Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Ninth Annual Autism Conference; Las Vegas, NV; 2015

Program by Continuing Education Events: Friday, January 23, 2015


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Special Event #1
CE Offered: BACB
CPT Training
Friday, January 23, 2015
7:30 AM–9:30 AM
Cataluna
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): billing procedures, CPT Training, insurance
Chair: Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
CE Instructor: Wayne W. Fisher, Ph.D.
 

CPT Training

Abstract:

For the past several years, ABAI has been working with the American Medical Association to establish new billing procedures for ABA and related services for children and youth with autism. Recently, the AMA adopted Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) Category III codes. The AMA codes recognize that applied behavior analysis (ABA) is an empirically supported and medically necessary intervention. Drs. Travis Thompson and Wayne Fisher, who were instrumental in the approval of these codes, will be the instructors for this training, which will explain the how the new codes define procedures and services performed by behavior analysts. Over time, the codes will result in systematic and standardized valuation of ABA services, as well as simplify and streamline the billing and collection processes for ABA services. These codes provide recognition from the American Medical Association that ABA is an empirically supported and medically necessary intervention; will improve access to ABA services for families of children with autism and severe behavior disorders; will reduce financial burdens on these families; will, over time, result in systematic and standardized valuation of ABA services; and will, over time, simplify and streamline the billing and collection processes for ABA services (e.g., facilitate electronic billing).

 
WAYNE W. FISHER (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Travis Thompson (University of Minnesota)
Wayne W. Fisher, Ph.D., is the H. B. Munroe Professor of Behavioral Research at the Munroe-Meyer Institute and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He is also the director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at the Munroe-Meyer Institute, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level (BCBA-D), and a licensed psychologist. He was previously a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and served as executive director of the Neurobehavioral Programs at the Kennedy Krieger Institute (Baltimore) and the Marcus Behavior Center at the Marcus Institute (Atlanta), where he built clinical research programs in autism and developmental disabilities with national reputations for excellence. Dr. Fisher's methodologically sophisticated research has focused on several intersecting lines, including preference, choice, and the assessment and treatment of autism and severe behavior disorders, which have been notable for the creative use of concurrent schedules of reinforcement; these have become more commonplace in clinical research primarily as a result of his influence. He has published more than 130 peer-reviewed research studies in 28 different behavioral and/or medical journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Psychological Reports, American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Pediatrics, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, and The Lancet. Dr. Fisher is a past editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, a Fellow of ABAI, and a recipient of the Bush Leadership Award and the APA (Division 25) award for distinguished contributions to applied behavioral research.
 
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the training, participants should be able to: (1) explain how CPT codes are determined and how they work; (2) identify the components of a behavior identification assessment; and (3) describe the items that should be included in a pre-determination letter.
 
Keyword(s): billing procedures, CPT Training, insurance
 
 
Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Early Intervention for Young Children With Autism: Best Practices for Receptive Language Instruction
Friday, January 23, 2015
9:30 AM–12:30 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Linda A. LeBlanc, Ph.D.
LINDA A. LEBLANC (Trumpet Behavioral Health)
Linda A. LeBlanc, Ph.D., BCBA-D, MI Licensed Psychologist, is the executive director of Research and Clinical Services at Trumpet Behavioral Health. She received her Ph.D. in child clinical psychology in 1996 from Louisiana State University and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She previously served as a professor on the psychology faculties at Claremont McKenna College (1997-1999), Western Michigan University (1999-2008), and Auburn University (2009-2012). She has published more than 80 articles and book chapters on topics such as behavioral treatment of autism, technology-based behavioral interventions, behavioral gerontology, and system development in human services. She has served on the board of directors of the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts, the California Association for Behavior Analysts, the Alabama Association of Behavior Analysts, and several nonprofit agencies serving individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. She also has served on state and national task forces to establish best practice guidelines for the treatment of autism and for the development of services for older adults with intellectual disabilities. Dr. LeBlanc has served as associate editor for Education and Treatment of Children, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Behavior Analysis in Practice. She also has served on the editorial boards of Research in Developmental Disabilities, Behavioral Interventions, Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, and The Behavior Analyst. She joined Trumpet in 2012 and has focused on development of clinical standards and research efforts throughout the organization.
Description: Discrimination training is one of the most important components of early intensive behavioral intervention with children with autism spectrum disorders. In order to design effective discrimination training procedures, behavior analysts and teachers must understand the critical differences between simple and conditional discrimination procedures. This presentation will cover research findings that inform our understanding of stimulus control with a specific application to receptive language programming as described in Grow and LeBlanc (2012). Receptive language refers to responding appropriately to another person's spoken language (e.g., responding to your name, following directions, responding to names and features of objects). Thisworkshop will present five critical best practices for designing and implementing programming for receptive language. In addition, this presentation will describe the potential negative effects for deviating from these recommendations and strategies for troubleshooting and eliminating stimulus control problems that have been created by prior nonoptimal programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to: (1) list the five best practices for receptive language programming; (2) identify the common practices that lead to the most common sources of faulty stimulus control; (3) describe how to arrange trials in order to minimize faulty stimulus control; and (4) identify inadvertent instructor cues that might lead to faulty stimulus control.
Activities: Forthcoming.
Audience: Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): discrimination training , receptive language
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Provide Parental Support
Friday, January 23, 2015
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
Steven C. Hayes is the Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. An author of more than 35 books and over 500 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and the application of this to the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. Dr. Hayes has been president of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, of the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He was the first secretary-treasurer of the Association for Psychological Science, which he helped form, and served a five-year term on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in the National Institutes of Health. In 1992, he was listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as the 30th "highest impact" psychologist in the world. His work has been recognized by several awards including the Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of APA, the Impact of Science on Application award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.
Description: Behavior analysis has a vast database for parental interventions focused on developmental disabilities, but has focused less on how to motivate and support parents in applying these interventions and in dealing with the psychological challenges of dealing with children with special needs. This workshop will describe relevant core methods of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which can be used to provide parental support. ACT is a contextual behavioral method that draws from a variety of behavioral and other approaches, integrated in an analysis based on behavioral principles as augmented by Relational Frame Theory. The workshop will explain the underlying theory behind ACT and will provide concrete examples of ACT methods that are known to be helpful, including methods in areas such as acceptance of difficult feelings, defusion from difficult thoughts, perspective taking, choosing values, and creating patterns of committed action.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to: (1) describe the six core processes that make up psychological flexibility; (2) provide behavioral explanations for at least two flexibility processes; and (3) demonstrate at least three methods designed to increase psychological flexibility.
Activities: Forthcoming
Audience: Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): acceptance, commitment, parental support

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