Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details

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Symposium #56
CE Offered: BACB
Recent Research on Video Modeling Interventions to Teach Daily Living Skills
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Online
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Tina Sidener (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Tina Sidener, Ph.D.
Abstract: This symposium will include three data-based presentations on using video modeling interventions to teach daily living skills to a variety of populations. The first study compared the effects of chaining, video-modeling, and video-modeling plus chaining on three different 20-step daily living skills with twin boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For both participants, the combined video-modeling plus chaining procedure was most effective under both variables. The second study used a treatment package with video prompting to teach water flossing to children with ASD and those of typical development. The treatment package included backward chaining, video prompting, and reinforcement conducted via telehealth. Results indicated that the intervention package was effective in teaching all participants to independently floss their teeth with a water flosser. The third study evaluated the effects of a video prompting teaching package on leg shaving skills with three women ages 22 to 56, each with a different diagnosis (i.e., paraplegia, Down Syndrome, and cognitive impairment with Schizoaffective Disorder). The Finishing Touch Flawless Legs™ shaver was selected because a) it can be used without water or shaving cream, b) it does not cut or knick, c) it is rechargeable and does not require batteries, and d) individuals with fine motor deficits can use the device. Participants learned to shave their legs at the mastery criterion of 100% independent, correct steps within a mean of 7.3 teaching sessions.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): chain, daily living, video modeling
Target Audience: practitioners, graduate students
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) Describe how to evaluate interventions for behavioral chains using video modeling, chaining, and a combination of both. 2) Describe how to teaching water flossing to children. 3) Describe how to teach leg shaving to individuals with disabilities.
 

A Comparison of Video Modeling, Chaining, and Video-Modeling-Plus-Chaining on Teaching Complex Daily Living Skills to Twin Boys With Autism Spectrum Disorder

FINLEY WREN AAVATSMARK (Middle Tennessee State University), Bethany P. Contreras Young (University of Nevada, Reno), Sean Ganus (Middle Tennessee State University)
Abstract:

Individuals with developmental disabilities often struggle to learn independent daily living skills requiring complex behavior chains. Applied behavior analysis has identified both chaining and video-modeling as effective training procedures for teaching such complex behaviors. The present study compared the effects of chaining, video-modeling, and video-modeling plus chaining to examine the most effective teaching method for twin boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We created a task analysis for three skills of equal difficulty level and randomly assigned each twenty-step chain to a teaching procedure. We examined both the percentage of steps completed in the correct order during probes and the number of steps completed independently regardless of order. For both participants, the combined video-modeling plus chaining procedure was most effective under both variables. The video modeling-alone conditions were the least effective for both participants under the total number of steps completed variable. The chaining-alone condition was the least effective for the first participant under the percentage of steps completed independently variable, and the video-modeling alone was the least effective for the other participant under the same variable.

 
Teaching Water Flossing to Children
KANDACE SOMERS (Caldwell University), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University), Heather Pane (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Oral hygiene is an important self-care skill that some children may lack, especially children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although some studies have evaluated procedures for teaching toothbrushing, no previous studies have demonstrated procedures for teaching flossing, which is essential for oral hygiene. This study used evidence-based procedures to teach water flossing to children with ASD and those of typical development. The treatment package included a backward chain, video prompting, and reinforcement conducted via telehealth. Behavioral Skills Training (BST) was used to train caregivers prior to implementation of the study. Results indicated that the intervention package was effective in teaching all participants to independently floss their teeth with a water flosser. Effects maintained for all participants 1-week after completion of teaching.
 

Teaching Leg Shaving With Finishing Touch Flawless Legs™ to Women With Disabilities

Natalie Folgia (Caldwell University), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University), Ruth M. DeBar (Caldwell University), NICOLE PANTANO (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

Teaching independence with shaving can provide individuals with privacy and comfort, increase quality of life, and reduce effort of caregivers. Unfortunately, no previous studies have provided clinicians with procedures for teaching leg shaving. The current study evaluated the effects of a video prompting teaching package on leg shaving skills using a concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. Participants included three women ages 22 to 56, each with a different diagnosis (i.e., paraplegia, Down Syndrome, and cognitive impairment with Schizoaffective Disorder). The Finishing Touch Flawless Legs™ shaver was selected because a) it can be used without water or shaving cream, b) individuals with fine motor deficits can handle the device, c) the device will not cut or knick the user, and d) it is rechargeable and does not require batteries. Participants learned to shave their legs at the mastery criterion of 100% independent, correct steps within a mean of 7.3 teaching sessions. These levels were maintained at 2-week probes and during generalization probes. On the Treatment Acceptability Rating Form - Revised, scores indicated high social validity of the procedures of this treatment package.

 

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