Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Second Education Conference; Chicago, IL; 2013

Program by Continuing Education Events: Sunday, November 10, 2013


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Invited Paper Session #12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Using Digital Technology With Learners With Special Needs: How Can We Decide What Works?

Sunday, November 10, 2013
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Karen L. Mahon, Ed.D.
Chair: Karen L. Mahon (Balefire Labs, Inc.)
KAREN L. MAHON (Balefire Labs, Inc.)
Karen Mahon is a learning scientist and educational psychologist whose expertise is in instructional design and behavior change programs. She is also an adviser to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. Dr. Mahon holds a B.A. from the University of California, San Diego, an M.A. and Ed.D. in educational psychology, with a graduate minor in the experimental analysis of behavior, from West Virginia University, and a Certificate in Product Management from the University of California at Berkeley. She has spent the past 15-plus years in education technology and instructional software. After graduate school, she was a research faculty member at the University of Kansas Parsons Research Center before moving to the private sector. For almost 10 years she wrote grants, funded by the National Institutes of Health, to support the design and development of educational software for the most difficult-to-teach kids, those with severe developmental disabilities. Following that, she spearheaded the global digital content strategy for a manufacturer of classroom technology hardware products, Mimio Interactive Teaching Technologies. Dr. Mahon is now the president and founder of Balefire Labs (www.balefirelabs.com), an online educational app review service that helps parents and teachers identify apps that provide the best instruction. Balefire Labs utilizes rigorous, research-based, instructional, and usability design criteria to review mobile apps for grades prekindergarten through 12.   
Abstract:

The explosion of education technology products holds great promise for learners with special needs. Modern technologies can teach learners with the greatest needs new skills, provide opportunities for practice, application, and problem solving, and allow collaboration with others in the classroom or across the globe. Teachers can see, in real time, what students have learned or still need to know. But with hundreds of thousands of possible solutions (there are more than 115,000 educational apps in iTunes alone), how do teachers and parents know what products are worth buying for their learners? This session will focus on one of the most popular education technology categories today—mobile educational apps. The most important features of apps for special needs learners will be discussed, along with how to identify the presence or absence of those features.

Target Audience:

Anyone who is interested in helping learners with special needs use digital technology.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to: -- Identify examples and nonexamples of apps that provide differentiated learner feedback following correct responses and errors. -- Identify examples and nonexamples of apps that provide screen and sound use that is relevant to the learning task. -- Identify examples and nonexamples of apps that provide adapting levels of difficulty.  
Keyword(s): Digital technology, special needs
 
 
Invited Paper Session #13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Interteaching: Applying Our Science and Using Data-Based Decisions in Teaching

Sunday, November 10, 2013
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Regency Ballroom D & E
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University)
Dr. Darlene Crone-Todd is an associate professor of psychology at Salem State University, and serves as the coordinator for the post-master’s certificate program in applied behavior analysis. She earned her Ph.D. in experimental behavior analysis at the University of Manitoba, Canada, and completed her post-doctoral work at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in behavioral pharmacology. Dr. Crone-Todd is the lead editor for the Behavior Analyst Today, the executive director for the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and serves as a board member and representative for experimental behavior analysis on the Massachusetts Association for Behavior Analysis. Her applied work in this area concerns using behavioral methods to increase higher-order thinking in higher education. She has published, and presented, on the use of the Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction (CAPSI), as well as on the use of Interteaching methods in the classroom. She is passionate about the area of applying behavioral principles to provide quality educational experiences, having been exposed to a variety of different educational settings in her early years.
Abstract:

Behavior analysis has contributed in a meaningful way to the development of higher-order thinking skills at all levels of education during the past decades. The use of small units of study, requiring that students prepare for lectures and discussions, monitoring student performance, and providing and responding to feedback, are all critical features of an approach called Interteaching. Developed by Boyce & Hineline, and expanded by Saville, this approach to teaching has been studied extensively during the past decade, and continues to gain traction as a method to promote student engagement, including pre-reading of the material and on-task class discussion. In this session, research on Interteaching will be reviewed, along with practical strategies for use in the classroom and ideas for research projects. The goal is to provide participants with practical strategies for use in various classroom settings, and to discuss how Interteaching might be adopted for online use.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, graduate students, and anyone interested in learning about Interteaching.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --Describe three features of interteaching, and at least one way it differs from other behavioral teaching methods. --Cite at least one empirical reason why interteaching produces better outcomes than simply just studying and preparing for class. --Describe how participants would use interteaching in their classrooms.
Keyword(s): Inter-Teaching
 
 
Invited Paper Session #14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Learning Strategies to Develop Problem Solving and Reasoning Skills

Sunday, November 10, 2013
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Joanne K. Robbins, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy)
Joanne Robbins is the principal of Morningside Academy in Seattle, WA, and a cofounder and executive director of PEER (Partnerships for Educational Excellence) International. She has more than 30 years of experience in program development, curriculum design, and teaching and supervision of programs for children and youth. Dr. Robbins' experience has been in both educational and mental health settings. She developed programs for prekindergarten through the college level. She is the author of Talk Aloud Problem Solving: A Script for Teachers, and co-author of Fluent Thinking Skills: A Generative Approach. She is currently co-chairperson of the Seattle Public Schools Superintendent's Positive Climate and Discipline Advisory Committee. Dr. Robbins completed her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago under the mentorship of Dr. Sue Markle, Dr. Phil Tiemann, and Dr. Herbert Walberg.
Abstract:

B. F. Skinner (1968) defined problem solving as a two-stage process, first is "the situation for which a response has not previously been reinforced," and the second as the process of solution, that is, "the behavior which brings about the change is the problem solving and the response to it is the solution." Stated otherwise, the behavior that solves the problem is absent and the problem solver must find a way to produce it. That process can, at times, be described as reasoning. Reasoning involves what Skinner called the inspection or reinforcement contingencies such that behavior can be described that meets contingency requirements without direct contingency shaping or rules (Robbins, 2011). Such a process involves those activities "where the speaker generates stimuli to supplement other behavior already in his repertoire" (Skinner, 1968). This session will have participants identify the problem to solve, ask the "right question," classify examples and nonexamples of the critical attributes of the performance of an expert reasoner and problem solver, and examine resources that lend themselves to peer tutoring or self-instructional repertoires required of classroom and everyday activities.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in teaching how to develop problem solving and reasoning skills.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --Identify the repertoires of a successful problem solver. --Identify the repertories of a successful active listener. --Identify the conditions required to maintain strategy application.
Keyword(s): Problem solving, reasoning skills
 
 
Invited Paper Session #15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Data Collection: The Next Frontier

Sunday, November 10, 2013
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Regency Ballroom D & E
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Joshua K. Pritchard, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
JOSHUA K. PRITCHARD (Florida Institute of Technology), RYAN LEE O'DONNELL (Florida Institute of Technology)
Dr. Joshua K. Pritchard is an assistant professor in applied behavior analysis at the Florida Institute of Technology. He received bachelor's and master's degrees from the Florida Institute of Technology. He earned his Ph.D. in behavior analysis from the University of Nevada, Reno. His professional experience includes providing direct consultation services for wide range of ages and populations in behavior acceleration and deceleration. Dr. Pritchard has served as a consultant with state facilities under review by the Department of Justice, done international consultation on behavioral programs and practicum experience, and conducted remote supervision of international students desiring certification in behavior analysis. Dr. Pritchard's research focuses on utilizing IRAP and Q Sort to examine complex human behavior, discovering and creating less expensive alternatives to traditional animal laboratories, transferring behavioral principles into marketable goods to improve quality of life and environmental behavior, and global dissemination of behavior analysis.
Ryan O'Donnell is a recent graduate of Florida Institute of Technology's applied behavior analysis master's program. As manager for JKP aquatic operant lab, Mr. O'Donnell oversees its care and implementation of several basic animal research experiments. Before attending Florida Tech, he received his bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno. His major interests are precision teaching, philosophical positions of the science of behavior, dissemination of behavior analysis, successful applications of technology to increase the efficiency of behavior analysts, and large-scale practical applications of behavioral technology. Mr. O'Donnell's thesis investigated a computer-based procedure to teach children to engage in the relational skills necessary for perspective-taking. He works as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) at Lodestone Academy, where he oversees the implementation of behavioral assessment and treatment to children diagnosed with a variety of disabilities in a school setting. Mr. O'Donnell has a diversity of experience gained during the past four years conducting behavioral assessments to then develop, implement, and train staff on behavior analytic programming. He has worked across several populations, including children and adults with developmental disabilities in outpatient, residential, and school settings.
Abstract:

The ubiquity of handheld smart phones should be revolutionizing the data collection landscape of behavioral and educational professions. In fact, as platforms for user-developed applications grow, the creation of professional tools designed to increase efficiency and productivity in the workplace has exploded. Apps can increase efficiency from listing to-dos to typing reports. Fortunately, developers are beginning to create tools focused on the needs of a behavior analyst: data collection, delivery of instruction or therapy, and case management. Even with technologies that can greatly enhance the efficiency of these activities, a large proportion of analysts still are using tree- and graphite-based technologies. One potential problem with early adoption of smart-phone apps is that analysts have experienced effects opposite of those that were promised: They resulted in inefficiencies for the professional. Once bitten, twice shy--these professionals then become hesitant to abandon practices and tools which already work for those which may not. The purpose of this breakout is to kindle the appetite of its audience, provide a menu of the various options currently available, and break down the overwhelming and complex environment of smart-phone apps into accessible, bite-sized content.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in learning more about apps for behavior analysis data collection.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants will be able to: --Describe the benefits of using applications to increase efficiency in data collection. --Identify which applications fit which contexts best. -- Use the decision-tree, given a scenario, to determine an appropriate application to use. --Identify one to three applications germane to their practice.
Keyword(s): apps, Data collection
 
 
Invited Paper Session #16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Instructional Design with Adobe Captivate

Sunday, November 10, 2013
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Regency Ballroom D & E
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Erick M. Dubuque, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
ERICK M. DUBUQUE (Spalding University)
Erick Dubuque is a Licensed Behavior Analyst (LBA), Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral (BCBA-D), and assistant professor in Spalding University's Applied Behavior Analysis Program. Dr. Dubuque is a former U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer (Kenya) and is the president and owner of Behavior Science.org, LLC, an organization dedicated to the dissemination and advancement of the science of behavior. As an active member of the behavior analytic community, Dr. Dubuque has served as the student representative to the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and chair of the Undergraduate Accreditation Committee. He is past academic coordinator for the Jordan University Science and Technology Master's Degree Program in Applied Behavior Health Analysis, the first graduate degree program in behavior analysis founded in the Middle East. Dr. Dubuque's scholarly interests extend across the philosophical, experimental, applied, and professional domains in behavior science. A general theme across all of his interests is the understanding of technology and complex human behaviors, especially as they relate to the topics of education and social justice.
Abstract:

Teachers have been using machines to facilitate instruction for almost 100 years (Benjamin, 1988). Many of the same principles of learning used by these early machines continue to form the foundation for modern e-learning software. The objective of this breakout session is for participants to discuss how e-learning software programs like Adobe® Captivate®, Articulate®, and Lectora® can be used to design lessons that capitalize on effective instructional techniques such as active responding, mastery, scripting, branching scenarios, and individualized feedback. During the session, participants will learn how to quickly create their own content using the award-winning Adobe® Captivate® 6 e-learning software. By the time participants leave the session they should have a better understanding of some of the pitfalls and benefits of incorporating e-learning software into their courses.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in learning how e-learning software programs can be used to design lessons.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: --Identify proven instructional techniques based on the principles of behavior. --Describe how e-learning software can be used to implement effective instructional techniques.
--Describe the basic steps necessary to create and publish a project in Adobe Captivate.
Keyword(s): Instructional design, Software programs
 
 
Invited Paper Session #17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

How to Avoid Using Spurious Reinforcers, The Importance of Program-Intrinsic Consequences When Building Learning Environments

Sunday, November 10, 2013
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: T. V. (Joe) Layng, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
T. V. (JOE) LAYNG (Generategy)
T. V. (Joe) Layng received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he was a student of Israel Goldiamond. Dr. Layng is the co-founder of Headsprout and was its senior scientist. At Headsprout, Dr. Layng and his colleagues designed, tested, and implemented highly successful Early Reading and Reading Comprehension programs, which are based on behavior analytic instructional technology. They also produced a comprehensive interactive whiteboard science curriculum for grades 3–8. He currently is a partner in Generategy, an interactive technologies company that provides educational software based on principles of generative instruction. Through Generategy, Dr. Layng and his colleagues have recently launched Music Learning Lab for iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch that teaches children music fundamentals. These programs have greatly expanded behavioral technology and have directly benefited countless children. Dr. Layng has published more than 30 articles describing, documenting, and analyzing these instructional programs, and has given more than 50 invited presentations of his work in this area both in the U.S. and abroad. He has four patents that reflect his work related to educational applications of behavior analysis. Dr. Layng has held a number of positions in schools, universities, and other public institutions related to instructional design, educational technology, large-scale performance improvement, and clinical behavior analysis. His work also has been well received outside behavior analysis, as exemplified the receipt in 2010 of the CODiE Award for best “online instructional solution” from the Software Industry and Information Association for the Reading Comprehension program, and two different public service awards from the city of Chicago. He also serves on the boards of a number of organizations dedicated to advancing both education and behavior analysis, including the Chicago School of Professional Psychology and Pacific Oaks College. Dr. Layng is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and his far-reaching work applying behavior analysis in education and other areas brings positive visibility to our discipline as a whole.
Abstract:

One of the more prominent features of what is often called “gamification” is that certain behaviors, such as correctly solving a problem, are followed by points, medallions, or awards made contingent on the behavior. But what makes the points or medallions valuable? Is solving the problem really important to the individual? And herein lies the one of the great dilemmas of gamification. The points, awards, etc. are often assumed to be reinforcing in and of themselves. Or, perhaps they are linked to prizes or to avoiding penalties. But are these really meaningful to the person? And if they are, do they derive their meaning from outside the activity being reinforced? Such consequences have been described by Skinner as “spurious,” and by Goldiamond as “program-extrinsic.” The identification and programming of “program-intrinsic,” activity-specific consequences, as contrasted with program-extrinsic, spurious consequences, will be the focus of the breakout. This session will allow participants to design those practices that help learners find the fun in math (and other topics), rather than design practices that simply make math fun.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in gaming and reinforcement.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to:

--Define "program."

--Distinguish between program intrinsic and program extrinsic consequences.

--State how potentiating program intrinsic consequences differ from potentiating program extrinsic consequences.

--Describe under what conditions knowledge of correct responding can act as a reinforcer.

Keyword(s): Gaming, program-intrinsic , reinforcement
 

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