Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Ninth Annual Autism Conference; Las Vegas, NV; 2015

CE by Type: BACB


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Special Event #1
CE Offered: BACB
CPT Training
Friday, January 23, 2015
7:30 AM–9:30 AM
Cataluna
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): billing procedures, CPT Training, insurance
Chair: Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
CE Instructor: Wayne W. Fisher, Ph.D.
 

CPT Training

Abstract:

For the past several years, ABAI has been working with the American Medical Association to establish new billing procedures for ABA and related services for children and youth with autism. Recently, the AMA adopted Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) Category III codes. The AMA codes recognize that applied behavior analysis (ABA) is an empirically supported and medically necessary intervention. Drs. Travis Thompson and Wayne Fisher, who were instrumental in the approval of these codes, will be the instructors for this training, which will explain the how the new codes define procedures and services performed by behavior analysts. Over time, the codes will result in systematic and standardized valuation of ABA services, as well as simplify and streamline the billing and collection processes for ABA services. These codes provide recognition from the American Medical Association that ABA is an empirically supported and medically necessary intervention; will improve access to ABA services for families of children with autism and severe behavior disorders; will reduce financial burdens on these families; will, over time, result in systematic and standardized valuation of ABA services; and will, over time, simplify and streamline the billing and collection processes for ABA services (e.g., facilitate electronic billing).

 
WAYNE W. FISHER (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Travis Thompson (University of Minnesota)
Wayne W. Fisher, Ph.D., is the H. B. Munroe Professor of Behavioral Research at the Munroe-Meyer Institute and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He is also the director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at the Munroe-Meyer Institute, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level (BCBA-D), and a licensed psychologist. He was previously a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and served as executive director of the Neurobehavioral Programs at the Kennedy Krieger Institute (Baltimore) and the Marcus Behavior Center at the Marcus Institute (Atlanta), where he built clinical research programs in autism and developmental disabilities with national reputations for excellence. Dr. Fisher's methodologically sophisticated research has focused on several intersecting lines, including preference, choice, and the assessment and treatment of autism and severe behavior disorders, which have been notable for the creative use of concurrent schedules of reinforcement; these have become more commonplace in clinical research primarily as a result of his influence. He has published more than 130 peer-reviewed research studies in 28 different behavioral and/or medical journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Psychological Reports, American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Pediatrics, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, and The Lancet. Dr. Fisher is a past editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, a Fellow of ABAI, and a recipient of the Bush Leadership Award and the APA (Division 25) award for distinguished contributions to applied behavioral research.
 
Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the training, participants should be able to: (1) explain how CPT codes are determined and how they work; (2) identify the components of a behavior identification assessment; and (3) describe the items that should be included in a pre-determination letter.
 
Keyword(s): billing procedures, CPT Training, insurance
 
 
Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Early Intervention for Young Children With Autism: Best Practices for Receptive Language Instruction
Friday, January 23, 2015
9:30 AM–12:30 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Linda A. LeBlanc, Ph.D.
LINDA A. LEBLANC (Trumpet Behavioral Health)
Linda A. LeBlanc, Ph.D., BCBA-D, MI Licensed Psychologist, is the executive director of Research and Clinical Services at Trumpet Behavioral Health. She received her Ph.D. in child clinical psychology in 1996 from Louisiana State University and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She previously served as a professor on the psychology faculties at Claremont McKenna College (1997-1999), Western Michigan University (1999-2008), and Auburn University (2009-2012). She has published more than 80 articles and book chapters on topics such as behavioral treatment of autism, technology-based behavioral interventions, behavioral gerontology, and system development in human services. She has served on the board of directors of the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts, the California Association for Behavior Analysts, the Alabama Association of Behavior Analysts, and several nonprofit agencies serving individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. She also has served on state and national task forces to establish best practice guidelines for the treatment of autism and for the development of services for older adults with intellectual disabilities. Dr. LeBlanc has served as associate editor for Education and Treatment of Children, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Behavior Analysis in Practice. She also has served on the editorial boards of Research in Developmental Disabilities, Behavioral Interventions, Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, and The Behavior Analyst. She joined Trumpet in 2012 and has focused on development of clinical standards and research efforts throughout the organization.
Description: Discrimination training is one of the most important components of early intensive behavioral intervention with children with autism spectrum disorders. In order to design effective discrimination training procedures, behavior analysts and teachers must understand the critical differences between simple and conditional discrimination procedures. This presentation will cover research findings that inform our understanding of stimulus control with a specific application to receptive language programming as described in Grow and LeBlanc (2012). Receptive language refers to responding appropriately to another person's spoken language (e.g., responding to your name, following directions, responding to names and features of objects). Thisworkshop will present five critical best practices for designing and implementing programming for receptive language. In addition, this presentation will describe the potential negative effects for deviating from these recommendations and strategies for troubleshooting and eliminating stimulus control problems that have been created by prior nonoptimal programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to: (1) list the five best practices for receptive language programming; (2) identify the common practices that lead to the most common sources of faulty stimulus control; (3) describe how to arrange trials in order to minimize faulty stimulus control; and (4) identify inadvertent instructor cues that might lead to faulty stimulus control.
Activities: Forthcoming.
Audience: Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): discrimination training , receptive language
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Provide Parental Support
Friday, January 23, 2015
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
Steven C. Hayes is the Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. An author of more than 35 books and over 500 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and the application of this to the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. Dr. Hayes has been president of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, of the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He was the first secretary-treasurer of the Association for Psychological Science, which he helped form, and served a five-year term on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in the National Institutes of Health. In 1992, he was listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as the 30th "highest impact" psychologist in the world. His work has been recognized by several awards including the Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of APA, the Impact of Science on Application award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.
Description: Behavior analysis has a vast database for parental interventions focused on developmental disabilities, but has focused less on how to motivate and support parents in applying these interventions and in dealing with the psychological challenges of dealing with children with special needs. This workshop will describe relevant core methods of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which can be used to provide parental support. ACT is a contextual behavioral method that draws from a variety of behavioral and other approaches, integrated in an analysis based on behavioral principles as augmented by Relational Frame Theory. The workshop will explain the underlying theory behind ACT and will provide concrete examples of ACT methods that are known to be helpful, including methods in areas such as acceptance of difficult feelings, defusion from difficult thoughts, perspective taking, choosing values, and creating patterns of committed action.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to: (1) describe the six core processes that make up psychological flexibility; (2) provide behavioral explanations for at least two flexibility processes; and (3) demonstrate at least three methods designed to increase psychological flexibility.
Activities: Forthcoming
Audience: Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): acceptance, commitment, parental support
 
Invited Paper Session #4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

ACT, RFT, and Autism: What Contextual Behavioral Science Has to Offer

Saturday, January 24, 2015
8:30 AM–9:20 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
Chair: Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University)
STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
Steven C. Hayes is the Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. An author of more than 35 books and over 500 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and the application of this to the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. Dr. Hayes has been president of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, of the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He was the first secretary-treasurer of the Association for Psychological Science, which he helped form, and served a five-year term on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in the National Institutes of Health. In 1992, he was listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as the 30th "highest impact" psychologist in the world. His work has been recognized by several awards including the Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of APA, the Impact of Science on Application award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.
Abstract:

Behavior analytic methods in the areas of autism, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and developmental disabilities are among the most powerful known. Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS) is a wing of behavior analysis that has for years been exploring functional, contextual methods approaches to language and cognition, and their implications for verbal interventions in a wide variety of areas. In this talk, Dr. Hayes will review the progress of this wing, in areas of relevance to autism and related areas. While Relational Frame Therapy (RFT), is not yet as well established as direct contingency principles, it offers a variety of new conceptual tools that are worth exploring. ACT methods appear to be helpful to higher functioning populations in this area. The specific properties of CBS required some degree of focused development, but advances in this area are available to anyone in behavior analysis who chooses to apply them.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) describe the defining features of relational frames; (2) explain how relational operants alter the impact of direct contingencies; and (3) describe at least two findings in CBS that appear to be relevant to work with autism and related disorders.
Keyword(s): contexual behavior, relational frame
 
 
Invited Paper Session #6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Autism, ABA, and Pivotal Response Treatment

Saturday, January 24, 2015
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Robert L. Koegel, Ph.D.
Chair: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
ROBERT L. KOEGEL (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Dr. Robert Koegel has focused his career on autism, specializing in language intervention, family support, and school integration. He has published more than 200 articles and papers relating to the treatment of autism. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions. Models of his procedures have been used in public schools and in parent education programs throughout California, the United States, and other countries. He has trained health care and special education leaders in the United States and abroad. Dr. Koegel and his wife, Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel, are the developers of pivotal response treatment, which focuses on motivation. They were the recipients of the first annual Children's Television Workshop Sesame Street Award for Brightening the Lives of Children and the first annual Autism Speaks Award for Science and Research. The University of California, Santa Barbara, received a $2.35 million gift to expand the physical space of its autism center, which was renamed the Koegel Autism Center in recognition of the Koegels' work on behalf of children with autism, and a large gift from the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Foundation to start the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Asperger Center, which is now part of the Koegel Autism Center.
Abstract:

Historically, autism has presented major challenges for treatment providers, educators, families, and the community at large. Before the 1960s while there were isolated examples of successful treatments reported in lay documents and books, such as Itard's The Wild Boy of Aveyron, nothing systematic or replicable was reported and most believed that intervention for this population was impossible. Fortunately, in the 1960s and '70s researchers such as Lovaas, Hewett, Lovett, Wolf, Risley, Sloane, etc., showed that behavioral interventions (developed through ABA) could substantially improve large numbers of individual target behaviors, including self-help skills, academic skills, disruptive behavior, and language skills. This initial research led to very large degrees of optimism and hope for children with autism, particularly for families who had previously been told their children were uneducable and should be institutionalized. Initially, the interventions dealt with literally thousands of individual target behaviors, and required extremely large amounts of time and effort for both the interventionists and for the children. Beginning in the 1980s, researchers were finding that certain core pivotal areas of autism appeared to be responsible for very large numbers of response classes of both appropriate and inappropriate behaviors, and the possibility existed for developing a very efficient and effective treatment that would treat those "pivotal areas," that could result in widespread, fluidly integrated gains. Although it took decades to identify interventions for pivotal areas, iterations of interventions developed through ABA, such as Pivotal Response Treatment, could dramatically improve the speed and naturalness of the recovery process. That is, by targeting key pivotal areas, such as motivation for social communication, literally thousands of fluidly integrated improvements occurred extremely rapidly, improving not only thousands of individual target behaviors, but also improving the entire condition of autism, as well as reducing stress for family members. This presentation will describe the various pivotal areas that have been researched and procedures for implementing Pivotal Response Treatment. Research outcomes, including single subject designs and randomized clinical trials will be presented as well as videotaped vignettes of Pivotal Response Treatment being implemented.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) describe the treatment of individual target behaviors related to autism; (2) describe the key pivotal areas underlying the condition of autism; (3) explain the interventions that target those pivotal areas, producing extremely rapid and fluidly integrated gains in not only the target behaviors, but in the entire condition of autism.
Keyword(s): pivotal response
 
 
Invited Paper Session #7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Linking Assessment and Treatment in Acquisition Programs for Children with Autism

Saturday, January 24, 2015
1:30 PM–2:20 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Dorothea C. Lerman, Ph.D.
Chair: Naomi Swiezy (HANDS in Autism, IU School of Medicine)
DOROTHEA C. LERMAN (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Dorothea Lerman is a professor of psychology at the University of Houston-Clear Lake, where she coordinates a master’s program in behavior analysis and serves as director of the UHCL Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. She received her doctoral degree in psychology from the University of Florida in 1995, specializing in the experimental analysis of behavior. Her areas of expertise include autism, developmental disabilities, early intervention, functional analysis, teacher and parent training, and treatment of severe behavior disorders (e.g., aggression, self-injury). Dr. Lerman’s graduate students serve as behavioral consultants for school districts in the Houston area and provide services to children and families through an on-campus clinic. Dr. Lerman has published more than 60 research articles and chapters, served as associate editor for The Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Research in Developmental Disabilities, was the founding editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice, and recently completed a term as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. She has secured more than $1.5 million in grants and contracts to support her work. She was the recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Contribution to Applied Behavioral Research Award and the 2001 B.F. Skinner Award for New Researchers, awarded by Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She also was named a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International in 2008. Dr. Lerman is a licensed psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.
Abstract:

A number of studies have examined variations of commonly used instructional strategies for children with autism, including prompting and reinforcement procedures. Results often show that the relative effectiveness of different procedural variations is idiosyncratic across children. These findings indicate that it may be beneficial to link individualized assessment to treatment when developing acquisition programs for children with autism. Dr. Lerman will present the method and results of experiments that illustrate an assessment-based approach for identifying the most effective prompting procedures, error correction strategies, and reinforcement contingencies for individual learners.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) describe general research findings on variations of commonly used instructional strategies for children with autism; (2) describe different types of prompting procedures, error-correction strategies, and reinforcement contingencies; and (3) describe the key elements of an assessment-based approach for developing acquisition programs for children with autism.
Keyword(s): prompting, reinforcement
 
 
Invited Paper Session #9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Recent Behavioral Research on Restricted Inflexible Behavior

Saturday, January 24, 2015
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Timothy R. Vollmer, Ph.D.
Chair: Jennifer R. Zarcone (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
TIMOTHY R. VOLLMER (University of Florida)
Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996, he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998, he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University of Florida in 1998 and is now a professor of psychology. His primary area of research is applied behavior analysis, with emphases in developmental disabilities, reinforcement schedules, and parenting. He has published more than 130 articles and book chapters related to behavior analysis. He was the recipient of the 1996 B.F. Skinner New Researcher award from the American Psychological Association (APA). He received another APA award in August 2004, for significant contributions to applied behavior analysis. He is a former ABAI council member. He is currently the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, a board member on the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and an ABAI fellow.
Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are defined, in part, by restricted inflexible behavior. At the Behavior Analysis Research Clinic at the University of Florida, Dr. Vollmer has been collaborating with colleagues and students to evaluate such behavior in a range of contexts. One, they have compared the behavior in children with ASD to typically developing children using arbitrary play activities. Although both groups showed restricted interests, the ASD children were far less likely to switch activity upon request to do so. Two, they have extended their work on restricted inflexible behavior to socially relevant activity such as restricted food interests and restricted interest in sedentary activity such as video games, videos, and computer surfing. They are examining shaping procedures to increase variability in responding. Three, they have evaluated repetitive behavior disorders such as stereotypy and severe self-injury. They are currently investigating emergency treatment procedures for situations when a single instance of problem behavior may be too dangerous. Results from this collection of studies will be presented and discussed.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) describe examples of restricted inflexible behavior displayed by individuals with ASD; (2) list at least three reasons that restricted inflexible behavior can be problematic; and (3) cite the evidence supporting elimination of the establishing operation as an emergency treatment procedure for severe behavior disorders.
Keyword(s): emergency treatment , inflexible behavior, restricted interest
 
 
Invited Paper Session #13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Toward a Safer, Faster, and Better Functional Analysis of Problem Behaviors Associated With Autism

Sunday, January 25, 2015
8:30 AM–9:20 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Gregory P. Hanley, Ph.D.
Chair: John D. Molteni (University of Saint Joseph)
GREGORY P. HANLEY (Western New England University)
Dr. Gregory P. Hanley has been applying the principles of learning to improve socially important behaviors of children and adults with and without disabilities for more than 20 years. He worked and trained at the Spurwink School, the Groden Center, and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Florida and was tenured at the University of Kansas. He is currently a professor of psychology and director of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral Program at Western New England University and an adjunct professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Hanley has published more than 80 articles in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as the assessment and prevention of problem behavior, teaching tactics for young children, and evidence-based values. Dr. Hanley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 25), past editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP), and a past associate editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Behavior Analyst, and BAP.
Abstract:

Although a diagnosis of autism is not dependent on problem behaviors like meltdowns, self-injury, or aggression, one or more of these types of problems will likely require address at some point in the life span of a person diagnosed with autism. There is strong evidence supporting behavioral intervention to address these problem behaviors, with better outcomes evident when a functional analysis is part of the pretreatment functional assessment process. Nevertheless, assertions regarding the legitimacy of different types of functional assessment vary substantially across published studies. In addition, the research literature shows an unfortunate trend toward the standardization of the functional analytic part of the process. In this session, a highly individualized and practical functional assessment process that leads to fast, safe, and effective outcomes will be described. The comprehensive and socially validated treatments for problem behavior that result from this particular functional assessment process also will be described.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) given the results of an open-ended interview, design an efficient, safe, individualized (nonstandardized), and synthesized functional analysis; (2) given different functions of problem behavior, design functionally relevant, effective, and skill-based interventions capable of producing generalizable and socially valid improvements in problem behavior; and (3) describe and implement several strategies for teaching individuals with severe problem behavior to tolerate both delays to and denials of reinforcers previously maintaining their problem behavior.
Keyword(s): functional analysis, problem behaviors
 
 
Invited Paper Session #14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Using Stimulus Pairing Procedures to Induce New Vocalizations

Sunday, January 25, 2015
9:30 AM–10:20 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Anna I. Petursdottir, Ph.D.
Chair: Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University)
ANNA I. PETURSDOTTIR (Texas Christian University)
Anna Ingeborg Petursdottir received her Ph.D. in psychology from Western Michigan University and is currently an associate professor of psychology at Texas Christian University. Her primary area of research is verbal behavior and its acquisition. Her applied research interests include strategies for enhancing basic communication skills of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, whereas more basic research interests include typically developing children's language acquisition, and how research and theory in this area may translate into effective language interventions. Dr. Petursdottir's research has been published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, among other journals. She is past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and an associate editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and has served on the editorial boards of numerous other journals. Dr. Petursdottir is also a past president of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis and has served on the annual convention program committee of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.
Abstract:

It has long been hypothesized that the early cooing and babbling of infants may be shaped into their native-language speech sounds in part via auditory feedback from their own voices. In behavioral terms, this means that vocalizations that resemble speech sounds regularly heard in the infants' environment function as reinforcers for vocalizing. Clinicians and researchers have translated this hypothesis into a stimulus-stimulus pairing intervention intended to increase novel vocalizations of nonverbal children with autism and other developmental disabilities. However, the literature to date has produced mixed results. In this presentation, Dr. Petursdottir will discuss strengths and limitations of the existing literature on stimulus-stimulus pairing, and use data from her lab to illustrate alternative procedures intended to establish speech sounds as conditioned reinforcers.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) explain how the concept of automatic conditioned reinforcement has been used to account for increases in child vocalizations after the child is exposed to pairings of adult speech sounds with preferred stimuli; (2) identify the strengths and limitations of the literature on stimulus-stimulus pairing to establish early speech sounds in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder; and (3) describe discrimination training and response-contingent pairing as two alternative procedures to establish speech sounds or other stimuli as conditioned reinforcers.
Keyword(s): stimulus pairing
 
 
Invited Paper Session #15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Autism Insurance Reform Across America

Sunday, January 25, 2015
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ph.D.
Chair: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
LORRI SHEALY UNUMB (Autism Speaks)
Lorri Shealy Unumb is a lawyer, professor, and the mother of three children--Ryan, 13, who has autism; Christopher, 9; and Jonathan, 6. In 2005, she wrote ground-breaking autism insurance legislation for South Carolina ("Ryan's Law") that passed in 2007 and served as the catalyst for the national movement toward autism insurance reform. Ms. Unumb began her work in autism advocacy as a volunteer. In 2008, she was recruited by the New York-based nonprofit Autism Speaks, where she now advocates full time on behalf of individuals with autism. As head of state government affairs, she has testified more than 100 times on health insurance issues in legislatures around the country. For her advocacy efforts, she has been recognized with the Jefferson Award for Public Service; the Autism Society of America 2008 "Parents of the Year" Award (along with her husband, Dan); the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's Michael Hemingway Award; the California Association of Behavior Analysts 2012 "Leadership in Law" Award; the Miss South Carolina Pageant 2012 "Woman of Achievement" Award; the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts 2013 "Jerry Shook" Award; and the NASCAR Foundation's Betty Jane France Humanitarian Award. Her work has been profiled on CNN, on NPR's Morning Edition, and in Town&Country magazine, from whom she received one of three 2009 "Women Who Make a Difference" awards. She is profiled in the American Academy of Pediatrics 2013 book Autism Spectrum Disorders: What Every Parent Needs to Know. Before joining Autism Speaks, Ms. Unumb enjoyed a fulfilling career as an appellate litigator with the United States Department of Justice and then as a law professor at George Washington University Law School and an inaugural faculty member at the Charleston School of Law. A frequent keynote speaker, Ms. Unumb still teaches a health law course at George Washington University Law School called "Autism and the Law." She and her husband, Dan, wrote the first-ever comprehensive textbook on legal issues related to autism, also called Autism and the Law. They recently founded the Autism Academy of South Carolina, a nonprofit center in Columbia serving the year-round therapeutic needs of children on the spectrum. She attended the University of South Carolina, where she earned degrees magna cum laude in broadcasting and political science and was awarded a full scholarship to USC Law School, where she graduated with honors in 1993. She was named the Law School Graduate of the Year by the international legal honor society Phi Delta Phi.
Abstract:

Historically, individuals with autism have had difficulty obtaining meaningful health insurance coverage. Since 2007, however, more than 35 states have enacted legislation requiring insurers to cover autism interventions, including applied behavior analysis. The purpose of this session is to explain the new laws and examine the underlying grassroots advocacy that resulted in their passage. Ms. Unumb will discuss the terms of the new laws, the different types of insurance policies that consumers may have, and the potential pitfalls that consumers may face in obtaining coverage.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) understand why health insurance has typically denied insurance coverage for ABA; (2) identify different types of health insurance policies and the significance of each; and (3) be aware of the implications of the Affordable Care Act on autism insurance coverage.
Keyword(s): insurance coverage, legislation
 

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