Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details

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Symposium #398
CE Offered: BACB
Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Improve Outcomes for Children With Disabilities in Public Schools
Monday, May 31, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Online
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Trevor Maxfield (University of South Florida)
Discussant: Marissa A. Novotny (University of Texas at San Antonio)
CE Instructor: Marissa A. Novotny, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium will describe a federally funded project aimed to improve training for behavior analysts and school psychologists to work collaboratively in the public school system. The focus will be on the interdisciplinary training and implementation of a team-based model for function-based assessments and interventions (the Prevent-Teach-Response; PTR model) within schools. The first paper will describe the overall project goals, framework, and preliminary outcomes. The second paper will describe how behavior analysis students have collaborated with school personnel to implement the PTR model in different classroom settings with successful student outcomes.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Interdisciplinary Training, School-Based Intervention, Teacher consultation, Team-Based Intervention
Target Audience:

Basic knowledge on school-based intervention, teacher training, interdisciplinary service provision, and function-based intervention

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the need for interdisciplinary and collaborative service provision for children with disabilities in schools; (2) Describe the innovative interdisciplinary training framework used by Project EBAS in preparing school-based behavior analysts and school psychologists ; (3) Explain the 5-step, team-based process used in implementing the PTR model; and (4) Describe the impact of implementation of collaborative team-based interventions on child outcomes.
 
Interdisciplinary Training to Prepare School-Based Behavior Analysts and School Psychologists: Project EBAS
CATIA CIVIDINI-MOTTA CIVIDINI (University of South Florida), Kwang-Sun Cho Blair (University of South Florida), Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida), Diana Ginns (University of South Florida), Rose Iovannone (University of South Florida/Florida Mental Health)
Abstract: Considering that much of the knowledge and many of the skills that behavior analysts and school psychologists possess are not unique to their particular discipline and that the school-based services they provide for students with disabilities overlap to varying degrees, it is important to consider the potentially overlapping roles that they share. However, behavior analysts receive very little to no formal training in interdisciplinary collaboration although they frequently collaborate with other professionals and families. Likewise, most school psychologists underutilize interdisciplinary collaboration and consultation in school settings. This presentation will introduce an interdisciplinary project (Project EBAS) designed to improve training for behavior analysts and school psychologists to work collaboratively in the public school system. Participants of the presentation will learn the benefits of having interdisciplinary pre-service behavior analysts’ and school psychologists’ work with classroom teachers and school-based teams to support children who require intensive behavior interventions. The presentation will describe the aggregated child data from a number of single subject design studies and the moderator effects of interventions on child behavioral outcomes.
 

Interdisciplinary Collaboration Using the Prevent-Teach-Reinforce Model for Children With Disabilities

KWANG-SUN CHO BLAIR (University of South Florida), Rose Iovannone (University of South Florida/Florida Mental Health), Catia Cividini-Motta Cividini (University of South Florida), Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida), Diana Ginns (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

Consultation models that are responsive to teacher needs and strengths and that provide supportive coaching and specific feedback have been successful in enhancing classroom practices. The presentation will introduce the process and outcomes of school-based behavioral consultation using the Prevent-Teach-Reinforce (PTR) model to support children with high-intensity needs who need individualized function-based interventions in public schools. Behavior interventions for children with severe problem behavior require individualized intervention planning based on functional behavior assessment (FBA) results. However, one issue with providing effective interventions and supports to children with severe problem behavior is the limited training and support provided to teachers and school-based teams on FBA and the design of function-based interventions. This presentation focuses on the impact of function-based interventions on individual child behavior when pre-service behavior analysts used the PTR model to provide behavioral consultation. Participants of the presentation will learn the benefits of having pre-service behavior analysts work with classroom teachers and school-based teams to support children who required intensive behavior interventions. The session will present data on 10 children with or at-risk for disabilities who received the PTR intervention and provide for discussion on how the PTR model can be used to provide behavioral consultation and improve outcomes for children with behavioral challenges in schools.

 

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