Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Second Education Conference; Chicago, IL; 2013

CE by Type: BACB


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Special Event #1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Introductory Remarks
Friday, November 8, 2013
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Digital education
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
CE Instructor: Janet S. Twyman, Ph.D.
 

The Intersection of Behavior, Education, and Technology

Abstract:

It's not a matter of whether or not new digital technologies will revolutionize education--they are, have, and will continue to do so. Digital education is not just another fad or reform; it signals a major phase change in transforming teaching and learning. Tremendous synergy exists between disruptive developments such as personalized learning (individualizing education not just for instruction but also interest), learning analytics (using formative and summative evaluation to determine what works from students to schools), online, hybrid, and blended delivery models (which promotes greater instructional reach), gaming technology (the clear use of levels, badges, mastery, and goals in learning), and much more. Will behavior analysis add to innovation and lead early adoption, or simply follow along with the majority, or even lag behind? Tremendous opportunities exist for behavior analysis to lead and support vital change, and this conference offers an exceptional opportunity for behavior analysts to both learn about and learn how to transform education.

 
JANET S. TWYMAN (UMass Medical School)
Janet S. Twyman, Ph.D., BCBA, is a noted proponent of effective instructional practices. She is committed to evidence-based instruction and has a strong record in the transfer of instructional technology and developing web-based programs for wide-scale distribution. She has been a preschool and elementary school teacher, a principal and administrator, and university professor. As vice president of instructional development, implementation and research at Headsprout, she led the design, development, and dissemination of the company’s highly regarded educational programs, and oversaw program implementation in more than 1,000 public and private schools. Dr. Twyman has served on the boards of numerous organizations including the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and PEER International. In 2007-08, she served as president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International. As associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School/E.K. Shriver Center, she focuses her time on evidence-based innovations in education and the systems that support them to produce meaningful differences in learners’ lives. Dr. Twyman recently was named as the director of innovation and technology for the U.S. Department of Education’s national Center on Innovations in Learning.
 
Target Audience:

Anyone interested in learning about digital education.

Learning Objectives: Forthcoming.
 
Keyword(s): Digital education
 
 
Invited Panel #5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Back to the Future: Behavioral Hallmarks in Education
Saturday, November 9, 2013
8:00 AM–9:20 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Chair: Joshua K. Pritchard (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Joshua K. Pritchard, Ph.D.
Panelists: R. DOUGLAS GREER (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), JOSEPH J. PEAR (University of Manitoba), CATHY L. WATKINS (California State University Stanislaus)
Abstract:

Enhancing education has been a target of interest since the beginning of the behavioral tradition, especially influenced by scientists such as Skinner, Dewey, Keller, Lindsley, and Engelman. While no one should be surprised by the fact that behavior analysis has influenced the education of folks with autism and other developmental disabilities, many are surprised to learn that education qua education is in fact part of the purview of behavior science. This panel will consist of a brief summary of several specific approaches to education from the behavioral tradition, their origins, where they stand today, and what directions they can go in the future. In the discussion of these approaches, the use of technology (established and emerging) in the service of these educational approaches will be highlighted. This is the perfect panel for an audience member who wishes to see what behavior analysis has and can contribute to the state of our educational systems, now and in the future.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Anyone who wishes to see what behavior analysis has and can contribute to the state of our educational systems, now and in the future.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --Compare/contrast various behavioral approaches to education including Precision Teaching, Direct Instruction, Computer Assisted Personalized Systems of Instruction (CAPSI), and Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS).  --Identify at least one technology that can enhance behavior analytic instruction.  --Articulate at least one way they can change how they provide instruction to people with or without disabilities using a behavioral technology from the panel. 
R. DOUGLAS GREER (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Dr. R. Douglas Greer is the coordinator of the programs in applied behavior analysis at Teachers College at Columbia University. He has taught at Columbia University Teachers College and the Graduate School of the Arts and Sciences for 42 years, sponsored 170 Ph.D. dissertations, taught more than 2,000 master students, founded the Fred S. Keller School, authored 13 books and 155 research and conceptual papers, served on the editorial board of 10 journals, and developed the CABAS� school model for special education and the Accelerated Independent Model for general education (K-5). He has received the American Psychology Association�s Fred S. Keller Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education, the Association for Behavior Analysis International Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis, been honored for his contributions to The Fred S. Keller School, and May 5 has been designated as the R. Douglas Greer Day by the Westchester County Legislature. He is a Fellow of the ABAI and a CABAS� Board-Certified Senior Behavior Analyst and Senior Research Scientist. He has taught courses at the universities of Almeria, Grenada, Cadiz, Madrid, Oviedo, and Salamanca in Spain, Oslo and Askerhus College in Norway, University of Ibadan in Nigeria, and University of Wales at Bangor in England. Dr. Greer has served as the keynote speaker at the Experimental Analysis of Behavior Group in England, the National Conferences on Behavior Analysis in Ireland, Israel, Korea, Norway, and in several states in the United States. He contributed to the development of several schools based entirely on scientific procedures and comprehensive curriculum based assessment in the U.S., Ireland, Sicily, England, and Spain. He is co-author of the book Verbal Behavior Analysis: Developing and Expanding Verbal Capabilities in Children With Language Delays.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy)
Dr. Kent Johnson founded Morningside Academy, in Seattle, WA, in 1980, and currently serves as its executive director. Morningside is a laboratory school for elementary and middle school children and youth. Morningside investigates effective curriculum materials and teaching methods, and has provided training and consulting in instruction to more than 125 schools and agencies throughout the USA and Canada since 1991. Dr. Johnson has served in all the positions at Morningside, including classroom teacher for 10 years, financial manager, administrator, teacher trainer, school psychologist, and school consultant. He has published many seminal papers and books about research-based curriculum and teaching methods, including The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction: What It Means to Leave No Child Behind, with Dr. Elizabeth Street. Dr. Johnson also is a co-founder of Headsprout, Inc., now Mimio, a company that develops web-based, interactive, cartoon-driven instructional programs, including Mimio Sprout Early Reading and Mimio Reading Comprehension Suite. Dr. Johnson received the 2001 Award for Public Service in Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis. Before founding Morningside, Dr. Johnson was a professor at Central Washington University, director of staff training at the Fernald School in Massachusetts, and an instructional designer at Northeastern University in Boston. He received his M.S. (1974) and Ph.D. (1977) in psychology at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. He received his B.S. in psychology and sociology from Georgetown University (1973).
JOSEPH J. PEAR (University of Manitoba)
Joseph J. Pear received a B.S. degree from the University of Maryland and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from The Ohio State University. He is currently a professor of psychology at the University of Manitoba. Pear has done basic and applied research and is a fellow of Division 6 (Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology) and Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association. Pear�s early basic research was with rats and pigeons. Currently, he is conducting research with fish using a tracking system he developed. His best-known basic research deals with behavioral contrast, shaping, and the spatio-temporal analysis of behavior. In addition, he has done work in the mathematical analysis of behavior. His early applied work focused on children with developmental disabilities at the St. Amant Centre, where he founded the Behaviour Modification Unit, now the Psychology Department. In 2009, he received an award for Outstanding Contribution to Behavior Analysis in Manitoba from the Manitoba Association for Behavior Analysis. Currently, he is the principal investigator on a grant to research Knowledge Transfer with members of the psychology departments at the University of Manitoba and Brock University, and with researchers at St. Amant and the New Haven Learning Centre in Ontario. Pear also developed an instructional and research program called Computer-Aided Personal System of Instruction (CAPSI). In addition to co-authoring Behavior Modification: What It Is and How to Do It with Garry Martin, Pear has written two other books: The Science of Learning and A Historical and Contemporary Look at Psychological Systems. He also has written numerous basic and applied research articles, book chapters, and encyclopedia articles.
CATHY L. WATKINS (California State University Stanislaus)
Cathy Watkins, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is professor emerita of special education at California State University, Stanislaus, and former director of the Center for Direct Instruction. She is past president of the California Association for Behavior Analysis and current president of the Association for Direct Instruction. She is the author of Project Follow Through: A Case Study of Contingencies Influencing Instructional Practices of the Educational Establishment and co-author of two book chapters on Direct Instruction. She has served on editorial boards and on the Advisory Board of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. Dr. Watkins has worked with general and special education students and trained and supervised teachers at the university and in public schools. She has been a consultant to schools and agencies and for SRA?s Ravenscourt Books. In 2002, Dr. Watkins received the Association for Direct Instruction?s Excellence in Education Award, and in 2012, was inducted into the Association for Direct Instruction Hall of Fame for an outstanding career helping children and their teachers to be successful.
Keyword(s): Educational approaches, Technology
 
 
Invited Paper Session #6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Complexity and Enquiry

Saturday, November 9, 2013
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: T. V. (Joe) Layng, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
T. V. (JOE) LAYNG (Generategy)
T. V. (Joe) Layng received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he was a student of Israel Goldiamond. Dr. Layng is the co-founder of Headsprout and was its senior scientist. At Headsprout, Dr. Layng and his colleagues designed, tested, and implemented highly successful Early Reading and Reading Comprehension programs, which are based on behavior analytic instructional technology. They also produced a comprehensive interactive whiteboard science curriculum for grades 3–8. He currently is a partner in Generategy, an interactive technologies company that provides educational software based on principles of generative instruction. Through Generategy, Dr. Layng and his colleagues have recently launched Music Learning Lab for iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch that teaches children music fundamentals. These programs have greatly expanded behavioral technology and have directly benefited countless children. Dr. Layng has published more than 30 articles describing, documenting, and analyzing these instructional programs, and has given more than 50 invited presentations of his work in this area both in the U.S. and abroad. He has four patents that reflect his work related to educational applications of behavior analysis. Dr. Layng has held a number of positions in schools, universities, and other public institutions related to instructional design, educational technology, large-scale performance improvement, and clinical behavior analysis. His work also has been well received outside behavior analysis, as exemplified the receipt in 2010 of the CODiE Award for best “online instructional solution” from the Software Industry and Information Association for the Reading Comprehension program, and two different public service awards from the city of Chicago. He also serves on the boards of a number of organizations dedicated to advancing both education and behavior analysis, including the Chicago School of Professional Psychology and Pacific Oaks College. Dr. Layng is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and his far-reaching work applying behavior analysis in education and other areas brings positive visibility to our discipline as a whole.
Abstract:

Frequently one hears that behaviorist approaches to teaching and learning focus on the more mundane "basic" skills and often neglect the important aspects of advanced learning. That is, there is an emphasis on the simple, rather than the complex, and on direct teaching rather than on enquiry and problem solving. This presentation looks at complexity and argues that the meaning of complexity, especially as it applies to education, is not well understood and requires an examination of a range of teaching and learning issues. Further, complexity of task is different than complexity of teaching the task, and often repertoires of increasing complexity may become increasingly simpler to teach. Enquiry may itself be one of those instances. As one builds the component repertoires for enquiry, one may find increasingly more complex patterns may emerge with little direct instruction. A model for teaching and applying enquiry repertoires to increasingly more demanding criteria will be suggested that topographically looks unstructured, but in fact builds upon careful contingency shaping.

Target Audience:

Anyone who is interested in direct teaching and contingency shaping.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to:

--Describe the relationship between entry repertoire and complexity.

--State how the use of a contingency-defined learning hierarchy can help teach complex topics through enquiry.

--Distinguish between complexity of repertoire and complexity of program.

--Describe how enquiry can be sequenced so as to potentiate academic success as a reinforcer.

Keyword(s): Complexity, Enquiry
 
 
Invited Paper Session #9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

A Behavioral Approach to Fun

Saturday, November 9, 2013
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: John Hopson, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
JOHN HOPSON (Bungie)
Dr. John Hopson is the head of user research at Bungie, creators of the popular Halo series of video games. In the past, Dr. Hopson was the lead researcher for a wide variety of games ranging from AAA blockbusters (Halo, Age of Empires) to small indie games (Trials HD, Crimson: Steam Pirates). He also is the author of a number of articles on the intersection of psychology and games, including the infamous "Behavioral Game Design." Dr. Hopson holds a Ph.D. in behavioral and brain sciences from Duke University and is the former chair of the International Game Developers Association's Games User Research Special Interest Group. He is currently at work on Bungie's upcoming game, Destiny.
Abstract:

On one hand, games are a creative medium full of incredibly nebulous, fluffy concepts like "fun," "storytelling," and "adventure." At the same time, modern games produce terabytes of exquisitely detailed behavioral data, letting us analyze everything from how our players respond to contingencies to the substance of their in-game conversations. The games industry is driven by a unique mix of talented designers who work by instinct and experience and analysts who use rigorous behavioral testing methodologies, battling and collaborating with each other to produce fun experiences for our players. This talk will cover some of the ways research has been incorporated into the game design process, from small-scale lab studies to beta tests with millions of active participants. The talk will cover why behavioral approaches have been so unexpectedly successful in games and cover the secret methods used to persuade stubborn designers to listen to data. Finally, Dr. Hopson also will discuss some of the ways that behavioral analysts are still way ahead of game designers and what the games industry needs to do in order to catch up.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in how behavior analysis research is incorporated into the game design process.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --List at least three types of behavioral data which may be collected in modern digital “games.” --Identify two ways in which (behavioral) research has been incorporated into the game-design process. --Describe at least three examples of how the behavioral approach has been successful in game design.  
Keyword(s): Game design
 
 
Invited Paper Session #10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Using Educational Data Mining to Study Problem Behaviors in Online Learning

Saturday, November 9, 2013
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Ryan Baker, Ph.D.
Chair: Ronnie Detrich (The Wing Institute)
RYAN BAKER (Columbia University)
Dr. Ryan Shaun Joazeiro de Baker is an associate professor of learning analytics at Teachers College, Columbia University. He earned his Ph.D. in human-computer interaction from Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Baker was previously an assistant professor of psychology and the learning sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and he served as the first technical director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center DataShop, the largest public repository for data on the interaction between learners and educational software. He is currently serving as the founding president of the International Educational Data Mining Society, and as associate editor of the Journal of Educational Data Mining. His research combines educational data mining and quantitative field observation methods to better understand how students respond to educational software, and how these responses impact their learning. He studies these issues within intelligent tutors, simulations, multi-user virtual environments, and educational games.
Abstract:

Increasingly, students' educational experiences occur in the context of online learning environments, creating opportunities to study student behavior in a fashion that is both longitudinal and very fine-grained. In this talk, Dr. Baker will discuss the use of Educational Data Mining methods on this type of data to automatically infer student problem behaviors during online learning, and to make basic discoveries about the factors that lead students to engage in these behaviors. He will illustrate this process through discussing his research group's work to leverage a combination of field observation and data mining to develop automated detectors that infer when a student engages in a range of problem behaviors, including gaming the system, off-task behavior, and carelessness. Dr. Baker will then discuss his group's work studying the ways that these behaviors and emotions are influenced by student interaction with online learning environments, and how that work influences developing next-generation online learning environments that students are more likely to choose to use appropriately and effectively.

Target Audience:

Anyone who is interested in educational data mining and online learning.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --Define educational data mining, and contrast it with learning analytics. --Cite an example of how data mining can inform educators and instructional designers about student engagement and emotional responses to instruction. --Cite an example of how student interaction with online learning environments influences the design of next-generation online learning.  
Keyword(s): Data mining, online learning
 
 
Invited Paper Session #12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Using Digital Technology With Learners With Special Needs: How Can We Decide What Works?

Sunday, November 10, 2013
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Karen L. Mahon, Ed.D.
Chair: Karen L. Mahon (Balefire Labs, Inc.)
KAREN L. MAHON (Balefire Labs, Inc.)
Karen Mahon is a learning scientist and educational psychologist whose expertise is in instructional design and behavior change programs. She is also an adviser to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. Dr. Mahon holds a B.A. from the University of California, San Diego, an M.A. and Ed.D. in educational psychology, with a graduate minor in the experimental analysis of behavior, from West Virginia University, and a Certificate in Product Management from the University of California at Berkeley. She has spent the past 15-plus years in education technology and instructional software. After graduate school, she was a research faculty member at the University of Kansas Parsons Research Center before moving to the private sector. For almost 10 years she wrote grants, funded by the National Institutes of Health, to support the design and development of educational software for the most difficult-to-teach kids, those with severe developmental disabilities. Following that, she spearheaded the global digital content strategy for a manufacturer of classroom technology hardware products, Mimio Interactive Teaching Technologies. Dr. Mahon is now the president and founder of Balefire Labs (www.balefirelabs.com), an online educational app review service that helps parents and teachers identify apps that provide the best instruction. Balefire Labs utilizes rigorous, research-based, instructional, and usability design criteria to review mobile apps for grades prekindergarten through 12.   
Abstract:

The explosion of education technology products holds great promise for learners with special needs. Modern technologies can teach learners with the greatest needs new skills, provide opportunities for practice, application, and problem solving, and allow collaboration with others in the classroom or across the globe. Teachers can see, in real time, what students have learned or still need to know. But with hundreds of thousands of possible solutions (there are more than 115,000 educational apps in iTunes alone), how do teachers and parents know what products are worth buying for their learners? This session will focus on one of the most popular education technology categories today—mobile educational apps. The most important features of apps for special needs learners will be discussed, along with how to identify the presence or absence of those features.

Target Audience:

Anyone who is interested in helping learners with special needs use digital technology.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants should be able to: -- Identify examples and nonexamples of apps that provide differentiated learner feedback following correct responses and errors. -- Identify examples and nonexamples of apps that provide screen and sound use that is relevant to the learning task. -- Identify examples and nonexamples of apps that provide adapting levels of difficulty.  
Keyword(s): Digital technology, special needs
 
 
Invited Paper Session #13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Interteaching: Applying Our Science and Using Data-Based Decisions in Teaching

Sunday, November 10, 2013
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Regency Ballroom D & E
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University)
Dr. Darlene Crone-Todd is an associate professor of psychology at Salem State University, and serves as the coordinator for the post-master’s certificate program in applied behavior analysis. She earned her Ph.D. in experimental behavior analysis at the University of Manitoba, Canada, and completed her post-doctoral work at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in behavioral pharmacology. Dr. Crone-Todd is the lead editor for the Behavior Analyst Today, the executive director for the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and serves as a board member and representative for experimental behavior analysis on the Massachusetts Association for Behavior Analysis. Her applied work in this area concerns using behavioral methods to increase higher-order thinking in higher education. She has published, and presented, on the use of the Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction (CAPSI), as well as on the use of Interteaching methods in the classroom. She is passionate about the area of applying behavioral principles to provide quality educational experiences, having been exposed to a variety of different educational settings in her early years.
Abstract:

Behavior analysis has contributed in a meaningful way to the development of higher-order thinking skills at all levels of education during the past decades. The use of small units of study, requiring that students prepare for lectures and discussions, monitoring student performance, and providing and responding to feedback, are all critical features of an approach called Interteaching. Developed by Boyce & Hineline, and expanded by Saville, this approach to teaching has been studied extensively during the past decade, and continues to gain traction as a method to promote student engagement, including pre-reading of the material and on-task class discussion. In this session, research on Interteaching will be reviewed, along with practical strategies for use in the classroom and ideas for research projects. The goal is to provide participants with practical strategies for use in various classroom settings, and to discuss how Interteaching might be adopted for online use.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, behavior analysts, practitioners, graduate students, and anyone interested in learning about Interteaching.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --Describe three features of interteaching, and at least one way it differs from other behavioral teaching methods. --Cite at least one empirical reason why interteaching produces better outcomes than simply just studying and preparing for class. --Describe how participants would use interteaching in their classrooms.
Keyword(s): Inter-Teaching
 
 
Invited Paper Session #14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Learning Strategies to Develop Problem Solving and Reasoning Skills

Sunday, November 10, 2013
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Joanne K. Robbins, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy)
Joanne Robbins is the principal of Morningside Academy in Seattle, WA, and a cofounder and executive director of PEER (Partnerships for Educational Excellence) International. She has more than 30 years of experience in program development, curriculum design, and teaching and supervision of programs for children and youth. Dr. Robbins' experience has been in both educational and mental health settings. She developed programs for prekindergarten through the college level. She is the author of Talk Aloud Problem Solving: A Script for Teachers, and co-author of Fluent Thinking Skills: A Generative Approach. She is currently co-chairperson of the Seattle Public Schools Superintendent's Positive Climate and Discipline Advisory Committee. Dr. Robbins completed her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago under the mentorship of Dr. Sue Markle, Dr. Phil Tiemann, and Dr. Herbert Walberg.
Abstract:

B. F. Skinner (1968) defined problem solving as a two-stage process, first is "the situation for which a response has not previously been reinforced," and the second as the process of solution, that is, "the behavior which brings about the change is the problem solving and the response to it is the solution." Stated otherwise, the behavior that solves the problem is absent and the problem solver must find a way to produce it. That process can, at times, be described as reasoning. Reasoning involves what Skinner called the inspection or reinforcement contingencies such that behavior can be described that meets contingency requirements without direct contingency shaping or rules (Robbins, 2011). Such a process involves those activities "where the speaker generates stimuli to supplement other behavior already in his repertoire" (Skinner, 1968). This session will have participants identify the problem to solve, ask the "right question," classify examples and nonexamples of the critical attributes of the performance of an expert reasoner and problem solver, and examine resources that lend themselves to peer tutoring or self-instructional repertoires required of classroom and everyday activities.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in teaching how to develop problem solving and reasoning skills.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: --Identify the repertoires of a successful problem solver. --Identify the repertories of a successful active listener. --Identify the conditions required to maintain strategy application.
Keyword(s): Problem solving, reasoning skills
 
 
Invited Paper Session #15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Data Collection: The Next Frontier

Sunday, November 10, 2013
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Regency Ballroom D & E
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Joshua K. Pritchard, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
JOSHUA K. PRITCHARD (Florida Institute of Technology), RYAN LEE O'DONNELL (Florida Institute of Technology)
Dr. Joshua K. Pritchard is an assistant professor in applied behavior analysis at the Florida Institute of Technology. He received bachelor's and master's degrees from the Florida Institute of Technology. He earned his Ph.D. in behavior analysis from the University of Nevada, Reno. His professional experience includes providing direct consultation services for wide range of ages and populations in behavior acceleration and deceleration. Dr. Pritchard has served as a consultant with state facilities under review by the Department of Justice, done international consultation on behavioral programs and practicum experience, and conducted remote supervision of international students desiring certification in behavior analysis. Dr. Pritchard's research focuses on utilizing IRAP and Q Sort to examine complex human behavior, discovering and creating less expensive alternatives to traditional animal laboratories, transferring behavioral principles into marketable goods to improve quality of life and environmental behavior, and global dissemination of behavior analysis.
Ryan O'Donnell is a recent graduate of Florida Institute of Technology's applied behavior analysis master's program. As manager for JKP aquatic operant lab, Mr. O'Donnell oversees its care and implementation of several basic animal research experiments. Before attending Florida Tech, he received his bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno. His major interests are precision teaching, philosophical positions of the science of behavior, dissemination of behavior analysis, successful applications of technology to increase the efficiency of behavior analysts, and large-scale practical applications of behavioral technology. Mr. O'Donnell's thesis investigated a computer-based procedure to teach children to engage in the relational skills necessary for perspective-taking. He works as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) at Lodestone Academy, where he oversees the implementation of behavioral assessment and treatment to children diagnosed with a variety of disabilities in a school setting. Mr. O'Donnell has a diversity of experience gained during the past four years conducting behavioral assessments to then develop, implement, and train staff on behavior analytic programming. He has worked across several populations, including children and adults with developmental disabilities in outpatient, residential, and school settings.
Abstract:

The ubiquity of handheld smart phones should be revolutionizing the data collection landscape of behavioral and educational professions. In fact, as platforms for user-developed applications grow, the creation of professional tools designed to increase efficiency and productivity in the workplace has exploded. Apps can increase efficiency from listing to-dos to typing reports. Fortunately, developers are beginning to create tools focused on the needs of a behavior analyst: data collection, delivery of instruction or therapy, and case management. Even with technologies that can greatly enhance the efficiency of these activities, a large proportion of analysts still are using tree- and graphite-based technologies. One potential problem with early adoption of smart-phone apps is that analysts have experienced effects opposite of those that were promised: They resulted in inefficiencies for the professional. Once bitten, twice shy--these professionals then become hesitant to abandon practices and tools which already work for those which may not. The purpose of this breakout is to kindle the appetite of its audience, provide a menu of the various options currently available, and break down the overwhelming and complex environment of smart-phone apps into accessible, bite-sized content.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in learning more about apps for behavior analysis data collection.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, participants will be able to: --Describe the benefits of using applications to increase efficiency in data collection. --Identify which applications fit which contexts best. -- Use the decision-tree, given a scenario, to determine an appropriate application to use. --Identify one to three applications germane to their practice.
Keyword(s): apps, Data collection
 
 
Invited Paper Session #16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Instructional Design with Adobe Captivate

Sunday, November 10, 2013
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Regency Ballroom D & E
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Erick M. Dubuque, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
ERICK M. DUBUQUE (Spalding University)
Erick Dubuque is a Licensed Behavior Analyst (LBA), Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral (BCBA-D), and assistant professor in Spalding University's Applied Behavior Analysis Program. Dr. Dubuque is a former U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer (Kenya) and is the president and owner of Behavior Science.org, LLC, an organization dedicated to the dissemination and advancement of the science of behavior. As an active member of the behavior analytic community, Dr. Dubuque has served as the student representative to the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and chair of the Undergraduate Accreditation Committee. He is past academic coordinator for the Jordan University Science and Technology Master's Degree Program in Applied Behavior Health Analysis, the first graduate degree program in behavior analysis founded in the Middle East. Dr. Dubuque's scholarly interests extend across the philosophical, experimental, applied, and professional domains in behavior science. A general theme across all of his interests is the understanding of technology and complex human behaviors, especially as they relate to the topics of education and social justice.
Abstract:

Teachers have been using machines to facilitate instruction for almost 100 years (Benjamin, 1988). Many of the same principles of learning used by these early machines continue to form the foundation for modern e-learning software. The objective of this breakout session is for participants to discuss how e-learning software programs like Adobe® Captivate®, Articulate®, and Lectora® can be used to design lessons that capitalize on effective instructional techniques such as active responding, mastery, scripting, branching scenarios, and individualized feedback. During the session, participants will learn how to quickly create their own content using the award-winning Adobe® Captivate® 6 e-learning software. By the time participants leave the session they should have a better understanding of some of the pitfalls and benefits of incorporating e-learning software into their courses.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in learning how e-learning software programs can be used to design lessons.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: --Identify proven instructional techniques based on the principles of behavior. --Describe how e-learning software can be used to implement effective instructional techniques.
--Describe the basic steps necessary to create and publish a project in Adobe Captivate.
Keyword(s): Instructional design, Software programs
 
 
Invited Paper Session #17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

How to Avoid Using Spurious Reinforcers, The Importance of Program-Intrinsic Consequences When Building Learning Environments

Sunday, November 10, 2013
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A & B
Area: EDC; Domain: Conceptual/Theoretical
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: T. V. (Joe) Layng, Ph.D.
Chair: Janet S. Twyman (UMass Medical School)
T. V. (JOE) LAYNG (Generategy)
T. V. (Joe) Layng received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he was a student of Israel Goldiamond. Dr. Layng is the co-founder of Headsprout and was its senior scientist. At Headsprout, Dr. Layng and his colleagues designed, tested, and implemented highly successful Early Reading and Reading Comprehension programs, which are based on behavior analytic instructional technology. They also produced a comprehensive interactive whiteboard science curriculum for grades 3–8. He currently is a partner in Generategy, an interactive technologies company that provides educational software based on principles of generative instruction. Through Generategy, Dr. Layng and his colleagues have recently launched Music Learning Lab for iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch that teaches children music fundamentals. These programs have greatly expanded behavioral technology and have directly benefited countless children. Dr. Layng has published more than 30 articles describing, documenting, and analyzing these instructional programs, and has given more than 50 invited presentations of his work in this area both in the U.S. and abroad. He has four patents that reflect his work related to educational applications of behavior analysis. Dr. Layng has held a number of positions in schools, universities, and other public institutions related to instructional design, educational technology, large-scale performance improvement, and clinical behavior analysis. His work also has been well received outside behavior analysis, as exemplified the receipt in 2010 of the CODiE Award for best “online instructional solution” from the Software Industry and Information Association for the Reading Comprehension program, and two different public service awards from the city of Chicago. He also serves on the boards of a number of organizations dedicated to advancing both education and behavior analysis, including the Chicago School of Professional Psychology and Pacific Oaks College. Dr. Layng is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and his far-reaching work applying behavior analysis in education and other areas brings positive visibility to our discipline as a whole.
Abstract:

One of the more prominent features of what is often called “gamification” is that certain behaviors, such as correctly solving a problem, are followed by points, medallions, or awards made contingent on the behavior. But what makes the points or medallions valuable? Is solving the problem really important to the individual? And herein lies the one of the great dilemmas of gamification. The points, awards, etc. are often assumed to be reinforcing in and of themselves. Or, perhaps they are linked to prizes or to avoiding penalties. But are these really meaningful to the person? And if they are, do they derive their meaning from outside the activity being reinforced? Such consequences have been described by Skinner as “spurious,” and by Goldiamond as “program-extrinsic.” The identification and programming of “program-intrinsic,” activity-specific consequences, as contrasted with program-extrinsic, spurious consequences, will be the focus of the breakout. This session will allow participants to design those practices that help learners find the fun in math (and other topics), rather than design practices that simply make math fun.

Target Audience:

Anyone interested in gaming and reinforcement.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to:

--Define "program."

--Distinguish between program intrinsic and program extrinsic consequences.

--State how potentiating program intrinsic consequences differ from potentiating program extrinsic consequences.

--Describe under what conditions knowledge of correct responding can act as a reinforcer.

Keyword(s): Gaming, program-intrinsic , reinforcement
 

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