Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AUT: Autism

    DDA: Developmental Disabilities

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PRA: Practice

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    TPC: Theoretical, Philosophical, and Conceptual Issues

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

40th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2014

Program by Invited Events: Sunday, May 25, 2014


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Invited Paper Session #171
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Leadership Networks and Dissemination of Behavior Science: A National Agenda in Italy

Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Fabio Tosolin, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark P. Alavosius (University of Nevada, Reno)
FABIO TOSOLIN (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis)
Since the 1980s, Fabio Tosolin has been introducing and spreading the Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) and Performance Management (PM) methodologies in Italy. In the 1990s, he began to apply the O. Lindsley’s Precision Teaching and Fluency Building Approach to the growing up e-learning and introduced and spread in Italy the Behavior-Based Safety process (B-BS). Since 1985, he has guided Fabio Tosolin & Associates, in Milan, his management consulting firm that deals with performance management, learning technologies and behavioral safety for many national and multinational companies. He is currently professor of human factor in the management of HSEQ at the Milan Polytechnic, Department of Engineering of the Industrial Processes. He has been the chair of the last seven editions of the European B-BS and OBM Conference. He is author of more than 100 scientific communications, experimental researches, articles, and books on behavior management, B-BS, leadership, psychology of learning, didactic communication, and learning technologies. He is the president of the Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis (AARBA), the Italian Chapter of ABAI, and adviser of the Cambridge Center for Behavior Studies.
Abstract:

Since the 1980s, Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) and Performance Management (PM) methodologies have been introduced and spread in Italy. Fabio Tosolin has been at the forefront of this dissemination. In the 1990s, he began to apply O. Lindsley’s Precision Teaching and Fluency Building Approach to e-learning and introduced Behavior-Based Safety process (B-BS) in Italy. Since 1985, he has led the Milan-based management consulting firm, Fabio Tosolin & Associates, which deals with Performance Management, learning technologies and behavioral safety for many national and multinational companies. This talk will highlight the role leadership networks and decision making play in the process of large-scale dissemination of behavior analysis across sectors of Italy.

Target Audience:

Forthcoming

Learning Objectives: Forthcoming
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Paper Session #175
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Going International: Behavior Analysis at the Global Level, a Success Story

Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Martha Hübner, Ph.D.
Chair: Martha Hübner (University of Sao Paulo)
RUBEN ARDILA (National University of Colombia)
Dr. Ruben Ardila is a Colombian research psychologist and a professor at the National University of Colombia. He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has conducted research on experimental analysis of behavior, history of psychology, and the application of psychology to socio-economic development. Dr. Ardila has published 32 books and more than 300 scientific papers in journals from several countries. Some of his books have been translated into English, German, Portuguese, and other languages. As a visiting professor in several countries, including the United States, Germany, Puerto Rico, Spain, and Argentina, he has promoted behavior analysis, international psychology, and history of psychology. Dr. Ardila has been president of the Inter-American Society of Psychology (SIP), the International Society for Comparative Psychology (ISCP), and the Latin American Association for the Analysis and Modification of Behavior (ALAMOC). He founded the Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia (Latin American Journal of Psychology) and edited the journal from 1969 to 2003. He was a member of the executive committee of the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) between 1992 and 2004. He is on the board of directors of the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP, 2006-2014). In 2004, he received the Science Award from Colombia. His most recent recognition is the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology (2007). His most recent books are Autobiografa, un Punto en el Tiempo y en el Espacio (Autobiography, a Point in Time and Space, 2012) and Historia de la Psicologa en Colombia (History of Psychology in Colombia, 2013).
Abstract:

The roots of behavior analysis are found on empirical philosophers, on Pavlov, Pieron, and other thinkers. However, during the larger part of its history behavior analysis has been a discipline cultivated mainly in the United States and other English-speaking countries. The pioneers of behavior analysis as an area of research were part of the Anglo-Saxon culture (Watson, Skinner, and Baum) and was also the case with applied workers (Wolpe, Eysenck, Rachman, Keller, and Azrin). Probably the philosophical assumptions of the Anglo-Saxon culture were in tune with behavior analysis as a science and applied area. On the other hand, during the past few decades, an internationalization of behavior analysis has taken place. Work of high quality is carried out in Norway, Japan, Spain, Brazil, and other nations. The situation of behavior analysis and its international growth is analyzed, including the role of the Association for Behavior Analysis International in this process. At the present time, behavior analysts are "thinking globally and acting locally."

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students and anyone interested in learning about the international growth of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: -Explain the current state of behavior analysis at the international level, -Discuss the main areas of research and application at the global level. -Explain the contribution of different cultures and worldviews to behavior analysis.
Keyword(s): behavior analysis, historical development, internationalization
 
 
Invited Symposium #178
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How Machine Implementations of Simple Verbal Operants Demonstrate the Emergence of Complex and Diverse Verbal Behavior
Sunday, May 25, 2014
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Barbara E. Esch (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.)
Discussant: Greg Stikeleather (Palo Alto, CA)
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
Abstract:

More traditional computer simulations of human behavior have involved information processing models of the brain, whereby the brain is assumed to be modeled after the way computers are architected: lots of data stored in memory with programs that retrieve the data given certain inputs. Adaptive network systems are elemental computer learning programs that have enabled the simulation of behavior at an operant level, whereby that behavior which is followed by reinforcing consequences is more likely to occur again. This symposium explores how adaptive networks can generate simple verbal operants, and how more diverse and complex behavior can then be generated as a result. Implications for the interpretation of more complex human linguistic behavior and the development of effective teaching programs also are considered.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): adaptive networks, computer simulations, effective teaching, verbal behavior
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, and graduate students interested in exploring how adaptive networks can generate simple verbal operants, and how more diverse and complex behavior can then be generated as a result.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Explain how implementing operant principles in a robot enables analysis of puzzling cases of verbal behavior; (2) Identify one or more examples of verbal behavior whose interpretation can be investigated by adaptive network simulations; and (3) Explain what an ANS is and specify how they differ from a typical computer program.
 

An Overview of How Adaptive Networks Can Generate Simple Verbal Operants

WILLIAM F. POTTER (California State University Stanislaus)
Abstract:

Adaptive networks are in essence, computer programs that learn. This very fact places them squarely in the domain of behavior analysis, although few in the field conduct research with them, or develop them for commercial or other purposes. This talk will provide an overview of what Adaptive Network Systems (ANS) are and how they differ from typical computer programs; provide insight into how they work; and show how they can adhere to the behavioral principles that the experimental analysis of behavior has uncovered over the years. The basic components of such a network will be explored including the architecture, some simple learning algorithms, and design features which preclude hard-wiring responses, or using brute computer power to solve problems or to produce more complex behaviors. Finally, some simple examples of ANS will be illustrated, particularly related to the elementary verbal operants.

After obtaining a bachelor's degree in business administration and a minor in journalism, Dr. Potter worked briefly as a journalist for a small daily newspaper, then left that to work in a small advertising agency in New York City. After 4.5 years of this, his true passion emerged--the pursuit of science. He obtained a spot in the behavior analysis graduate program at Western Michigan University, which eventually resulted in a Ph.D. and much training in behavior analysis under the tutelage of Dr. Jack Michael and Dr. Alan Poling, both of whom he owes much. Throughout the years, he has dabbled in many things (VB, CBT, OBM, ANS, MOs, and a few other obscure acronyms), making him a jack of all trades but a master of none. He currently chairs the Psychology/Child Development Department at California State University, Stanislaus, and is director of the International Dual Behavior Analysis Degree in collaboration with universities in Warsaw, Poland and Bangor, Wales.
 

How Adaptive Networks Can Aid in the Interpretation of Complex Linguistic Puzzles

DAVID C. PALMER (Smith College)
Abstract:

Because the experimental analysis of verbal behavior is constrained by practical and ethical considerations, most of our understanding of complex cases arises from verbal interpretations. But such interpretations are limited by the sheer number of relevant variables and our ignorance of subjects' histories. In contrast, adaptive network simulations permit complete control over both complex contextual variables and historical variables. If such simulations are tightly constrained by behavioral principles, they offer powerful demonstrations of the explanatory adequacy of such principles. Dr. Palmer will discuss several examples that seem to defy verbal interpretation, examples such as the problems of novelty, nesting, generalization of neologisms according to apparent grammatical form, conditioning the behavior of the listener, mysterious structural regularities in verbal behavior, and the problem of acquisition of complex forms. He will suggest that adaptive network simulations of verbal behavior may be the best interpretive tool and in some cases the only one.

With bachelor's degrees in geology and English, Dr. David Palmer was devoting his post-graduate years to avoiding the draft when he chanced to pick up a copy of Walden Two from a friend's bookshelf. It changed the direction of his life. He promptly read the rest of the Skinner canon and spent the next decade trying to start an experimental community and preaching radical behaviorism to anyone who would listen. Eventually, he took some classes with Beth Sulzer-Azaroff, who urged him to apply to graduate school. Thanks to a dyslexic secretary, who entered his undergraduate GPA backward, he was admitted and began working with John Donahoe. He was happy in grad school and would be there still if the University of Massachusetts had not threatened to change the locks. He has spent the past 25 years as the token behaviorist at Smith College. During that time he co-authored, with John W. Donahoe, Learning and Complex Behavior, a book which attempts to integrate adaptive network simulation with experimental analysis and verbal interpretation of complex cases. He continues to puzzle over the interpretation of memory, problem-solving, and, particularly, verbal behavior. He still thinks Skinner was right about nearly everything.
 

A Demonstration of Teaching Verbal Behavior to an Operant Robot

WILLIAM R. HUTCHISON (Behavior Systems)
Abstract:

The presentation will describe a robot whose behavior is learned via an adaptive network based on behavior analytic principles, embedded in a body with sensors including vision and hearing and with responses including spatial movements and vocalizations. The demonstration will first show how that robot learns elementary verbal operants, then more complex verbal behaviors based on them. We will examine in detail how some of the puzzling verbal behaviors described in the preceding papers in the symposium are learned, illustrating how using a robot makes it possible to examine moment-to-moment changes in the conditions that control the behavioral sequence.

William Hutchison earned his bachelor's degree from Kansas University with majors in psychology and mathematics, then entered the Ph.D. program in clinical psychology at State University of New York at Stony Brook, the first purely behavioral clinical psychology program. His major adviser was Leonard Krasner, one of the pioneer generation of researchers in behavior modification, token economies, and verbal conditioning. Equally influential on his career was his work as teaching assistant to Howard Rachlin, a leading figure in quantitative analysis of behavior. He then taught at one of the hotbeds of radical behaviorism, West Virginia University, in its Ph.D. program in behavioral systems analysis. In 1983, he developed a behavioral alternative to cognitive artificial intelligence, a computer system based on the equations from quantitative experimental analysis of behavior. That system became one of the first adaptive ("neural") networks and was the foundation for one of the first companies, BehavHeuristics, applying that methodology to commercial software. The company's focus was on resource allocation in changing environments, but a subsequent company, Applied Behavior Systems, embodied the adaptive network in robots and developed software for computerized training of verbal behavior to the robot and to children. Hutchison continued the robotics direction in a 4-year stint with the government's Intelligence Technology Innovation Center.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #196
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Leadership and the Science of Behavior Change

Sunday, May 25, 2014
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Maria E. Malott, Ph.D.
Chair: Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
MARIA E. MALOTT (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
Dr. Maria E. Malott is CEO of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), which she has administered since 1993. During this time and within a few short years, ABAI has risen from near-bankruptcy to become a financially stable, growing scientific and professional organization. Her past experience includes serving as vice president of manufacturing at a Midwestern injection molding company and president and founder of Malott and Associates, through which for 14 years she consulted for advertising agencies, restaurants, retail and manufacturing companies, hotels, banks, governmental organizations, and nonprofit institutions. Her clients included Meijer, Inc.; Kellogg’s; Pharmacia & Upjohn; and General Motors Corp. Throughout her career, Dr. Malott has combined the analysis of metacontigencies and behavioral contingencies in managing complex systems and, in the process, has taught dozens of corporate executives to appreciate the power of organizational behavior management technology. Dr. Malott has presented nearly 200 papers, taught 34 workshops, and lectured in 37 universities in 18 countries, and is an affiliated faculty at three universities. She has served on four editorial boards and is the author of the book Paradox of Organizational Change, published in Spanish and English and co-author of Elementary Principles of Behavior. She is a fellow of ABAI and was the recipient of the 2003 Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, the 2004 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Organizational Behavior Management from the Organizational Behavior Management Network, the 2002 Outstanding Alumni Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University, and the 2013 Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis.
Abstract:

Throughout history and more recently, countless people have changed the world in significant ways. They forged new paths and demonstrated a remarkable ability to inspire others to follow. Margaret Mead suggested: Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Was she right that the actions of not one but a few individuals under special motivating circumstances are what account for profound change? Or is it the case that leaders possess incomparable and unique repertoires that enable them to affect change single-handedly? Are there common traits and systems-based strategies that effective leaders use to bring about change? As behavior analysts, we must reflect on these questions and wonder if our scientific approach can account for the change.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in leadership and the science of behavior change.

 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Illustrate why effective change is rarely the result of the actions of a single individual; (2) Understand the behavioral systems strategies used by successful leaders to affect the actions of others; and (3) Show how complex social systems are not replicable and have no lineage, yet they must be subject matter for behavior analysts.
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Paper Session #201
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Hoped-for Demise of Significance Testing: Why and How

Sunday, May 25, 2014
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Marc N. Branch, Ph.D.
Chair: M. Jackson Marr (Georgia Tech)
MARC N. BRANCH (University of Florida)
Marc N. Branch was introduced to behavioral approaches while an undergraduate at Stanford University in the 1960s. After graduate-school stints at Arizona State University and the University of Maryland, followed by a post-doctoral year at the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Dr. Branch took a position as a faculty member in the Psychology Department at the University of Florida in fall of 1973. During his time there he served, among other duties, as editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, as chairman of the Psychology Department, and as president of ABAI. He retired from teaching in the summer of 2012 and is now professor emeritus of psychology.
Abstract:

Despite more than 60 years of published information clearly showing that null-hypothesis significance tests (NHSTs) and the p values associated with them provide essentially no information about the reliability (i.e., probability of replication) of research outcomes, they remain at the core of editorial decision-making in the behavioral sciences, including psychology, with statistical significance serving as the major gateway to publication of research results. Two reasons appear to contribute to the continuing practice. One, information available suggests that a majority of psychological researchers incorrectly believe that p values do provide information about the reliability of research results. Two, among the minority thatare aware that p values do no such thing, a position sometimes taken is that even though p values do not provide the information many think they do, using them to make decisions about whether to believe in research results is and has been essentially benign. This paper addresses both reasons. Because the first has been pointed out many times, it is briefly covered, because of the apparent persistence of the misunderstanding. The second, that NHSTs have no significant negative effects on behavioral sciences, is the focus of the major portion of the paper, which describes seven “side-effects” of NHSTs that continue to retard effective development of psychological science. The paper makes an appeal to journal reviewers and editors to de-emphasize or eliminate the role of NHSTs, and it closes by offering a few suggestions about alternatives that could be considered and with a challenge to psychological researchers to develop new methods that more fully assess the reliability and generality of research findings.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in data-analysis techniques.

Learning Objectives: 1. Define a p value. 2. Indicate why a p value provides no information about the probability that research results are "due to chance." 3. Indicate at least one way in which significance testing has hindered the development of behavioral science.
Keyword(s): Null-hypothesis, P-value, Reliability, Statistical significance
 
 
Invited Paper Session #210
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Some Musings on Automatic Reinforcement: Central Concept, Controversial Status

Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W375e (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Jessica L. Sassi, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica L. Sassi (New England Center for Children)
WILLIAM H. AHEARN (The New England Center for Children)
William H. Ahearn, Ph.D. and BCBA-D, joined The New England Center for Children (NECC) in August 1996, and currently serves at NECC as the director of research. He is also an adjunct faculty member for Western New England University's master's and doctoral programs in applied behavior analysis. Currently, Dr. Ahearn serves as the president of the Board of Directors for the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts. Formerly, he served as president of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy. He was named the 2009 American Psychological Association--Division 25 awardee for Enduring Contributions to Applied Behavioral Research. Dr. Ahearn's research interests include social skills in children with autism, verbal behavior, assessment and treatment of stereotypy, severe problem behavior, and pediatric feeding difficulties. He also is interested in resistance to change, behavioral economics, and conditioned reinforcement. His work has been published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavioral Interventions, Behavior Modification, The Lancet, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and he has written book chapters on teaching children with autism and pediatric feeding problems in children with autism. He is currently the editor-in-chief for Behavioral Interventions and is on the editorial boards for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, and The Behavior Analyst.
Abstract:

Automatic reinforcement is a controversial topic. Skinner (1957) described automatic contingencies in Verbal Behavior as an important concept relative to complex human behavior. However, empirical evidence relative to the existence of automatically reinforced behavior is scant. Vaughan and Michael (1982) described automatic reinforcement as referring to three types of functional relations and practitioners have operated on the assumption that automatic reinforcement, as in producing sensory consequences, provides a helpful context for crafting more effective intervention. However, problem behavior that is automatically reinforced is thought to be persistent and challenging to alter across the lifespan. This presentation will explore whether automatic reinforcement actually provides a useful account of behavior that clearly offers pragmatic value to behavior analysis and its successful application. Whether behavior, referred to as automatically reinforced, is operant, respondent, or adjunctive in nature also will be discussed.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in autism and behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Describe the concept of automatic reinforcement as having three usages (i.e., describes three types of functional relations); (2) Describe whether there is evidence that automatically reinforced behavior is operant in nature; (3) Describe whether automatic reinforcement is a useful concept in behavior analysis.
Keyword(s): autism, best practice, treatment
 
 
Invited Panel #219
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Leadership Seminar: Charting a Course for Behavior Analysis: Signposts of Future Directions
Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Mark P. Alavosius (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Panelists: JULIE SMITH (Continuous Learning Group), SIGRID S. GLENN (University of North Texas), MARK A. MATTAINI (Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract:

The field of behavior analysis and related disciplines offer much to promote behavioral solutions to socially significant practices. How our discipline is led and becomes more influential is a challenge we can apply our science toward. By drawing upon their pioneering work in behavior science, panelists will provide comments regarding this theme of the Seminar on Leadership and Cultural Change. The seminar is designed tohelp educational leaders to create new models of stewardship and open opportunities for innovation while adjusting to growing social upheaval, technological advances, and environmental concerns, as well as crises in the global economy, health, education, and environment. It will address how behavior analysis finds common ground with other sciences by investigating the behavior of leaders who influence organizations and society.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in the future of behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) State broad themes to be explored in basic and applied research that may revitalize interest in our discipline; (2) Describe any methodological refinements likely to develop to enable future research; and (3) Identify themes in science, society, and the culture at large that influence leaders of behavior analysis and discuss how these frame the future of our field.  
JULIE SMITH (Continuous Learning Group)
Dr. Julie M. Smith is the co-founder of Continuous Learning Group, the world’s largest behavior-based consultancy. She and her team have devoted the last quarter-century to pioneering the most powerful and practical behavior-centric business management system available today. Working with her global clients, Dr. Smith has created an extensive track record that proves CLG’s behavior-centric approach leads to superior strategy execution and dramatic performance improvement. As a world-class business management consultant, Dr. Smith is noted for her astonishing energy and ability to help leaders achieve “mission impossible” while navigating their organizations’ inevitable cycles of challenge and change. Dr. Smith’s engaging, motivating style makes her a sought-after speaker to address organizations, professional conferences, and forums on change and global leadership. Incorporating her extensive experience, humor, and real-world examples into her presentations, Dr. Smith brings a masterful clarity to even the most complex issues. She has a gift for taking complex behavior-change methods and making them simple, so leaders at all levels can achieve positive, measurable, and repeatable results while simultaneously improving employee engagement. Dr. Smith lives with her husband, Mickey, in Morgantown, WV, where they enjoy spending time with their family building Heston Farm, which includes Heston Farm Winery, Pinchgut Hollow Distillery, and Foxfire Restaurant. Identified as one of the fastest start-ups in West Virginia, Heston Farm already has won national awards for marketing, packaging, and product quality. In recognition of her visionary entrepreneurism, Dr. Smith was recently inducted into the West Virginia Business Hall of Fame.
SIGRID S. GLENN (University of North Texas)
Sigrid S. Glenn, regents professor emeritus at the University of North Texas (UNT), is a past president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and was elected as one of ABAI’s five founding fellows. Dr. Glenn’s published work includes empirical and theoretical articles, as well as books and book chapters, targeting audiences within and outside behavior analysis. Her articles and chapters developing the concept of metacontingenies are used by behavior analysts all over the world in analyzing cultural problems and developing avenues of cultural change. She is widely recognized by behavior analysts as incorporating cultural phenomena in the behavior analytic worldview. Dr. Glenn was the founding chair of the nation’s first Department of Behavior Analysis and the primary author of its master’s and bachelor’s degree programs. She is a charter certificant of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board and for 10 years she founded and directed UNT’s online academic certificate program. Dr. Glenn travels nationally and internationally, lecturing on behavior theory and philosophy as well as cultural processes from a behavior analytic perspective.
MARK A. MATTAINI (Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago)
Mark Mattaini, DSW, is an associate professor in the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Editor of the journal Behavior and Social Issues, Dr. Mattaini is also the author/editor of 10 books, including Peace Power for Adolescents: Strategies for a Culture of Nonviolence (NASW Press) and Finding Solutions to Social Problems: Behavioral Strategies for Change (American Psychological Association, with Bruce Thyer), and more than 80 other publications. Since the mid-1990s, Dr. Mattaini has focused his research and practice on behavioral systems analysis for violence prevention with youth, and analyses of the dynamics of nonviolent struggle. His new book, Strategic Nonviolent Power: The Science of Satyagraha, published by Athabasca University Press and available in open access format online, analyzes potential contributions of behavioral systems science to nonviolent social action and civil resistance supporting justice and human rights. He also is consulting with the American Friends Service Committee on peace building projects.  
Keyword(s): Leadership Seminar
 
 
Invited Symposium #221
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
What Does Evidence-Based Practice Have to do With Applied Behavior Analysis?
Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
Discussant: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The term "evidence-based practice" now appears in the professional literature of every discipline that attempts to change human behavior in some dimension (e.g., health, social, communication, etc.). In recent years, behavior analysts have begun discussing the role of evidence-based practice within our field. Differing views about the definition of "evidence-based practice of ABA" have been raised as well as the question of how the evidence-based practice of ABA should influence practitioners. This presentation invites leading scholars within ABA to define evidence-based practice and to discuss the implications of their definition on the practice of behavior analysis. By answering questions like "What is a practice?" "What constitutes evidence?" and "How should the evidence-based practice of ABA influence practitioners' decision-making in their daily work?", Tim Slocum and Tristram Smith will demonstrate that the answers are essential to our field but more murky than they appear on face value. In addition, they will identify the role researchers must play if an evidence-based practice of ABA is to be realized in a meaningful way. They conclude by providing recommendations about how we should proceed as practitioners, researchers, and as a field if we expect to fully adopt the evidence-based practice of ABA.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The primary target audience is practitioners who are required to make decisions regarding evidence-based practice as a part of their daily work. A secondary audience is researchers who conduct research and/or submit for federal funding in this area.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to (1) Provide different definitions for the evidence-based practice of applied behavior analysis; (2) Answer the question "What is a practice?"; and (3) Answer the question "What constitutes evidence?"
 

Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Professional Problem Solving

TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Dr. Slocum will suggest that evidence-based practice of behavior analysis (EBP-BA) be defined as a decision-making process that integrates (A) the best available evidence with (B) clinical expertise and (C) client values and context. This definition corresponds with definitions of EBP in other professions including medicine and psychology, supports the foundational principles of applied behavior analysis, and provides a framework that can be applied to virtually all of one's professional practice as a behavior analyst. In this definition, behavior analysts' practices are understood to encompass all of their professional behavior. It states that behavior analytic practice should be based on the best available evidence. The quality, volume, and relevance of evidence varies greatly across the decisions that behavior analysts make--what is constant is that behavior analysts should seek out and use the best of what is available. This approach to EBP-BA suggests that ABA researchers (A) advance best available evidence through primary intervention research, (B) investigate how clinical expertise, client values, and context can be most effectively integrated into professional decision making, and (C) develop ways to make the best available evidence functionally accessible to practitioners.

Dr. Timothy A. Slocum earned his doctorate in special education at the University of Washington in 1991 and has been a faculty member at Utah State University (USU) in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation since then. He has been involved in reading instruction and reading research for more than 25 years. He has conducted research on phonological skills, vocabulary, and school-wide implementation of research-based reading instruction, and evidence-based practice. He teaches courses at the undergraduate, master's, and doctoral levels on topics including evidence-based reading instruction, research methods and statistics, advanced topics in behavior analysis, and language. Dr. Slocum was recognized as 2011 Teacher of the Year by the USU College of Education, and he received the 2011 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association.
 

What is Evidence-Based Behavior Analysis?

TRISTRAM SMITH (University of Rochester Medical Center)
Abstract:

Although behavior analysts often say we engage in evidence-based practice, we express differing, sometimes contradictory views on what constitutes "evidence" and "practice." In order to provide useful guidance to consumers, providers, third-party payers, and researchers, we need to be clear on what is or is not a practice and what is or is not suitable evidence. This talk will critique applied behavior analytic interventions that behavior analysts have identified as evidence-based practices. It argues that establishing such practices involves more than analyzing the effects of discrete intervention procedures on behavior; it requires synthesizing findings into a package that is demonstrably usable by independent providers and useful to consumers. Recognizing the need for synthesis offers behavior analysts many promising opportunities to build on our existing research in order to increase the quality and quantity of evidence-based practices.

Tristram Smith, Ph.D., is a professor of pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), where he leads federally funded studies comparing the efficacy of different interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders. He is also a clinician in URMC's Community Consultation Program, serving students with ASD and other intellectual disabilities in schools and other agencies. His commitment to the study and treatment of children with ASD began in 1982, when he had the opportunity to volunteer as a buddy for an adult with autism who lived near his college. This experience inspired him to apply to graduate school at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he studied clinical psychology and worked as a therapist and researcher with O. Ivar Lovaas, Ph.D., in the UCLA Young Autism Project. Before moving to Rochester in 2000, he directed clinics for children with autism and their families in the states of California, Iowa, and Washington. He has authored or coauthored several of the most widely cited studies on treatment outcomes for children with ASD.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #222
CE Offered: BACB

Development of an Applied Behavior Analysis Program at the National Changhua University of Education in Taiwan

Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
W196b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Gabrielle T Lee, Ph.D.
Chair: Gabrielle T. Lee (ABA Services, LLC)
HUA FENG (National Changhua University of Education)
Dr. Hua Feng completed her studies in educational psychology at National Taiwan Normal University and special education at The Ohio State University before assuming a position at National Changhua University of Education. The National Changhua University of Education was instituted in 1971, acquired national status in 1980, and reached university level along with its present name in 1989. It is the premiere university in Taiwan for training teachers. Dr. Feng served as a professor in the Department of Special Education there for nearly 10 years. She then became director of the Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Counseling and continues to serve as a professor in that program. She trains teachers and conducts research in assessment and teaching children with autism, teaching social skills for students with emotional/behavioral disorders, complex verbal behavior, a behavioral approach to counseling for disability, intraverbal training and teaching, and development of theory-of-mind testing and teaching strategies.
Abstract:

This talk will present a brief history of the Applied Behavior Analysis Program at the National Changhua University of Education (NCUE) in Taiwan. Taiwan has actively promoted applied behavior analysis and its application for more than 10 years. The graduate program, which offers board certification in behavior analysis, has been approved by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board since 2006. In 2011, a clinical center, which was based on behavior analytic principles, was established. Teachers who are trained in this center have contributed greatly to raising the awareness and profile of applied behavior analysis in academic circles in Taiwan. The students and professors at NCUE have contributed research findings in a number of important areas including verbal behavior, pretend play, joint attention, self-management skills, perspective-taking, and emotional skills training. Staff and students at the clinical center have developed training protocols and comprehensive assessment tools to assist them with the provision of evidence-based instruction for children with autism. Special education and rehabilitation teachers have the opportunity to access in-service training and practicum opportunities through the clinical center. Research findings suggest that these opportunities have had a favorable impact on the education system in Taiwan. Future development plans and proposed research also will be discussed as a part of this talk.

Keyword(s): ABA, teacher education
 
 
Invited Symposium #235
CE Offered: BACB
Pursuing a Career in Behavioral Science? You Need Funding!
Sunday, May 25, 2014
2:00 PM–3:50 PM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Paul L. Soto (Texas Tech University)
Discussant: Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
CE Instructor: Paul L. Soto, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Obtaining research funding is a critical part of most research careers. A number of funding avenues are available to basic and applied behavior analysts. The speakers in this symposium are individuals with successful records of obtaining funding from a variety of sources such as the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Federal Aviation Administration, and other sources and individuals who serve as program officers at the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. Each speaker will provide their perspective on strategies for success in obtaining funding.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): grants, NIH, NSF, research funding
Target Audience:

Basic and applied behavior analysts interested in obtaining federal funding for research.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Identify potential funding sources; (2) Understand how to research opportunities and announcements; and (3) Identify strategies for developing successful applications.
 

Funding Research for Behavioral Solutions

STEVEN R. HURSH (Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc.)
Abstract:

Funding behavior analysis research through the National Institutes of Health can be difficult. The challenge is not just about the shrinking available dollars. The more important difficulty is the NIH emphasis on clinically relevant research and the need to demonstrate that behavioral research will translate into improved treatment for a clinical disorder. Much important behavior research has little to do with clinical disorders but is about understanding the behavior of average people: how they make decisions that affect the economy, the environment, the safety of transportation and industry, and the functioning of communities. Solving behavioral problems in these domains are every bit as important as contributing to health care, so how does such research get funded? In this talk, Dr. Hursh will illustrate several strategies for successful research funding, using his experience as a case study. In particular, nearly all his research has been funded from sources other than NIH. Alternative funding requires a shift from being a behavior analyst to being a problem analyst, applying behavioral solutions.

Dr. Steven Hursh is president and chairman of the Institutes for Behavior Resources, where he directs research and application efforts on human performance and fatigue, behavioral economics, drug abuse, and cooperative team performance. He is also an adjunct professor of behavioral biology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Hursh is the world leader in theory and modeling in the behavioral economics subfield of psychology as defined by the application of economic concepts and metrics to individual and group behavior. In addition, Dr. Hursh is also the technical leader of an effort to model the relationship between sleep deprivation and performance. His patented biomathematical model, the Sleep, Activity, Fatigue, and Task Effectiveness, or SAFTE model, and the Fatigue Avoidance Scheduling Tool has been accepted by the U.S. Department of Defense as the standard warfighter fatigue model, has been validated and calibrated by the Department of Transportation as a fatigue risk management tool, and is currently used by the Federal Railroad Administration, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, and major corporations to assess fatigue in transportation and other industries to assess and manage fatigue in operational settings. Dr. Hursh earned his B.A. in psychology from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of California, San Diego. During his 35 years in research, Dr. Hursh has authored or co-authored more than 80 published articles, book chapters, and technical reports, and served as associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Dr. Hursh has obtained grants and contracts from numerous sources including the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, NASA, Federal Railroad Administration, Federal Aviation Administration, Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration, Transport Canada, Army, and Air Force, plus private industry consulting.
 

Preparing Quality Grant Applications: Understanding the Process and the Context

WILLIAM J. MCILVANE (University of Massachusetts Medical School)
Abstract:

This presentation will convey perspectives on the process of preparing competitive grant applications for peer review. For more than 30 years, Dr. McIlvane has been writing applications to various federal funding agencies, most of which have been successful. He also has served on dozens of advisory panels that have reviewed grant applications or made recommendations about funding priorities and procedures. In his current position, he serves as principal investigator on five active National Institutes of Health grants. He also mentors colleagues in the process of preparing competitive grant applications. Through his combined experiences, he has come to understand quite a bit about the variables that determine whether or not grant applications are successful. Because he serves in multiple roles (i.e., principal investigator, reviewer, mentor, and research administrator), he will convey multiple perspectives that may help behavior analysts understand the overall context within which grant applications are successful (or not). Also, he will discuss strategies and tactics for operating research programs within tight budgetary constraints such as those faced currently by researchers nationwide.

Dr. William McIlvane directs a broad research program that addresses a variety of scientific problems relevant to understanding and perhaps correcting behavior deficits of people with neurodevelopmental disabilities. One area of deficit, for example, is in symbolic behaviors involved in communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing, etc.). One focus of his program is development of methods to encourage progressively more rapid learning of symbolic behaviors. Another is to adapt behavioral neuroscience methods--including animal modeling--to further understanding of brain processes involved in symbolic behavior. A second focus of Dr. McIlvane's program is to develop valid nonverbal neuropsychological testing methods for use with individuals and populations that do not understand verbal instructions. Methods developed in this aspect of his research have been adapted to further understanding of the behavioral profiles associated with disorders such as autism, depression, and neurotoxicant exposure. In addition, Dr. McIlvane's program has a strong research-to-practice emphasis. For example, methods emerging from laboratory research are being used to teach practical skills in regular and special education classrooms in both the United States and in Brazil. Dr. McIlvane has obtained funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, the National Institute on Environmental Health Services, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Center for Research Resources, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Science Foundation. He has been continuously funded since 1985.
 

NIH Funding Opportunities in Behavioral Research

SUSAN VOLMAN (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
Abstract:

Behavioral research is critically important to NIH’s mission not only at the NIH institutes that have responsibility for behavioral disorders, but also because behavior has a pervasive effect on most health outcomes. Topics that will be covered in this talk include an overview of NIH-wide initiatives in behavioral research, such as the Science of Behavioral Change (SOBC) and the Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet), and the funding priorities in behavioral research of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and other NIH Institutes. Strategies for finding the best home for your research at NIH also will be presented.

Dr. Susan Volman oversees a program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse that emphasizes a systems neurobiology approach in animal models, including electrophysiological recording of neural activity during drug-related activities; studies of learning and memory systems to elucidate how normal processes of neuronal plasticity contribute to drug addiction; and computational approaches to understanding the effects of drug-induced alterations on neural circuits. Dr. Volman obtained her Ph.D. in neurobiology and behavior from Cornell University in 1985 and was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology. She was a faculty member in the Department of Zoology and a member of the Neuroscience Graduate Studies Program and the Center for Cognitive Science at The Ohio State University and then served as director of developmental neuroscience at the National Science Foundation before coming to NIDA in 1998. Dr. Volman has carried out NIH-funded research in a variety of neuroethological model systems with a common theme of neural circuit re-organization underlying behavioral change in response to injury, natural selection, and during ontogeny. Her most recent research had been on song learning in birds. She has served on the editorial board of Brain, Behavior, and Evolution and on the review panel for the behavioral and computational neuroscience programs at the NSF.
 

Funding Opportunities at the National Science Foundation

DONALD A. HANTULA (Temple University)
Abstract:

The National Science Foundation funds basic and applied research in many areas of interest to behavior analysts. In general, funded research advances theory and has substantial broader impacts beyond the results of the research itself. This presentation reviews the proposal and review process including the criteria of intellectual merit and broader impact, highlights opportunities in Decision, Risk & Management Sciences, and describesthree funding mechanisms that may be of special interest: dissertation improvement grants for doctoral students; CAREER grants for early-career behavioral scientists; and research in undergraduate institutions (RUI) grants for faculty at undergraduate colleges and universities.

Donald Hantula is a visiting scientist and program director for decision, risk, and management sciences at the National Science Foundation, an associate professor of psychology and director of the Decision Laboratory at Temple University, and associate editor of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. His research includes behavior analysis, behavioral economics, human decision making in dynamic environments, and technological applications. He has previously held positions in occupational health promotion (The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), human resource management (King's College), and management information systems (St. Joseph's University), and as a visiting scholar at the University of Nevada, Reno. His research has appeared in American Psychologist, IEEE Transactions, the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, the Journal of Analytical Psychology, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. His most recent book is Consumer Behavior Analysis: (A)Rational Approach to Consumer Choice with Victoria Wells.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #241
CE Offered: BACB

Mitigating the Risks Associated with Treatment of Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Sunday, May 25, 2014
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anjali Barretto, Ph.D.
Chair: Anjali Barretto (Gonzaga University)
CATHLEEN C. PIAZZA (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Dr. Cathleen Piazza received her doctorate degree from Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. She completed her predoctoral internship and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. After her training, Dr. Piazza continued as a faculty member at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she served as the director of the Severe Behavior Unit, the chief psychologist of the Neurobehavioral Unit, and the director of the Pediatric Behavioral Sleep Clinic. In 1996, Dr. Piazza became the director of training for the Department of Behavioral Psychology. In 1997, she became the director of the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program. In 1999, the Kennedy Krieger and Marcus Institutes became affiliates, and Dr. Piazza moved to Atlanta, GA, to initiate the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program at the Marcus Institute. She also served as the director of training for the Marcus Institute. Dr. Piazza is a former editor, former book editor, former associate editor, and former board member of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. In 2002, the Chron's and Colitis Association named Dr. Piazza a Woman of Distinction. She also was identified as the most productive female researcher and one of the top five researchers in the world in the areas of behavior analysis and behavior therapy in the 1990s. Dr. Piazza has served as a mentor to more than 50 predoctoral interns and postdoctoral fellows who trained at the Kennedy Krieger, Marcus, and Munroe-Meyer Institutes. Dr. Piazza currently is the director of the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program and a professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute and Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Piazza has published more than 75 peer-reviewed studies on the assessment and treatment of severe behavior and feeding disorders.
Abstract:

Treatments for pediatric feeding disorders based on applied behavior analysis have the most empirical support in the literature, even though the results of several studies have shown that the etiology of pediatric feeding disorders is often complex and multifactorial. Factors that contribute to the etiology of a feeding disorder include medical problems, oral-motor dysfunction, and nutritional and/or caloric deficits. Therefore, it is critical that the behavior analyst seek input from physicians, speech and/or occupational therapists, and dietitians before initiating treatment of a child with a feeding disorder. The first purpose of this presentation is to familiarize the audience with the potential risks associated with treatment of a pediatric feeding disorder. A second purpose is to teach the audience ways to mitigate these risks. A third purpose is to teach the audience why interaction with professionals from other disciplines is important for safe and effective treatment of a child with a feeding disorder.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #242
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Leadership Seminar: Leadership Lessons from Behavioral Science: Bringing the Best Out of Yourself and Others

Sunday, May 25, 2014
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
W190a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: E. Scott Geller, Ph.D.
Chair: Timothy D. Ludwig (Appalachian State University)
E. SCOTT GELLER (Virginia Tech)
E. Scott Geller, alumni distinguished professor at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and senior partner of Safety Performance Solutions, Inc., has authored or co-authored 39 books, 56 book chapters, 38 training manuals, 234 magazine articles, and more than 350 research articles addressing the development and evaluation of behavior-change interventions to improve quality of life. His most recent books are Actively Caring for People: Cultivating a Culture of Compassion and Actively Caring at Your School: How to Make it Happen. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Association for Applied Behavior Analysis International, and the World Academy of Productivity and Quality Sciences. He is past editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (1989-1992), current associate editor of Environment and Behavior (since 1982), and current consulting editor for Behavior and Social Issues, the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and the Journal of Safety Research. In 2005, Dr. Geller was awarded the Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award by the State Council of Higher Education. He has received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the International Organizational Behavior Management Network and the American Psychological Foundation. At the May 2009 graduation ceremonies at the College of Wooster, his alma mater, Dr. Geller was awarded the honorary degree doctor of humane letters.
Abstract:

From dawn to dusk, psychology affects every aspect of our lives. For example, success in educational settings, at the workplace, on the athletic field, and at home is influenced dramatically by interpersonal and intrapersonal leadership. Are teachers facilitating motivation and learning among their students? Do supervisors empower workers to go beyond the call of duty to achieve organizational goals? Do coaches bring the best out of their players by enhancing self-motivation and cultivating interdependent teamwork? Do parents discipline their children so undesirable behaviors are not only eliminated but desirable behaviors and attitudes are promoted? This presentation will offer research-based principles and techniques teachers, coaches, supervisors, and parents can use to instruct and inspire others to perform at optimum levels of effectiveness. This is transformational leadership. Within this context, the vision of an Actively Caring for People Movement will be introduced--large-scale applications of behavioral science and leadership principles to cultivate cultures of compassion worldwide, thereby preventing interpersonal conflict, bullying, and violence.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, graduate students, and anyone interested in instructing and inspiring others to perform at optimum levels of effectiveness.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to (1) Define the advantages of a success-seeking over a failure-avoiding mindset; (2) List five levels of interpersonal listening; (3) Increase the perception of empowerment and self-motivation in yourself and others; (4) Define self-transcendence and its connection to actively caring for people (AC4P); and (5) Define five dispositions that enhance one’s propensity to perform AC4P behavior and explain how to influence these five person states.
Keyword(s): leadership
 
 
Invited Paper Session #261
CE Offered: BACB

CANCELED: Measuring Organism Variables in our Stimulus-Organism-Response-Consequence Model: Phenotypic Expression of Genetic Disorders and Neuroimaging Data

Sunday, May 25, 2014
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anjali Barretto, Ph.D.
Chair: Anjali Barretto (Gonzaga University)
DAVID M. RICHMAN (Texas Tech University)
Dr. David Richman is a professor of educational psychology and leadership at Texas Tech University. He received his Ph.D. in school psychology and minor in applied behavior analysis from the University of Iowa, and he completed a research postdoctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Kennedy Krieger Institute. Dr. Richman has previously been on faculty at the University of Kansas School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore County, and the University of Illinois. Dr. Richman's areas of research include assessment and treatment of problem behavior; phenotypic expression of genetic disorders correlated with intellectual disabilities and severe behavior problems; family resiliency, parenting stress, familial quality of life; and cortical reorganization post-behavior therapy.
Abstract:

Many behavior analysts have shown keen interest in how an animal’s genetic endowment interacts with environmental variables to evoke and elicit responses and how these responses and associated consequences affect future responses and produce changes in organism variables. Throughout the years, great progress has been made in understanding biobehavioral interactions. However, our progress in understanding these complex interactions could be accelerated if more behavior analysts participated in transdisciplinary research teams that function as “think tanks” to develop studies that answer questions that could not be addressed by single-discipline research. The focus of this talk will be on (1) the potential benefits of incorporating indirect measures of behavior to document patterns of behavior within specific genetic disorders prior to costly large-scale direct observation studies, and (2) how technological advances such a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can expand our range of dependent variables to facilitate our understanding of how organism variables interact with environmental variables. Specifically, this talk will describe Dr. Richmond’s research on phenotypic expression of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder that has incorporated parental report or fMRI dependent variables.

 

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