Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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32nd Annual Convention; Atlanta, GA; 2006

Program by Workshops: Friday, May 26, 2006


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
OBM: What it is and How to Use it in Human Services Organizations
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Regency VI
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John Austin, Ph.D.
JOHN AUSTIN (Western Michigan University)
Description: Summary: This workshop will guide participants through various concepts of performance improvement of individuals and groups in any organization, but especially in human services organizations. The strategies presented will assist attendees in identifying a performance problem, developing measures to collect data on it, diagnosing the problem, developing solutions for the problem, and developing a means for maintaining those solutions. This workshop is appropriate for those who conduct human performance improvement activities in organizational settings, as well owners/operators of small companies or administrators/managers/supervisors in human services or other organizations. Participants should come prepared with an actual performance problem from their organization that they would like to work through during the session.
Learning Objectives: By the end of the workshop participants should (be able to): 1. Identify the mission of your organization, department and job 2. Identify a pinpoint to focus improvements on 3. Develop a measurement system to measure the pinpoint 4. Diagnose the problem 5. Develop a solution and implementation plan for the problem 6. Develop a plan to maintain the solution 7. Know a collection of strategies that they can use to improve human performance
Activities: Participants should come to the workshop with ideas in mind for performances they would like to improve. The attendees will identifying a performance problem, develop measures to collect data on it, diagnose the problem, develop solutions for the problem, and develop a means for maintaining those solutions.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for those who conduct human performance improvement activities in organizational settings, as well owners/operators of small companies or administrators/managers/supervisors in human services or other organizations.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Human Performance Engineering to Achieve Desired Results
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Techwood
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: This workshop is designed to teach a practical and efficient approach to improve any type of human performance. The method is called Human Performance Engineering, (HPE) because like other types of engineering, it is an application of scientific principles to solve human problems. HPE is the application of behavior analysis to solve human performance problems so that individuals and organizations can achieve desired results. The process is called PARSE, an acronym which stands for 1) Pinpoint performance problems worth solving, 2) Analyze their causes, 3) Recommend the best solutions, 4) Solve the problems by designing and implementing the best solutions, and 5) Evaluate effectiveness, efficiency and return on investment of the solutions that you implemented. The PARSE process is cybernetic or self-correcting, because human performance engineers use data on the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of their solutions to redesign their solutions until they have achieved their desired results at an acceptable cost. The skills you acquire in this workshop will allow you to solve performance problems at the individual, process or organizational level.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop the participant will be able to perform the following skills: 1) After collecting information about a client�s desired results and the performance necessary to achieve those results, the designer will pinpoint the client�s performance problems by a) defining the client�s desired results and performance and b) evaluating current results and performance to decide whether the problem is worth solving. 2) Given information about the causes of a client�s performance problems, the designer will analyze those problems, classifying them as �can-do,� �know-how,� and/or �want-to� problems and identifying their causes as defective resources, training, and/or reinforcement contingencies. 3) Given an evaluation of the client�s current performance problems and an analysis of their causes, the designer will list possible solutions, considering the estimated value, cost and compliance of each solution with ethical standards, and recommend those solutions with the best return on investment. 4) Given a list of recommended solutions to a performance problem which may include resources, training, and performance management, the designer will solve the problem by designing and implementing the solutions. 5) After collecting measures of improvement in performance and results, the time and costs to produce the improvement, the designer will evaluate solution effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment, and recommend design changes needed to produce further improvements.
Activities: 1) Fluency practice. Participants will gain fluency in component skills of human performance engineering by practicing with flashcards, measuring and graphing their own learning efficiencies. 2) Practice solving human performance problems. Participants will practice solving human performance problems with case studies provided by the instructor. 3) Engineer solutions to human performance problems. Each participant will pinpoint a human performance problem, analyze its causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problem, and evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of the solutions. 4) Discuss performance engineering projects. Participants will discuss their performance-engineering projects, presenting their work to the instructor and fellow students and helping their fellow students solve project-related problems.
Audience: This workshop will be of interest to anyone responsible for solving human performance problems, whether these exist at the individual, process, or organizational levels. For example, it can be used by process engineers, trainers, and managers to improve individual, process, and organizational performance or it can be used by individuals to improve their own performance. It is designed to solve can-do, know-how, and want-to problems, by incorporating solutions from a behavior-analytic approach to the fields of process improvement, instructional design and performance management. For example, HPE can be used to evaluate and improve the design of information, procedures, and tools, or the design of training or educational programs, or the design of performance management procedures.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Functional Analysis and Treatment of "Psychotic" Topographies
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Inman
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Javier Virues Ortega, Ph.D.
TOMAS JESUS CARRASCO-GIMENEZ (Universidad de Granada), JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (Instituto de Salud Carlos III & Universidad de Granada)
Description: Functional analysis is a developing subject within ABA. Nevertheless, research on functional analysis methodology has been restricted to a few topographies. This workshop aims to review the literature on functional analysis of psychotic topographies from an applied behavioral-analytical standpoint. According to this framework, "psychotic" behaviors (e.g., delusions and hallucinations), can be partially explained as functional behaviors. In addition to the evidence currently available we will present a more comprehensive operant-based framework on psychotic topographies learning and development. Contingencies surrounding the onset of "psychotic disorders" will be analysed in terms of the particular behaviors and operant classes that are acquired. The workshop will be based on (a) the existing literature on functional analysis, (b) a theoretical analysis of psychotic topographies, and (c) a extensive series of case studies from the primary instructor clinical practice. We will describe the most common controlling contingencies and establishing operations for psychotic topographies. This information might work as clinical guidelines for performing functional analyses and designing functionally-based intervention programs for patients with "schizophrenia" and other forms of "psychotic" behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, the participants will be able to: 1. Formulate functional hypotheses explaining "psychotic" behaviors given a detailed clinical history. 2. Design a operant-based intervention driven by a pre-treatment functional analysis. 3. Identify the most common contingencies affecting patients with psychotic behaviors both early and late in their behavioral history. 4. Identify the most common establishing operations affecting patients with psychotic behaviors both early and late in their behavioral history. 5. Describe the shortcomings of functional analysis methodology implementation with patients with psychotic behaviors.
Activities: The workshop is interactive and participation is encouraged. Participants will be instructed on the use of theoretical and descriptive analyses of psychotic behaviors through a number of case studies. In addition, participants will take part in a series of exercises and structured role-play sessions. At the end of the workshop participants will conduct a hypothetic functional analysis of a case study and will design an operant-based intervention. All participants will be provided with a compact disc that contains the PowerPoint presentation of the workshop and additional materials to conduct FA of psychotic behaviors.
Audience: This workshop is intended for all professionals involved in the treatment of patients with "psychotic" behaviors, behavior analysts working at mental health units, faculty members, researchers, graduate students, managers, social workers, and mental health administrators. It would be particularly applicable to individuals interested on functional analysis methodology.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Promoting the Generalization and Maintenance of Skills in Learners with Autism and Related Disorders
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
University
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Private Practice)
Description: Educators and other services providers of learners with autism and related disorders are often faced with situations in which skills do not generalize or maintain over time. Many providers fail to recognize the steps they should be taking to promote generalization and maintenance or teach in ways that actually inhibit generalization; nonetheless, the field of applied behavior analysis offers both a framework and a number of methods that can be implemented to circumvent these challenges. During this workshop, the various forms of generalization (stimulus, response, and temporal generalization) will be described along with specific methods that may increase the likelihood that generalization and maintenance can be observed. Efforts to address generalization and maintenance need to be individualized fore ach learner, tailored to the target skill, and planned for in a systematic manner. More specifically, methods will be presented that can be incorporated at three broad phases in the teaching process, during treatment planning and prior to the initial teaching of a target skill, during the process of teaching hte particular target skill, and after the target skill is mastered. A framework for determining how best to maintain target skills after they are mastered will also be offered
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1) differentiate the various types of generalization; 2) recognize common obstacles and teaching approaches that impede generalization and maintenance; 3) design and implement a variety of strategies to promote generalization; 4) design and implement a variety of strategies to promote maintenance; 5) recognize learner and task characteristics that will inform when such strategies could be implemented; and 6) evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to promote generalization and maintenance.
Activities: Although workshop is primarily didactic, participants will be given many opportunities to engage in discussion and will participate in tasks that will concretize and synthesize the didactic information and increase the likelihood of later implementation. Videotape vignettes of a variety of teaching interactions will be provided to illustrate an array of generalization and maintenance strategies. Data collection tools and tracking forms relevant to generalization and maintenance will also be shared along with a bibliography of articles related to generalization. Examples will be provided throughout the presentation and adapted to the interests and needs of the participants.
Audience: This workshop will benefit professionals from a variety of disciplines, as well as parents who are significantly involved in the educational programming of learners with autism and related disorders. Participants should be familiar with behavior analytic teaching procedures, such as discrete trial instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Activity Schedules: Beyond Independent Activities
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Greenbriar
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: David M. Corcoran, M.S.
DAVID M. CORCORAN (BEACON Services), JOSEPH M. VEDORA (BEACON Services)
Description: Activity schedules have been employed with individuals with autism to promote independence and increase on-task behavior. The purpose of this workshop is to train participants in the use of various forms of visual activity schedules. There will be an overview on how to design schedules and teach students to use a basic activity schedule consisting of close ended activities. Variations in procedures, format and materials will be explored. Next, participants will learn how to expand upon basic activity schedule repertoires to: increase social and play skills, food acceptance, self-help skills, community behavior, choice; facilitate transitions and accept unexpected changes in routines. Lastly participants will receive instruction on the use of computerized activity schedules, including the use of video modeling.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1.Describe and set up basic activity schedules. 2.Identify settings and occasions to use them and learners to use them with. 3.Describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals� learning styles. 4.Troubleshoot and describe modifications enhancing usefulness of activity schedules. 5.Expand upon basic activity schedules.
Activities: 1. Review of Activity Schedule instructional methodology 2. Review of Activity Schedule data collection and error analysis/correction procedures 3. Hands on practice in the establishment and generalized use of activity schedules. 4. Review video taped exemplars of activity schedules
Audience: Teacher and parents working with children and adults with disabilities
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Childhood Psychiatric Disorders & Mental Issues: Functional Assessment & Behavioral Intervention
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Lenox
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University), LYNN A. OLSON PAGE (Regent University)
Description: Children with developmental disabilities, children with medical issues, and children in the child welfare system often develop several of the symptoms of various childhood psychiatric disorders, such as: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, bipolar disorder and reactive attachment disorder. These symptoms can develop as the result of factors such as: separation from parents during painful and/or prolonged treatment in a hospital setting, residential placement with limited staff and/or frequent turn-over, early abuse/neglect, multiple placements and multiple caregivers. Differential diagnosis becomes a critical issue in providing appropriate treatment and services for these children and their families. However, these children are often diagnosed based on behavior exhibited in hospital settings or during office visits and based on personality assessment instruments with questionable reliability and validity for children. Additionally, the treatment focus follows the medical model with the assumption that behavioral symptoms are the result of underlying psychopathology. Behavior analysts are in a unique position to provide more comprehensive diagnosis that includes observations of behavior in a variety of settings to determine the effect of various stimulus conditions and setting events, functional assessments to determine the causes and maintainers of various behavioral symptoms, and careful analysis of learning histories to determine the efficacy of various reinforcers and punishers. Behavior analysts are also able to provide assessment-driven treatment approaches, to design therapeutic environments that support the learning of appropriate replacement behaviors and to facilitate typical development rather than psychopathology.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to: 1. explain the differences between the medical and behavioral approaches to the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of psychopathology and medical issues in children 2. name some of the symptoms used in the differential diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder and reactive attachment disorder 3. describe the unique learning histories of children with psychiatric disorders and medical issues and how feelings serve as establishing operations in these children 4. tell why children with this learning history often are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, and conduct disorder in different developmental stages of their lives 5. identify how the behavioral model compliments consultation models in the tertiary hospital setting and identify several strengths of using functional behavioral assessment in a hospital setting 6. name some of the antecedents, behaviors and consequences that are unique in children with psychiatric diagnoses and medical issues 7. describe how to provide assessment-driven treatment and target specific behaviors that are unique in children with psychiatric diagnoses and medical issues
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and hospital settings, take notes, ask questions, view a power point presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, nurses, health care provides, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Reading with Morningside Generative Instruction
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Montreal
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy), LIBBY M. STREET (Central Washington University), ELIZABETH HAUGHTON (Haughton Learning Center), MARIANNE DELGADO (Morningside Academy), JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy)
Description: In the last 20 years we have seen the rise of functional assessment in the clinical thinking and procedures of educators, both within and outside of behavior analysis. This increasing focus upon the complex context in which we analyze and teach behavior requires many of us to become knowledgeable about school curriculum. Much of the disruptive behavior in schools that we are asked to change occurs as a function of poor curriculum and instruction. Many behavior analysts are now including academic components in treatment plans for non-school clients. In our experience working with over 95 schools and agencies, we have much more credibility, value, and influence when we propose to work not only on conduct, classroom management, disruptive behavior and discipline, but also with specific academic curriculum and instructional methods. A good place to start this work is the curricula of foundation skills, because deficits in areas such as reading, writing, and math are very much in the media and in public discussion. Foundation skills are also very amenable to behavior analysis and modification. It is important that we are thorough in our analysis and treatment of foundation skills, not just superficially acquainted with reading or math. Nor should we uncritically accept materials and methods that are being used in the school settings in which we work. Even in clinical settings we may introduce an academic foundation skills program as a powerful component of our treatment plan. This workshop will provide a thorough introduction to the area of reading. Mastery of the presentations and materials contained in this workshop will put you well on the road to becoming a reading expert. As workshop participants you will receive a minimal amount of materials to allow you to participate in practice exercises. We encourage you to purchase Morningsides Generative Reading Instruction three-ring binder available in the ABA Bookstore for $75. It includes all the materials we will present in our slide shows, as well as articles and sample teaching materials that will allow you to implement immediately upon your return home. Please purchase Generative Reading Instruction in the ABA Bookstore before you attend this workshop. For those who find this impossible, a few books may be available at the workshop.
Learning Objectives: � Learn to describe the most important components of effective reading instruction. � Learn to describe Morningside methods of teaching key components of reading instruction. � Learn to describe Morningside methods of practicing key components of reading instruction. � Learn to describe Morningside methods of applying key components of reading instruction to everyday life. � Practice Morningside methods of teaching several components of reading instruction. � Experience our methods of feedback and coaching as you practice. � Learn how to use our criteria to evaluate commercially available reading programs and instructional materials that are immediately available to you. � Make a plan to integrate reading instruction into your classroom, syllabus, or clinical program.
Activities: You will learn about the key components of a total reading program, including prerequisites to reading (language, phonemic awareness, phonological coding, and rapid automatic naming skills); phonics and decoding skills; vocabulary and background knowledge; comprehension skills & strategies; application of comprehension skills and strategies during reading; techniques for self-monitoring during reading; and learning skills such as rapid interaction with a teacher and peer, reasoning and problem solving repertoires, and participating in classroom discussions. We will present the basic principles for teaching each component, then show and model each component with commercially available reading curricula. You will practice some of these components in smaller breakout groups. We will give you feedback and coaching while you practice our methods. In this manner you will experience our methods of providing in-classroom coaching of teachers or clinicians who are implementing our reading programs. You will also be able to evaluate any reading program with our criteria.
Audience: Any teachers, clinicians, tutors, college professors, administrators, and organizational behavior managers who want to learn how to incorporate reading performance in their teaching and intervention plans.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Surfing the Third Wave: Functional Analytic Psychotherapy
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Auburn
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert J. Kohlenberg, Ph.D.
ROBERT J. KOHLENBERG (University of Washington), REO NEWRING (University of Washington), CHRISTEINE M. TERRY (University of Washington), MARY D. PLUMMER (University of Washington), GARETH I. HOLMAN (University of Washington)
Description: The focus of this workshop is learning to develop intense therapeutic relationships with outpatient psychotherapy clients. This workshop is for behavior analysts who want to apply functional analytic principles to outpatient mental health treatment and for practicing clinicians who want to incorporate functional analysis in their work. We will explain how a functional analysis in psychotherapy leads to a focus on the client-therapist relationship, and overview the basic principles of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP). Clinicians who are new to functional analysis or FAP are welcome and we also aim to present topics that go beyond the basics. Strategies and techniques for using the client-therapist relationship as a therapeutic tool will be introduced and practiced. The presenters will address challenges and concerns about focusing on the client-therapist relationship. Experiential learning, didactics, and case materials will be used to illustrate the principles of FAP. Participants will have opportunities to discuss ways of tailoring FAP to their needs and integrating this approach with other treatments. Finally, time permitting, we will address issues in training and supervising therapists.
Learning Objectives: This workshop will contain an overview of the basic principles of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and introduce strategies and techniques to apply these principles. Objective 1: To become familiar with the notion of in-vivo work. Objective 2: To understand how the identification, evocation, and modification (i.e., natural reinforcement) of in-vivo behavior can improve clinical outcomes. Objective 3: To learn the tools and techniques suggested in FAP. Objective 4: To practice strategies and discuss how these principles can be applied with participants� clients. Objective 5: To learn to use a functional analysis to assess and interpret client behavior and develop treatment plans. Objective 6: To experience the intensity of an in-vivo interaction within the constraints of the workshop. Objective 7: To introduce considerations for supervision and discuss difficulties in training therapists and applying the suggested strategies. By the end of the workshop, attendees should be able to use a number of FAP strategies, including case conceptualizing, identifying and evoking clinically relevant behaviors, assessing the effects of interventions, and focusing on the therapeutic relationship.
Activities: This workshop is a combination of didactic presentation, videotaped clinical case material, and a variety of exercises and activities. Participants will be encouraged to discuss ways to tailor FAP principles to their own clients. Attendees will have the opportunity to practice with materials frequently used in or adapted for FAP. In addition, materials will be provided to help participants apply the workshop strategies to their own practice. FAP is unique in that the treatment is tailored to the needs, history, and abilities of each client; the workshop presenters will use FAP strategies and techniques to tailor the workshop to the needs, history, and abilities of the attendees.
Audience: The workshop is aimed at several audiences. One is the behavior analyst who is interested in an introduction to therapy techniques and a behavior analytic interpretation of the therapeutic process. Because FAP is built on behavior analytic principles, anyone who understands BA can learn to focus on and improve their therapeutic relationships. Another is the therapist who is interested in applying functional analysis in his/her approach to treatment. Any therapist who is interested in increasing the intensity and/or salience of the therapeutic relationship, regardless of the type of interventions used, is invited to attend. Although the focus of the workshop will be on working with adult, outpatients with generally intact cognitive functioning, we welcome discussion of how these methods may apply to other populations. Because clinical material is being presented, the workshop is open only to faculty, graduate students, or professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Direct Instruction: Overview of Instructional Curriculum and Implementation with Non-Traditional Populations
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Baker
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, M.S.
WENDY L. KOZMA (BEACON Services), ANN FILER (BEACON Services), ROBERT K. ROSS (BEACON Services)
Description: This presentation will provide a review of outcome data related to the implementation of two (DI) curriculum components; Language for Learning and Reading Mastery in a population of children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The relevance for use with individuals with developmental disabilities will be demonstrated. Modifications of instruction and strategies to support the implementation of DI with children with ASD will be discussed and highlighted via videotape. The methods and structure of DI incorporate behavioral principles into instruction, including prompt fading, use of multiple exemplars and frequent measurement of efficacy. The instructors will provide in depth review of the types of instructional modifications required to implement DI with atypical learners. These modifications will include the use of token systems, visual schedules, additional visual prompts, presenting tasks in isolation and pre-teaching. These modifications although not specified in traditional DI scripts and trainings will be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: 1.Demonstrate beginning knowledge of Direct Instruction, as a teaching process with specific techniques and strategies. 2.Be able to implement at least three or more Direct Instruction instructional practices. 3.Demonstrate beginning knowledge of Direct Instruction, as a curriculum designed to teach reading decoding, comprehension, and language development skills. 4.Describe the data supporting successful implementation of Direct Instruction programs with children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. 5.List at least five modifications effective in the implementation of Direct Instruction programs with children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Activities: Didactic lecture, Video tape review, Interactive question and answer activities, Small group hands on practice
Audience: Those new to Direct instruction or those who wish to apply it to non-traditional populations such as those individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Developmental Disabilities.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Intensive Early Intervention: A Comprehensive Staff Training and Management System for Behavior Therapists
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Hong Kong
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest), KARA L. RIEDESEL (Lovaas Institute Midwest)
Description: In order to deliver effective early intervention services to a child with autism, the staff must possess a complete set of behavior analysis skills. The demands for sophisticated staff skills are extreme, requiring extensive individualization of each child's program. The purpose of this workshop is to identify the comprehensive variety of the required skills and present specific training programs which have been developed and validated to establish these skills and to manage the staff's behavior so that they are used consistently throughout the child's life. A particular challenge is to train staff to use independent clinical judgment and make the dynamic programming decisions on a daily basis that support optimal rates of child behavior development. In addition, the team leaders must possess the skills to organize and maintain consistent staff programming as the child's behavior rapidly develops. The skills necessary in the third year of programming are much more complex and varied than are those in the first year of programming. Dynamic self-feedback systems give the staff daily, weekly, and six-month feedback on the success of their treatment decisions, enabling the most cost-effective therapy for achieving the best outcomes. This workshop will present the competencies needed for effective child behavior therapy, and the methods used to train staff. The workshop will make extensive use of videos of actual staff training activities. The workshop will also present a data-collection system for staff management at the child and programmatic levels.
Learning Objectives: 1) identify a comprehensive array of staff competencies 2) identify effective methods for teaching these competencies 3) identify a system of management to integrate consistent staff behavior across a group of teams 4) identify an evaluation system for staff training 5) identify a system of dynamically self-adjusting staff training 6) identify essential competencies for behavior therapists 7) identify essential competencies for clinical supervisors
Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and problem-solving sessions. Video models of actual staff training activities will be used extensively. Participants will obtain specific program materials provided by the instructor.
Audience: The workshop is designed for parents, lead therapists, line therapists, consultants, and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavioral terms used in intensive early intervention. At least one-month's experience with intensive early intervention is preferable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Cognitive-Behavioral Strategies to Increase Social Skills in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Vancouver
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (Eden II Programs/The Genesis School), SHARON A. REEVE (Caldwell College)
Description: Individuals with autism exhibit many deficits in the area of socialization. It is often thought that behavior analysts are well equipped to decrease problematic behavior but are less equipped to teach adaptive behavior. Behavior analysts actually can teach social skills to individuals with autism and have many skills that will assist them in this endeavor. This workshop will focus on the role of stimulus control in the development of social skills. A blueprint for developing skills will be reviewed and specific teaching strategies based in applied behavior analysis will be discussed. Specific strategies will include the use of modeling, behavioral rehearsal, video modeling and video rehearsal, cognitive picture rehearsal and conducting ABC analyses on student's social behavior.
Learning Objectives: At completion of the workshop participants will have learned: 1. The role of stimulus control in social skill development. 2. How to use a blueprint to design a social skill development program. 3. How to operationalize social concepts such as "friendship" 4. How behavioral rehearsal can be used effectively with individuals with autism. 5. How cognitive picture rehearsal can be used to increase appropriate social behavior. 6. How to use self-monitoring techniques with individuals with autism to promote independence in their social skills. 7. How to teach a particular social skill using behavioral principles (e.g, task analysis, etc).
Activities: Participants will watch video clips depicting a variety of behavioral strategies that can be used to teach social skills. Specific activities will include creating drawings to be used for cognitive picture rehearsal, developing a story about a particular social situation and operationalizing and task analyzing specific social skills.
Audience: Psychologists, special educators, consultants, social workers, speech pathologists, parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Training Generative Verbal Behavior in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Centennial Ballroom IV
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John D. McElwee, M.S.
JOHN D. MCELWEE (Step By Step Academy), IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway)
Description: Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) is an effective behavior analysis based approach to remediation of deficits for Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) where communication is the core deficit. Although evidence based outcomes support EIBI, one persistent difficulty in the case of some clients has been the inability to train generativity i.e., the capacity to understand and produce novel or untrained verbal responses. One possible solution to this problem may be provided by Relational Frame Theory (RFT), a modern behaviour analytic approach to human language and cognition. RFT extends Skinners analysis of verbal behavior by conceptualizing language as generalized relational responding, thus providing new directions for behavioral research and intervention. The purpose of this workshop is to demonstrate how insights and procedures generated by the RFT approach might be applied in the EIBI domain. The first part of the workshop will involve a brief review of the core concepts of RFT. Prospective audience members should consult the tutorial on RFT provided at the following URL: http://www.relationalframetheory.com/tutorial/index.html. Core terms and concepts will also be provided in a handout. The workshop will first explain the history that gives rise to the core generalized operants which RFT sees as being essential to the development of language. It will explain how the analysis of verbal behavior in terms of what is known as relational framing can explain the extraordinary generativity characterizing language and will outline findings from RFT-based work that has used laboratory generated relational framing to model a diversity of linguistic and higher cognitive skills, with particular emphasis on those most obviously relevant to EIBI, such as derived naming, hierarchical relational responding and perspective taking. The second part of the workshop, which will involve greater participation by the audience than the first, will examine how RFT may be combined with EIBI to provide a comprehensive framework for teaching relational framing. It will examine existing EIBI curricula and show how Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (ABLLS) might be reinterpreted and extended using Relational Frame Theory, putting particular emphasis on the importance of the RFT-based concepts of multiple exemplar training, contextual control and derived relational performance outcomes. A curricular sequence and an assessment of generative skills beginning with basic conditional discriminations and progressing through various stages of non-arbitrary and arbitrary relational responding will then be provided. Starting with simple non-arbitrary auditory and visual identity matching, the framework will progressively target auditory-to-visual matching-to-sample, mutually entailed sound-object / object-sound relations, contextually controlled (SAME versus DIFFERENT) non-arbitrary visual and auditory matching, flexibility of contextual control and combinatorial entailment. Methods of assessment presented will include a revised version of the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities (ABLA). In addition, a customised computer program training and testing progressive stages of contextually controlled relational responding will also be available to members of the audience on a CD.
Learning Objectives: � Be able to understand how RFT approaches language � Be able to understand key theoretical concepts of RFT such as mutual and combinatorial entailment and transformation of function � Be familiar with several of the areas of the RFT empirical research programs that are relevant to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention � Understand and use techniques designed to train relational framing from a basic level � Be knowledgeable of how existing EIBI curricula and core training protocols such as the ABLLS might be reinterpreted and extended using Relational Frame Theory � Be familiar with methods of assessment of generativity such as the revised ABLA � Be able to implement a Relational Frame based training protocol, using a CD-ROM based computer program that will be provided to all members of the audience
Activities: � Didactic Instruction � Small Group Work � Brief Exercises � Handouts � CD
Audience: The audience will be therapists with expertise in the analysis of verbal behavior and the implementation of EIBI programs that are interested in applying principles of Relational Frame Theory in the EIBI domain. Prospective audience members should consult the tutorial on RFT provided at the following URL: http://www.relationalframetheory.com/tutorial/index.html
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Sign Language to Hearing Children and Adults with Down Syndrome, Autism, and Other Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Regency VII
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), TROY A. FRY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), COLLEEN CORNWALL (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates)
Description: Many children and adults with Down Syndrome, Autism, and other developmental disabilities, do not communicate using spoken words. At the present time, the most popular alternative communication response forms include selecting pictures or words manually or with electronic devices. This workshop, which is based on B.F. Skinners analysis of verbal behavior and the work of Michael, Sundberg, Partington, and many others, provides participants with a new look at the advantages and disadvantages of sign language, demonstrations of many learners using signs, and practice teaching learners sign mands, tacts, and intraverbals.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, each participant will be able to: (1) describe the importance of the echoic repertoire, (2) describe when an alternative communication response form � signing, pictures, or augmentative devices � is necessary, (3) describe the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative communication response forms, (4) describe and implement effective procedures for teaching sign mands (5) transfer sign mands to tacts and intraverbals, (6) collect data while teaching sign mands, tacts, and intraverbals, and (7) adjust teaching procedures when common problems occur in teaching sign mands, tacts, and intraverbals.
Activities: This workshop will provide: (1) written descriptions, (2) videotape demonstrations, (3) live demonstrations, and (4) practice activities.
Audience: The target audience for this introductory workshop includes teachers, behavior analysts, speech-language pathologists, and others who work with children and adults with developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Curriculum for Intensive, Early Intervention Program for Children with Autism: The First Three Phases
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Regency V
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Barbara A. Metzger, Ph.D.
BARBARA A. METZGER (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools), ANGELA L. POLETTI (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools)
Description: The first three phases of a curriculum for teaching young children with autism will be presented. The curriculum is presented in a flow chart format that specifies the sequence of teaching programs as well as grouping the programs by level of difficulty into three phases. The curriculum has a heavy emphasis on teaching early language and play skills. The curriculum also covers imitation, school readiness and self-help skills. Teaching methodologies and strategies, problem solving, and video clips for beginning programs and advanced programs will be presented. Systems for maintenance and generalization will be presented. Each participant will be given a copy of the curriculum flow chart as well as the corresponding "consultant" notes.
Learning Objectives: 1. Read the curriculum flow chart to determine the sequence of skills. 2. Identify the programs of the first three phases of the curriculum. 3. Identify the goal of each program. 4. Identify potential mistakes of each program. 5. Identify teaching tips for each program. 6. Demonstrate the steps of discrimination training. 7. Demonstrate the left to right visual work system. 8. Identify the types of generalization. 9. Read the maintenance system flow chart. 10. Identify play activities to incorporate into your teaching.
Activities: 1. Watch video clips of specific programs and specific teaching methods/strategies 2. Lecture 3. Question and answer 4. In vivo practice of teaching methodologies/strategies
Audience: Parents and professionals who want to learn about the curriculum and methodologies to teach a young child with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Review of Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior: Theoretical and Applied Implications
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Fairlie
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Caio F. Miguel, Ph.D.
CAIO F. MIGUEL (New England Center for Children)
Description: In his book Verbal Behavior, Skinner described language acquisition using well-known principles of learning. He described a way of categorizing language based on the environment functions, rather than underlying cognitive structures and processes. Skinners environmental account of language acquisition has been useful for research and application, especially when teaching children with autism, whose verbal repertoires are usually deficient. In this workshop participants will be introduced to the behavior analytic model of language development by learning how to identify language units/verbal operants based on their environmental functions. Both selection-based and topography based verbal behavior will be considered. The implications of Skinners analysis for teaching language to individuals with disabilities will be discussed. Participants will also review the empirical evidence for a VB analysis of language and identify topics for future research.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to describe the behavior analytic model of language development Participants will identify and classify language units/verbal operants Participants will distinguish selection based vs topography based VB Participants will be able to identify areas for future research in the analysis of VB Participants will be able to list some of the implications of Skinner�s analysis to teach language Participants will be able to define and give examples of secondary and higher order verbal operants such as the autoclitic and the naming repertoire.
Activities: Attendees will participate in didactic presentations, discussions and exercises.
Audience: Those interested in a conceptual understanding of Skinners analysis of VB as it pertains to teaching language to individuals with disabilities.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Sleep Issues in Autism Spectrum Children
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Dunwoody
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert W. Montgomery, Ph.D.
ROBERT W. MONTGOMERY (Reinforcement Unlimited)
Description: Pediatric sleeplessness and sleep disruptions are among the most common concerns of all parents. Sleep concerns are also among the most common of concerns expressed by parents of ASD Children to their pediatricians. Excessive sleepiness in a child is a symptom that is often under recognized and misinterpreted, but when left untreated can exacerbate or lead to serious behavioral, academic, developmental, and medical consequences. Pediatric sleeplessness is widely prevalent and often behaviorally based. Research supports that pediatric sleeplessness can be treated effectively with nonpharmacologic interventions. This workshop reviews the nature of sleep and sleep disruption (including common pediatric sleep disorders), and introduces the participant to behavioral treatment strategies (e.g., extinction, parent education, positive routines, sleep hygiene). Finally, behavioral issues and research on sleep for children in the autism spectrum are integrated throughout the presentation.
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will be able to identify 3 major forms of sleep disturbance. 2) Participants will be able to identify the major reasons for a medical referral relating to sleep disturbance. 3) Participants will be able to explain the implications of various medication classes on sleep. 4) Participants will be able to explain the research support of the use of melatonin for pediatric sleeplessness. 5) Participants will be able to identify the 5 stages of sleep. 6) Participants will be able to implement a BEARS screening assessment of sleep disturbance. 7) Participants will be able to distinguish between Extinction and Graduated Extinction as they relate in the literature to sleep hygiene and sleep disturbance.
Activities: Workshop participants will participate in didactic presentation, case-examples, individual completion of a sleep hygiene assessment, and question and answer session.
Audience: Those who work with children and adolescents in the Autism Spectrum.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Functional Analysis in School Settings
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Cairo
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bryan J. Davey, Ph.D.
MICHAEL M. MUELLER (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.), DANA TRAHANT (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.), AJAMU NKOSI (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.), BRYAN J. DAVEY (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.)
Description: The full day workshop will highlight the application of Functional Behavior assessment (FBA) methodology in a variety of school settings. Functional analysis, one component of a comprehensive FBA, has been demonstrated as an effective assessment procedure used to determine the reinforcer for severe problem behavior. Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982) described for the first time what have become typical conditions used in functional analyses. Given the dynamic and often changing environment of school settings, procedures can, and should, be modified to fit those instances when the referral environment differs from typical functional analysis conditions. The workshop will begin with a review of current literature on functional behavioral assessments that include functional analyses conducted in public schools with school age children presenting with a variety of developmental disorders. Population characteristics, educational placement, functional behavior assessment methodologies and outcomes, and treatment selection and outcomes will be presented and discussed. The review will be followed by the presentation of the May South assessment model, which includes indirect, direct, and experimental measures. However, the discussion will focus on contextual factors that must be addressed prior to and during assessment in school settings. Some of those changes include adjustments made to typical functional analysis conditions, shortening or lengthening the duration of functional analysis conditions, including atypical reinforcers in test conditions, testing abnormal school behaviors, and using other professionals as therapists. To illustrate these points, the workshop will include multiple data sets depicting traditional and innovative functional analyses in school settings for a variety of problem behaviors. All data sets, sometimes after extended analysis, identify reinforcers for severe behavior in school settings and all interventions were based on those results. Instructors will lead an audience in a discussion on creating easy to use, nonaversive, effective, and acceptable interventions. A synthesis of the presentations and general comments regarding the current state of analysis and treatment of problem behavior in schools settings will conclude the workshop.
Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the continuum of services involved in comprehensive Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA). 2. Conduct a comprehensive FBA, including indirect, direct and experimental analyses. 3. Derive hypotheses from indirect and direct assessments that suggest test conditions for a functional analysis (FA). 4. Setup a school based FA. 5. Conduct a FA that is responsive to school contextual factors. 6. Understand how and when to use dynamic or innovative test conditions. 7. Interpret FA outcomes for subsequent or intervention planning
Activities: Participants will be provided concise instructions, copious handouts, and several models, followed by multiple case examples presented by instructors. These presentations will be followed by a question and answer period to ensure skill acquisition. Finally, participants will complete a comprehensive case example that provides opportunities for participants to solve challenges inherent in functional analysis conducted in school settings. The comprehensive case example will consolidate and increase fluency of the skills described and taught during the instructional phase of the workshop. Additionally, participants will be encouraged to present questions in regard to previous functional analysis experiences.
Audience: Practitioners, students, researchers, educational service providers, and others interested in functional analysis methodology and function based interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: None
Getting Set to Understand the Talks: Building Vocabulary and Concepts
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Learning Center
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bobby Newman, Ph.D.
BOBBY NEWMAN (Room to Grow)
Description: This is an introductory workshop aimed at those who are new to the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. The workshop will emphasize developing an understanding of the basic vocabulary and concepts that are central to understanding the books, journals, and presentations of ABA. In addition to building basic vocabulary and understanding of the basic concepts, a portion of the time will be spent "translating" the vocabulary of other fields into language and concepts compatible with ABA.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will become fluent in the basic vocabulary of ABA. 2. Participants will be able to translate concepts from other fields into language compatible with ABA. 3. Participants will learn the basics of common behavior management techniques. 4. Participants will learn the basics of common teaching techniques. 5. Participants will learn how and when to use common data collection techniques. 6. Participants will learn to draft basic behavioral goals and objectives. 7. Participants will learn to avoid common treatment mistakes that come about from misunderstandings of particular ABA techniques.
Activities: This will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and analysis of audio and video materials.
Audience: Parents and direct care workers who are fairly new to the field of Applied Behavior Analysis, or those who wish to brush up on the basics.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: None
Behavior Therapists: What They Do and Why They Do It
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Piedmont
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Theodosia R. Paclawskyj, Ph.D.
THEODOSIA R. PACLAWSKYJ (Kennedy Krieger Institute), ERIK A. MAYVILLE (Connecticut Center for Child Development)
Description: This is a workshop intended to make technical information accessible to anyone interested in the development and implementation of a behavior program for persons with developmental disabilities. There are many clinicians working in applied behavior analysis who implement programs for their patients or students without the means or opportunity to fully explain the background and rationale for treatment selection. However, families looking to help their children want to do so to the best of their abilities and would benefit from acquiring the knowledge that would allow them not only to carry over effective strategies into the home setting but to teach new behaviors on their own. Learning the foundations of applied behavior analysis allows a caregiver to move beyond implementation to intervention design. We will review applied behavior analysis in the contexts of both interventions for improving maladaptive behavior and for educational programming. Throughout the workshop, we will encourage open discussion of the rationale and practicality of what is described; especially in terms of why a strategy is selected over other possibilities, when do procedures feel artificial and when a more naturalistic approach is important, what procedures are essential yet difficult to routinely implement, what strategies are useful for maintaining consistency in public versus home or school settings, and how to manage conflicts between personal views on child-rearing with recommended behavioral interventions. For skill acquisition programs, we will also compare routine versus best practice interventions in special education as well as behavioral programming in special education versus general education settings.
Learning Objectives: - Draw comparisons between common behavioral interventions and their parallels in everyday interactions and situations - identify the critical skills necessary to develop both behavior reduction and educational programs - Define the essential components according to current best practices of a behavior program for decreasing maladaptive behavior - Define and Describe valid methods of descriptive, ecological, functional and reinforcer assessments - Define and Describe research-based interventions that target reduction of maladaptive behaviors through antecedent modifications, remediation of skill or performance deficits, environmental modifications, reinforcement-based interventions and specific consequences - Define and Describe research-based interventions in the educational setting that address skill acquisition, including the selection of different instructional strategies - List the common misconceptions about applied behavior analysis and discuss strategies to promote their resolution - Describe the full scope of behaviors and situations in which persons of all functioning levels can benefit from behavioral intervention - identify circumstances during which the provision of appropriate behavioral services is questionable and the mechanisms through which a well-trained behavior analyst can be identified
Activities: Presentation of information will take place in a lecture format with open discussion encouraged throughout the workshop. Participants will have the opportunity to view slides, videos, and hands-on demonstrations and role-plays as well as to bring up individual case examples.
Audience: Parents and caregivers of children and adults with developmental disabilities
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Others to Teach Children with Autism: What to Teach and How to Teach It
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
International Ballroom North
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Colin Peeler, Ph.D.
COLIN PEELER (Behavior Solutions, Inc.)
Description: Increases in the prevalence of autism, a growing body of literature supporting ABA, and recognition among the government that ABA is the best treatment for autism have all led to a demand for ABA services greater than the current supply of qualified providers. Unfortunately, because of this the quality and/or quantity of services these children receive is typically below the best practice standard and as such their gains are not maximized. However, it is possible through better training and supervision (i.e., better consultation) that behavior analysts and other trained autism therapists (including parents) can teach almost anyone how to provide intensive behavior therapy thereby improving the quality and quantity of providers available. The presenter will discuss the difference between best practice standards as defined by the literature and actual practice as it is affected by training and funding issues. A large portion of the workshop will focus on the 3 key skills all therapists should know (therapy skills, training skills, consultation skills) and how to assess and train them. Lastly, the presenter will discuss how to efficiently supervise an in home program given a limited amount of time to do so.
Learning Objectives: - Describe findings from the literature on IBT as a treatment for Autism - Identify critical components of an IBT program that are associated with improved outcomes - Describe funding/training issues and how they impact one�s ability to implement the most effective IBT program - Describe the sequence of training events to maximize the effectiveness of a new therapist working with a child with autism - Describe the 10 Basic Therapist Skills for working with a child with autism and correctly score them from videotapes - Learn basic consultation skills each therapist should know that will improve the consistency and efficacy of the therapy across therapists - Describe how to supervise and manage a team of therapists within current funding issues
Activities: Video examples will be used throughout and participants will learn how to score therapist skills from the video examples.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, autism therapists and consultants, parents looking to set up and manage an in home program, those who want to learn the basics of intensive behavior therapy or those who are responsible for training these skills to others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Smart and Sensitive Parenting Program (SSPP): Teaching Parents How to Effectively Deal with Their Children's Behavioral Difficulties
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Centennial Ballroom III
Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Amos E. Rolider, Ph.D.
AMOS E. ROLIDER (Emek Yezreel College, Israel), ROBYN M. CATAGNUS (Clarity Behavioral Consulting)
Description: In this workshop, a parent consultation model entitled The Smart and Sensitive Parenting Program (SSPP) will be presented. This model emphasizes teaching parents to rearrange significant context variables and to discover the antecedents and functions of their childrens most burdensome behaviors. Parents subsequently learn to identify the function of their own responses to their childrens inappropriate behaviors and are trained to select and apply simple and effective interventions based on the discovery of antecedents and maintaining consequences.
Learning Objectives: The following will be discussed learned and demonstrated: 1. Identifying behaviors and typical parental responses associated with: a. The termination of a preferred activity of reinforcer. b. Refusal or inability to provide a preferred activity or reinforcer. c. Demand situations d. Transition from preferred activity to non-preferred activity e. Elicited emotional outbursts 2. The importance of preparing an established weekly schedule and set of expectations, and the role of: a. The weekly family meeting b. The daily family meeting 3. Preparing children for antecedents in the form of difficult situations. 4. Selecting an appropriate response based on the function of the inappropriate behavior. 5. Selecting an appropriate motivational program based on DRO/DRA.
Activities: We will practice using the model to deal with children's most common inappropriate behaviors: a. Bickering and refusal b. Tantrums and aggression c. Over-dependence d. School-related problems e. Other problems at the participants' requests
Audience: Practitioners who work with or are interested in working with parents of children who exhibit a variety of behavioral issues
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior for Language Assessment and Intervention for Children with Autism
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Courtland
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D.
MARK L. SUNDBERG (Sundberg and Associates)
Description: B.F. Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior has provided professionals and parents with a conceptual roadmap for analyzing and treating language disorders. This workshop will begin with a brief overview of B. F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, followed by a presentation of the most recent applications of the analysis to language assessment and intervention. The major focus will be on the use of a verbal behavior analysis to examine a number of common language barriers that often impede language acquisition. Participants will learn intervention strategies that may help to remove those barriers. In addition, this workshop will present the most recent task analysis of the verbal operants, and strategies for teaching each of them.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to use a behavioral approach to language assessment (e.g., mands, tacts, and intraverbals). Participants will be able to explain how a behavioral analysis of language is different from a cognitive analysis of language Participants will be able to describe how to teach manding Participants will be able to describe how to teach intraverbal behavior Participants will be able to describe the common elements of matching-to-sample, receptive discriminations, and RFFC Participants will be able to explain how to use the concepts from the book Verbal Behavior to analyze language deficits Participants will be able to explain how to use concepts from the book Verbal Behavior to analyze language curricula
Activities: Attendees will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and exercises in the analysis of verbal behavior. A 250 page handout will be provided to each participant.
Audience: Participants should have a strong working knowledge of behavior analysis and some interest in the application of behavior analysis to language assessment and intervention.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supporting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Public School Settings
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Manila
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Maria Garrett, M.S.
NICOLE WEIDENBAUM (Nassau-Suffolk Services for Autism), MARIA GARRETT (Nassau-Suffolk Services for Autism), JENNIFER MARY KADEN (Nassau-Suffolk Services for Autism), MICHELE MELVIN (Nassau-Suffolk Services for Autism), KATHLEEN MANNION (Nassau-Suffolk Services for Autism)
Description: The transition to, and success in, public school often present significant challenges to learners with Autism Spectrum Disorders and to their support staff. For support staff, the issue is further complicated by the need to design individualized interventions and supports necessitated by the complex learning, social, and behavior demands of a public school environment. This workshop will focus on assisting students with ASD to navigate the complexities public school settings including academic challenges, developing friendships, teasing and bullying, along with recommendations for assessment and modifications and promoting independence and social skills.
Learning Objectives: 1) create measurable and functional objectives for students with autism 2) conduct functional behavior assessments 3) design data collection systems for use in public school classrooms 4) design behavior intervention plans 5) modify curriculum 6) promote social skills in inclusion environments 7) conduct peer training 8) create strategies for positive team interactions including family participation 9) better understand a parent's perspective
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation as well as small group discussion, role plays, and trouble-shooting sessions. Participants will also be involved in data collection and curriculum modification exercises, as well as the design of behavior plans and writing of measurable objectives.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals who are involved with individuals with autism in public school settings including psychologists, behavior analysts, special educators, speech pathologists, parents, and school administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
OBM PART I: Using Organizational Behavior Management Approaches in Human Services Programs
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Spring
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (B. F. Skinner Institute; Orlando Behavior Health, LLC), JOSEPH D. CAUTILLI (Children Crisis Treatment Center/Temple University)
Description: This workshop will provide a theoretical framework for utilizing behavior analysis principles of organizational behavior management, combining it with methods from CQI and statistical process control, as applied to human services provider organizations (Hantula, 1995; Babcock, Fleming & Oliver, 1999). Organizational management and human resources (HR) applications are a growing area for behavior analysts, who have the unique skills and experience to utilize principles of behavior analysis to improve processes and functions in human services organizations. One particular area of interest for behavioral practitioners will be organizational behavior management (OBM). OBM conceptualizes and empirically solves organizational problems. This workshop will provide participants with the concepts and knowledge to increase their potential for professional behavioral consultation to human services organizations. Operation issues tend to plague many mental health and service industry professions. It is our experience that organizational behavior management has much to offer traditional operations in job design, analysis, and HR management. In addition, OBM readily lends itself to improve the quality of treatment services in human service organizations that provide services to people with mental retardation, developmental disabilities, autism, and emotional/behavioral disorders. This presentation will focus on applying the basics of OBM to the development of successful service operations, and provide data from a demonstration research project conducted in a residential treatment facility serving these populations. Management involves the acquisition and use of resources. OBM redefines management from control of the person to control of the context/environment in which the person works. It has developed powerful techniques for a range of management areas, and can be used to improve the integrity and quality of treatment approaches being used in a human service organization. (Cautilli & Clarke, BAT, 2000, Weinberg et. al., BAT, 2001; Daniels, 1989).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) Develop management by team objective programs. 2) Analyze performance problems from a traditional operations perspective. 3) Identify ways that OBM can enhance this approach. 4) Understand operations and HR approaches to enhance employee performance, and to achieve a company's strategic goals. 5) Use OBM in operations to enhance treatment integrity. 6) Use statistical process control to determine when to intervene (P-Chart) 7) Set up functionally based programs with the supervision of all staff as the cornerstone. 8) Set up benchmarks and define outcomes for successful interventions. 9) Understand the essential skills of an effective manager. 10) Understand key skills to devise performance objectives linked to evaluation, mission of the organization, and performance-contingent salary increases. 11) Identify basic principles of the 6-Sigma approach.
Activities: Participants will work in breakout groups to: o Devise performance objectives for professionals and staff linked to the organization�s mission; o Consider human resource and management issues in their organization and devise potential solutions using OBM methods; o Arrange for use of assessment methods covered in the workshop to address employee performance issues in human services settings
Audience: Behavior analysts, human resources professionals, program directors or administrators of human services organizations, OBM professionals, and students in OBM track programs.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Radical Behaviourism and the Counseling Process: Constructional Bones, Solution-Focused Flesh
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Vinings
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Johnny Williams, Ph.D.
JOHNNY WILLIAMS (University of Waterloo)
Description: This workshop has been created to reflect the emergence of methods that are consistent with a goal-directed, competency-oriented approach to counseling/psychotherapy. Elements of a radical behavioral viewpoint will be related to practices, strategies, and concepts involved in helping others. The aim is to help provide attendees who are interested in or familiar with radical behaviorism with the ability to begin using this perspective when working with clients. It will also be of interest to those with a counseling background who wish to know how counseling approaches are related to a radical behavioral perspective. The workshop will consist of five components: a review of pertinent features of a radical behavioral perspective, the relationship to counseling/psychotherapeutic practices and strategies, a description of the basic components of a constructional approach, illustrations of these components, and exercises to facilitate acquisition of this perspective and these skills (with take-home material to facilitate continued practice).
Learning Objectives: 1. Basic aspects of a radical behavioral analysis and their relationship to counseling approaches. 2. The importance and usefulness of maintaining a radical behavioral semantic framework and eschewing creeping/tempting mentalistic cognitivism. 3. The importance of working within a goal-directed framework as opposed to a traditional categorical diagnostic system. 4. The basic outlook and repertoire of constructional/solution-focused skills. 5. How these skills reflect a different perspective on client situations than do other approaches. 6. The skills in use and as they have been used in client situations. 7. Trial and practice of constructional skills so participants can begin developing a constructional repertoire. 8. The timing and use of skills in client situations.
Activities: Teaching activities include: presentation of conceptual and practical material, self-testing of the acquisition of this material, video illustration of the skills and their application, practice in using basic constructional skills via exercises and role play, and discussion of participants� application questions.
Audience: Practitioners, prospective practitioners, and others who see the world from a radical behavioral viewpoint and wish to expand their counseling repertoire with practices consistent with this perspective.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supplemental Measurement in Behavior Analysis: Strategies to Improve Accountability and Evaluate the Achievement of Ultimate Outcomes for Children and Their Families
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Singapore
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jonathan A. Worcester, Ph.D.
JONATHAN A. WORCESTER (New Tampa Behavioral Health, LLC)
Description: While precise and empirical measurement of the implementation of the independent variable and its corresponding target and replacement behaviors is and will always remain a hallmark of behavior analysis, experts have long discussed the role of social importance and subjective criteria within the field (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968; Wolery, 1994; Wolf, 1978). As the field of behavior analysis continues to expand, so does the need to demonstrate the relevance of its application. Consequently, the purpose of this workshop will be to operationally define and discuss types of objective and subjective supplemental measures available to behavior analysts providing services to children and families (e.g., social validation, parent satisfaction, quality of life, procedural fidelity, positive/negative adult statements). Participants in this workshop will: 1) obtain an exposure to some of the available objective and subjective measures used to document the social importance of behavior change within the context of the child and familys natural environment; 2) review illustrative case examples and their corresponding methods of measurement; and 3) discuss the inclusion of supplemental measures relative to functional assessments and the implementation of functional assessment-based intervention plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. Describe the role of �social importance� and subjective criteria within the field. 2. Identify types of objective and subjective supplemental measures behavior analysts can use to demonstrate accountability and support progress toward ultimate outcomes. 3. Define social validation, procedural fidelity, contextual fit, and quality of life. 4. Identify strategies and tools for measuring social validation, procedural fidelity, contextual fit, parent satisfaction, and quality of life. 5. Discuss ways by which supplemental measures may be used within functional assessments and/or their corresponding behavior intervention plans. 6. Discuss the specific strengths and limitations associated with individual supplemental measures. 7. Describe how the inclusion of supplemental measures may be used to enhance the quality of behavior analytic service delivery.
Activities: Participation in this workshop will entail the following: 1. Lecture 2. Discussion/question & answer 3. Brief quiz at end of session to assess acquisition of learning objectives.
Audience: Professionals and students currently engaged in clinical applications of applied behavior analysis with children and families.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Consulting the Behavioral Way: The Pyramid Approach to Shaping Performance in Autism Educational Services
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Roswell
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Beth Sulzer-Azaroff, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants), BETH SULZER-AZAROFF (Browns Group Naples)
Description: This workshop focuses on how be an effective consultant to programs for children with autism and related disabilities. We will address how to use behavioral strategies to shape the performance of people providing services within school, community, and home-based settings. Critical topics will include identifying key antecedents to both the behavior of the consultant and of those being advised. Important behavioral targets for various people responsible for serving children will be noted. Finally, we review reinforcement strategies designed to help maintain the performance of service providers. We also plan to discuss our views on appropriate ethical conduct for consultants. Each of these elements is based upon our work, The Pyramid Approach to Education in Autism (Bondy & Sulzer-Azaroff, 2002).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to provide written examples of: 1) Appropriate antecedents associated with the performance of the service provider as well as the consultant. 2) Critical target behaviors of the service provider, support personnel, as well as the consultant. 3) Strategies for identifying and using powerful reinforcers for service providers and support personnel. 4) Ethical issues associated with providing behaviorally-based consultation.
Activities: Participants will receive a copy of The Pyramid Approach to Education as well as other supportive material. We will review the basic structure for this approach to organizing educational factors for children with autism and related disabilities. We summarize the rationale for introducing the Pyramid elements in a sequential fashion. Participants will go over forms designed to help implement the model as well as help service providers plan to use central principles of applied behavior analysis. Participants will have an opportunity to begin to plan how to use the structure in their current consultancies. Forms are provided that are designed to help service providers plan their day around functional activities while embedding functional communication goals. Participants will begin to identify critical reinforcers associated with the service providers they consult, including key personnel with regard to the service provider.
Audience: Consultants, supervisors, or advisors to staff working with children with autism or related disabilities, or individuals about to embark on such activities. Participants should be well versed in the fundamentals of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Creating Academic Programs for Children with Autism and Other Disabilities Using Microsoft PowerPoint
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Harris
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: William A. Flood, M.A.
WILLIAM A. FLOOD (May South, Inc.), STEPHEN T. NORTH (May South, Inc.), PAUL W. HEERING (R Plus, LLC)
Description: When creating academic programs (school or home-based) for children with Autism and other developmental disabilities, it is challenging to develop programs that are reinforcing to each child. In an effort to find higher reinforcing activities, a greater number of classrooms are using computers for either teaching academic skills or as pure reinforcing activities. Recent advances in technology have allowed for the creation of extremely innovative electronic educational software that many children find reinforcing. Unfortunately, many of these programs are designed for typically developing children and do not use the principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis. This workshop will teach you how to create low-cost academic programs on the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint with the intention of teaching and/or generalizing skills. The workshop will give a basic overview of how to use the program Microsoft PowerPoint. You will learn how to integrate behavioral principles and procedures into the computer program to ensure the most effective teaching. Finally, the instructor will display examples of academic programs created and successfully implemented with children with autism. Participants are encouraged to bring their personal laptops and develop academic programs alongside the instructor.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: � Operate the basic functions of the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint. � Identify common mistakes from traditional multimedia teaching programs. � Create basic academic programs in PowerPoint. � Integrate behavior principles (e.g., prompting, prompt fading, reinforcement, extinction, etc.) into their academic programs. � Recognize various academic programs (e.g., match-to-sample, receptive object identification, reading comprehension) that can easily be taught with PowerPoint.
Activities: The workshop will begin with a brief lecture about the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint. The remainder of the workshop will consist of interactive hands-on teaching in which the participants are systematically guided through the creation of academic programs in PowerPoint. The participants are strongly encouraged to use their personal laptop computers and create academic programs concurrently with the instructor.
Audience: Teachers, parents, behavior analysts, or anyone in charge of creating curriculum for children with disabilities/autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Helping Parents of Children with Autism or Developmental Delays: An Acceptance and Commitment Training Approach
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Edgewood
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel J. Moran, Ph.D.
DANIEL J. MORAN (MidAmerican Psychological Institute), JOHN TANNER BLACKLEDGE (University of Nevada, Reno), PATRICIA BACH (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Description: The parents of developmentally disabled children experience high levels of chronic stress (DeMyer, 1979; Holroyd, Brown, Wikler, & Simmon, 1975), and have high rates of depressive and anxiety disorders (Breslau & Davis, 1986). While most researchers understand that such concerns are largely secondary or reactive to the stress and special non-normative adaptations these children require (Konstantareas, 1990, p. 60), the fact remains that high levels of distress in these contexts both decrease quality of life and impose significant barriers to the parents successful & consistent implementation of behavioral treatment programs. It thus appears prudent for ABA consultants to also be prepared to help the parents of the referred client. This workshop will help ABA consultants be aware of signs of significant parental psychological distress, and help them make appropriate referrals. In addition, this workshop will also discuss an Acceptance and Commitment Training approach to helping these parents with their distress and challenges. Results, for example, from Using Acceptance and Commitment Training in the Support of Parents of Children Diagnosed with Autism (Blackledge & Hayes, in press) showed that general distress (as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventorys G) and depression levels (BDI-II) decreased significantly after group ACT training, and that these changes were maintained 3 months after the treatment was delivered, and that these changes were mediated by ACTs core processes. The workshop will focus on the ACT consistent assessment and the pertinent ACTraining exercises and interventions that can be helpful to distressed parents. The workshop will cover values assessment, barriers to values-based behavior and relevant mindfulness exercises. A significant portion of the workshop will focus on applying ACT interventions.
Learning Objectives: 1) Attendees will become more aware of how parental distress interferes with the successful implementation of behavioral programs. 2) Attendees will learn to recognize and functionally analyze problematic behavior on the part of the caregiver. 3) Attendees will be introduced to the ACT approach to addressing problematic experiential avoidance exhibited by distressed caregivers. 4) Attendees will understand the reasons for and usefulness of values assessment in helping parents improve their functioning when helping their children, and also to improve their own quality of life. 5) Attendees will be introduced to acceptance and defusion exercises (e.g., mindfulness exercises) applicable to the distress they and parents of their child clients experience in the process of working with developmentally disabled children and adults.
Activities: A significant portion of this workshop will focus on the application of ACT exercises and interventions. We will discuss the major areas in the ACT model for behavioral flexibility and how it relates to being a parent with a child with disabilities. The participants can choose to engage in exercises in developing their own value system, and then learn what barriers impede value-guided behaviors. The workshop will also be guided by a slide show and slide show handouts will be distributed.
Audience: This workshop is for behavior analysts who work with children with developmental disabilities or autism-spectrum disorders. This will also be worthwhile for parents of children with disabilities. The presenters plan a comfortable pace to introducing ACTraining and this workshop will be useful to anyone interested in the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy approach.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB
Overview of Standard Celeration Charting
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Marietta
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), CLAY M. STARLIN (University of Oregon), ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), HENRY S. PENNYPACKER (University of Florida), JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
Description: This workshop will teach participants to read and chart human performance on the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). Participants will learn: important features of the chart, the rationale for monitoring performance frequencies, standard SCC conventions, how to chart performance across varying lengths of counting time, and how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The presenters will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of setting to illustrate key concept taught in the workshop. Examples from the areas of university teaching, intervention with children with autism, educational intervention with students with learning disabilities, general public school education, and the monitoring of private events will be used. All participants will receive a copy of all materials used in the workshop including a CD-ROM containing additional copies of the presentation materials, forms, example videos, and an animation-based tutorial.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: � Read human performance data charted on all versions of the SCC. � Chart human performance data charted on all versions of the SCC. � Describe data on the SCC in terms of its frequency (level), celeration (trend), and bounce (variability). � Describe performance management systems helpful in maintaining consistent use of the SCC in clinical and educational settings.
Activities: Applying principles derived from behavior analysis of well-designed instruction, our world-class group of workshop presenters will use a range of activities to ensure participants learn the key skills targeted in the objectives. Participants will engage in choral responding and paced practice, timed practice on key concepts and skills, and both small and large group discussion.
Audience: Anyone seeking an introduction (or refresher!) to Standard Celeration Charting, including those persons interested in using the SCC to improve their own teaching or clinical practice, as well as individuals planning to take the BACB examination.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Skinner's Verbal Behavior to Analyze Pure and Impure Verbal Operants to Improve Communication-Training Interventions
Friday, May 26, 2006
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Kennesaw
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants), LORI FROST (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: This workshop focuses on how to use Skinners Verbal Behavior to analyze common communications objectives and intervention plans for individuals with disabilities. We will briefly review Skinners core verbal operants (i.e., mand, tact, intraverbal, etc.) but will add strategies to identify multiple controlled verbal operants (which are more common than pure verbal operants). We will review common language goals and objectives from representative IEPs and other formats. We will review videotaped examples of language training sequences and practice identifying the multiple controlled verbal operants that are in use (as opposed to the intended operants). Examples will vary across modalities, as verbal behavior does not pertain to any one or preferred expressive modality. We will also review an understanding of autoclitics and how they are acquired and modified over time can improve training strategies with individuals with various disabilities.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) Distinguish between pure and impure verbal operants. 2) Identify compound verbal operants. 3) Analyze videotape examples of compound verbal operants. 4) Define and identify common autoclitic operants (both vocal and non-vocal). 5) Suggest strategies to promote the development and understanding of autoclitics. 6) Rewrite common IEP objectives in terms of Verbal Operants
Activities: Participants will review Skinner�s fundamental verbal operants and review examples across several modalities. We will then describe impure verbal operants and suggest a way of using an ABC analysis to identify sources of multiple control over such operants. Participants will review written examples of impure operants and then review videotape examples of them. Participants will review and suggest modifications to sample IEP objectives (and are encouraged to bring their own), including identifying pure and impure operants as well as potential teaching strategies. We will then discuss autoclitics and the many functions that Skinner identified associated with them. We will review several key factors associated with easy versus difficult acquisition of such verbal operants as well as discuss how Skinner�s views can impact on our understanding of various disabilities, including autism.
Audience: Teachers, speech/language pathologists, psychologists, and behavior analysts. Participants should be well versed in the fundamentals of applied behavior analysis as well as be familiar with Skinners fundamental operants described in Verbal Behavior. Participants should be ready to share examples of language targets with which they are familiar.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Providing Feedback on the Intensive Teaching of Verbal Operants through a Transcription Code
Friday, May 26, 2006
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Marietta
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Miklos, Ph.D.
MICHAEL MIKLOS (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network), WILLIAM A. GALBRAITH (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network)
Description: This three hour workshop will guide participants through the process of observing and recording the instructional behavior of teachers during intensive teaching of the primary verbal operants for children with autism. The conceptional origins and basic instructional procedures for using a mixed and varied approach to teaching the verbal operants will be briefly reviewed . Focus will be on a method of transcribing teacher behaviors using a formalized code. The transciption code to be presented is flexible and allows consultants to deliver competency based performance feedback to instructors. Participants will learn to code rate of instructional presentation (trials per minute), the frequency of type of verbal operant trial presented; ratio of reinforcement delivery;and fidelity with error correction and prompting procedures.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify components of instruction using a mixed and varied approach to teaching the verbal operants to children with autism. 2.Participants will read transcription protocols and describe the quality of instruction represented by the protocol. 3. Participants will practice using the observational code to transcribe both demonstrations of instruction and videotaped instructional samples 4. Participants will practice scoring transcription protocols and analyzing the protocols 5. Participants will identify steps in providing systematic feedback using the transcription protocol.
Activities: Participants will be provided opportunities to practice coding videotaped segments of instruction as well as instructional demonstrations. Practice in reading and interpreting transcription protocols will be provided.
Audience: Consultants and teachers providing intensive behavioral interventions which incorporate Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior for students with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Clients with Maladaptive Habits, Tics, Tourette's Syndrome, and Stuttering Using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Program
Friday, May 26, 2006
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Roswell
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: R. Gregory Nunn, Ph.D.
R. GREGORY NUNN (National University)
Description: Maladaptive and undesirable habits, tics, Tourettes Syndrome (TS), and stuttering are extremely common problems which can seriously affect the personal relationships and self-esteem of individuals who suffer from them. Because these problems can cause acute psychological distress, many different types of treatments for them have been developed. Habit Reversal is a behavioral treatment approach which has proven to be an effective, General treatment for habits and tics including TS (Azrin & Nunn, 1973; Azrin & Nunn, 1977; Nunn, 1978; Azrin, Nunn & Frantz, 1980; Azrin & Peterson, 1988a; Finney, Rapoff, Hall, & Christopherson, 1983; Franco, 1981; Zikis, 1983: Miltenberger, 2001). In this Workshop we will discuss the identification, nature, and treatment of children, adolescents, and adults with these type of problems. Specifically we will cover the diagnosis and treatment of individuals using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures of Azrin and Nunn as well as treatment variations that have evolved from their original work. Case studies are included where possible and workshop participants are strongly encouraged to provide input.
Learning Objectives: Identify and diagnose maladaptive habits, tics, TS, and stuttering with children and adults. Understand the theoretical rationales that have spawned the many treatments for these types of problems. Describe the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures. Identify the common pitfalls of treatment and ways of overcoming them.
Activities: Case studies are included where possible and workshop participants are strongly encouraged to provide input.
Audience: All practitioners, educators, and other professionals working with children, adolescents, or adults presenting with these types of problems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Legal & Ethical Issues for Behavior Analysts Serving People with Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities
Friday, May 26, 2006
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Edgewood
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: R. M. (Duke) Schell, Ph.D.
R. M. (DUKE) SCHELL (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: This workshop will focus on legal issues related to the use of behavior analysis techniques and procedures with people with mental retardation and related developmental disabilities. It will also describe legal issues from the field of mental health that have had an impact on behavior analytic approaches. Legal issues will be discussed across the varied settings from which they are drawn including schools, mental retardation and mental health facilities, and community settings.
Learning Objectives: On completion of the workshop the participants will be able to: 1. Describe legal issues (topical areas and specific court cases) that have influenced the general use of behavior analysis techniques and procedures. 2. Describe and discuss the effects of legal issues and precedents on the everyday practice of behavior analysis with consumers (i.e., people directly receiving behavior analytic services). 3. Describe and discuss the effects of legal issues and precedents on the perception of behavior analysis techniques and procedures on the public as consumer. 4. Describe and discuss legal issues in the context of ethics for psychologists and the responsible code of conduct for certified behavior analysts.
Activities: A brief review of historical and more current legal information will be followed by casebook-style discussions based on experiences of the presenter as well as composite examples that raise legal and ethical issues. Cases will be discussed in small-groups and then presented to the entire audience. Participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences with legal issues and anonymous case examples for discussion with the group.
Audience: People involved in the development and supervision of behavioral assessment and treatment procedures and applied research with people with mental retardation and related disabilities. People who manage the provision of behavior analytic services in applied settings are also encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB
Data Collection and Analysis Using Computer Technology: Hands-on Discrete and Sequential Applications of the BEST System
Friday, May 26, 2006
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Harris
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), DANIEL W. BALDERSON (Weber State University), MATTHEW R. MARTIN (Illinois State University), JOHN KOPERWAS (n/a)
Description: The workshop will provide hands on application of a sophisticated software package designed to collect and analyze discrete and time-based behavioral data. The program is particularly useful to advanced graduate students and behavioral psychologists interested in analyzing complex configurations of behaviors which are emitted at high rates, oftentimes overlap in time, and which are context dependent. Discussion includes an introduction to (a) recommended procedures when collecting time-based data in the live setting and from videotape records, and (b) computer generated discrete and sequential descriptions, graphic and statistical analyses, and reliability comparisons of discrete and sequential data. Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the complete software package on CD ROM, and a .pdf file summary copy of a compatible research methods text published by Sage Publications as a function of workshop participation. ***While some computer hardware will be provided, it is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with software-based data collection and analysis competencies, including the ability to (a) construct and apply systemic observation systems, (b) generate a time-based behavioral record using an inclusive overlapping category system, (c) perform traditional and sequential analyses using multiple measurement methodologies and interpret Z score transformations, (d) create and edit graphic data representations and apply relevant visual and statistical analyses, (e) conduct reliability and treatment fidelity analyses, and (f) apply a variety of data record edit and merge functions when operating with complex multiple event category systems. Learning Objective 1: The participants will be able to discuss in conceptual and applied ways the principles and practice of discrete and sequential behavior analysis methods. Learning Objective 2: The participants will be able to apply a range of computer-based data collection, reliability, and measurement techniques to their particular behavior analysis interests. Learning Objective 3: The participants will be able to understand and apply a range of computer-based descriptive and statistical data analysis techniques in relation to discrete and sequential measurement sets. Learning Objective 4: The participants will be able to construct a variety of behavior graphs and apply appropriate analysis techniques to the graph types covered.
Activities: Activities include (a) review of traditional behavior analysis recording methods, (b) introduction to, and hands on application of, a computer-based package designed to enhance behavior analyses of complex interactive settings, and (c) detailed hands-on demonstration of data collection features, discrete and sequential analysis capabilities, within and across data-file graphic representations, and a variety of reliability, treatment fidelity, and data manipulation and editing functions.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in experimental and applied settings who are interested in research and development related to the interactive nature of behavior in situations where study of multiple behaviors and events, multiple participants, and changing setting variables are present. Those working in educational and social science settings and who are challenged with how to describe and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary software particularly appealing to a wide range of research and assessment applications.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Successful Behavioral Consultation in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): Parent and Professional Perspectives
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Regency V
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jane M. Barbin, Ph.D.
JANE M. BARBIN (Behavioral Directions, LLC), LINDA S. MEYER (Linda S. Meyer Consulting, LLC), SUZANNE LETSO (Connecticut Center for Child Development), ERIK A. MAYVILLE (Institute for Educational Planning), LISA HEILBRONNER (Parent)
Description: Extensive research supports the effectiveness of a behavioral approach for individuals with ASD and their families. Behavioral consultation, that is professional consultative guidance in educational, vocational, residential, and family systems based on ABA principles, is often the avenue in which families, agencies, and learners access behavioral intervention. Consultation often involves sharing of information on instructional strategies, skill acquisition, behavior reduction, curricula, motivational systems, and organizational systems and occurs in home, school, community, and other settings. An effective behavioral consultant must understand and become proficient in the contingencies which establish effectiveness for consumers. In addition to assuring the consultant has adequate credentials, parents and agency staff must explore that sufficient resources are available and that empirically-supported interventions are utilized. Response data from parents and professionals (consultants, home-based instructional staff, and vocational, residential school staff) will be presented to clarify essential factors for best outcome in the consultation relationship. This workshop will explore the importance of making data-based decisions and the importance of ongoing training with effective feedback. Other related success elements will be discussed (e.g., generalization, immediacy of change). Parent and professional similarities and differences will be reviewed as they relate to building better collaboration and coordination between team members.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify three key factors related to successful behavioral consultation. 2. Understand important credentialing requirements for professionals which sets up successful consultation. 3. Identify strategies for increasing communication and collaboration within the treatment team, including use of consultation contracting. 4. Demonstrate an increased appreciation for the impact of family (e.g., sibling, marital) and agency (e.g., resources, treatment philosophy) issues which impinge on service delivery.
Activities: Classroom presentation and discussion will be provided. Participants will also engage in a brief problem-solving session in which participants will break into groups to discuss how the presented information can be directly applied to their own consultation activity. Each participant will receive an information folder containing samples and supportive reading materials for exploration.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, related service providers, and other consultants who provide behavioral consultation services; agency staff or caregivers who deliver or receive consultation services; parents or caregivers of individuals with autism and professionals who support them.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing the Quality of Special Education Classrooms and Services
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Auburn
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lisa N. Britton, Ph.D.
LISA N. BRITTON (Spectrum Center), AMY CRYE (Spectrum Center), WHITNEY S. O'KEEFE (Spectrum Center)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to provide the participants with some tools that will allow them to assess a classroom to evaluate the quality of the program. In particular, we will provide training in the following areas: Classroom Climate Data: Participants will learn how to use a partial interval recording system to collect data on instructions, praise statements, and negative statements delivered by classroom staff and compare these data to classroom expectations. Communication Data: Participants will learn how to use a partial interval recording system to assess the use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication devices and how classroom staff promote communication within the classroom setting. Participants will also learn how to compare these data to classroom expectations. Functional Assessment (FA) and Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) Checklist: Participants will learn to assess the quality of an FA and BIP based on the criteria discussed through the workshop. There will be an emphasis on assessing the thoroughness of the FA in determining the function of the behavior as well as ensuring that the BIP is based on the function of the behavior. Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Checklist: Participants will learn to assess the quality of IEP goals based on the criteria discussed through the workshop. There will be an emphasis on ensuring that the baseline levels have quantitative values. In addition, there will be a focus on ensuring that the IEP goals are specific and measurable.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will learn how to use a partial interval recording system to collect data on instructions, praise statements, and negative statements delivered by classroom staff and compare these data to classroom expectations. 2. Participants will learn how to use a partial interval recording system to assess the use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication devices and how classroom staff promote communication within the classroom setting. 3. Participants will learn to assess the quality of an FA and BIP based on the criteria discussed through the workshop. 4. Participants will learn to assess the quality of IEP goals based on the criteria discussed through the workshop.
Activities: A didactic lecture will be provided on each of the topics listed. After each section, the participants will have an opportunity to practice the skills discussed. The following practice activities will occur: 1. Participants will practice collecting partial interval recording on staff interactions with students. 2. Participants will practice collecting partial interval recording on staff promoting communication skills with students. 3. Participants will practice assessing the quality of an FA and BIP. 4. Participants will practicing assessing the quality of IEP goals.
Audience: Consultants in schools, Special Education Teachers, School Psychologists, and other professionals working in an education setting
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: None
Functional Assessment: An Introduction to Managing Problem Behavior
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Baker
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jane I. Carlson, Ph.D.
JANE I. CARLSON (The May Institute), HANNA C. RUE (The May Institute), ELIZABETH LYONS (The May Institute)
Description: This workshop will provide an introductory overview of functional assessment procedures and strategies. Topics include the theoretical underpinnings of functional assessment, various assessment methods, and utilizing a problem-solving approach to intervention.
Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will understand the rationale supporting functional assessment techniques. 2. Attendees will learn to utilize various assessment techniques (e.g., scatter plots and ABC data collection). 3. Attendees will be able to identify and analyze the function of problem behaviors, learn to implement appropriate interventions, and evaluate outcomes based on a problem-solving model. 4. Attendees will become familiar with empirically supported behavioral interventions.
Activities: Attendees will record behavioral data, complete problem solving plans, review case examples, and develop functional interventions based on data collection.
Audience: Parents and teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: None
Improve Your Oral Presentations
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
University
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ned Carter, Ph.D.
NED CARTER (Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Stockholm, Sweden), KENNETH NILSSON (Behavior Analysis Group, Sweden), THOMAS E. BOYCE (Center for Behavioral Safety, LLC)
Description: Oral presentations play an essential role in individual success in both the public and private sectors. The workshop content is based on detailed practical analyses of speaker and audience behavior. Truly effective speakers conduct a dialogue with their audience, preparing themselves to control and to be controlled by their audience. This workshop will assist participants in identifying variables initiating and maintaining audience attention, interest and participation. Emphasis is placed on using the principles of behavior analysis, particularly the analysis of verbal behavior, to improve speaker behavior. The workshop has been offered annually since 1999 and the majority of attendees have rated the workshop as excellent.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to - Identify high probability audience behaviors and requests - Use multiple techniques to initiate and promote audience participation - Deal with situations such as stage fright, "losing your place" and aggressive questioning - Identify and control extraneous stimuli in order to maximize audience attention.
Activities: The workshop is interactive and active participation is encouraged. Techniques for creating better overheads, PowerPoint slides and presentation figures will be described. Participants will take part in a series of exercises and structured role-play sessions. Course content will be adapted to the interests of participants.
Audience: Behavior analysts who desire to improve their presentation skills at meetings, conferences and in teaching. The workshop is appropriate for both novices and experienced public speakers. Participants are encouraged to bring real-life examples for use in role-playing exercises.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ensuring Procedural Integrity of Clinical Programming in Applied Settings
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Lenox
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Frank L. Bird, M.Ed.
DANIEL COHEN-ALMEIDA (Melmark New England), FRANK L. BIRD (Melmark New England), RITA M. GARDNER (Melmark New England), HELENA L. MAGUIRE (Melmark New England)
Description: The clinical effectiveness of a behavior support plan relies not only on the technological sophistication of the written plan, but also on the ability of direct service staff to accurately and consistently implement the behavior support plan. This workshop will present the staff training and performance monitoring systems for clinical programming that have evolved over the past 8 years at Melmark New England: a private, not for profit, community based organization serving children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, with acquired brain injury, with neurological diseases and disorders, dual diagnosis, and severe challenging behaviors. Following a review of the OBM literature on effective systems development, workshop participants will review sample training schedules, training protocols, performance monitoring tools, as well as procedures for training supervisors to implement these systems. The goal of workshop will be to provide participants with systems to ensure competent and accurate implementation of clinical programs from a direct service staff persons 1st day on the job.
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will identify the components of an effective staff training program 2) Participants will develop training schedules and select training protocols for sample clients. 3) Participants will accurately score sample performance monitoring tools after viewing video samples of work performance. 4) Participants will identify the components of training systems necessary for supervisory staff.
Activities: Short Lecture, Case Studies, Guided Practice with feedback
Audience: Professional staff responsible for the training and/or supervision of direct service staff.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: None
Incorporating Applied Behavior Analysis Principles and Procedures in the Natural Environment
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Centennial Ballroom IV
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Amy Conforti, M.Ed.
AMY CONFORTI (TheraCare, Inc.), KATHLEEN FLANDERS (TheraCare, Inc.), TANYA CIANCIO (TheraCare, Inc.), LISA M. RESTO (TheraCare, Inc.)
Description: The workshop will discuss ABA principles and procedures and Natural Environment Therapy techniques and how to incorporate these two methods to optimize learning. The presentation will also discuss Autism Spectrum Disorders, how to create an individualized program for your students, and tips on choosing appropriate goals and objectives. It will be presented in power point format while promoting the audience as active participants in the presentation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. understand basic principles and procedures of ABA, Verbal Behavior, and Natural Environment Therapy. 2. increase spontaneous language in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders by using these methods. 3. create short and long term goals and develop an appropriate individualized curriculum. 4. increase acquisition of new skills in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Activities: The presentation will be in power point format. They will watch videos of children in sessions. They will be invited to actively participate by asking questions and volunteering for role playing activities.
Audience: This presentation is targeted for educators or any other service providers working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and other developmental disabilities. Parents of children with ASD and other developmental disabilities will also gain knowledge from this presentation.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treatment of Chronic Pain with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Roswell
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: JoAnne Dahl, Ph.D.
JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Description: This is an experiential workshop that focuses on the theory, research and practice of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a third wave behavior therapy approach to the analysis and treatment of individuals who are trapped in chronic pain/stress symptoms and subsequent avoidance behaviors. A powerful model of intervention for treatment of chronic pain that can be used for individuals or groups will be presented. Hands on exercises will be demonstrated and practiced. Topics covered will include: Basic analysis and ACT principles of treatment for chronic pain Conceptualization on new ways of approaching the problem The hexaflex Dramatization of the complex process of establishing chronic pain life patterns. Role play of the first session: values life compass, creative helplessness. Exercises in pairs: life compass, creative hopelessness, commitment. Group exercises: o Being present in the here and now: mindfulness exercise, the observer self o showing the ACT principles Values: Funeral exercise o Defusion: Bus metaphor o Defusion: Chess board o Defusion: Joe the Bum o Commitment: taking valued steps
Learning Objectives: 1) The main objective of this workshop is to illustrate the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the field of chronic pain/stress as an effective alternative to the traditional medical model approach to chronic illness. 2) To practise functional conceptualization of chronic pain using the ACT model 3) To practice the components of ACT: values, defusion, exposure, mindfullness and comittment in the application of chronic pain. 4) To experience through experiential exercises how to do and use ACT skills in the form of dramatisation of ACT components for use in groups of clients with chronic pain.
Activities: Workshop activities will include: role play, experiential exercises, written exercises, group activities in the form of dramatisation of metaphors. Theortical model for ACT in the treatment of chronic pain will be presented in the form of a lecture.
Audience: Anyone working with clients with chronic pain
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB
Using Excel Spreadsheets and Graphs for Visual Display of Individual Behavior and Academic Performances in Applied Settings
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Inman
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bryan J. Davey, Ph.D.
BRYAN J. DAVEY (Southern Behavioral Group, Inc.), DONALD M. STENHOFF (University of Kentucky)
Description: Visual display of data in single-subject research is imperative when communicating quantitative relationships and behavior patterns to consumers and fellow practitioners. Excel is an application which allows practitioners and consumers to create spreadsheets and graphical displays. Excel graphs convey effect across various single-subject designs (e.g., multiple-baseline, alternating treatment, reversal, cumulative record). These designs allow practitioners to display assessment (i.e., functional analyses, structural analyses) and intervention (i.e., various forms of differential reinforcement, discrete trial programs) outcomes. While Excel can be difficult to navigate and master, this workshop will provide participants with hands on training promoting effective use. Workshop mini lessons include how to setup spreadsheets and input data sets, chart wizard navigation, graph construction including all data or select data sets within a spreadsheet, manipulation of graph components (e.g., axes, data labels, phase change lines, raised zero), and updating data sets and graphs when data are available. Instructors will provide several models, followed by opportunities for participants to practice skills with timely feedback. Throughout the workshop instructors will explain and demonstrate the subtle nuances of Excel. These tips allow for easier Excel navigation and enhance graphical presentations. Additionally, workshop instructors will provide an Excel CD tutorial that will continue to guide participants in future Excel projects. Participants are required to bring a laptop with the Excel application and strongly encouraged to bring their own data sets to graph during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of this workshop participants will be able to: 1. Setup measurement specific spreadsheets, input data sets, and manipulate data sets within an Excel spreadsheet 2. Create graphs for alternating treatment, reversal, multiple-baseline designs, and cumulative records 3. Use the chart wizard, construct graphs of all data or select data sets within a spreadsheet, and update databases and graphs as data collection continues 4. Manipulate graph components (e.g., axes, gridlines, backgrounds, data points, data paths, secondary axis), and use drawing tools to insert additional components (e.g., arrows, data labels, phase change lines, text boxes)
Activities: Participants will be provided concise instruction and several models with instructor support to ensure skill acquisition. Finally, participants will complete a comprehensive case example which provides opportunities for participants to solve challenges inherent in the Excel application. The comprehensive case example will consolidate and increase fluency of the skills taught during the instructional phase of the workshop. Additionally, participants will be encouraged to bring questions with regard to previous Excel experiences.
Audience: Practitioners, students, researchers, educational service providers, and others interested in visual display of data in single-subject research and program progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Applications of OBM Strategies in Service Settings for Individuals with Autism: Promoting Quality Outcomes
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Learning Center
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daphna El-Roy, Ph.D.
DAPHNA EL-ROY (Eden II Programs), EILEEN HOPKINS (Eden II Programs), JOANNE GERENSER (Eden II Programs)
Description: The incidence with autism has grown considerably in the past ten years. In order to meet the needs of this growing population, there has been a corresponding growth in the development of programs serving individuals with autism. While these programs are essential to meet the needs of the autism community, issues of attracting, training, and retaining a qualified workforce becomes very difficult. In addition to the competition among autism service providers, these agencies must also compete with the employment opportunities that are less stressful and less demanding than working with individuals with autism. There have been a large number of articles and books published on the effectiveness of using the principles of applied behavior analysis to change behavior. The use of applied behavior analysis has been widely supported for the treatment and education of children with autism. Despite the widespread use of behavior teaching techniques in special education, few providers apply these same principles to address staff behavior change and organizational change. Organizational behavior management (OBM) is the application of behavior analysis to organizational improvement (Abernathy & Harshbarger, 2002). The field of organizational behavior management provides us with an empirically validated, data based framework to impact employee performance, professional development as well as overall organizational health. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an overview of organizational behavior management techniques to address common issues within the field of human services and more specifically to programs serving individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Topics to be addressed include issues of staff retention and turnover, staff development, and issues of quality assurance and improvement. Data will be presented on different organizational interventions along with details on these specific interventions.
Learning Objectives: ? Understand basic principles of OBM as applied to autism service settings ? Apply a variety of assessment techniques to identify program strengths, weaknesses and areas in need of improvement ? Become familiar with components of a quality improvement plan and strategies for implementation ? Become familiar with data collection procedures and strategies for evaluation the efficacy of quality improvement strategies and plans
Activities: Activities include didactic instruction and small group work. Participants will be given sample plans and assessment tools
Audience: Program administrators, clinical supervisors and other related professionals
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Combining Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching for Children with Autism
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Greenbriar
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTA ZAMBOLIN (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KELLY J. FERRIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), AMY KING (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KATHLEEN S. LAINO (University of North Texas)
Description: This workshop will present participants with skills that are often very helpful in combining direct instruction curricula and precision teaching in intervention programs for children with autism and related disabilities. The workshop will focus on (a) selecting appropriate direct instruction programs given various learner characteristics, (b) measuring student progress through DI curricula and using those data to make ongoing instructional decisions, (c) precision teaching sections or key skills from the major DI curricula that tend to be difficult for children with autism, (d) modifying error correction procedures to help promote appropriate stimulus control and true learning, (e) accelerating students progress through DI curricula. We will focus on these skills across the curriculum areas of language, reading, mathematics, and writing. Participants will receive printed and digital copies of all materials presented including an enhanced CD-ROM that contains supplemental instructional and practice activities as well as recommended readings related to the workshops topic.
Learning Objectives: By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to discriminate between developmental and corrective Direct Instruction curricula By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to select an appropriate DI curriculum given various learner characteristics from the curricular areas of language, reading, mathematics, and writing By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to describe how to measure student progress through DI curricula and make various instructional decisions based on that measurement By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to list skills that tend to be problematic for learners with autism from the major DI curricula in the areas of language, reading, mathematics, and writing By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to describe modifications that should occur to prescribed error corrects to facilitate appropriate stimulus control By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to describe ways to accelerate students� rates of progress through DI curricula.
Activities: This workshop will employ a blend of lecture, discrimination practice, and coached small group activities to facilitate participants� skill acquisition as it relates to the above objectives.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinicians, parents, and teachers who are currently employing or wish to employ direct instruction curricula in the intervention programs of children with autism and related disabilities. Some familiarity with the tenets and procedures associated with precision teaching would be helpful.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Real Function of Play: Transitioning from Contrived to Natural Antecedents and Consequences When Targeting Play, Language, and Social Development in Children with Autism
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Singapore
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kristie M. Frissen-Thompson, Ph.D.
KRISTIE M. FRISSEN-THOMPSON (ABC of North Carolina), ALLETA JOHNSON (ABC of North Carolina)
Description: By definition, play is described as intrinsically motivated, freely chosen, and process-oriented over product-oriented, non-literal, and enjoyable. Incorporating play skills for a child with autism is important for many reasons. First, developmentally appropriate social interaction a primary impairment in autism. Second, play is a fundamental means by which children typically interact with others. In typical development, the reinforcer for playing with others is the interaction itself (i.e., reciprocity), rather than an unrelated, tangible reinforcer. Children at the one-word stage use language to communicate social functions such as regulating others behavior, establishing joint attention, and social interaction. As more advanced language develops, children must have social motivation to use it (e.g., through commenting, narratives, conversation, referencing, etc.) Children with autism often have delays in pragmatic development (i.e., use of language in a social contexts) which may be related to an overall deficit in development of social motivation. By teaching play, language, and social development by looking at function, we ensure that our learners are able to respond to natural antecedent and consequent conditions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify natural and unnatural antecedents and consequences for play, language, and social behaviors. 2. Identify ways to transition from the use of contrived to more natural antecedents and consequences. 3. Write developmentally appropriate play language targets based on identification of a child�s level of social motivation. 4. Define and identify the components of proximity play. 5. Identify the sequence of teaching components and determine the child's ability to move forward within the teaching sequence.
Activities: We will review the literature on play, language, and social skills development and will show videotaped vignettes of play and language development in neurotypical peers, of transitioning from contrived to natural antecedents and consequences, and of targeting natural play language in children with autism.
Audience: The workshop is designed for individuals currently implementing programs to teach play skills to children with autism using ABA-based teaching technologies. Participants should have some knowledge of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Consultative Speech and Language Services for Children with Autism and Severe Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Vinings
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Laura M. Hutt, M.S.
LAURA M. HUTT (New England Center for Children), BETH O. BELLONE (New England Center for Children)
Description: Children with autism and severe developmental disabilities present with critical needs in communication and difficulties acquiring, maintaining and generalizing skills. Consistent and extensive instruction is required to insure that learning and subsequent performance increase. Direct pull-out speech and language treatment may not adequately address the communication deficits of children with autism. The American Speech Language and Hearing Associations (ASHA) 1993 position statement endorses the consultative model as an effective way to provide services. In a consultative model, children receive several hours each day of direct instruction from their teacher targeting their individual communication needs. Data collected from the ASHA National Outcomes Measurement study indicate that children of many ages made more and better progress when they received treatment delivered in this manner. At New England Center for Children, this model includes presenting 1) learning opportunities, 2) prompting accurate performance for both teachers and students, 3) reinforcement of correct performances, and 4) systematically fading prompts. Training teachers to provide instruction in speech and language ensures more learning opportunities in the settings that the target skills must be used. Participants will learn to present the benefits of the model to school administrators and parents, provide trainings for teachers, and observe and evaluate program effectiveness.
Learning Objectives: 1. identify drawbacks of the traditional pull-out speech and language services for children with autism 2. identify benefits of the consultative/collaborative model of speech and language services 3. present benefits of the consultative/collaborative model to families, teachers, and school administrators 4. develop caseload management systems within the framework of the consultative/collaborative model 5. train teachers to use speech and language curriculum, collect and summarize data, and present student progress
Activities: Case studies with video and/or written examples: Participants will identify classroom and individual goals, environmental factors, and training issues. Motivating operations, antecedents, target behavior, and reinforcement will be identified for the student and for the trainer. Analysis of consumer, service, and organizational factors will be conducted and participants will make decisions on implementing this type of service plan.
Audience: Behavior analysts working in school systems, school personnel, speech and language pathologists, direct care staff, teaching aides
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Intensive Early Intervention: Advanced Social Language and Social Skills Programming
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Regency VI
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest), KARA L. RIEDESEL (Lovaas Institute Midwest), CHARRYSE M. FOUQUETTE (LIFE-Midwest/St. Cloud State University)
Description: In intensive early intervention with young children with autism, a great number of language skills are developed. This workshop will outline how to develop the skills within a coherent conceptual framework, enabling productive treatment planning and program evaluation. The framework will be a matrix of social language skills which follows a sequence of generative language development. Most importantly, not only is the matrix of skills organized across generalization modalities, syntax forms, and conditional discriminations; but it is also clinically focused on the functional social relationships which interfere with natural development. After basic receptive and expressive skills are developed, the matrix naturally flows into auditory comprehension and production skills. The organization of the language curriculum is used to control the pace of development related social skills in a systematic manner. Due to the functional social impairments often displayed by children with autism, a lack of cooperative play skills, and therefore mutual friendships, are not developed without specialized intervention. The purpose of this workshop will also be to focus on the developmental progression of play, effective behavioral techniques and procedures to develop creative and spontaneous play skills, problem-solving strategies to enhance the acquisition of play skills, and generalization of play skills from highly structured environments to naturalized environments. Complex social contingencies will be addressed to ensure that the child is not only acquiring social skills, but is using those skills functionally throughout the child's 24-hour and 7-day life.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1, Plan a child�s language curriculum as part of a coherent whole. 2, Implement programs that promote creative language production and auditory comprehension through generative language learning. 3, Program genuinely functional social language skills. 4, Program the development of play skills that include: independent play, parallel play, associative play, cooperative play, imaginative play, social congruent play, and social language play. 5, Identify behavioral techniques and procedures to teach play skills. 6, Identify generalization procedures to promote naturalized play skills.
Activities: Participants will observe videos of social language programs, and participate in didactic presentations, problem-solving discussions, and interactive exercises. Participants will obtain specific program sheets provided by the instructors.
Audience: Parents, lead therapists, line therapists, consultants, and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavioral terms used in intensive early intervention. At least one-month's experience with intensive early intervention is preferable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Reading and Writing to Children with Autism
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Manila
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mark Adams, Ph.D.
PATRICIA R. MASSOTH (BEST Consulting, Inc.), MARK ADAMS (BEST Consulting, Inc.)
Description: Children receiving intensive 1:1 discrete trial training often show deficits in developing vocal speech, while receptive language skills are strong. In addition, there is beginning to be support shown for developing alternative means of vocal speech (e.g., writing or typing or word exchange) as a substitute for vocal, expressive speech. The purpose of this workshop is to provide training of expressive object labeling and other expressive language skills using writing, typing, and word exchange as a substitute for vocal speech response requirements. It is proposed that strengthening the "equivalence" properties of hearing vocal speech, seeing objects and constructing their corresponding written or typed responses through the use of a Reading and Writing Program based on the publication The Reading and Writing Program, (Watthen-Lovaas & Lovaas, 1998), will facilitate the use of language, regardless of the formal characteristics of the expressive response. Workshop participants will receive hands-on practice using a Reading and Writing board and corresponding materials. Additionally, they will leave with a Reading and Writing board, and receive a comprehensive manual outlining progressions and various methods of implementing a Reading and Writing Program based on case examples.
Learning Objectives: This workshop will demonstrate: - steps to teach children with Autism to read and write. - steps to teach advanced alternative means of vocal speech such as writing, spelling, and typing. - how to teach each progression of a Reading and writing program. - Helpful procedures to teach advanced receptive and expressive skills. - how to make a Reading and writing board and related materials. - how to develop lessons using procedures of the Reading and writing program.
Activities: Workshop activities will include modeling of procedures as well as video examples. Participants will practice teaching skills to incorporate procedures discussed during the workshop.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are parents and professionals who deliver behavioral services to children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Pay Attention! Strategies for Active Engagement of Preschoolers with Autism in Home/Community Classroom Environments
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Piedmont
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Justin A. DiDomenico, M.Ed.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Advance, Inc./Partners in Learning, Inc.), LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance, Inc.), JUSTIN A. DIDOMENICO (Advance, Inc.), LORI A. LORENZETTI (Advance, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Advance, Inc.), NICOLE M. SWANFELD (Partners in Learning, Inc.)
Description: Attending and active engagement are critical components of learning. Preschoolers with autism often experience severe challenges in both attending to relevant environmental cues and sustaining attention for the duration of activities. Active engagement is vital for children to benefit from the experiences occurring in typical settings such as the home or a community preschool classroom. The attending challenges experienced by young children with autism require systematic intervention strategies specifically adapted to each environment in order to assist the child in developing improved attending skills. This workshop will address the challenges associated with engaging young children with autism in activities occurring in the natural environment, focusing on strategies and adaptations that improve the attending abilties of preschoolers with autism. We will discuss the importance of active engagement in inclusive settings, as well as meaningful participation in family activities in both the home and community environment. Examples of effective programming used by professionals and families for each environment will be presented. DVDs with sample strategies will be given to each participant.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will be able to: (1) define active engagement/attending of preschoolers per environment (2) measure engagement/attending via objective data collection procedures (3) develop strategies to address attending/engagement deficits in classroom settings (4) develop strategies to address attending/engagement deficits in home/community settings
Activities: Using lecture, video demonstrations, handouts and small group activities, participants will learn strategies to improve engagement and objectively measure progress of students.
Audience: This workshop is designed for teachers, paraprofessionals, parents, and behavior consultants for preschoolers with autism. The emphasis is on designing and implementing strategies to improve engagement in a variety of typical environments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Research-Based Instructional Supports for Children with Autism
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
International Ballroom North
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Pat Mirenda, Ph.D.
PAT MIRENDA (University of British Columbia), BRENDA FOSSETT (University of British Columbia)
Description: Instructional techniques incorporating pictures and/or videotapes can be quite effective for teaching a wide range of skills to children with autism. This workshop will provide participants with research-based guidelines for using four visual support techniques. Single-subject studies examining each of the techniques will be used to illustrate key principles and components. Visual schedules use pictures to depict sequences of activities or task steps and thus enable individuals to predict future events in order to reduce problem behavior and/or increase independence. Contingency maps depict environment-behavior relationships by using pictures to represent : (a) the common antecedent that precedes both problem and alterative behaviors, (b) the topography of both problem and alternative behaviors, (c) the functional reinforcer(s) that will be provided contingent on alternative behavior, and (d) the previously-available functional reinforcer(s) that will no longer be provided contingent on problem behavior. Picture-to-text matching instruction is used to teach sight words to individuals with autism who are unable to speak and for whom the use of pictures may interfere with sight word learning when used within a paired associate learning paradigm. Finally, video modeling can be used to teach social interaction and other skills to children with autism in peer play situations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Summarize ABA research on the use of visual schedules, including the components that appear to be essential for success; 2. Describe the four key elements of contingency maps and guidelines for creating and implementing them; 3. Describe the differences between paired associate and picture-to-text matching paradigms for sight word instruction and provide examples of how to implement the latter; 4. Design a basic video modeling intervention using multiple vignettes to teach social language skills to children with autism in peer play contexts
Activities: Activities will include opportunities for participants to view research-based case studies (some with videotaped examples) and to engage in activities related to the objectives. For example, participants will be asked to plan a contingency map for a hypothetical child, design a picture-to-text matching activity for a student in a regular classroom, and plan a video modeling intervention to teach social language skills.
Audience: The target audience includes teachers, speech-language pathologists, and behavior analysts at a post-masters level who work with children with autism spectrum disorders who have difficulty using and/or understanding spoken language. The children may be in home-based ABA programs or inclusive classrooms in public schools.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Linking Assessment to Practice: How to Analyze Assessment Scores to Design Effective Educational Programming for Learners with Autism
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Spring
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Alison L. Moors, M.A.
ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HOLLY ALMON (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KELLY J. FERRIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SARA J. PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: When working with children with autism, clinicians and parents are faced with varied and countless reports of assessment protocols from the initial diagnosis and throughout the student's educational career. This workshop is specifically designed to target service providers and parents working with kids with autism who want to gain a better understanding of academic/achievement testing and how the results can aide in future educational programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. Define types of assessments commonly used in educational programming. 2. Define parts of assessment score reports when shown examples 3. List examples of criterion and normed referenced assessments conducive to educational planning \4. Create example educational plans using sample assessment data
Activities: While some lecture will be used, emphasis will be placed on audience participation through discussion as well as participants performing the objectives or components of this workshop.
Audience: This is an introductory level workshop designed for clinicians, parents, teachers or anyone else responsible for designing educational programming for students with autism. Applied knowledge of behavior analytic teaching techniques and subsequent terminology is required.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Fairlie
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel J. Moran, Ph.D.
DANIEL J. MORAN (MidAmerican Psychological Institute), PATRICIA BACH (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Description: This workshop will provide a step-by-step framework for functionally conceptualizing client behavior problems, and will discuss selection and application of specific ACT interventions. The workshop will also help attendees develop their own ACT consistent interventions, exercises, and metaphors. Process and outcome measures will be discussed, as well as the utilization of the Action and Acceptance Questionnaire-2 as an adjunct measure of clinically-relevant behavior change. The workshop will also discuss first order and second order therapeutic approaches, and help the attendees discriminate when to use the appropriate therapeutic intervention. This workshop will be based on content from the forthcoming publication Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, (Moran and Bach, in preparation, New Harbinger).
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will become familiar with the six core ACT principles of defusion, self-as-context, acceptance, values, committed action, and contacting the present moment, which will be described from a strict behavior analytic perspective Workshop participants will be able to conceptualize clinically relevant behaviors as functional response classes, and discriminate when they are amenable to an ACT approach. Workshop participants will be able to select ACT interventions appropriate for addressing specific core principles. Workshop participants will learn how to apply specific ACT interventions based on the case formulation Workshop participants will learn to use ACT case conceptualization to facilitate creating one�s own ACT consistent metaphors, exercises, and interventions for application in the context of a client�s unique history and presenting complaints. Workshop participants will learn methods of assessing effectiveness of interventions
Activities: The workshop will use a case-based approach beginning with instructor supplied cases and later using participants� clinical cases for practice in ACT case formulation, selecting interventions, and assessing the effectiveness of interventions, and outcomes. There will be a 60 minute slide presentation, demonstrations, large group exercises and case-based practice. Participants will be provided with handouts to use with their clients for assessment and homework assignments to augment in session interventions. Worksheets will also be distributed for the participants to use to facilitate ACT case formulation.
Audience: This workshop is suitable to clinicians with little exposure to ACT who would like to learn how to apply ACT broadly. It is also suitable for participants who have attended ACT experiential workshops and would like to improve their skill in functional contextual case formulation and deciding when to apply specific ACT interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching a Behavioral Child Development Course with Interteaching and Student Response Systems (Clickers)
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Edgewood
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Gary D. Novak, Ph.D.
GARY D. NOVAK (California State University, Stanislaus), MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University)
Description: Very few behavior analysts teach courses in child development. As a result, this important area is dominated by nonbehavioral viewpoints. This workshop will give you the knowledge and skills needed to be prepared to teach a course in child and adolescent development from a behavioral perspective. The workshop leaders will present the basic concepts of their behavioral-systems approach to child and adolescent development that are detailed in their textbook. Through the use of Student Response Systems (clickers), participants will learn how to develop an interactive classroom format in which peers, the instructor, and the student share an active teaching role. Objectives, outlines and other materials will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Explain the basic principles of a behavioral systems approach to child development. Write questions to be used in cllicker-based interteaching sessions Take a chapter and write learning objectives for a unit of a child development course. Identify the pedagogical approach they will take in teaching a course. Know the basics for teaching a course in behavioral development.
Activities: Participants will be given a set of chapter objectives related as models. They will be asked to write their own set of objectives for one chapter. Participants will create sample questions based on the objectives they create. Participants will learn how to use clickers to effectively engage students. Participants will discuss the type of pedagogy that would work best for their individual teaching situations.
Audience: Graduate students, full-time and part-time faculty interested in learning about developmental theory and its applications; those teaching a course in child development at the undergraduate or graduate level.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Creative Problem Solving Skill Acquisition and Behavior Reduction for Individuals with Autism in an ABA Center-Based Program
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Harris
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Judith L. Palazzo, M.Ed.
JUDITH L. PALAZZO (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), ELIZABETH CRANMER (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), APRIL G. GILMORE (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), AIMEE H. HARAY (University of North Texas), KRISTINE L. MARINO (Connecticut Center for Child Development, Inc.), STEPHANIE POCIUS (University of North Texas), TANIA A. VIDOSEVIC (University of North Texas)
Description: This workshop will illustrate the problem-solving model used at the Connecticut Center for Child Development and provide examples of creative problem solving strategies addressing issues for individuals with autism across different age groups. Specific problems will be presented along with the rationale for intervention, description of intervention, data collected on the intervention, summary of progress, and implications for the individual with autism. Participants will have opportunities to identify individual concerns and design potential interventions with assistance.
Learning Objectives: -Participants will learn the steps in an effective problem-solving model. -Participants will learn creative problem-solving strategies for skill acquisition objectives. -Participants will learn creative problem-solving strategies for behavior reduction objectives and tolerance of non-preferred situations. -Participants will identify individual problems and design potential solutions using the steps in the problem-solving process illustrated.
Activities: Discussion about steps in the problem-solving model. Data-based presentations of creative problem-solving strategies. Video clips of creative problem-solving strategies. Design of potential problem-solving strategies to address participants' individual concerns.
Audience: Teachers, Behavior Analysts, ABA Providers, Related Service Providers, parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Effective Language-Based ABA Classrooms within Public School Systems
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Hong Kong
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.), PAMELA G. OSNES (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: Research has clearly established the effectiveness of intensive behavioral intervention with children with autism. A great proportion of these services have been provided to children in 1 to 1 training sessions outside of a public school classroom. However, it is possible and desirable to incorporate these effective educational services within public school classroom environments. This workshop will review critical components for establishing and providing effective language-based behavioral interventions within classrooms of the public school systems. A review of issues related to, and specific recommendations for staff training, classroom structure and schedule, curriculum development, small-group (1 to 2+) instructional strategies, skill acquisition tracking, and behavioral consultation will be provided.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. Identify critical teaching skills that must be demonstrated by teachers and instructional assistants in a language-based, ABA classroom. 2. Specify components of a classroom schedule that will allow for high frequency of learner responding to high-priority learning tasks. 3. Identify how to assess learner skills and construct an IEP to ensure the development of language and other important learner skills. 4. Identify methods for implementing behavioral language training strategies in a small group format. 5. Specify critical components of a classroom-wide, data collection system and a system for monitoring student progress. 6. Identify how the critical elements of discrete trail instruction can be implemented within the child�s typical daily events.
Activities: Participants will receive information regarding critical teaching skills that must be demonstrated by teachers and instructional assistants in a language-based, ABA classroom, specific components of a classroom schedule that will allow for high frequency of learner responding to high-priority learning tasks, development of appropriate IEP objectives, methods for implementing behavioral language training strategies in a small group format, critical components of a classroom-wide, data collection system and a system for monitoring student progress.
Audience: This workshop is highly recommended for behavio analysts, educators, administrators and consultants who wish to help public schools develop effective, data-based classroom services.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Software System for Shaping Reliable Behavioral Tacting and Intervention Skills During Staff or Student Training
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Vancouver
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Roger D. Ray, Ph.D.
ROGER D. RAY ((AI)2, Inc.; Rollins College), JESSICA M. RAY (Rollins College)
Description: Reliable identification of client behaviors requiring different intervention strategies (reinforcement, extinction, time out, etc.) is a prerequisite to offering consistent services by various staff members. Thus training staff to observe and tact client behaviors is a fundamental starting point across many types facilities and client services. But there is rarely an efficient means for such training, much less measuring how reliable behavioral tacting and interventions might be. This workshop is designed to give participants experience with a new software training system that shapes observational, tacting, and intervention-decision making skills. This software tool is also useful in teaching researcher observation and recording skills and for calibrating inter-observer reliability in research settings. With the aid of this software system, participants will take an active role in constructing alternative training coding schemes for tacting video-based client behaivors. Participants will learn how to load such coding schemes into the software system; will engage in coding a brief video so the file may be used as an expert reference for automated training feedback; and will learn how to access the detailed statistical analysis of behavioral sequences observed in the session. Further, inter-observer reliability scores, as measured by simple percent agreement as well as Cohens Kappa, will be demonstrated.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: � Use software-based shaping procedures to shape observational and intervention-identification skills in someone else. � Apply behavioral principles to teach observational techniques in staff training situations � Build a simple behavioral tacting scheme to use within the software system. � Link any external digital video file to the software for customizing the training environment. � Use alternative levels of successive approximation to shape expert intervention-identifications of a selected video. � Explain unconditional and conditional behavioral probabilities and their meaning to others. � Code and save a sample training file as well as measure the inter-observer reliability between this file and the expert reference file.
Activities: Activities will include an interactive review of observational foundations including methods of sequential analysis; introduction to and detailed use of new software which uses shaping principles to teach observation and tacting skills; hands-on experience in creating coding schemes, actually coding behavior via a video, and analyzing session data.
Audience: Teachers and trainers who have a need for teaching others how to reliably identify and describe behaviors in need of intervention across various settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB
Graphing with Microsoft Excel
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Techwood
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sarah E. Roberts, M.S.
SARAH E. ROBERTS (Behavioral Dimensions), EMILY R. MONN (St. Cloud State University), ERIC RUDRUD (St. Cloud State University), KIMBERLY A. SCHULZE (St. Cloud State University)
Description: Participants will be provided with systematic instruction on graphing single-subject research designs using Microsoft Excel. Single-subject designs covered include: ABAB, Multiple Baseline, Alternating Treatments, and Cumulative Records. Participants will also learn to graph session-by-session learner acquisition data. Participants will be provided with a CD providing detailed text instructions, a streaming video with demonstrations, and templates for learner acquisition data.
Learning Objectives: 1. Enter data on Excel spreadsheet for appropriate single-subject research design. 2. Graph data for single-subject design. 3. Edit graph content (titles, axis, background, condition, trend lines). 4. Graph learner acquisition data.
Activities: Participants will be provided with step-by-step instruction and practice in graphing single-case designs using Microsoft Excel. We encourage participants to bring laptop computers to practice entering data and graphing results.
Audience: Practitioners and researchers who need to graph data in an efficient manner. Faculty and graduate students who teach behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The AAMR Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum: Overview and Practical Methods for Successful Implementation
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Marietta
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: David A. Rotholz, Ph.D.
DAVID A. ROTHOLZ (University of South Carolina), DENNIS H. REID (Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support Center)
Description: This workshop will be provided by the senior editor and senior author of AAMR Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum. The presenters will provide information from the source on the evidence base underlying the curriculum contents, the validation process for components of the curriculum, what the curriculum includes and how to prepare and plan for its successful implementation. Participants will have the opportunity to get answers to questions about implementing this best-selling training curriculum at their own agencies. The AAMR Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum is a trainer-ready resource for providing competency-based training on positive behavior support to staff who supervise direct care professionals. Designed specifically for staff working with adults & adolescents who have developmental disabilities, this curriculum provides skill training for those who implement and supervise the implementation of supports. The curriculum is focused on implementation of positive behavioral supports, not the design of such supports. By including key skills such as teaching methods, providing appropriate social interactions, and observing and providing feedback to staff, in addition to the basics such as the effective use of reinforcement, appropriate data collection (see aamr.org for further information on the curriculum contents), this curriculum can help an agency train its staff in key areas that can directly benefit those to whom it provides support. A more comprehensive description and discussion of the curriculum and its statewide implementation can be found in a recent article in the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions (2003, volume 5, pp. 35 46). A description of how this fits into a statewide systems change effort in positive behavior support can be found in Mental Retardation, (2003, 41,{5}, 354 364). This 3-hour workshop provides an overview of the curriculum content, a description of the competency-based aspect of the training, a detailed discussion on the role of the trainer and how best to use the modules, plus information on related practical issues associated with successful implementation of the training curriculum. Information will also be provided on the 800+ supervisors who have participated in this competency-based training (in small groups) in a 5-day format in one state over the past 6 years. A description of a model for training new trainers of the direct support edition of the curriculum will also be provided. Ample time for questions and answers from participants will be provided to enable proactive problem solving for implementation of the curriculum.
Learning Objectives: 1. Understand how the use of this training curriculum functions as a key component of improving quality of behavior supports provided to adults & adolescents with mental retardation/developmental disabilities. 2. Know the key content areas for training direct support staff supervisors that affect the quality of behavior supports provided. 3. Use strategies for successfully implementing competency-based training on key skill areas necessary for implementing effective positive behavior supports. 4. Use key strategies for organizing the training with this curriculum based on 6 years of statewide training experience.
Activities: 1. Provide information on development of the PBS training curriculum, why specific skills were included and how this relates to improving services. 2. Provide information on results of training on a statewide basis. 3. Provide information on content of curriculum, how it is organized, how it is "trainer-ready" to facilitate easy use. 4. Demonstration of how a training module would be presented (e.g., module 8 on choice; demonstration of providing a 2-item choice). 5. Participants practice giving choice (as per curriculum), then demonstration of an in-class skills check on giving a 2-item choice. 6. Review of how feedback was provided during the demonstration skills-check with elaboration on the feedback component. 7. Discussion of practical issues that effective use of the curriculum requires. 8. Discussion of trainer preparation issues. 9. Questions & answers with participants on curriculum content, process for training, related practical issues and whatever else they bring up related to use of the AAMR Curriculum on Positive Behavior Support.
Audience: Professionals interested or involved in staff training at programs serving adults and/or adolescents with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities. Professionals interested in providing training to staff that will increase skills in teaching, providing choices (including to those with severe disabilities & limited communication skills), preventing problem behavior, and addressing problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designer Education: Creating Educationally-Appropriate Schools for Children and Adolescents with Brain Injuries
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Dunwoody
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Dennis C. Russo, Ph.D.
DENNIS C. RUSSO (The May Institute)
Description: Educational systems seem ill-suited to the needs of the recovering child with Acquired Brain Injury. Focused on group-based, verbal instruction; rife with multi-step tasks, heavily focused on sequences and organizational requirements, and requiring sustained attention; and crowded with numerous pupils, the educational environment is a setting likely to bring out the worst in many of these children. This presentation will focus on the development of brain injury intelligent behavioral interventions and environments. This presentation will address outcomes of neurological trauma, development of IEPs, staff training, use of behavioral procedures, academic schedules, and other variables which affect success in school for the child with ABI.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will gain knowledge of the outcomes of neurotrauma or disease and how they impact child behavior. 2. Participants will identify aspects of behavioral treatment which are effective with children and adolescents with ABI. 3. Participants will learn of factors in the educational environment which may produce negative educational outcomes in children. 4. Participants will learn specific methodologies for the design of instructional programs for children with ABI.
Activities: Didactic instruction, case studies, in-vivo practice in writing objectives.
Audience: Behavioral and educational professionals who work in special needs schools, human services, or healthcare.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Overcoming Problems in Intensive Behavioral Treatment: Strategies Used and Developed Over Ten Years' Time
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Cairo
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Glen O. Sallows, Ph.D.
GLEN O. SALLOWS (Minnesota Early Autism Project, Inc.), MICHELLE SHERMAN (Minnesota Early Autism Project, Inc.), LISA BARSNESS (Minnesota Early Autism Project, Inc.)
Description: Being skilled in delivering an ABA based treatment intervention begins with understanding principles of learning, knowledge of behavioral teaching strategies and access to a curriculum of skills. However, this is not enough to be able to carry out treatment proficiently, or to individualize treatment for individual children or to deal effectively with even the common problems that arise. This workshop will cover many common problems and strategies for addressing them that were used in a successful replication of the UCLA model of Intensive Behavioral Treatment. Common problems include resistance and oppositional behavior, rigid beliefs or actions (e.g., winning or loosing, having to be first), aggression, inattention, slow learning, failure to generalize skills to the natural environment, parental problems (e.g., not following recommendations, lack of involvement), sibling problems (e.g., conflictual relationship or avoidance), school problems on the bus, in the classroom (non-compliance, inattention, not completing work), and on the playground (e.g., not knowing how to join a group, being teased or bullied), poor social conversation skills (staying on topic, initiating/changing a topic, reading others social cues), understanding others perceptions (e.g., perceiving accidental, unintended, or chance outcomes as deliberate slights). Strategies used to address these issues will be demonstrated using vignettes and video clips, and include Interactive Play (involves carefully reading the childs behavior and play), to build a positive relationship, recognizing signs that the program demands are too difficult and knowing how to modify them, eliciting the childs reasoning, Video Modeling and other visual strategies, Role Playing, use of motivational systems such as Tokens/Points/Response-Cost, use of Social Stories, Foreshadowing, and rules, school observations/working with teachers, gradual exposure and assigning a task to reduce anxiety in new situations, Skill Streaming Groups, Error Correction, and providing replacement language.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will become familiar with common problems of children as they progress in treatment. 2. Participants will learn strategies for building a positive relationship. 3. Participants will learn how to recognize the signs that program goals are too difficult and how to modify the program. 4. Participants will learn strategies for increasing motivation and decreasing inattention. 5. Participants will learn strategies for dealing with behavior problems and a viariety of social difficulties.
Activities: We will use lecture, video clips, demonstration, and vignettes.
Audience: Clinicians and professionals providing treatment for children with autism, and school personnel.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Program Formulation for Nave Learners: Four Key Questions to Answer
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Courtland
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
VICCI TUCCI (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), DANIEL E. HURSH (West Virginia University)
Description: This workshop will provide attendees with a basis for formulating programming for nave Learners. Such programming requires determining (1) what repertoires are to be developed, (2) are there adequate stimuli available to affect change, (3) what contingencies will be designed given type of programming required, and (4) how can parts of the instructional conditions be arranged and re-arranged given required contingencies or programming? Application of these four formulation questions to classroom programming will be reviewed and discussed.
Learning Objectives: 1. Each participant will complete worksheet to answer each of the Four Key questions in application to an individual case of his or her choice. 2. Each participants will complete Placement test for a Learner of his/her choice. 3. Each participant will follow and apply the decision path for determining which supplemental contingencies should be used to promote individual Learner performance. 4. Each participant will conduct an environmental assessment to identify the place and occurence of specific instructional conditions within a teaching/learning environment. 5. Each participant will complete a worksheet to identify current arrangements and potential re-arrangements of instructional conditions.
Activities: 1. PowerPoint overview of each component of programming steps (1-4). 2. Review and illustration of presented assessment and placement procedures. 3. Review and illustration of presented contingency selection and application procedures. 4. Review and illustration of typical classroom instructional conditions. 5. Review and illustration of the construction, arrangement and re-arrangement of instructional conditions to promote improved and enhanced Learner performance.
Audience: BCABAs, BCBAs, and service providers such as teachers, home program therapists and program supervisors working with young children expressing challenging learning and behavioral concerns.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Behavior Chains to Children with Autism Using Task Analysis: Research to Practice
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Montreal
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Julie S. Weiss, M.S.
JULIE S. WEISS (New England Center for Children), STACIE L. FITCH (New England Center for Children), SORREL RYAN (New England Center for Children), PAMELA M. OLSEN (New England Center for Children), MYRNA E. LIBBY (New England Center for Children)
Description: Behavior chains consist of a sequence of related responses and each response or step in the chain results in a change in the environment, which reinforces the response that precedes it and becomes the discriminative stimulus for the next response in a chain. Typically, acquisition trials are organized by breaking the chain into teachable units, thus task analyzing the chain. This workshop will begin by reviewing current research in the area of teaching behavior chain including prompting procedures, how to teach untrained steps and determining the optimal number of teachers for implementing the curriculum. This workshop will also address critical components of task analysis to facilitate design of effective curriculum. The workshop will provide an overview of methods to teach a behavior chain including forward, backward and total task presentation. Participants will learn factors to facilitate acquisition when using task analytic programming. Participants will be instructed on how to implement teaching procedures. Emphasis will be placed on teaching criteria and prompting, as well as how to address untrained steps in the chain. Participants will be taught how to summarize and analyze the task analysis data.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, trainees will be able to: a. Describe past and current research in the area of task analysis b. Specify factors for facilitating acquisition in task analytic programming c. Specify components for designing effective task analyses d. Implement forward, backward and total task chaining procedures e. Develop task analytic curriculum f. Specify appropriate prompting strategies g. Determine how to teach untrained steps in the chain h. Analyze and summarize data from task analysis sessions i. Evaluate the efficacy of the teaching procedure
Activities: Through the use of didactic presentations, handouts, video taped examples, and competency based practice, participants will learn to develop and implement a behavior chain. Participants will learn factors to facilitate acquisition when using task analytic programming. Participants will practice how to implement teaching procedures. Emphasis will be placed on teaching criteria and prompting, as well as how to address untrained steps in the chain. Participants will learn data summary and how to analyze task analysis data.
Audience: The workshop is designed for teachers and clinicians currently implementing skill acquisition programs to teach behavior chains to children with autism and developmental disabilities. Participants should have some knowledge of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: None
Effective Parenting Repertoires
Friday, May 26, 2006
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Kennesaw
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lynn Yuan, Ph.D.
LYNN YUAN (Fred S. Keller School), BARBARA KIMMEL (Fred S. Keller School), GINA DILEO (Fred S. Keller School)
Description: This workshop presents an overview of applied behavior analysis and effective parenting repertoires. The workshop will focus on (1) the basic principle of operant behavior (2) the types of antecedent and consequences that result in the increase or decrease of a target behavior, (3) various ways to measure behaviors and how to interpret the results of the data collected (4) effective teaching strategies for parents, and (5) the process of setting long-term and short-term goals for the child.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Identify an operant, including antecedent, behavior, and consequence (2) identify the form and function of the target behavior (3) measure behaviors by counting, recording, graphing, and interpreting the data (4) implement effective teaching strategies, and (5) set long-term goals and the appropriate sized short-term objectives to meet those goals.
Activities: The three hour workshop will consist of 3 components: (1) A lecture on basic principles of behavior, (2) group activities that require parents to utilize the skills they learned in the lecture component, and (3) a group discussion giving parents an opportunity to present their work and receive feedback from the instructor.
Audience: This introductory ABA workshop is designed for parents who have limited or no knowledge in applied behavior analysis and its relationship to effective parenting strategies. The target audience will be parents who are seeking the knowledge and tools required to implement programs to either teach new behaviors, increase the frequency of desirable behaviors, or decrease inappropriate behaviors at home or in the community.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic

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