Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, May 29, 2021


 

Invited Paper Session #25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Systemic Behavior Analysis: A Therapeutic Approach for Optimizing Best Practices for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Families
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: PRA
Chair: Paula Ribeiro Braga-Kenyon (Kadiant)
CE Instructor: Angeliki Gena, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Abstract:

This presentation will address the question of effective practices for the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, from both an epistemological and a therapeutic perspective, and suggest the importance of a synthesis of two paradigms—behavior analysis and general systems theory—as a means of optimizing our assessment of the needs and the services provided to people with disabilities. Despite the development and the use of a wide array of behavior analytic practices that help all children with ASD to reach their full potential, a question that remains under-researched has to do with the effort expected from the child and his/her family and whether this effort can be somehow lessened without compromising the benefits. The answer to that question led to investigating the properties of another epistemological paradigm—general systems theory—its merits, its compatibility, and its complementarity to the discipline of behavior analysis. This presentation aims to demonstrate that the two paradigms are compatible and complementary and that their combination may lead to optimizing the therapeutic and pedagogical outcomes of behavior analytic practices. If we are to adapt a systemic perspective, according to which the joining of two or more systems leads to an outcome that exceeds by far the additive effects of those systems, it will be interesting to assess the potential emergent benefits of the synthesis of two compatible and complementary epistemological paradigms and how those translate into therapeutic outcomes.

Target Audience:

Researchers and therapists in the field of autism spectrum disorder.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation the participants will be able to: (1) utilize the main principles of Systemic Behavior Analysis to evaluate a treatment program for people with ASD; (2) assess whether the breath of a Systemic Behavior Analytic treatment program is feasible and appropriate for the population of people with ASD of his/her interest; (3) plan for changes in the development of a behavior analytic intervention that incorporate systemic elements.
 
ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Angeliki Gena is Professor at the School of Philosophy, Department of Philosopsy-Pedagogy-Psychology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece (EKPA). She received her BA in Psychology and Sociology, her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology and her Ph.D. from the “Learning Processes” program of the Psychology Department of the City University of New York. She conducted her Doctoral Dissertation at the Princeton Child Development Institute, in Princeton, New Jersey. She worked in various institutes in the USA and became the director of the Alpine Learning Group, a prominent center for children with autism in Alpine, New Jersey. She also taught as an adjunct professor at the City University of New York. In Greece she started her teaching career at the University of Thessaly, was elected at the University of the Aegean, and since 1998 teaches at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Her research is predominantly in the area of Behavior Analysis and its applications for early intervention in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Was general secretary of the Association of Behavioral Research for 11 years, is an associate of the Institute of Behavioral Research and Therapy, and a founding member and current president of the Institute of Systemic Behavior Analysis. She has served as an elected member of the Senate of EKPA, since 2016 she is a member of the board of trustees of IKY – National Organization of Scholarships, Greece – has been appointed to national committees of the Greek Ministry of Education, and has served on the board of various non-for-profit organizations. She has received several scholarships and awards for distinguished research and clinical practices addressing children with autism and grands from the European Commission and various Greek organizations. She has published numerous books, empirical and theoretical articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as book chapters. The main focus of her research is in systemic behavior analysis and its applications for children with ASD and their families.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #28
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission ABA in the Kingdom: Shaping the Field
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
CE Instructor: Lamis Baowaidan, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LAMIS BAOWAIDAN (Dar Al-Hekma University)
Abstract:

Over the past 10 years, as the prevalence rate of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) increased, applied behavior analysis (ABA) has become the topic of interest in Saudi Arabia. It has drawn the attention of medical professionals, teachers, clinicians, stakeholders, and legislators alike. ABA is increasingly being recognized as the leading evidence-based intervention for individuals with ASD, and with this rising recognition, there is a growing demand for accountability and provision of state-of-the-art services. To respond to this demand, we have established the first verified course sequences in the Middle East on both undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as provided collaborations with schools and clinics. In this presentation, I describe the dissemination efforts made through training behavior analysts, implementation of positive behavior support in schools, and advocating for services and the establishment of a local legislative body. Furthermore, the significant growth in the number of certificants, clinics using ABA, ABA training programs, as well as the current challenges and the future of ABA in Saudi Arabia are discussed.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the status of the field of ABA in Saudi Arabia; (2) describe the actions taken to advocate for the establishment of a local legislative body in the country; (3) identify challenges and potential solutions in disseminating the science of ABA and regulating its practice.
 
LAMIS BAOWAIDAN (Dar Al-Hekma University)

Dr. Baowaidan is the department chair of the Master of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis and assistant professor of special education at Dar Al-Hekma University, Saudi Arabia. She launched the first graduate program in ABA in the Middle East.  In 2016, she became the first Saudi to hold a Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst with doctoral designation (BCBA-Dâ). She earned her MA and Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from Columbia University under the direction of professor R. Douglas Greer. She has extensive teaching experience with children with and without special needs under the CABAS® model of schooling at the Fred S Keller School, where she also acted as a program supervisor and served as a clinical professor to many graduate students.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #39
CE Offered: BACB
Private Events, Selfing Behaviors, and Responding to the Own Behavior
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Amy Murrell (Murrell Psychological Services )
CE Instructor: Amy Murrell, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CARMEN LUCIANO (University of Almería; Madrid Institute Contextual Psychology, MICPSY)
Abstract:

Human behavior, especially those behaviors identified as the self, the selfing behavior, are not an easy target for experimental analysis. The functional perspective provided the cues and meaning of such behavior however the analytic conceptualization of relational framing is opening the doors for such an analysis. The aim of this presentation is tracking these processes and let the door perhaps much more opened for experimental analysis and its use in clinical behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

All interested in behavior analysis, experimental analysis, relational frame theory, and clinical behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify behavior analytic perspective in regard to the self; (2) discuss the emergence of thoughts and the sense of self; (3) identify the two ways to interact with the own behavior, effective and ineffective; (4) describe the experimental analysis on responding to the own behavior.
 
CARMEN LUCIANO (University of Almería; Madrid Institute Contextual Psychology, MICPSY)
Carmen Luciano received her Ph. D. from the Complutense University of Madrid in 1984. She was professor of psychology at the University of Granada from 1979 to 1993 and been professor of psychology at the University of Almeria since 1994. Her research dedication began on the experimental analysis of language. Her post-doc Fulbright research stay in Boston University and the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies was centered in studying problem-solving behavior with Skinner’s supervision. This was a critical point in her career as basic researcher. She was involved in equivalence research, rule-governed behavior and, shortly after, in RFT and ACT research. Her research lab conducts basic creative experimental-applied RFT designs for the analysis of: analogies; coherence; deictic and hierarchical framing in the context of identifying core components of metaphors; false memories; experiential avoidance; values; defusion; self and responding to one’s own behavior. Additionally, the lab designs brief ACT protocols and teaches ACT-focused analysis of the conditions under which emotions, thoughts, and valued motivation are brought to the present to build flexibility responding.   Dr. Luciano has been the Director of the Experimental and Applied Analysis of Behavior Research Group since 1986, where she has supervised over thirty doctoral theses--some of her students are running their own labs nowadays. She is also Director of the Functional Analysis in Clinical Contexts Doctoral Program at the University of Almeria and Director of the Master Program in Contextual Therapies at the Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology. Her research has been funded by international, national, and regional public funds. She has collaborated with research groups from different countries and she has spread the functional analysis perspective with meetings, courses, research presentations, and publications. She is known for her vibrating and creative style while teaching, working with clients, and doing research.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Treatments for Epilepsy in Developing Nations
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sarah M. Richling (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Sarah M. Richling, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Abstract:

Access to low-cost, easily implemented behavioral treatments for a range of socially important health issues is severely limited in developing nations. As a case in point, most citizens in developing countries have no access to behavioral treatments for epilepsy. In behavior medicine, epilepsy is defined as the combination of a tendency to seize together with internal and external factors which increase the probability of reacting with a seizure reaction. In this model, epileptic seizures, like any behavior, is amenable to respondent and operant conditioning; thus, it is possible to effect and change the outcome of the seizure process using a behavior analysis and subsequent interventions. This paper aims to present a summary of the main points of clinical research in the behavioral treatment of epilepsy during the past 50 years and show the author's own recent studies done in South Africa and India. A presentation of two such RCT studies of behavioral treatment in the form of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy show promising results.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden)

JoAnne is a native North American who has lived her whole adult life in Sweden. She has her clinical psychology degree, psychotherapy degree, Ph.D. och Docent from Uppsala University in Sweden where she also held a position of full professor of psychology prior to her retirement last year. JoAnne has specialized in behavior medicine and has focused on applying learning theory in practice for many chronic illnesses such as epilepsy, constipation, asthma, obesity, and chronic pain. She is the author and or coauthor of five professional books applying ACT and RFT to both chronic illness as well as Love relationships as well as publishing over 60 scientific studies in these areas. JoAnne is a peer reviewed ACT trainer and an ACBS fellow.

 
 
Invited Panel #47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Quantitative Theories of Relapse to Improve Functional Communication Training: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Christopher A. Podlesnik (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Christopher A. Podlesnik, Ph.D.
Panelists: ANDREW CRAIG (State University of New York Upstate Medical University), JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia), TIMOTHY SHAHAN (Utah State University)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Brian Greer’s SQAB Tutorial on using quantitative theories of relapse to improve FCT.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contemporary applications of computer technologies in behavior analysis; (2) describe the research questions to be addressed by computer technologies; (3) describe resources to leverage computer technologies in behavior analysis.
ANDREW CRAIG (State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
Dr. Andrew Craig earned his Ph.D. in Psychology with an emphasis in experimental analyses of behavior from Utah State University. He completed postdoctoral training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Munroe-Meyer Institute, where he gained experience applying behavior-analytic principles to the assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders in children and adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Dr. Craig currently is a postdoctoral research associate in the Family Behavior Analysis program at Upstate Medical University and coordinator of the Behavior Analysis Murine laboratory. Dr. Craig’s research focuses on understanding why behavior persists when faced with challenges that deter it and why behavior comes back (or “relapses”) after it has been eliminated. He is particularly interested in bi-directional translational research, wherein novel approaches to intervention are developed in controlled laboratory settings, assessed in clinical applications, and further refined in the laboratory to maximize treatment efficacy and minimize barriers to treatment. Dr. Craig has published over 20 articles and book chapters on these and other topics, with several other manuscripts under review or in development. He currently serves on the board of editors for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behaviorand has served as an ad hoc reviewer for The American Journal of Additions Behavioral Neuroscience, Behavioural Processes, the European Journal of Behavior Analysis, the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Perspectives of Behavioral Science.
JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia)
Joel Ringdahl is an associate professor in the department of communication sciences and special education at the University of Georgia. His research interests include functional analysis and treatment of severe behavior problems, stimulus preference assessments, functional communication training and translational research in the areas of behavioral momentum theory and behavioral economics. He is the editor of Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice.
TIMOTHY SHAHAN (Utah State University)
Dr. Shahan received his Ph.D. in psychology from West Virginia University in 1998. He was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Vermont, and then a Research Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire until 2003. Dr. Shahan was the 2006 recipient of the B.F. Skinner Young Researcher Award from Division 25 of APA. He is presently a Professor in the Psychology Department at Utah State. Dr. Shahan's research focuses on resurgence, behavioral momentum, choice, conditioned reinforcement, and drug self-administration. Since 2000, his research has been funded by a variety of NIH Institutes including the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He is a Fellow of ABAI and has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior, president of the Society of the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and chair of the Biobehavioral Regulation, Learning and Ethology study section at NIH.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #48
CE Offered: BACB
ACoLE/BARR: Behavioral Assessment of Reading and Writing: Analyzing Student's Skills and Establishing Teaching Goals
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
CE Instructor: Rocio Rosales, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DEISY DE SOUZA (Universidade Federal de São Carlos)
Abstract:

Reading and writing skills can be conceived as a network of equivalence relations between stimuli (e.g., printed words, dictated words, pictures, objects) and between stimuli and responses (e.g., picture naming, textual behavior, transcription, dictation-taking). We have been using this conceptual framework as a foundation for the development of assessment tools and teaching procedures. In this presentation I will describe an instrument for the assessment of basic repertoires involving S-S and R-S relations which characterize the skills of beginning readers. The instrument comprises 15 tasks, organized in blocks of 15 trials each. Some tasks measure identity matching-to-sample (picture identity, printed word identity), arbitrary auditory-visual MTS (picture recognition, printed word recognition), and visual-visual matching-to-sample MTS (picture <--> printed word correspondence). Other tasks measure discriminated operants for which the discriminative stimuli are pictures (picture naming), printed words (copying, textual behavior ["reading'']), and spoken words (dictation-taking). The child performance in these tasks allows the identification of basic perceptual skills (does the student see and hear?), vocal skills (does the student articulate the sounds with accuracy and in the correct sequence?), and the main discriminations required to read and write accurately. Failures in some of these tasks (or in all of them) provide important information about the student's current repertoire and the gaps that need to be developed. The instrument was applied to approximately 2300 students (6 to 12 years old). Individual results allowed the evaluation of selection-based responses (listening and seeing behavior) and topography-based responses (verbal operants in vocal or written modes) and to define a profile of the student's repertoire. Averaged data showed that the matching skills were significantly correlated with textual behavior and dictation-taking. An "integration" index taking into account all the scores showed that, as predicted by the stimulus equivalence paradigm, the interdependence of the operants increased as the entire repertoire developed. The integration index may be a useful tool for the prediction and evaluation of the effects of teaching programs for establishing the target repertoire in non-readers.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts interested in basic (initial) reading and writing repertoires: assessment and teaching procedures

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the elements of the network of stimulus-stimulus and stimulus-response relations which characterize an integrated repertoire of reading and writing skills in beginning readers; (2) conduct a functional analysis of the verbal operants involved in reading and writing (identifying the three-term contingencies and the behavioral function of each operant); (3) justify the relevance of selection-based responding as requisites for the acquisition of the operants: textual, copying and dictation-taking; (4) describe the graphics and Interpret the scores of individual students obtained with the application of the BARR Instrument; (5) derive behavioral objectives to promote the target repertoires based on the student's skills profile and the identification of skill gaps.
 
DEISY DE SOUZA (Universidade Federal de São Carlos)

Deisy de Souza is Full Professor at the Psychology Department, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), Brazil, where she teaches behavior analysis in graduate and undergraduate courses in Psychology, and in Special Education. She obtained her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology at Universidade de São Paulo (USP), under the direction of Carolina Bori, and held a post-doctoral position at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, working with Charlie Catania. She has published articles and book chapters on non-human and human relational learning, including studies applying the stimulus equivalence paradigm to investigate the acquisition of symbolic relations involved in reading and writing, and in developing curricula to teach those skills. She is past-Editor of the Brazilian Journal of Behavior Analysis (BJBA), past-Associate Editor of Acta Comportamentalia, and she is currently a member of the Board of Editors of JEAB. She received the 2015 Distinguished Contributions to the Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Award  from the Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Special Interest Group (EAHB SIG); she was elected ABAI Fellow (2018); and she is currently the International Representative in the ABAI Council.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #58
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Designing Skill Acquisition Programs: Considerations and Recommendations
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Tiffany Kodak, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TIFFANY KODAK (Marquette University)
Abstract:

Designing skill acquisition programs requires careful consideration of variables that can affect the speed of learning. For example, the number and type of stimuli to include in an instructional set, sequencing of stimuli during instruction, the number of practice opportunities to arrange, and the selection of mastery criteria are important considerations when designing programs for learners. In this presentation, Dr. Kodak will synthesize research on these topics and provide recommendations for practitioners who are responsible for designing instructional programs. In addition, areas of additional research that can help improve the design and outcomes of skill-acquisition programs will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: This presentation is designed for an audience of RBTs with several years of experience in early intervention, BCBAs who have at least some familiarity with skill-acquisition programming, and students and faculty members who conduct research on skill acquisition.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) differentiate between stimuli included in early versus later skill-acquisition programs; (2) consider how different stimulus set sizes can affect acquisition; (3) identify different ways to structure practice opportunities for learners; (4) select mastery criteria based on the goals of intervention.
 
TIFFANY KODAK (Marquette University)

Dr. Kodak is an Associate Professor in the Behavior Analysis program at Marquette University. She is a licensed psychologist, licensed behavior analyst, and Board Certified Behavior Analyst. She has worked with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder more than 25 years. Dr. Kodak obtained her Ph.D. in School Psychology from Louisiana State University. She formerly served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Learning and Motivation. She currently serves on several editorial boards including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and Learning and Motivation. Her research interests in the area of early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder include increasing the efficiency of skill acquisition, treatment integrity, assessment-based instruction, verbal behavior, conditional discriminations, parent training, and computer-assisted instruction.

 
 
Invited Symposium #59
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Cultural Biases in Assessment, Treatment, and Access to ABA Services
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
Discussant: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University)
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Though the principles of behavior are universal, the specific behaviors, stimuli, and social contingencies impacting our clients are rooted in the cultures in which they live. As behavior analysis grows around the world, the inherent biases and assumptions of our technology becomes more apparent. Assessment instruments need translation, revision, and validation; interventions need to be adapted to ensure social validity and relevance; and the ways in which behavior analysts provide services need to expand to ensure that they are accessible to all clients in need. This symposium will present strategies for behavior analysts to identify biases in their professional practices, minimize such biases when they arise, and learn to practice cultural humility.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Practitioners and researchers. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe applicability of diversity, equity, and inclusion and analyze their own self-bias as related to cultural differences; (2) engage in ethical problem-solving frameworks as related to culturally humble and responsive behaviors; (3) identify the topography of culturally humble behaviors in our research and practice; (4) describe ways to engage in institutional accountability and systems change towards increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion through the engagement of culturally humble behaviors; (5) describe values procedures for increasing their own behaviors oriented toward social justice; (6) identify specific behaviors they could do more of in their own lives that may strengthen their work as accomplices for social justice; (7) describe how to use self-monitoring plans to increase their own behaviors oriented toward social justice; (8) discuss the role that culture plays in behavior analytic interactions; (9) list barriers for international dissemination of behavior analysis; (10) desribe two existing models for the documentation of cultural adaptations made to interventions. 
 
Diversity submission 

The Role of Culture for the Global Dissemination of Behavior Analysis

MAITHRI SIVARAMAN (Ghent University, Belgium; Tendrils Centre for Autism, India), Tara A. Fahmie (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

The cultural and linguistic diversity that characterizes the world remains a seminal barrier for the global uptake of applied behavior analysis (ABA). Although North America accounts for only 4.7% of the world’s population, more than 95% of BCBAs live in the United States and Canada. While behavioral principles may be universally applicable, this talk will argue for why understanding cultural diversity and avoiding prejudice is important. We will discuss specific challenges for the global dissemination of ABA, with India as an example, and suggest potential training strategies with which to overcome such barriers. Our training protocol may serve as an initial framework for practitioners and researchers to achieve buy-in and positive outcomes internationally. In addition, we will highlight existing frameworks to define and describe cultural adaptations and list previously used adaptations in ABA-based treatments for individuals outside of North America. Finally, we will advocate for a behavior analytic perspective for organizing and reporting potentially relevant variables for the global success of ABA services.

Maithri Sivaraman is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst with a Masters in Psychology from the University of Madras and holds a Graduate Certificate in ABA from the University of North Texas. She is currently enrolled as a doctoral student in Psychology at Ghent University in Belgium. In 2016, Sivaraman established the Tendrils Centre for Autism Research and Intervention in Chennai, India to make behavior analytic services more accessible to families with children with developmental disabilities. With Dr. Tara Fahmie, she is the co-recipient of a dissemination grant from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board’s (BACB) Committee of Philanthropy to train caregivers in function-based assessments and interventions for problem behavior in India. Her research focusses on social and verbal behavior interventions for children with disabilities, and cultural considerations in the dissemination of behavior analysis. She has served as Guest Reviewer for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis since 2018, and is the International Dissemination Coordinator of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment (ASAT).
 
Diversity submission 

Lessons Learned From Behavior Analysts of Color on How to Become Stronger Accomplices

JONATHAN TARBOX (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids), Brandon Whitfield (Autism Therapies), Jacqueline Ramirez (University of Southern California ; Positive Behavioral Supports Corporation)
Abstract:

Since the rise of the #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter movements, and especially since the murder of George Floyd, the field of behavior analysis is experiencing tremendous growth in action toward social justice. This growth of action and activism within our field is exciting but many have concerns over how much of this change is actually structural, versus performative, and therefore whether or not it will persist over time. From the perspective of a white man in a position of substantial privilege and power within the field of behavior analysis, I will stand next to and amplify the voices of behavior analysts of color who have offered powerful and practical resources to all of us to create and sustain our roles as accomplices in furthering social justice. This presentation will amplify recent publications by behavior analysts of color on practical strategies for enacting social justice within our own personal lives, within the service provision agencies where we work, and within our graduate programs, among others. In particular, practical strategies from behavioral approaches to self-management, including acceptance and commitment training, will be shared.

Dr. Jonathan Tarbox is the Program Director of the Master of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis program at the University of Southern California, as well as Director of Research at FirstSteps for Kids. Dr. Tarbox is the past Editor-in-Chief of the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice, a Board Member of the ABA Task Force to Eradicate Social Injustice, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Women in Behavior Analysis (WIBA) conference. He has published five books on applied behavior analysis and autism treatment, is the Series Editor of the Elsevier book series Critical Specialties in Treating Autism and Other Behavioral Challenges, and an author of over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles and chapters in scientific texts.  His research focuses on behavioral interventions for teaching complex skills to individuals with autism, Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), and applications of applied behavior analysis to issues of diversity and social justice. 

 
Diversity submission 

DEI, Bias, and Cultural Humility: Putting It All Together for Social Justice Change

NASIAH CIRINCIONE-ULEZI (ULEZI, LLC; Pivot 2 Inclusion; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Capella University), NOOR YOUNUS SYED (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

The pressing need to engage in compassionate, culturally humble behavior as a field became apparent following the needless deaths of those such as Mr. George Floyd; the world at large recognized the importance of social justice and, as behavior analysts, we are uniquely poised to engage in systems change and create levels of institutional accountability throughout all aspects of our work. This dialogue will discuss culture as a dynamic metacontingency and will focus on understanding diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) as related to all cultures. We will analyze our own self-bias and will describe ethical problem-solving frameworks designed to increase DEI through the engagement of culturally humble behaviors as practitioners and researchers. Finally, we will review ways to implement measures of institutional accountability to assess whether we are meeting our goals of DEI. We will end by inviting questions from the audience to promote thoughtful considerations intended to further our understanding of the topography of culturally humble behaviors and how we can begin immediately to engage in social justice change.

Nasiah is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, with a Doctorate degree in Education from Loyola University of Chicago. She holds a Master’s degree in Special Education from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and a Master's degree in Educational Leadership from the American College of Education. She is a graduate of the Infant Studies Specialist program at Erikson Institute of Chicago. In addition to her BCBA credential, she is an Illinois licensed special education teacher and an Illinois Early Intervention provider and State evaluator. Professionally, she has served as a special educator, clinician, educational administrator, and professor of special education. Her clinical experience spans infancy through adulthood. Currently, she is the CEO & Founder of ULEZI, LLC, Co-Founder of Pivot 2 Inclusion and serves as a court appointed special advocate, for children in the Illinois foster care system. She is also an Advisory Board member for Black Applied Behavior Analysts and a Board member for the Illinois Association for Behavior Analysis. She has assisted school districts in the State of Illinois in developing meaningful educational programs to meet the needs of students with autism. Her research interests include supervision, mentoring, leadership, and culturally humble practice within the field of ABA. She is a champion for diversity, equity and inclusion and is deeply committed to using her skills and experiences, paired with the science of applied behavior analysis, to empower the lives of the people she supports and serves, in positive and meaningful ways.

Noor Syed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA/LBS, (she/her) is an Assistant Professor of Applied Behavior Analysis, Clinical Coordinator, and founding Director of the Center for Autism Inclusivity (Research, Education, and Services) with SUNY Empire State College. She is also a Senior International Program Director with Anderson Center International, an Adjunct Professor Advisor in ABA with Endicott College, and Research Coordinator for the Global Autism Project.  She is a certified general and special education teacher in New York, U.S., birth through grade six. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Syed has worked with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and developmental disabilities from early intervention through adulthood in school and center-based settings as a teacher, therapist, consultant, and administrator. Dr. Syed has consulted for autism clinics around the world, including in Uganda, Antigua and Barbuda, and the Czech Republic, and currently serves as the international and school-based expert on ABAEthicsHotline.com with Dr. Jon Bailey. She assisted in building Lehigh University Autism Services and its corresponding practicum, which is an insurance and university-based program offering services in the home, community, and clinic. Dr. Syed’s interests lie in compassionate care, cultural humility, ethical practices, supervision, the practice of school-based BCBAs, and diversity. She received her undergraduate degree in ABA under Dr. Raymond G. Romanczyk in the Institute of Child Development at Binghamton University and completed her PhD in ABA with Dr. R. Douglas Greer at Teachers College, Columbia University.

 
 
Invited Panel #83
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
Computer Technology and the Future of Behavior Analysis: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 29, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jonathan W. Pinkston (Western New England University)
CE Instructor: Darlene Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Panelists: CASEY CLAY (University of Missouri), DARLENE CRONE-TODD (Salem State University), AARON FISCHER (University of Utah)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Ellie Kazemi’s SQAB Tutorial on the utility of computer technologies in behavior analysis.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contemporary applications of computer technologies in behavior analysis; (2) describe the research questions to be addressed by computer technologies; (3) describe resources to leverage computer technologies in behavior analysis.
CASEY CLAY (University of Missouri)
Dr. Casey Clay is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Missouri. He is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D) and Licensed Behavior Analyst (LBA) in the state of Missouri. He received a Master of Science degree from Northeastern University in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and a Ph.D. from Utah State University in Disability Disciplines. After his Ph.D. program he completed a Post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Missouri. He has over 10 years of clinical experience designing and implementing ABA programs with individuals with disabilities including working at the ASSERT preschool and Behavior Support Clinic in Logan, UT; the New England Center for Children in Boston, MA; and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental disabilities in Columbia, MO. He also has published his research in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), Behavior Analysis in Practice, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and Learning and Motivation. He has also served as a guest reviewer for JABA, Journal of Behavioral Education, Behavioral Interventions, and The Behavior Analyst. His research focuses on evaluation of preference for and reinforcing efficacy of novel stimuli (e.g., social interactions, therapy animals), reduction of severe problem behavior, and methodologies to increase efficiency of skills training for clinicians and pre-service behavior analysts.
DARLENE CRONE-TODD (Salem State University)
Darlene E. Crone-Todd (University of Manitoba, 2002) is a Full Professor in Psychology at Salem State University. She designed and coordinates the graduate program in Behavior Analysis, and has presented in over 50 symposiums at conferences worldwide, including time spent researching and presenting in Brazil. She has published research in peer-reviewed journals including, The Behavior Analyst Today, The Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Substance Use and Misuse. Dr. Crone-Todd completed a post-doc at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Behavior Pharmacology in 2003. Her current research interests include human choice behavior, computer-mediated learning environments, higher-order thinking, basic and applied research in behavioral pharmacology, and shaping behavior. Ongoing projects involve behavioral interventions related to wellness, and to facilitating student success.
AARON FISCHER (University of Utah)
Dr. Fischer has been working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and individuals with social-emotional and behavioral problems, and their families, for over 15 years. He graduated from the University of Miami, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and worked as a research coordinator at the Center for Autism and Related Disabilities. Dr. Fischer completed his master’s and doctoral degree in school psychology at Louisiana State University. Before arriving at the University of Utah in 2014, he completed his predoctoral internship in clinical psychology at the May Institute in Massachusetts. His internship and graduate work focused on providing evidence-based practices in schools, hospitals, and mental health clinics to children with disabilities and their families. Specifically, Dr. Fischer’s clinical interests concentrate on the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with ASD and related disorders, as well as providing support and training to their families. Additionally, he has extensive experience in the assessment and treatment of problem behavior, as well as the acquisition of adaptive skills, in individuals with ASD and developmental disabilities. As such, his scholarship is considerably influenced by his applied work in those areas. Currently, Dr. Fischer is the Dee Endowed Professor of school psychology, an adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry, and director of the Huntsman Mental health Institute HOME program interdisciplinary pediatric feeding disorders clinic at the University of Utah. Additionally, Dr. Fischer is a Licensed Psychologist and Licensed Board Certified Behavior Analyst.
 
 
Invited Symposium #98
CE Offered: BACB
Values and Choice: Contemporary Experimental Research on Bias
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Domain: Translational
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Experimental behavior analysis has produced a robust literature on the role of bias in matching and choice. Despite its beginnings in the laboratory, this work has extended far beyond simple choice models and operant responses to address how bias impacts social responding. This symposium will present contemporary research on the assessment of implicit bias, translational models of choice, and the ways in which bias can impact the choices researchers make within the laboratory.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe in broad terms how the IRAP has been used to study implicit bias; (2) explain how recent experimental analyses of the IRAP have refined the RFT view of implicit bias; (3) discuss the relationship between delay disounting and bias; (4) describe how bias has impacted women in research; (5) describe how bias has impacted the inclusion of female laboratory animals in research; (6) describe potential harm from the exclusion of women and female laboratory animals in research.
 

The Study of Implicit Bias in Behavior Analysis: A Cautionary Tale

(Service Delivery)
DERMOT BARNES-HOLMES (Ulster University)
Abstract:

The study of implicit bias in behavior analysis has been dominated by one particular method, the implicit relational assessment procedure (IRAP). The IRAP could be considered quite unusual as a method for studying implicit bias because it targets verbal relations as defined within relational frame theory (RFT). In contrast, implicit bias in the non-behavior-analytic “mainstream” literature is often interpreted as reflecting the strength of associative links in a mental realm (e.g., a memory store). Despite this conceptual difference, research on implicit bias using the IRAP could be seen as relatively successful, at least in terms of number of published studies and the results of a meta-analysis of IRAP studies. On balance, until relatively recently IRAP research tended to focus on the method as a measure of implicit bias without conducting experimental analyses of the multiple variables, from an RFT perspective, that are brought into play when participants complete an IRAP. Conducting these more recent experimental analyses has served to produce an increasingly sophisticated and complex understanding of exactly what so called “implicit bias” involves from an RFT and a behavior-analytic perspective. The current paper will provide an overview of this research story.

Dr. Dermot Barnes-Holmes graduated from the University of Ulster in 1985 with a B.Sc. in Psychology and in 1990 with a D.Phil. in behavior analysis. His first tenured position was in the Department of Applied Psychology at University College Cork, where he founded and led the Behavior Analysis and Cognitive Science unit. In 1999 he accepted the foundation professorship in psychology and head-of-department position at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. In 2015 he accepted a life-time senior professorship at Ghent University in Belgium. In 2020 he returned to his alma mater on a fractional contract as a full professor at Ulster University. Dr. Barnes-Holmes is known internationally for the analysis of human language and cognition through the development of Relational Frame Theory with Steven C. Hayes, and its application in various psychological settings. He was the world's most prolific author in the experimental analysis of human behavior between the years 1980 and 1999. He was awarded the Don Hake Translational Research Award in 2012 by the American Psychological Association, is a past president and fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, is a recipient of the Quad-L Lecture Award from the University of New Mexico and became an Odysseus laureate in 2015 when he received an Odysseus Type 1 award from the Flemish Science Foundation in Belgium.
 

The Role of Delay Discounting in Explicit and Implicit Racial Bias

(Service Delivery)
D. PEREZ (University of Utah), Melanie Domenech-Rodriguez (Utah State University), Amy Odum (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Delay discounting measures a facet of impulsivity and is related to various socially significant behaviors. Researchers suggest that altruism and impulsivity arise from the same underlying mechanism; thus, individuals are less altruistic towards people that are different from themselves (e.g., a different race or ethnicity). However, researchers have yet to analyze the relation between delay discounting and implicit and explicit racial bias. In the present study, participants will complete a delay discounting procedure and several Likert scale surveys: the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP), the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS), and the Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy (SEE). The delay discounting task will assess discounting for two delayed magnitudes (i.e., $100 & $1000) using an adjusting amount procedure. The IRAP measures implicit racial bias by having participants categorize stimuli based on either pro-Latino stereotypes or pro-White stereotypes; the difference in the length of time required to categorize stimuli that are consistent or inconsistent with the stereotypes measures bias. To examine explicit racial bias, we will use the total scores on the CoBRAS and the SEE. We expect participants who steeply discount delayed rewards will be more implicitly and explicitly racially biased toward members of a different race or ethnicity.

D. Perez is a doctoral student in the Experimental Behavior Analysis Program at Utah State University. D completed her Bachelor's degree in Psychology at California State University Northridge. Her research interests are racial bias, social discounting, delay discounting, impulsivity, and incorporating multicultural psychology into behavior analysis. In her free time, she enjoys photography, hiking, kayaking, and spending time with her dog, Luna.
 

Mouse-ogyny: Bias Against Female Laboratory Animals

(Service Delivery)
AMY ODUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Historically, women have experienced bias in science. This bias has affected women as participants in research, as well as women as conductors of research. Although little recognized, another form of bias extends to female laboratory animals. Female laboratory animals, particularly rodents, have long been regarded as more variable in their behavior and other dependent measures and therefore were excluded from experiments. I will describe the inclusion of female laboratory animals in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. I will describe trends over time in the inclusion of female laboratory animals for different types of animals (e.g., pigeons and rats). For studies involving both sexes and in which animals are identified by sex, I will examine the level of variability in the behavior of male and female animals. Finally, I will review published data describing the variability in a wide variety of dependent measures for both male and female laboratory animals. These data show that female laboratory animals have been excluded from research based on bias rather than fact. The exclusion of female laboratory animals precludes learning about genuine sex differences with important health implications and is no longer allowed in NIH-funded research.

Amy Odum is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. Her research interests are in basic behavioral phenomena, such as response persistence, sensitivity to delayed outcomes, conditional discriminations, and environmental influences on drug effects. She is committed to increasing diversity and inclusion in behavior analysis. Her work has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Vermont’s Human Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory after earning her Ph.D. and M.A. in Psychology, specializing in Behavior Analysis, from West Virginia University. She received a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Florida. Dr. Odum has served as President of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of ABAI and was Editor in Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #111
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Bidirectional Naming and Problem Solving
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: VRB
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
CE Instructor: Caio Miguel, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CAIO MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

We often solve problems by engaging in mediating strategies such as talking to ourselves. In order to accurately use and respond to these strategies, we must understand what we are saying. The term bidirectional naming (BiN) has been used to describe the integration of both listener and speaker behaviors that leads to speaking with understanding. In this talk, I will describe a series of studies showing that in the absence of either speaker or listener behaviors, participants often fail to solve problems in the form of matching-to-sample and categorization tasks. These results suggest that to solve complex tasks participants must be verbal. Thus, I will propose that the BiN repertoire is one of the most important skills learned during language development and must be prioritized in early intensive behavioral intervention.

Target Audience:

Basic and applied researchers, clinicians.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) distinguish between tasting and naming; (2) explain how bidirectional naming is developed through typical child-caregiver interaction; (3) discuss how derived stimulus relations research conducted with adults may be influenced by BiN.
 
CAIO MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Dr. Caio Miguel is a professor of psychology and director of the Verbal Behavior Research Laboratory at California State University, Sacramento. He holds adjunct appointments at Endicott College, MA., and at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. He is the past-editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and past-Associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis Dr. Miguel's research focuses on the study of verbal and verbally-mediated behaviors. He has given hundreds of professional presentations in North America, South America and Europe, and has had over 70 manuscripts published in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. He is the recipient of the 2013-2014 award for outstanding scholarly work by the College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies at Sacramento State, the 2014 Outstanding Mentor Award by the Student Committee of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), the 2019 Award for Excellence in Teaching Verbal Behavior from the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group of ABAI, and the 2019 Alumni Achievement Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University.
 
 
Invited Panel #121
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Exploring Publication Bias in Behavior Analysis Research
Saturday, May 29, 2021
4:00 PM–4:50 PM EDT
Online
Domain: Theory
Chair: Matthew Tincani (Temple University)
CE Instructor: Matthew Tincani, Ph.D.
Panelists: MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington), JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia), JASON TRAVERS (Temple University)
Abstract:

Publication bias is the disproportionate representation of studies with certain characteristics, such as strong experimental effect, in the published research literature. Publication bias skews the body of scientific knowledge by overrepresenting studies with specific methodologies, analytic techniques, and data, which distorts the scientific literature and, ultimately, foments public distrust in science. Scholars in psychology and education have documented the presence of publication bias within these broad bodies of research. However, to date, behavior analysts have focused little attention on the possibility of publication bias in basic and applied behavior analysis research. Participants in this panel will reflect on their experiences as researchers, journal editors, and manuscript reviewers regarding issues of publication bias in behavior analysis. Their discussion will explore whether publication bias is a problem in behavior analysis research; how publication bias might manifest uniquely in our work; the potential impact of publication bias on the corpus of scientific knowledge in basic behavior analysis, applied behavior analysis, and on consumers of behavior analytic interventions; and potential strategies for reducing publication bias.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state the definition of publication bias and describe examples of publication bias within scientific research; (2) describe how publication bias could manifest in basic and applied behavior analytic research; (3) discuss possible ways of reducing publication bias in basic and applied behavior analysis research.
MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington)

Dr. Galizio received his BA from Kent State University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee where he worked with Dr. Alan Baron.  In 1976, he joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he is currently Professor of Psychology. His research interests include behavioral pharmacology,  stimulus control/concept learning, aversive control, and human operant behavior.  He has published two books, more than 100 articles and his research has been supported by NIDA, NSF and NICHD. He is a Fellow of ABAI and four APA divisions and is a past-president of APA Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis and served as an At-Large member of the ABAI Executive Council. He has served on numerous NIH study sections and chaired two of them. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia)
Joel Ringdahl is an associate professor in the department of communication sciences and special education at the University of Georgia. His research interests include functional analysis and treatment of severe behavior problems, stimulus preference assessments, functional communication training and translational research in the areas of behavioral momentum theory and behavioral economics. He is the editor of Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice.
JASON TRAVERS (Temple University)
Jason Travers, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is an associate professor in the college of education and human development at Temple University. He serves on the editorial board of several journals, including Journal of Special Education Technology, TEACHING Exceptional Children, and Journal of Disability Policy Studies
 
 
Invited Panel #149A
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Applying Our Science to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Conversation With the ABAI DEI Board
Saturday, May 29, 2021
5:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: DEI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
Panelists: SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas), JOVONNIE ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno), ELIZABETH FONG (Pepperdine University), RICHARD FUQUA (Western Michigan University), RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno), JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This panel represents the second annual DEI Board discussion in a series designed to provide the ABAI membership with: 1) updates on Board activities, 2) opportunities for considering specific topics of relevance to advancing DEI efforts within ABAI and more broadly, and 3) a mechanism for input and ideas from the audience. This year’s panel will focus on the potential contributions of behavior analysis theory and scientific research to improving diversity, equity, and inclusion in ABAI and, more generally, in society. After a brief review of the Board’s actions over the past year by Carol Pilgrim, Chair of the ABAI DEI Task Force, DEI Board members will share perspectives on how the science of behavior analysis can be brought to bear in designing DEI initiatives and evaluating their effectiveness. Time for questions and comments from the audience will be included to allow for sharing relevant experiences and lessons learned.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify actions taken by ABAI’s DEI Board over the past year; (2) discuss the application of behavior-analytic theory and research in the design of DEI initiatives; (3) discuss the application of behavior-analytic research in evaluating the effectiveness of DEI actions.
SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Shahla Alai received her B.S. from Southern Illinois University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at the University of North Texas. Shahla and her students collaborate with community partners to serve people who are under resourced and marginalized within current societal structures. Shahla is a member of an interdisciplinary lab that includes faculty and students from Woman’s and Gender Studies, Applied Anthropology and Behavior Analysis. Shahla teaches courses on technology transfer, ethics, autism intervention, parent training, behavioral systems, applied research methods, behavior change techniques, and assessment. Shahla has served on several boards and disciplinary committees, most notably the ABAI Practice Board and the ABAI Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Board. She has published and presented research on social justice, ethics in early intervention, play and social skills, family harmony, change agent training, supervision and the relationship between love and science in the treatment of autism. Shahla has over four decades of experience working with families and has trained hundreds of behavior analysts. She was awarded an Onassis Foundation Fellowship for her work with families, was the recipient of UNT’s prestigious “’Fessor Graham” teaching award, received the 2019 Texas Association for Behavior Analysis Career Contributions award, and the UNT 2020 Community Engagement award.
JOVONNIE ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno)

Jovonnie Esquierdo-Leal is the Program Development Specialist for the Diversity and Inclusion Office at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She received her M.A. from California State University, Fresno and is currently a doctoral candidate at UNR. Jovonnie’s scholarly interests include diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI); social justice; Behavioral Systems Analysis (BSA); verbal behavior; and leadership.

ELIZABETH FONG (Pepperdine University)
Dr. Hughes Fong has over two decades of experience in the fields of behavioral health, education and management. Her educational background is in clinical and counseling psychology and applied behavior analysis. She holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a concentration in Forensic Psychology. She is currently the Associate Director of the MSABA online program and Visiting Clinical Professor at Pepperdine University.

In 2011, Dr. Hughes Fong founded Multicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts (MultiABA) which was a special interest group of the Association of Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). The SIG has since rebranded as the Culture and Diversity SIG and she continues to be a board member of that group. As a doctoral student, she was a "Distinguished Scholar" with the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.  In addition, she was the founder of “Diversity in Behavior Analysis” a section in Behavior Analysis Research and Practice, and served as an Associate Editor for the journal. She has been a reviewer for Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and the National Multicultural Conference and Summit.

Currently, Dr. Hughes Fong serves on the Executive Committee for the American Psychological Association's (APA) Division 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women), and Division 35 Section 5 Psychology of Asian American and Pacific Women).  Dr. Hughes Fong is also a member Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board.

In addition to Dr. Hughes Fong activities, she is a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst and licensed as a Behavior Specialist in Pennsylvania, a trainer in the Pennsylvania Bureau of Autism’s Functional Behavior Analysis training, and has received training certificates in the area of Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy Childhood Traumatic Grief. She received her level one certification in Pivotal Response Training and Gottman Couples Therapy. Her primary areas of interest are in the application of ABA to diverse populations, telehealth, social validity, health and behavior analysis, and examining child custody and parental competency when a child has developmental disabilities.
RICHARD FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Wayne Fuqua (Ph.D., BCBA-D) is a Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University where he served as the Chair of that Department for 14 years. Dr. Fuqua’s research and scholarly interests span a range of topics including autism, health psychology, gerontology, dissemination of evidence-based practice, ethics, and behavioral approaches to sustainability and climate change. His contributions have been recognized with several appointments and awards including: election as a Fellow for the Association of Behavior Analysis; a Distinguished Service Award at WMU; the Jacobson Award from New York State ABA; and a term on the Michigan Autism Council. He has also produced a series of training videos that feature interviews and demonstrations with leaders in behavior analysis (wmich.edu/autism/resources).
RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Dr. Ramona A. Houmanfar is Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She currently serves as the trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Chair of the Organizational Behavior Management Section of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, and editorial board members of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and Behavior & Social Issues. Dr. Houmanfar has served as the editor of Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, senior co-chair of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, Director of the Organizational Behavior Management Network and President of the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis.

Dr. Houmanfar has published over seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters, delivered more than 100 presentations at regional, national, and international conferences in the areas of behavioral systems analysis, cultural behavior analysis, leadership in organizations, rule governance, communication networks, instructional design, and bilingual repertoire analysis and learning. Her expertise in behavioral systems analysis and cultural behavior analysis have also guided her research associated with implicit bias, cooperation, situational awareness, decision making, and value based governance.  Dr. Houmanfar has published three co-edited books titled “Organizational Change” (Context Press), "Understanding Complexity in Organizations", and “Leadership & Cultural Change (Taylor & Francis Group).
JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)

Dr. Jomella Watson-Thompson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, and the Director of the Center for Service Learning at the University of Kansas. She is also affiliated with the Center for Community Health and Development. She attained a Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology and a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Kansas. She applies behavioral science methods and interventions to improve how communities address issues related to community health and development. Her research has focused on behavioral-community approaches to neighborhood development, substance abuse prevention, and youth and community violence prevention. Dr. Thompson supports community-engaged scholarship using participatory approaches to address social determinants or factors that may contribute to disparities, particularly for marginalized groups and communities. She has researched the effects of community-based processes and behavioral-community interventions to promote mobilization and change in communities. Dr. Thompson has received numerous funding awards and co-authored articles on community capacity-building, youth and neighborhood development, and adolescent substance abuse and youth and community violence prevention.  She is as an Associate Editor with Behavior and Social Issues and serves on the ABAI Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board.

 

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