducting stimulus preference assessments. Conduct several types of stimulus preference assessments. Select the most appropriate type of stimulus preference assessment for the individual�s needs. Collect, interpret, and apply the data from stimulus preference assessments. Use preference assessment methods in applied settings.
Activities: Participants will be given a review of preference assessment literature and will receive instruction on the rationale for conducting preference assessments for individuals with autism and related developmental disabilities. Participants will receive instruction on how to conduct various types of preference assessments. Instruction will include videotaped and live demonstrations of preference assessment techniques, opportunity for participants to practice the techniques and receive feedback from the instructors. Participants will be shown how to collect assessment data, how to collect data on inter-observer agreement, and how to analyze the results and incorporate the results into programming.
Audience: Parents, para-professionals, and professionals who work directly with students with autism and other developmental disabilities who use instructional and/or behavioral techniques based on positive reinforcement.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: None
Improve Your Oral Presentations
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Beacon D
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ned Carter, M.Ed.
NED CARTER (Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden), THOMAS E. BOYCE (University of Nevada, Reno), KENNETH NILSSON (Beteendeanalysgruppen, Uppsala, Sweden)
Description: Oral presentations play an essential role in individual success in both the public and private sectors. Workshop content is based on detailed practical analyses of speaker and audience behavior. Truly effective speakers conduct a dialogue with their audience, preparing themselves to control and to be controlled by their audience. This workshop will assist participants in identifying variables initiating and maintaining audience attention, interest and participation. Emphasis is placed on using the principles of behavior analysis, particularly the analysis of verbal behavior, to improve speaker behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify high probability audience behaviors and requests. Identify techniques to initiate and promote audience participation. Deal with situations such as stage fright, "losing your place," and aggressive questioning. Identify and control extraneous stimuli in order to maximize audience attention.
Activities: The workshop is interactive and active participation is encouraged. Techniques for creating better overheads, slides, and presentation figures will be described. Participants will take part in a series of exercises and structured role-play sessions. Course content will be adapted to the interests of participants.
Audience: Behavior analysts who desire to improve their presentation skills at meetings, conferences and in teaching. The workshop is appropriate for both novices and experienced public speakers. Participants are encouraged to bring real-life examples for use in role-playing exercises.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: None
Intensive Early Intervention: Basic Expressive, Receptive, and Operant Language Programming
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Independence East
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, M.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (LIFE Midwest), KARA L. RIEDESEL (LIFE Midwest), MELISSA J. GARD (University of Kansas), CHARRYSE M. FOUQUETTE (St. Cloud State University)
Description: In intensive early intervention with young children with autism, a great number of language skills are often taught. Such skills can be developed in a coherent conceptual framework, enabling productive treatment planning and program evaluation. In the case of language skills, a four-dimensional matrix of skills can be used to design an overall generative process of language development. The matrix of skills is addressed across generalization modalities, syntax forms, conditional discriminations, and functional communicative relationships. After receptive and expressive skills are developed, the matrix naturally flows into auditory comprehension and production skills. The organization of the language curriculum can be used to control the pacing of related social skills in a systematic manner. Data obtained from children in intensive early intervention will be presented to demonstrate how the generative curriculum can improve the progress of children with severely challenging language disorders. This is part one of a two part workshop. This workshop will present the basic skills programming during the first 18 months of intervention, which sets the stage for advanced comprehension and social language skills.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Detail information necessary to plan and program children�s language curriculums into a coherent whole. State how to develop generative language skills rather than rote language skills. Implement conditions that promote the production and comprehension of generative language learning. Program across generalization modalities, syntax forms, conditional discriminations, and functional communication relationships.
Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and interactive exercises. Participants will obtain specific program sheets provided by the instructors.
Audience: Parents, lead therapists, line therapists, consultants, and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavioral terms used in intensive early intervention. At least one-months experience with intensive early intervention is preferable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: None
OBM Part II: Performance Improvement Methods in Behavior Health Care Organizations
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Beacon H
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Devereux Florida University), JOSEPH D. CAUTILLI (Children's Crisis Treatment Center)
Description: The utilization of services in community-based behavior health organizations is a growing issue in recent years for managed care companies. In this workshop, participants will learn how to devise and establish performance improvement and monitoring methods for those providing behavioral services including behavior analysts and other therapy services. Attendees will be given the opportunity to devise a systems-based plan for establishing these approaches in their organization. In addition, issues that also need to be addressed in the organization such as performance evaluation, data systems, and feedback systems will be presented and discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Devise a plan for performance improvement for professional staff in a behavior health care organization. Devise a plan for data monitoring systems for professional staff in a behavior health care organization. Write job descriptions for professional staff in clear, objective terms that link to performance objectives and clear performance criteria in the organization. Devise a feedback system for professional staff to reinforce performance objectives and to promote corrective action planning.
Activities: Break-out activities will take place in smaller groupings for participants to develop initial outlines and basics of a performance improvement plan, monitoring systems and feedback systems to reinforce desired performance and to provide corrective action planning with time frames for performance improvement. Opportunities to write clear, objective job descriptions that also foster or link with performance criteria will also be provided
Audience: Behavior health care professionals, managers, and directors of behavior health care organizations; human resources professionals; and behavior analysts interested in the application of OBM principles to such settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: None
One Good Way to Teach a College Content Course
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Independence West
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John L. Michael, J.D.
JOHN L. MICHAEL (Western Michigan University), CAIO F. MIGUEL (Western Michigan University)
Description: A large part of the learning for college courses is supposed to take place outside of class. We will provide a guideline for appropriate out-of-class time requirements, and consider the various motivational factors available for generating effective outside study. In an analogy to work settings, to do a good job the student must have very clear information about what is required by the instructor, and must be frequently assessed with respect to the developing repertoire. An effective type of information called study objectives will be described, and a guideline for assessment frequency will also be provided. The reinforcement for studying will be analyzed in terms of the procrastination scallop. The role of lectures and other classroom activities, the relation of these activities to text material, and a number of suggested principles with respect to lecturing will be considered. We will also consider the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of assessment procedures, as well as an appropriate assessment context. Our goal is to provide a system that will permit the new instructor to teach effectively and to receive good course evaluations.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to describe: The motivational variables responsible for generating out-of-class study. Good and bad functions of lectures as a source of information. Study objectives as a source of information. The various types of study objectives. Effective study objectives. The advantages and disadvantages of the various kinds of student assessments (exams). The factors determining how frequently assessments (exams) should occur.
Activities: Participants will be exposed to a brief didactic presentation, participate in discussion, and try writing a few study objectives.
Audience: Anyone involved or interested in college teaching.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: None
Overview of Behavioral Assessment in Applied Settings
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Gardner A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel Gould, M.Ed.
DANIEL GOULD (New England Center for Children)
Description: The most effective interventions are those based on an assessment of the function of the target behavior. Hypotheses regarding the function of target behaviors may be generated by a number of assessment methods. This workshop will review the differences between indirect assessment, descriptive assessment, and systematic manipulation. The emphasis will be on behavioral assessment in applied settings.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the purpose and importance of functional behavioral assessment. Describe the differences between indirect assessment, descriptive assessment, and systematic manipulation. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of indirect assessment, descriptive assessment, and systematic manipulation. Design assessments for sample cases.
Activities: This workshop will emphasize trainee participation and discussion. Each of the training objectives will be addressed through a combination of brief lecture, discussion and written exercises.
Audience: Clinicians, therapists, teachers, students, and anyone else who can benefit from a review of behavioral assessment in applied settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: None
Reinforcer Identification for Students with Autism and Other Disabilities
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Gardner B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas S. Higbee, Psy.D.
THOMAS S. HIGBEE (Utah State University), KATIE ENDICOTT (Utah State University), KARA A. REAGON (Utah State University)
Description: Over the past several years, a technology for the identification of potential reinforcers for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities has been developed. This technology, called Stimulus Preference Assessment (SPA) provides systematic methods for predicting reinforcer effectiveness. As the success of many instructional and behavioral interventions for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities depends on the potency of the positive reinforcers used, the identification of potentially powerful reinforcers is particularly important. In this workshop, participants will learn about different methods for identifying potential reinforcers and will have the opportunity to practice and receive coaching. Participants will also receive practical information about how these techniques can be used in applied settings.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand the history of reinforcer identification procedures for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Conduct various types of stimulus preference assessments. Identify when each type of stimulus preference assessment is appropriate. Collect and analyze preference assessment data. Use these techniques in applied settings.
Activities: Participants will be instructed on the history of reinforcer identification for persons with autism and other developmental disabilities. Participants will receive instruction on the various types of stimulus preference assessments that can be used in applied settings. Participants will watch demonstrations of preference assessment techniques and will have the opportunity to practice these techniques and receive feedback from the instructors. Participants will be shown how to collect and analyze preference assessment data.
Audience: Professionals, para-professionals, and parents who work directly with students with autism and other developmental disabilities who use instructional and/or behavioral techniques based on positive reinforcement.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: None
Review of Observation and Measurement Methods in Applied Settings
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Beacon B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Nicole Ciotti Gardenier, Ed.D.
NICOLE CIOTTI GARDENIER (New England Center for Children), AMY S. GECKELER (New England Center for Children), CHERYL J. DAVIS (New England Center for Children)
Description: Direct observation and measurement of behavior is a hallmark of the behavior analytic approach. This workshop will provide a review of and practical guidelines for observation and measurement procedures in applied settings. The workshop will briefly review identifying and prioritizing target responses and developing operational definitions. A particular emphasis will be placed on selecting appropriate methods for measuring target responses and obtaining interobserver agreement data. Advantages and disadvantages of various measurement methods will be discussed with particular emphasis on selecting the most accurate measurement methods possible given the limited resources in typical applied settings.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Evaluate operational definitions using four specific criteria. Describe appropriate measurement methods based on video-taped samples of behavior. Describe advantages and disadvantages of various measurement methods for a variety of target responses. Select and calculate an appropriate index of interobserver agreement data.
Activities: This workshop will emphasize trainee participation in a series of exercises. For operational definitions, trainees will generate definitions from video-taped behavior samples. Then a review and critique other trainees� definitions according to specific criteria will occur. For measurement methods, trainees will (a) use a variety of measurement methods to record behaviors of varying frequency, duration, and temporal distribution; and (b) evaluate accuracy and interobserver agreement using sampling methods with varying procedures to measure the same target response.
Audience: Clinicians, therapists, teachers, students, and anyone else who can benefit from a review of specifying, defining, and measuring target responses. It will also be of interest to behavior analysts who are preparing to take the board certification examination. The workshop will focus primarily on Task List Content area #7.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: None
Seeing the World With XRay Eyes: Using Goldiamonds Constructional Questionnaire to Functionally Analyze Disturbing Behavior
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Beacon A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Paul Thomas Andronis, Ed.D.
PAUL THOMAS ANDRONIS (Northern Michigan University), T. V. JOE LAYNG (Headsprout)
Description: The functional analysis of behavior has become the generally accepted standard for initial behavioral assessment in the delivery of human services by both public and private agencies, and many other institutions throughout the United States. At the same time, perhaps because of the demands imposed by their rapid and widespread dissemination, the procedures associated with this approach have often become formalized around a relatively simplified cluster of basic analytic assessments. Goldiamond (1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, & 1984) elaborated a thoroughgoing method for a functional analysis of behavior that includes a carefully researched questioning protocol that may be used to identify the critical consequences responsible for maintaining disturbing patterns of clinical interest. This protocol has been used successfully to identify important contingencies and develop successful treatment programs for a wide range of clinical problems including: drug addiction, phobias, borderline syndrome, anxiety attacks, depression, behavior problems associated with Autism, delusions, hallucinations, and various forms of schizophrenia among others. This workshop will focus on the use of Goldiamonds Constructional Questionnaire as a basis for functional analysis. The questionnaire was researched and developed over a period of years by Goldiamond and his students at The University of Chicago, and is a powerful tool for identifying putative consequential contingencies maintaining disturbing patterns. This workshop will provide an overview of Goldiamonds (1974) Constructional Questionnaire. With an emphasis on: Making sense of seemingly irrational or apparently maladaptive behavior. Constructional Program Planning using topical and systemic programs The theoretical model used in this workshop treats human behavior as a rational and adaptive outcome of individuals unique personal histories (including both social and biological endowments). Accordingly, we will discuss how the Constructional Questionnaire and Program Planning Guide demonstrates how behavior usually benefits individuals in personal ways, and how a Constructional Approach can thus make sense of behavior that, from other perspectives, is classified as senseless, irrational, maladaptive, dysfunctional, pathological, and so on.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe a contingency-based description of the rationality of behavior, making sense of examples of troublesome behavior drawn from clinical, educational, and other practical settings. Describe Goldiamond�s Constructional Approach, and critically distinguish it from other behavioral approaches to analyzing and changing behavior. Distinguish between linear and nonlinear contingency relations, and between topical and systemic programming strategies Identify important assessment and programming variables through use of the Constructional Questionnaire Identify linear and nonlinear contingency relations from a set of examples and nonexamples. Use the Constructional Programming and Planning Guide to define disturbing behavior patterns in terms of their functions as successful operants and propose programs for constructional behavior change.
Activities: After a presentation of the model, participants will discuss key elements of the Constructional approach, and Questionnaire, and their differences from those procedures that characterize conventional functional analysis, and the importance and utility of distinguishing between linear and nonlinear contingency relations, and between topical and systemic procedures. With materials supplied to them, including the Constructional Questionnaire, Questionnaire Guide, and Constructional Programming Guide, the participants will work in small groups to analyze clinical or other applied vignettes, describe them in Constructional terms, identify the appropriate contingency matrices, suggest the outlines for Constructional interventions in those cases, and then present their analyses to the workshop as a whole for further discussion.Audience: People working in clinical, educational, or other applied settings with various populations, and those looking for a humane, effective, and radically behavioral approach to helping others who engage in challenging or disturbing behavior. Participants for this workshop should have a basic understanding of the consequential governance of behavior.
Audience: .
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: None
Supervisory Techniques in Home-Based Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Services
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Liberty B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joel P. Hundert, Ph.D.
JOEL P. HUNDERT (Behaviour Institute), NICOLE WALTON-ALLEN (Behaviour Institute)
Description: Although there are numerous sources of information describing how to design and implement early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI), there is little literature suggesting how to supervise front-line staff who implement EIBI programs. Supervision of EIBI delivered in childrens homes is particularly challenging because of the added difficulties of controlling the environment, accessing childrens performance data and giving corrective feedback to staff. The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with techniques for supervising staff in home-based EIBI. Supervisors of home-based EIBI are not only responsible for ensuring the quality of staff performance, but also the appropriateness of the selection of instructional targets, arrangement of instructional sequences and the design of instructional programs. Topics covered will include: how to detect child performance problems; how to monitor staff performance; how to provide corrective staff feedback; how to select instructional targets for children; and how to arrange instructional sequences. Videotape models, exercises, handouts will be used to present the topics that will be covered.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Use child performance data to detect when instructional programs are not working. Convert trial by trial child performance data into a provided data summary sheet designed to assist in detection of programming problem. Identify strengths and weaknesses in videotapes of staff program implementation using a provided rating scale. List the skills involved in providing corrective feedback to therapists. Identify sources of information involved in selecting instructional targets and apply that information to the selection of instructional target for case examples. Arrange instructional sequences and identify what is missing from presented instructional sequences.
Activities: Concepts and strategies of the supervision of home-based early intensive behavior intervention (EIBI) will presented using didactic instruction. Participants will apply the skills covered to exercises based on videotapes and case study information. Supervisory skills will be modeled using videotape. Handouts will be provided on the content of the presentation.
Audience: Individuals involved in staff supervision of EIBI for children with autism and/or other developmental disabilities. The content would be particularly applicable to those supervising home-based EIBI. It is assumed that the participants have a good foundation in EIBI.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: None
Teaching Prerequisite and Early Reading and Writing Skills 2
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Beacon F
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, M.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy), JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), ELIZABETH HAUGHTON (Private Practice)
Description: This workshop will focus upon the auditory skills and early language skills that research has determined to predict success in learning to read and write. Many young children at risk for learning to read and write have profited from a curriculum that focuses upon these components. Our emphasis will be upon both instructional methods for acquiring these skills as well as practice methods for building their fluency. Phonemes are individual speech sounds represented by letters of the alphabet. Phonemic awareness is the understanding that spoken words and syllables are composed of a specific sequence of individual speech sounds. Phonemic awareness is evidenced when a learner can produce, discriminate, and manipulate the phonological or sound structure of a language, as distinct from its meaning. Phonemic awareness is a prerequisite to the development of reading and spelling skills, especially phonics. Word, syllable and rhyming awareness must be developed prior to phonemic awareness, however these areas usually require less practice to become fluent. Research has repeatedly shown that phonemic awareness is a powerful predictor of success in learning to read and spell. Phonemic awareness is more highly related to learning to read than are tests of general intelligence, reading awareness, and listening comprehension. The discovery of the nature and enabling importance of phonemic awareness is said to be the single greatest breakthrough in reading pedagogy in the 20th century. Early language skills are also very important predictors and prerequisites to success in learning to read and write. Many early language skills have been isolated and shown to be significant enhancers of learning to read and write, particularly with at-risk learners. These skills include rapid automatic naming, retelling, syntactic language conventions, language of instruction, and basic vocabulary and knowledge typical of children in preschool and the primary grades.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand the methods for teaching phonological coding through auditory discrimination training and testing. Understand the methods for teaching early language skills including rapid automatic naming, retelling, syntactic language conventions, language of instruction, and basic vocabulary and knowledge typical of children in preschool and the primary grades. Understand the methods for conversational language. Experience our methods of feedback and coaching as you practice implementing our system. Incorporate phonological coding and early language objectives into your treatment plans.
Activities: Lecture, demonstration and discussion methods; Direct Instruction; and Precision Teaching will be used. Our faculty and staff will also coach you and give you feedback as you practice the technologies.
Audience: Any teachers, administrators, clinicians, direct care staff, tutors, and instructional designers who want to learn how to teach phonological coding and early language skills to children and youth, as well as adults in literacy programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: None
The ABCs of Consulting in School Districts
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Liberty A
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kristen M. Villone, Ed.D.
KRISTEN M. VILLONE (Melmark, Inc.), NOELLE M. GREEN (Bancroft NeuroHealth)
Description: One of the biggest challenges behavior analysts face when consulting in school districts is balancing the role of invited guest with the role of professional with expertise. Based on the experiences of a veteran consultant (with 15 years consulting experience) and a relatively new consultant (with eight years clinical experience), each will offer their unique perspectives on the different strategies and approaches that they have found invaluable.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe common types of services most often requested by school districts. Have a better sense of a consultant's role (and how to establish boundaries). Better understand the interpersonal dynamics and contingencies in school districts. Have a �blueprint� of how to set up/conduct classroom observations. Understand the importance of body language, staff perceptions, documentation and communication during classroom observations. Identify/address the primary �client� and/or presenting problem(s). List the types of materials, resources, skills, and training that are beneficial. Learn strategies that builds teamwork and motivates staff when you�re a �visitor� in their �house�. Know �when�, �how�, and �where� to document situations and conversations.
Activities: Participants attending the workshop will receive handouts and will have opportunities to participate in didactic presentations, problem solving discussions, and the exploration of professional and ethical considerations through discussion and presentation of case examples.
Audience: Behavior analysts who are interested in consulting in school districts and have ABA experience consulting/teaching children with developmental disabilities in clinical settings, as well as experience training staff to implement behavioral teaching strategies.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: None
The Use of Video/Computer Technology in Teaching Children with Autism
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Hampton
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Catherine E. Falleo, M.D.
CATHERINE E. FALLEO (Personal Touch Early Intervention Program), MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (The Genesis School), SHARON A. REEVE (Caldwell College)
Description: Often children with autism have great difficulty learning new skills, and one factor that often impedes learning by children with autism is the social component of the learning process. The use of video-based instruction has been successful for children with autism across a variety of skill areas. This workshop will provide information on a variety of video-based instructional methods that have been effective in teaching children with autism. Specific methods to be reviewed will include: video-based contingencies, video rehearsal/role play, video-based instruction, video modeling, and video priming. In addition to video-based instruction, computer-based instruction is showing promising effects for individuals with autism. A sample of computer-based instructional programs that have been effective for children with autism will be modeled (e.g., The Discrete Trial Trainer).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe at least three video-based instructional methods that can be used with children with autism. Describe at least two uses for video modeling with children with autism. Explain in what circumstances the use of video contingencies might or might not be warranted. Provide a rationale for using video or computer-based instruction for children with autism.
Activities: Participants will observe video-based instructional techniques on video and select a behavior to increase using a video-based instructional method. Volunteer participants will sample computer-based technology programs.
Audience: Special educators, psychologists, school personnel, behavior analysts, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: None
Using ABA Technology to Create an Inclusive Preschool Program for Children with Autism: The Partners in Learning Model
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Fairfax B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ph.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Advance, Inc.), LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance, Inc.), LORI A. LORENZETTI (Advance, Inc.), JUSTIN A. DIDOMENICO (Advance, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Partners in Learning), KIM M. GOERGEN (Partners in Learning), NICOLE M. SWANFELD (Partners in Learning)
Description: Including children with Autism Spectrum Disorders into preschool settings is a challenging but critical task, in order for them to learn from appropriate social models. Partners in Learning is a typical preschool, which employs ABA technology to successfully include children with autism into the program. This workshop illustrates the key components of a successful inclusive environment. Participants will be able to identify and apply these strategies for students with developmental disabilities in other typical preschool settings.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: Relate the benefits of inclusion for young children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Use ABA technology in a typical preschool setting. Build clinical competencies in staff and parents. Use environmental design to meet IEP goals. Create and maintain home programs to ensure generalization of skills across settings.
Activities: Using lecture, video demonstrations, handouts and discussion, participants will learn the key components of a successful inclusive ABA preschool.
Audience: professionals who work with young children with autism including behavior analysts, teachers, administrators and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: None
Using Video Modeling to Teach Play to Young Children with Autism
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Back Bay B
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: June M. Sanchez, M.D.
JUNE M. SANCHEZ (New England Center for Children), REBECCA P. F. MACDONALD (New England Center for Children), KRISTINE WILTZ (New England Center for Children), SHELLY COTA (New England Center for Children)
Description: Play is an important part of a typical child's development and contributes to the acquisition of language and social interaction skills. Children with autism often do not develop play skills. Video modeling has been demonstrated to be an effective procedure to teach a variety of skills. We will review several studies that we have conducted demonstrating the effectiveness of video modeling teaching procedures to teach independent pretend play to children with autism. In addition, we will present data from our most recent work, teaching cooperative play between children with autism and typically developing peers using video modeling. Video modeling is now an integral part of our preschool social skills and play curriculum. In this workshop, we will review how to develop scripts using commercially available play sets, create video modeling tapes, and provide video instruction to children with autism. We will discuss the advantages of this teaching procedure and the technical issues encountered when implementing the procedures. We will also discuss the implications for this technology as an easy and effective strategy for teachers and parents to use to teach play and other skills.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Define video modeling as a teaching procedure and describe its advantages. Describe how to teach simple imitative and toy play using video modeling procedures. Describe how to teach pretend play and reciprocal play with a peer using video modeling procedures. Describe how to create new individualized play scripts using a variety of commercially available toys.
Activities: Participants will work in small groups to plan and create video modeling play scripts. The participants will first complete planning forms. The participants will consider certain child characteristics such as age, interests/preferences, language skills, fine motor skills, and potentially interfering behaviors to aid them in planning individualized play scripts. The participants will then generate the play actions and verbal statements that make up the play scripts. Finally, the participants will create and act out a video modeling play script using commercially available toys.
Audience: Parents, educators, and consultants currently implementing programs to teach appropriate play skills to children with autism using behaviorally based teaching technologies. Participants should have some knowledge of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: None
Utilizing ABA Strategies with Toddlers with Autism
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Conference Room 3
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anne S. Holmes, Ph.D.
ANNE S. HOLMES (Eden Family of Services), DIANE VANDRIESEN (Eden Family of Services)
Description: The use of highly structured, consistent, concrete ABA intervention strategies such as discrete trial teaching are well established as having positive effects on children with autism (Lovaas, 1987). As diagnosticians become more proficient with diagnoses and children are diagnosed at younger ages (under two), professionals need to expand their use of ABA strategies to meet the needs of developing toddlers. Normal child development during toddlerhood is characterized by the childs active exploration of his environment. Toddlers with autism, left on their own, are not likely to access a sufficient variety of learning experiences. A solely child-directed approach to intervention is ineffective because toddlers with autism have extremely limited interests. A solely therapist-directed approach is ineffective because toddlers with autism are not being taught to experiment and explore their world. This workshop will outline an ABA approach that is child initiated, adult directed. These strategies have been successfully implemented with positive data based outcomes at the Eden Family of Services Wawa House for the past ten years. Future implications for focus of intervention will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify early indicators of toddlers �at risk� of autism. Assess appropriate treatment goals for toddlers with autism. Utilize ABA strategies in a child initiated, adult directed approach. Identify areas of focus for future research.
Activities: Participants will hear lecture and review videotapes and data.
Audience: Professionals who work in the field of autism and applied behavior analysis, speech pathologists, psychologists, special education teachers, and consultants.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: None
Working Effectively with Parents to Provide Quality ABA Services to Families of Children with Autism
Friday, May 28, 2004
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Conference Room 2
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Judith L. Palazzo, Psy.D.
JUDITH L. PALAZZO (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), ERICA ROEST (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.)
Description: An important factor in establishing effective ABA home and center-based programs is creating a positive working relationships with parents. This workshop will address how to develop effective working relationships with parents and family members. Strategies applying the principles of applied behavior analysis for maximizing parent/staff communication and trust will be presented. A parent training model covering autism, applied behavior analysis, and teaching strategies for parents will be outlined and discussed. Additionally, strategies for getting and maintaining parental involvement will be examined.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Motivate parents to participate in their child's ABA program. Set reasonable goals and objectives for parents' participation in their child's program. Promote positive and professional communication between parents and staff members. Help maintain parental involvement in their child's program over time.
Activities: Attendees will participate in didactic presentations, group discussions, and problem solving sessions. Results of a parent survey will be presented and discussed.
Audience: Behavior analysts, educational service providers, and parents interested in improving working relationships between parents and professionals in ABA programs for children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic

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