Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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32nd Annual Convention; Atlanta, GA; 2006

Program by Workshops: Saturday, May 27, 2006


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Workshop #W65
CE Offered: None
The Distinction between Functional Analysis and Functional Assessment
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Edgewood
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Amanda N. Adams, Ph.D.
AMANDA N. ADAMS (Wahoe County School District), JACLYN ANN SHANDY-PINTO (B.E.S.T. Consulting, Inc.), KIMBERLY A. WOOD (B.E.S.T. Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will train the audience on the difference between a functional assessment and a functional analysis when dealing with aberrant behavior. It will review the current literatures use of the terminology and the discrimination between experimental and non-experimental procedures. In addition, it will review various techniques and procedures that make up the functional assessment process- including but not limited to: indirect assessments, direct/descriptive assessments, experimental analyses, data collection, how to analyze and evaluate data, and the ethical implications to consider when implementing experimental procedures with children and adults.
Learning Objectives: 1. Discuss and discriminate between the terms "functional assessment" and "functional analysis" 2. Learn the different components that make-up a "functional assessment"- such as indirect assessments and direct assessments. 3. Learn when to implement an "analysis" and the ethical considerations of an "analysis" 4. Discuss contradictions between terminology use in behavioral literature. 5. Discuss future needs for research
Activities: Hands-on exercises such as the analysis of data.
Audience: Persons working in the field of autism.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ethics for Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lenox
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D.
JON S. BAILEY (Behavior Management Consultants, Inc./Florida State University/Florida Association of Behavior Analysis), MARY R. BURCH (Instructional Strategies Unlimited)
Description: This workshop will provide participants with a basic foundation in ethics for behavior analysts. Topics will include nine core ethical principles, how to write an ethical behavior plan, and what makes behavior analysts unique with regard to ethics. The BACB Guidelines will be covered in detail.
Learning Objectives: 1. Briefly describe three key issues in the early history of �behavior modification� that caused serious ethical problems for the field; 2. Articulate at least six of the nine core values of the scientist/practitioner behavior analysts who is striving for responsible conduct; 3. Outline at least five features of the practice of behavior analysis that makes it unique in the human services; 4. Give at least five examples of common, everyday situations that can compromise the ethics of a behavior analyst and they will be able to describe how to handle each situation.
Activities: The workshop will involve PowerPoint presentations, active learning activities such as, "Ethics games people play" and analyzing ethics scenarios.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts who are currently practicing.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Your Home-Based ABA Program: A Parent-Professional Perspective
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
International Ballroom North
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sharon E. Baxter, M.A.
SHARON E. BAXTER (ABLE Clinic), MICHELLE KARREN (St. Cloud State University), TYLA M. FREWING (University of Victoria)
Description: This workshop will use a behavioral perspective to examine the challenges of creating and maintaining an effective ABA home program. This workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of these issues from three perspectives: an ABA trained parent who also works in the field, a practicing Behavioral Consultant and a behavioral tutor. The goal of the workshop is to discuss how those perspectives can work together both in theory and in practice. Participants will learn how the principles of applied behaviour analysis can be applied to hiring, training and the ongoing supervision of staff, and how these principles can be integrated into the structure of family life. This workshop will outline the importance of a team approach between the behavioral consultant, parent and therapists/tutors to run a maximally effective home-based ABA program.
Learning Objectives: o Describe the implications of parent training and involvement in a home program o List the necessary training components of a successful ABA home program o Identify the risks and challenges of a home program that does not incorporate a partnership approach o Describe of how the rules of behavior govern both family and staff approaches o Be able to apply these principles to practical �real life� home programming issues o Set up practical contingencies within the home to make programs effective o Describe the importance of practical, relevant behavior plan design and how parents must actively participate in both the training and implementation of behavior plans o List at least three common pitfalls that parents run into and potential real life solutions for each o Discuss what a consultant needs from a family for program success and ways to ensure these needs are met o List what a therapist/tutor needs from a family and how both parties can actively participate to make this relationship work. o Identify at least three ways you can provide your tutors with positive reinforcement. o Identify at least three examples of boundaries that should be upheld between parents and tutors. o Describe strategies that can be used to improve the way a team works and operates
Activities: Active group discussions as well as seminar type learning, with real life problem solving within the workshop; examples of successful programs and the approaches used, video presentation of successful strategies in action.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, parents who have or are setting up and managing a home program, Graduate students training to provide home programming consulting, Autism therapists/tutors, direct care staff, teachers and school personnel
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Inner Behavior: Changing Thoughts, Feelings, and Urges
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
University
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), EMMA F. COBANE (TreeHouse School)
Description: This workshop views thoughts, feelings, and urges as inner behaviors that can be observed, counted, and changed. It reviews the history of private events and inner behavior, including sharing some charts of people who have counted inner behaviors in the past 35 years. The workshop also teaches how to use the Standard Celeration Chart to count and change any inner behavior.
Learning Objectives: 1. Learn the background and become familiar with the research on observing and changing inner behavior. 2. Define and identify thoughts, feelings, and urges. 3. Practice writing positive thoughts, feelings, and/or urges at 30-35 per minute and saying them at 50-75 per minute. 4. Count and record some specific inner behaviors for the duration of the workshop. 5. Discuss and develop a plan to change inner behaviors of self or clients.
Activities: The primary focus is on the practice of identification, listing, counting, recording, and changing inner behavior. There is a minimal amount of lecture on the literature and successes of the technique.
Audience: Psychologists, clinical behavior analysts, parents, teachers of regular or special education children including those with behavior disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Video Modeling to Teach Play to Young Children with Autism
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Marietta
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Shelly R. Cota, M.S.
SHELLY R. COTA (New England Center for Children), REBECCA P. F. MACDONALD (New England Center for Children), THERESA M. CLEVENGER (New England Center for Children), SALLY N. ROBERTS (New England Center for Children)
Description: Play is an important part of a typical childs development and contributes to the acquisition of language and social interaction skills. Children with autism often do not develop play skills. Video modeling has been demonstrated to be an effective procedure to teach a variety of skills. We will review several studies that we have conducted demonstrating the effectiveness of video modeling teaching procedures to teach independent pretend play to children with autism, as well as to teach cooperative play between children with autism and typically developing peers. In addition, we will present data from our most recent work, teaching children to generate novel play using video modeling. Video modeling is now an integral part of our preschool social skills and play curriculum. In this workshop, we will review how to develop scripts using commercially available play sets, create video modeling tapes, and provide video instruction to children with autism. We will also discuss the advantages of this teaching procedure and the technical issues encountered when implementing the procedures. We will also discuss the implications for this technology as an easy and effective strategy for teachers and parents to use to teach play and other skills.
Learning Objectives: 1. The participant will be able to define video modeling as a teaching procedure and describe its advantages. 2. The participant will be able to describe how to teach simple imitative, toy play, pretend play and reciprocal play with a peer using video modeling procedures. 3. The participant will be able to describe strategies to generate novel play using video modeling procedures. 4. The participant will be able to describe how to create new individualized play scripts using a variety of commercially available toys.
Activities: The participants will work in small groups to plan and create video modeling play scripts. The participants will first complete planning forms. The participants will consider certain child characteristics such as age, interests/preferences, language skills, fine motor skills, and potentially interfering behaviors to aid them in planning individualized play scripts. The participants will then generate the play actions and verbal statements that make up the play scripts. Finally, the participants will create and act out a video modeling play script using commercially available toys.
Audience: The workshop is designed for educators and consultants currently implementing programs to teach appropriate play skills to children with autism using behaviorally based teaching technologies. Participants should have some knowledge of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Typical Programming: Advanced Topics in Behavior Analytic Interventions for Children with Autism
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Auburn
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KELLY J. FERRIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTA ZAMBOLIN (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SHELLEY MCINNIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: This workshop will present attendees with a range of topics often encountered when delivering behavior analytic intervention to children and adolescents with autism and related disorders. Topics presented will include the non-linear/constructional management of misbehavior, the measurement of client assent and the use of assent data to inform instructional decision making, and the integration of augmentative/adaptive communication devices into instructional programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1) Define child assent and describe ways of measuring assent. 2) Describe the types of intervention decisions that can be made through analysis of assent data. 3) Describe ways in which curricular sequences can be modified to incorporate augmentative or adaptive communication systems. 4) Analyze instructional sequences for possible stimulus control problems that may arise if a child responds using an augmentative or adaptive communication system and describe plans for correcting such.
Activities: Throughout the workshop, participants will practice discriminating between appropriate and inappropriate instances of all of the concepts presented as well as practice applying skills relate to each learning objective given case study data. Participants will receive printed and digital copies of all materials presented in the workshop, along with a supplemental and expanded CD-ROM containing additional training and expansion materials as well as recommended readings.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinicians, parents, and teachers who are responsible for supervising behavior analytic intervention programs for children with autism and related disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Transition Planning for Adult Placement
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Singapore
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Tracey G. Galiatsatos, M.S.
TRACEY G. GALIATSATOS (New England Center for Children), STACY E. EDINBURG (New England Center for Children), KAREN L. ALITZ-POLGA (New England Center for Children), KIMBERLY KEOGH (New England Center for Children)
Description: There are many factors that influence a successful transition of individuals to adult placement. Adults are expected to hold a job, be active members of their community, and take responsibility for their own medical and financial needs. Many individuals that we serve may not be prepared for this level of independence. Through the use of case studies, this workshop will assist the clinician or parent to identify and prioritize critical skills necessary to facilitate the most successful transition to adult placement settings. General skill areas include behavior, self-preservation, self-care, community integration, vocational and academic. Particular emphasis will be given to IEP planning for clinical, vocational, educational and domestic objectives for individuals ages 16 and older. In addition to the IEP planning, this workshop will review the transition planning process including legal (e.g., guardianship), medical (e.g., insurance), and financial (e.g., SSI) considerations to address when preparing individuals for placement to adult service settings.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify critical clinical issues to consider for IEP planning in preparation for transition to adult placement. 2. Identify critical vocational, educational and domestic skills to facilitate transition to adult placement. 3. Create an individualized transition plan. 4. Access resources/agencies available pre/post transition.
Activities: Instructors will utilize handouts, lecture, checklists and case studies. Workshop participants will go through the process of identifying critical clinical issues to consider during the transition planning process. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the planning process for individuals of different ages with a variety of skills.
Audience: This workshop is targeted for clinicians, administrators, parents, educators and therapists who work with individuals over the age of 16.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Language-Based Learning Objectives and Curricula Using the ABLLS Assessment
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Harris
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel Cohen-Almeida, M.A.
CHRISTINE D. HAGENLOCHER (Newton Public Schools), JAMES T. ELLIS (Melmark New England), DANIEL COHEN-ALMEIDA (Melmark New England)
Description: The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (ABLLS) is an objective guide for the assessment of young children with autism. This workshop will review the ABLLS assessment; specifically the Requesting, Labeling, and Intraverbal sections. Participants will develop IEP objectives from sample ABLLS assessment results, and will also develop curricula for these skill areas. Participants will receive a CD of sample curricula from each of these 3 skill areas
Learning Objectives: Participants will: 1) Review the ABLLS assessment: specifically the Requesting, Labeling, and Intraverbal sections. 2) Develop IEP objectives from sample assessment data. 3) Review the components of effective language curricula. 4) Develop sample language curricula.
Activities: Brief Lecture, Case Study, Video Review
Audience: Behavior Analysts and Special Educators responsible for the assessment of language skills and the development of language curricula.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Data-Based Classroom Observations and Evaluations
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Greenbriar
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Suzanne Letso, M.A.
SUZANNE LETSO (Connecticut Center for Child Development), ERIK A. MAYVILLE (Institute for Educational Planning)
Description: Today, a host of programs and services for students with autism are available throughout the country in both public and private settings. The more challenging question now is to determine whether or not any particular program is actually based on the educational principals of applied behavior analysis, or not. Secondarily, parents and professionals often need to assess whether these services and learning environments are appropriate to meet the specific needs of a given child. This workshop will provide information and resources to assist in the process of program evaluations to facilitate educational placement decisions. An overview of the observation and evaluation process will be described, and rationale for self-evaluation, as well as collaboration with independent evaluators will be discussed. Determination of observation and evaluation parameters, utilization of norm references tests, determination of curriculum and key programmatic components, environmental considerations, and staff competencies will be discussed. Methods of collecting data and writing observation and evaluations to support the decision making process will be described, and samples provided.
Learning Objectives: 1. Determine factors that affect the purpose of an observation or evaluation, and how these processes can assist IEP development. 2. Define program parameters which are observable, measurable, and relevant to the environment and an individual student. 3. Describe a basic overview of the observation and evaluation processes including the rationale for internal evaluation, parent evaluation, and independent evaluation. 4. Identify assessment tools to determine a particular student�s readiness for active participation in different learning environments. 5. Identify clinical and administrative program criteria including credentials of staff, staffing ratios, training, supervision, and access to peers and the community. 6. Create a customized check-list of critical features in relation to a student�s individual educational needs. 7. Customize data collection systems and guidelines for writing observation and evaluation summaries including data summaries.
Activities: Didactic lecture, group discussion, video tape review, and guided notes will be utilized. Handouts will include identification of additional resources, sample data collection systems, sample report summaries, and sample IEP objectives.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, school Administrators, Psychologists, or other educational service providers working in applied settings with individuals with autism or related disorders. Participants should have a basic understanding of the signs and symptoms of autism spectrum disorders, applied behavior analysis, and autism intervention and education strategies.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
EIBSC: Early Intervention Behaviorally Scripted Curriculum
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Manila
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Rosa C. Martinez, Ph.D.
ROSA C. MARTINEZ (Children's Center for Early Learning)
Description: This workshop is designed to introduce a behaviorally scripted curriculum to teachers, therapists, clinical staff members and administrators of early intervention programs for children aged 0-3 on the autism spectrum. The curriculum is criterion referenced and includes an assessment of developmental milestones from 0-42 months of age.
Learning Objectives: 1. Define Autism Spectrum Disorder 2. Assess a child in a natural learning environment 3. Identify skill and deficit areas based on each child's individual assessment to target developmentally appropriate instruction 4. Individualize a curricular program based on individual child deficits and use a behavioral template to develop further programming
Activities: 1- Powerpoint presentation on Autism Spectrum Disorder 2- Overview of EIBSC: Early Intervention Behaviorally Scripted Curriculum 3- Write Sample Individualized Programs using behavioral template
Audience: Participants of this workshop should have general knowledge of applied behavior analysis regarding discrete trial therapy, learn units and natural teaching environments. The target audience is homebased or centerbased providers of ABA for children on the autism spectrum.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W75
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
S.T.E.P.S.: Systematic Training and Evaluation of Practitioner's Skills: A Model for Training Applied and Theoretical Competencies
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Hong Kong
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Justin A. DiDomenico, M.Ed.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Advance, Inc./Partners in Learning, Inc.), LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance, Inc.), JUSTIN A. DIDOMENICO (Advance, Inc.), KIM M. GOERGEN (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI A. LORENZETTI (Advance, Inc.)
Description: Workshop Description: Developing competencies in Applied Behavior Analysis requires a mastery of both theory and application. Successful Behavior Analysts require both an in depth knowledge of theory and the ability to apply the skills in clinical and school settings. This workshop is designed for trainers to teach the competencies of ABA to teachers, paraprofessionals and other clinical staff to master both theory and demonstrate core clinical skills required to enact IEP goals. Participants will be able to identify core competencies in theory and train staff to display these skills to mastery in applied settings using a systematic, data-based approach. Trainers will receive a manual and DVD with video models and training modules.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn: 1) the key components of theory required to train teachers and paraprofessionals. This includes paper and pencil mastery exams. 2) how to teach and measure clinical skills in applied settings. 3) how to develop skills to measure the staff�s skill acquisition of clinical skills using treatment integrity protocols. 4) how to create a program to motivate and monitor the staff�s skill acquisition. 5) how to create and design individual core competencies skills profiles for each staff member tailored to their skill level of both mastery of theory and application.
Activities: Using lecture, video demonstrations, handouts and discussion, participants will learn the key training protocols for staff to effectively implement ABA based IEP goals.
Audience: This workshop is designed for Behavior Analysts who train teachers and paraprofessionals who work with children with autism. This will help teach the staff to understand and demonstrate the core competencies of Applied Behavior Analysis in order to be effective practitioners. Knowledge of ABA and autism helpful.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: None
Autism: How to Select an Effective Treatment and a Qualified Therapist
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Regency VI
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert W. Montgomery, Ph.D.
ROBERT W. MONTGOMERY (Reinforcement Unlimited LLC), MEAGHAN TIMKO (Reinforcement Unlimited LLC), CHRISTINE R. MONTGOMERY (Reinforcement Unlimited LLC)
Description: This workshop is intended for parents of children with autism and other consumers. The focus is on what the research says works, who it works for, and what we know about the variables that impact effective treatment of autism. Additionally, the workshop will provide valuable guidelines for consumers of services on what to look for in a qualified therapist.
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will be able to name three seminal articles supporting effective treatment for autism. 2) Participants will be able to identify the behaviors which best predict positive treatment outcome. 3) Participants will be able to determine if a therapist has the basic education and training to independently implement effective treatments for ASD children. 4) Participants will be able to access appropriate resouces to determine if new treatments are actually empirically supported by the peer-reviewed literature.
Activities: Didactic interaction, mock credentials review, deconstruction of a research article on ASD treatment, and questions and answer session.
Audience: Parents and others who have to make informed decisions regarding selection of effective treatments and qualified treatment providers for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Fluent Language Skills for Children with Autism Part III: Pragmatic Language Skills
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Courtland
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Alison L. Moors, M.A.
ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTIN N. SCHIRMER (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SARA J. PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: This workshop will focus on using the techniques of fluency-based instruction to teach pragmatic language skills to children with autism. Once children have gained facility with basic, intermediate, and advanced language skills, such as asking and answering informational questions, they still have much to learn to acquire verbal repertoires of sufficient extensity to allow them to maximally benefit from classroom instruction and social interactions with others. We will focus on pragmatic language skills as they relate to attending and responding to vocal and non-vocal cues of others, following conversational rules, predicting social cause and effect, usage of idiomatic/metaphorical language, and increasing overall flexibility and scope of language. We will present skill descriptions, scope and sequence charts showing component/composite relationships between skills, suggested skill frequency aims, descriptions of the critical and variable attributes relevant to the instructional stimuli used for each skill, and methods for empirically validating critical instructional outcomes such as skill retention, endurance, stability, and application. Throughout the workshop, we will use actual student performance data and videotaped examples to illustrate each of the key skills discussed.
Learning Objectives: � List and describe important pragmatic language skills across multiple verbal behavior repertoires. � Describe the relationship between those skills and other curriculum areas such as reading comprehension and social language development. � Generate teaching examples that account for all skill critical and variable stimulus features � Generate sample scope and sequence teaching outlines for various skills across multiple verbal behavior repertoires
Activities: Throughout the workshop, participants will discuss the material with the presenters, practice developing scope and sequence teaching outlines, practice generating teaching examples of their own, and develop plans for teaching verbal responses within a fluency-based instruction arrangement.
Audience: Anyone interested in teaching advanced/pragmatic language skills for children with autism, and/or whose students have difficulty with appropriate social use of language. It will be particularly helpful for persons designing or supervising language intervention programs for children with autism in home or school settings. Please note: a basic understanding of fluency-based instructional practices is recommended.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W78
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
RFT 101: An Introduction to Relational Frame Theory
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Piedmont
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel J. Moran, Ph.D.
DANIEL J. MORAN (MidAmerican Psychological Institute), PATRICIA BACH (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Description: Arbitrarily applied what? Derived relational who? If you started learning about Relational Frame Theory (RFT), and then stopped when you read: Crel {ArxB and BrxC}, or have just been interested in learning the basics of RFT, this is the introductory workshop for you. This workshop will outline and explain the basic concepts of RFT and help the audience members understand an expanded functional approach to verbal behavior. We will discuss, from a behavior analytic point of view, how people can listen with understanding and speak with meaning. The workshop will simplify functional contextualism principles and discuss the basic RFT research methods and results in a manner that will help people who are new to RFT to begin applying the concepts to their own behavior analytic endeavors. We plan to make clear the core assumptions of functional contextual behavior analysis and how they apply to discussing language and cognition. We aim to not let your eyes glaze over as we discuss transformation of stimulus functions, generalized operants, and the different types of derived relating. Most importantly, we plan to help everyone have an enjoyable time while framing events relationally about RFT.
Learning Objectives: 1) Workshop attendees will be able to list and describe six basic principles of functional contextualism, and also contrast those principles from mainstream psychology principles. 2) Attendees will be able to compare and contrast conditioned discrimination and derived relational responding, in research contexts and in daily use. 3) Attendees will be able to define arbitrary applicable relational responding, along with mutual entailment and combinatorial entailment. 4) Attendees will be able to define �relational frame� in behavior analytic terms, and give 6 examples of relational frames. 5) Attendees will be able to describe transformation of stimulus functions regarding relational frames. 6) Attendees will be able to explain an expanded view of �verbal behavior� using RFT principles. 7) Attendees will generate examples of how to apply RFT principles to their own research or application questions.
Activities: The workshop will be guided by an animated slide show and will be punctuated with audience participation, and small group participation. Slide show handouts will be distributed as well as files for RFT SAFMEDS cards.
Audience: This workshop is for behavior analysts with limited exposure to Relational Frame Theory. Because we will focus on the fundamentals of RFT, all specializations in behavior analysis will be discussed (AUT, OBM, CBA, etc.), and practitioners interested in teaching verbal skills to individuals will certainly find this workshop valuable.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Implementing System Changes to Meet Current Standards of Practice in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Techwood
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Gary M. Pace, Ph.D.
GARY M. PACE (The May Institute), MEREDITH L. COCHRAN (The May Institute), AVA E. KLEINMANN (The May Institute), SARA MCCOLLUM (The May Center for Child Development)
Description: Standards for designing and implementing program-wide behavior systems are an area of increasing importance in the field. This workshop will highlight several systems-wide protocols developed for settings where the individuals served present with challenging behaviors. First, guidelines for writing focused and consumer friendly behavior support plans will be presented. This structured procedure will highlight best practices in the field particularly with regards to the implementation of program-wide policies. Second, a procedure for collecting program-wide staff integrity data will be presented. Both individual and group data will be presented to illustrate the proximate clinical utility of this procedure, as well as longer term implications for standards of staff training. Third, two approaches to collecting 24-hour reliability/ interobserver agreement (IOA) data will be presented as applied in two different settings. Methods and outcome data will be presented for the collection of these data for both maladaptive behaviors and skill acquisition. It is the goal of this workshop that attendees will be able to apply the protocols to their own settings to both improve the overall quality of service delivery and introduce methods of accountability for systems-wide goals.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: � write more focused and consumer-friendly behavior support plans � monitor staff integrity for the implementation of these plans � collect reliability (IOA) data on a variety of behaviors throughout the treatment day
Activities: Participants will listen to PowerPoint presentations on each of the three educational objectives. Presentations will be interactive such that questions and discussion will be encouraged throughout the workshop. Participants will also practice skills such as writing behavior goals and completing sample integrity and IOA forms.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards behavior analysts that want to establish or enhance systems in their programs to write effective behavior support plans, improve the integrity of plan implementation, and collect continuous IOA data.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Training for Functional Independence: Creative Use of Visual and Auditory Supports to Achieve Functional Independence in Learners with Autism
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Inman
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Judith L. Palazzo, M.Ed.
JUDITH L. PALAZZO (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), MEGAN MCCARRON (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), JILL E. CASTELLANI (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will illustrate basic considerations to identify target objectives and design procedures to teach functional independent skills to learners with autism. The evolution of procedures will be highlighted and examples of such objectives will be outlined across learners at different functioning levels. Samples of visual and auditory supports will be presented and participants will have an opportunity to identify target skill areas and design potential teaching procedures with assistance.
Learning Objectives: - Participants will learn basic considerations for identifying and designing procedures to teach functional independent skills to learners with autism. - Participants will learn strategies for using visual supports to promote functional independence in learners with autism. - Participants will learn strategies for using auditory supports to promote functional independence in learners with autism. - Participants will identify and design potential procedures for teaching functional independent skills to learners with autism.
Activities: - Discussion of basic considerations for identifying and designing procedures for teaching functional independent skills - Presentation of examples of specific teaching procedures and the use of visual and auditory supports - Video clips of teaching procedures - Group development of potential teaching procedures
Audience: Teachers, Behavior Analysts, ABA Providers, related Service Providers, Parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior to Teach Language Skills During Daily Activities to Children with Autism or Other Developmental Delays
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Regency V
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.), PAMELA G. OSNES (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to provide the attendees information as to how language skills (based on B. F. Skinners analysis of verbal behavior) can be taught to children in the context of ongoing, daily activities. Participants will review videotapes of such training and practice identifying specific verbal operants and other basic learner skills that could be taught during typical daily activities in the home environment.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to identify how basic language skills can be taught to young children with autism in the context of on-going daily activities. 2. Participants will be able to identify examples of B. F. Skinner�s verbal operants that are included in the teaching procedures. 3. Participants will be able to describe several examples as to how parent's can maintain the motivation of young children during the language instruction. 4. Participants will be able to identify how teaching a child to mand for reinforcers results in the development of several other important learner skills. 5. Participants will be able to identify how to sequence daily events such that the child's participation in targeted language activities results in reinforcers that are typically delivered non-contingently.
Activities: A brief review of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior will be provided. Participants will review videotapes of language training procedures conducted in children's homes and practice identifying specific verbal operants (mands, tacts, echoics, intraverbals) and other basic learner skills that could be taught during typical daily activities in the home environment.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for behavior analysts, teachers, speech and language pathologists, or other individuals who are responsible for implementing, developing, or monitoring educational programs for children with autism or other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Improving Classroom Behavior Support Practices through Applied Behavior Analysis Interventions
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Baker
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (The May Institute), MARCIE W. HANDLER (The May Institute), CHRISTINE DAVIS (The May Institute)
Description: This workshop will provide behavior analysts with an evidence-based approach to designing effective classroom interventions. It includes the use of functional assessment as a method to systematically evaluate the classroom environment in order to design, implement and evaluate effective classroom-wide behavioral support practices. Once the environment is assessed, the model incorporates both indirect (i.e., lecture, written training materials) and direct (i.e., modeling, performance feedback) instruction. Finally, participants will learn how teachers participate in a data-based decision making process in order to establish more effective practices, procedures, and interactions with students. Data will be presented supporting the need for a comprehensive training method that includes both indirect and direct instruction for teachers to adequately implement classroom-wide behavior support practices.
Learning Objectives: Learning Objective 1: Participants will learn how to apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices. Learning Objective 2: Participants will learn evidence-based methods used to train teachers in classroom-wide behavior support practices. Learning Objective 3: Participants will learn a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices. Learning Objective 4: Participants will learn instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students.
Activities: Participants will have an opportunity to engage in discussions with other behavior analysts, analyze sample data, draw conclusions about relevant classroom-wide interventions, and role play the direct instruction (e.g., performance feedback) provided to teachers.
Audience: Behavior analysts who provide training and consultation to school teachers or paraprofessionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preference-Based Teaching: Procedures for Helping People with Developmental Disabilities Enjoy Learning without Problem Behavior
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Spring
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Dennis H. Reid, Ph.D.
DENNIS H. REID (Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support Center), CAROLYN W. GREEN (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: This workshop will describe a preference-based teaching approach for helping people with developmental disabilities enjoy learning functional skills without problem behavior during teaching sessions. The focus is on how to make teaching programs highly preferred (as indicated, for example, through indices of happiness and absence of indices of unhappiness). A program approach will be described and demonstrated that: (a) enhances the preferred nature of teaching programs to increase learner enjoyment in participating in the programs, and (b) removes the motivation for problem behavior that often occurs in attempts to escape or avoid the programs. Specific strategies to be described include how a teacher or instructor can build rapport with a learner and establish his/her attention as a reinforcer, using preferred events as antecedents and consequences to teaching sessions, interspersing preferred events within instructional trials, incorporating efficient choice opportunities within the teaching process, and timing the scheduling of teaching sessions to promote learner enjoyment. Summaries of recent behavior analytic investigations will also be provided to demonstrate the evidence base of preference-based teaching.
Learning Objectives: a. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to describe how to include a preferred event before, during and after a teaching session to enhance the preferred features of the session for a learner with disabilities. b. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to describe how to use establishing operations to maximize the preferred nature of at least one aspect of a teaching session. c. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to describe how at least one learner choice can be embedded within a teaching session to enhance the preferred nature of the session for a learner. d. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to describe three things a teacher can do to establish his/her attention as a preferred event for a learner.
Activities: Activities of participants will include: (1) listening to instructor lecture/presentations, (2) viewing overhead presentation of key points, (3) completing pencil and paper activities relating to scenarios depicting applications of key points, (4) viewing role-play demonstrations of target procedures by instructors, (5) practicing target procedures in role-play situations with performance feedback by instructors (provided until individual participants demonstrate competency in accordance with performance checklists employed by instructors) , and (6) opportunities to ask questions of instructors and receive instructor answers.
Audience: The target audience includes anyone who implements skill-acquisition teaching programs with people who have developmental disabilities including autism. Examples of target audience participants include teachers, teacher assistants, residential direct support and supervisory staff, vocational support staff (e.g., job coaches), behavior analysts, behavior specialists and technicians, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W84
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treatment Procedures and Staff Training in Intensive Behavioral Treatment: 49% Average Scores after Four Years
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Learning Center
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Glen O. Sallows, Ph.D.
GLEN O. SALLOWS (Wisconsin Early Autism Project), TAMLYNN DIANNE GRAUPNER (Wisconsin Early Autism Project)
Description: This workshop will present methods used to carry out a successful replication of the UCLS Intensive Behavioral Treatment Project using current procedures. We will begin with a review of the progress during the four year effort for 35 children with autism, where 17 of 35 (49%), achieved scores in the average range in IQ, language, social, academic, and adaptive areas, and succeeded in regular classrooms with a regular curriculum. Several measures were used to assess the presence of residual symptoms, and these results will be described. We also developed outcome prediction models that were 91% accurate with this group. We will describe staff selection, training, supervision, and scheduling. We will demonstrate treatment procedures using video clips. A partial list includes behavioral teaching, incidental teaching, programs for building generative language, building social skills through interactive play and play dates, video modeling and role playing, increasing parental involvement, transition to school, use of shadows and psychiatric services.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will understand optimum staffing and staff training, supervision practices. 2. Participants will understand a wide range of current treatment procedures used to successfully treat young children with autism. 3. Participants will learn predictive variables useful in determining which children will do well in treatment. 4. Participants will learn the extent of residual symptoms in children who achieve average post-treatment scores, and strategies for treating them.
Activities: Presenters will use lecture, video clips, handouts, and demonstrations.
Audience: Providers and administrators of intensive behavioral treatment programs, clinicians and staff who work with children diagnosed with autism, and school professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W85
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Behavior Systems Technology in Teacher Education Programming: Principles, Practice, and Hands-on Applications
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Roswell
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), DANIEL W. BALDERSON (Weber State University), MATTHEW R. MARTIN (Illinois State University)
Description: This workshop will provide introduction to, and hands on application of, a data supported protocol for the (a) comprehensive description, (b) discrete and sequential analysis, and (c) feedback and goal-setting activities necessary to effective teacher training in postsecondary classroom and on-site K-12 deliberate practice environments. Workshop activities include (a) introduction to the importance of a behavior systems approach to teacher training, (b) hands-on observation system construction, and (c) simulated data collection and analysis activities designed for instructional purposes. Additionally, detailed explanation and hands-on interaction with protocols designed for a range of logically sequenced training activities are provided, including (a) classroom video observations, (b) on-site data-based assessment and immediate feedback and goal-setting, and (c) research and development into effective educational practice. Workshop participants will leave with a conceptual and applied familiarity with behavior systems educational protocols designed for effective professional training practice. Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the complete software tools and methods procedures on CD ROM, and MSWORD files of all necessary illustration materials in relation to the educational protocols discussed as a function of workshop participation. ***While some computer hardware will be provided, it is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with technologically-based instructional skills in the area of applied behavioral teacher training. Skills include the ability to (a) design observation systems that match with training objectives, (b) construct video-based observational learning laboratory experiences in relation to training objectives, (c) implement on-site data-based feedback and goal-setting experiences to determine if training objectives have been met, and (d) develop a set of applied research activities to document the relative effectiveness of professional training activities. Learning Objective 1: Participants will be able to discuss in conceptual and applied ways the principles and practice of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional teacher training. Learning Objective 2: Participants will be able to construct observation systems relevant to their particular professional teacher training objectives. Learning Objective 3: Participants will be able to design and implement video-based observational learning activities in relation to educational objectives for professionals in training. Learning Objective 4: Participants will be able to understand and apply a range of computer-based data collection and analysis techniques in relation to recommended data-based on-site feedback and goal setting instructional protocols. Learning Objective 5: Participants will be able to develop an applied research agenda in relation to professional training objectives to determine the relative effectiveness of instructional efforts.
Activities: Activities include: 1. Review of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional training activities. 2. Hands on application of observation system construction designed as compatible with professional training objectives. 3. Hands-on application of observational laboratory development in relation to the classroom instruction of relevant behavior analytic professional training objectives. 4. Hands-on application of data-based on-site feedback and goal-setting protocols in relationship to deliberate practice activities of professional trainees. 5. Introduction and review of recommended research activity development in relation to determining the relative effectiveness of recommended professional training activities.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in the area of professional teacher education in specific, and in the area of postsecondary training for professional competencies in general. Those working in postsecondary educational settings where focus is on the education, on-site training, and assessment of professional practice competencies, and who are challenged with how to teach, describe, and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary materials particularly appealing to a wide range of professional training, assessment, and applied research applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Formal Sequential Program for Shaping Applied Skills in Personnel Programs Serving Children with Special Needs
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Montreal
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Beth Sulzer-Azaroff, Ph.D.
BETH SULZER-AZAROFF (Browns Group Naples), KATHLEEN DYER (River Street Autism Program)
Description: The pool of personnel skilled in the applied practice of behavior analysis in programs for children with special needs is limited. Even those capable of "talking the talk" of ABA may have insufficiently mastered the capability of "walking the walk." In this workshop, we will present a program that college, university, and program-based trainers of behavior analysis in organizations serving children with special needs will be able to use to guide trainees step by step along the path toward increasing competence. Attendees will receive a copy of a teaching manual to take to their home locations.
Learning Objectives: By the end of this workshop participants should be able to: 1. Say why guided and reinforced practice is essential to preparing skillful personnel within applied settings 2. Identify instructional objectives of relevance to the personnel they hope to train 3. Sketch out a plan for designing and implementing that training 4. List a set of methods for assessing the effectiveness of their procedures
Activities: 1. Overview of objectives 2. Case examples 3. Audience contributions of case examples 4. Step by step sequence of weekly assignments designed to support trainee progress 5. Participant plans to introduce the sequence at their respective programs 6. Evaluation of learning and satisfaction
Audience: Behavior analysts concerned with promoting skills of personnel employed within their organizations or those training, coordinating and/or supervising students in practicum or internship sites
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W87
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Enhancing Behavior Analytic Practices with Feminist Principles
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Kennesaw
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Maria R. Ruiz, Ph.D.
CHRISTEINE M. TERRY (University of Washington), MARIA R. RUIZ (Rollins College)
Description: Though rarely seen as compatible behavior analysis and feminist theory, broadly defined, share some interesting conceptual and practical perspectives. For example, the feminist critique of traditional psychological science in many respects parallels the behavioral critique. Feminist psychology and behavior analysis also share some important assumptions about scientific knowledge and the process of knowledge making. Feminist psychologists have tackled many interesting domains in their research, but their research methodologies have often been limiting. This workshop will explore what a merger of feminist research interests and behavior analytic practices might look like. Specifically, we will consider how feminist enhanced behavior analysis might lead to stronger pedagogical and clinical practices.
Learning Objectives: 1--participants will describe 4 points of conceptual convergence between behavior analysis and feminist psychology 2-- participants will describe 4 key points in the feminist critique of traditional psychological science 3--participants will identify 4 ways in which the teaching of behavior analysis might be enhanced by feminist practice 4--participants will identify 4 approaches to enhancing behaviorally oriented clinical practice (eg. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy) with feminist principles
Activities: Lecture material will be presented with Powerpoint --Videos --Small group activities --Experiential exercises
Audience: Introductory level
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Formulating Programs for Nave Learners: Worksheets for Designing Contingencies
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Dunwoody
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
VICCI TUCCI (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), DANIEL E. HURSH (West Virginia University)
Description: The design and implementation of effective contingencies to solve problems of social importance is the sine qua non of behavior analysis. This workshop will provide assistance to educators and parents to make conspicuous the contingencies operating in a given situation. Participants will learn to formulate and deliver supplementary reinforcement contingencies as prescribed by best-practice recommendations. Each participant will receive a copy of a Contingency Management binder that compiles many of the contingencies known to reflect 'best practice' for achieving ethical change in problematic behavior. For service providers already familiar with the principles and operations of behavior analysis the worksheets contained within this binder will serve as a convenient means of standardizing communication and documentation of procedures. For those less familiar with Applied Behavior Analysis the booklet will provide an overview of the critical concepts, principles and operations that the ethical utilization of each of the contingencies contained therein. Each contingency description is designed so that that page can be copied and completed for an individual learner or client. Each participant will be required to select and complete a contingency worksheet for a Learner of his or her choice.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn to utilize the procedures and materials contained within the CLM "Designing Contingencies" binder to identify, individualize, and formulate contingencies to establish, strengthen or extend educational and behavioral targets for naive Learners. This binder compiles many of the contingencies known to reflect 'best practice' for achieving ethical change in problematic behavior.
Activities: 1.Overview and introduction to the "Designing Contingencies" Binder. 2. Review and practice utilizing the decision process for selecting contingencies. 3. Practice in completing and individualizing selected contingencies for at least three Learners of concern to the participant.
Audience: BCABAs, BCBAs, and service providers (teachers, home program therapists and program supervisors) working with young children with challenging learning and behavioral concerns.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W89
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABC's of Consulting in School Districts
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Vinings
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kristen M. Villone, Ph.D.
KRISTEN M. VILLONE (Melmark)
Description: One of the biggest challenges behavior analysts face when consulting in school districts is balancing the role of "invited guest" with the role of "professional with expertise." Consultants working in school districts may also be challenged more by the behavior of the service providers than that of the identified student(s). The experiences of a veteran consultant (with 17 years consulting experience) will offer unique perspectives on strategies and approaches they have found invaluable.
Learning Objectives: -Describe common types of services most often requested by school districts -Identify/address the primary "client" and/or presenting problem(s) -Understand the importance of body language, staff perceptions, documentation, and communication during class
Activities: Participants will receive handouts to aid reviewing the workshop�s learning objectives during the first part of the workshop. The second part of the workshop will consist of a problem-solving discussion of different types of obstacles, scenarios and case examples the presenters have experienced. As time permits, audience members will be encouraged to present their own obstacles/issues for problem-solving.
Audience: Anyone interested in consulting in school districts, especially relatively new consultants who have ABA experience teaching children with developmental disabilities and training staff in clinical settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W90
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
TeachTown: Incorporating ABA Best-Practices into Computer-Assisted Treatment for Children with Autism
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Regency VII
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Christina Whalen, Ph.D.
CHRISTINA WHALEN (TeachTown), BRAD MCGUIRE (TeachTown), MANYA C. R. VAUPEL (TeachTown)
Description: The use of computers with children with autism is becoming increasingly prevalent yet this technology still seems relatively untapped with its potential. In this workshop, all of the essential elements of ABA for children with autism will be discussed including Sd's, prompting, discrimination, acquisition, reinforcement, generalization, data-collection, information sharing, and research. These topics will be discussed in terms of how to incorporate the best-practices of ABA into computer technology. One example of a program that attempts to incorporate all of these essential elements, the TeachTown program, will be presented and attendees will receive free demo copies of the software. It is suggested that attendees bring laptop computers for a more hands-on experience.
Learning Objectives: 1) What are ABA best-practices and how will we know when we are doing it? 2) How can we use computers to improve existing ABA practices? 3) How can we better manage data from ABA programs? 4) How important is generalization? What is the best approach for incorporating generalization into treatment? How can we measure generalization in ABA programs? 5) What research has been done on using computers with children with autism and what research still needs to be done? 6) What is the TeachTown program? How does this program incorporate ABA best-practices?
Activities: Review of ABA therapies available for children with autism; review of "best-practices" in ABA therapy; review of studies using computers for children with autism; discussion of advantages & disadvantages of using computers for children with autism; review and hands-on demonstration of TeachTown program along with discussion of "best-practices" in ABA; discussion of generalization and ideas for incorporating generalization into computer-assisted programs.
Audience: Parents, teachers, professionals, and researchers specializing in autism, language delays, or other special needs. Basic understanding of ABA and ABA principles (e.g. reinforcement, prompting, discrimination, etc.) - these terms will be reviewed briefly but workshop is ideal for those with basic understanding of these principles.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Community-Based Behavior Service for Adults with Developmental Disabilities: Assessment, Treatment, and Evaluation
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Fairlie
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Liming Zhou, Ph.D.
LIMING ZHOU (Midsouth Behavior Clinic)
Description: This workshop provides a technical roadmap for behavior analysts on how to serve adults with developmental disabilities/mental retardation who live in the community settings (group home, family home and other supported living arrangement). The workshop focuses on practical questions such as how to conduct appropriate functional assessment based on individual needs, how to develop reinforcement-based treatment procedures based on functional assessment, how to prevent and intervene SIB, aggression, destruction and other challenging behaviors, how to develop adaptive replacement behavior, how to build supportive environment through staff training and agency/parents consultation, and finally, how to evaluate effectiveness of treatment program. While studying the above questions, the instructor will first briefly review selected ABA literature, and then guide audience to learn and practice behavior analysis and behavior therapy techniques that are proven to be effective.
Learning Objectives: 1. Understand and conduct basic functional assessment to assess target behaviors based on individual's needs. 2. Understand and develop basic reinforcement-based prevention and intervention procedures to treat behavior problems. 3. Understand and build supportive environment through training and consultation. 4. Understand and evaluate effectiveness of treatment program
Activities: Didactic lecture includes literature review, technical analysis, data analysis, and case study. Group discussion will be utilized. Handout will cover sample of functional assessment tools, sample of reinforcement-based procedures with data sheet, sample of case study with data analyses, and a list of selected key references. Participants will have structured opportunities of asking questions and sharing practical experiences.
Audience: Behavior analysts, behavior analyst associates, behavior specialists, graduate students and college students in ABA program, direct care professional supervisors, managers, program coordinators, case managers and administrators of private and government agencies serving adults with developmental disabilities, and parents of individuals with developmental disabilities. Participants should have basic knowledge of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: BACB
AimChart: Standard Celeration Charting on the Web at www.aimchart.com
Saturday, May 27, 2006
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Vancouver
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Charles T. Merbitz, Ph.D.
CHARLES T. MERBITZ (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), BEN MERBITZ (aimchart.com)
Description: Aimchart (www.aimchart.com) is a web based tool for Standard Celeration Charting. The basic service is free to use over the internet; advanced services provide better management and sharing of data across institutions with complex needs. Aimchart guides any user to properly drag and drop data on the screen for instant uploading to the central database and immediate display on a proper standard Chart, complete with automatic Celeration. This data is stored by Aimchart and can be shared by the user with other stakeholders such as parent, team members, administrators and referring sources. An authorized user can immediately see the newest, completely current data from anywhere in the world 24/7. Aimchart supports phases, aimstars, and extremely precise printing. You can instantly, easily stack and restack data from an unlimited number of combinations of learners, pinpoints, and times. Workshop attendees will learn and practice with Aimcharts easy-to-use tools to set-up, collect, save, and analyze data and Charts and control access for groups and individuals. Future developments will be discussed. Participants receive an Aimchart institutional account (minimum value, $100). Attendees please bring a laptop with wifi or Ethernet and Flash 7, and contact Ben Merbitz (ben-aba@xig.net) to discuss equipment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. Set up AimChart accounts for students, clients, teachers, and schools 2. Define behaviors to count and set goals for acceleration, deceleration, both (for comfort pairs), or neither. 3. Access the site as a student or other user and enter data 4. View the same data on Daily, Weekly or Monthly Charts 5. Set and remove phase lines & celeration lines, AimStars, and notes. 6. Select combinations of Charts (across persons and pinpoints) to view as overlays 7. Set the system to center on any Sunday for both data entry and display 8. Set controls on access to the information in the AimChart database. 9. Export AimChart data to Excel. 10. List at least: - one way to maintain confidentiality - one minimum system requirement for AimChart
Activities: This workshop will be begin with a brief introduction of Standard Celeration Charting. Then participants will be guided through the use of Aimchart, including the creation of an Aimchart account; setting up groups, learners and actions; entering and editing data, markers, notes and aimstars; viewing different combinations of Charts; exporting data; and controlling access to their data. Future Aimchart developments will also be discussed, and feedback and requests will be gathered from participants for inclusion in newer versions of Aimchart. Substantial time will be spent allowing participants to practice using Aimchart and helping them with any questions they have. Workshop attendees are strongly encouraged to bring or arrange for a laptop so they can actually practice these techniques. Participant computers should have a working internet (WiFi or ethernet) connection and Macromedia Flash Player 7. (We recommend Firefox on Windows, OS X and Linux. We also support IE on Windows) A very limited number of computers will be available for rental ($25) during the workshop. Please arrange this well before the conference with Ben Merbitz (ben-aba@xig.net)
Audience: Interested professionals may include BCBAs, academic behavior analysts, teachers, and administrators; AimChart supports data collection across agencies, consulting practices, schools, classroom, and other organization where it is desirable for key people to have 24/7 access to learning and performance data for clients and students. Parents, students, and other persons may set up AimChart accounts as individuals simply for convenient Charts, or for easier data analysis. We prefer that participants understand the basics of Precision Teaching and use of the Internet.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic

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