Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis InternationalĀ® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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32nd Annual Convention; Atlanta, GA; 2006

Program by Special Events: Monday, May 29, 2006


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Special Event #272
ABA Business Meeting
Monday, May 29, 2006
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Montreal
Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Frances K. McSweeney (Washington State University)
Panelists: KEITH D. ALLEN (Professional Affairs Board Coordinator), THOMAS S. CRITCHFIELD (Program Board Coordinator), RAMONA HOUMANFAR (Senior Program Co-Chair), R. DOUGLAS GREER (Affiliated Chapters Board Coordinator), MARIA E. MALOTT (Executive Director/Secretary Treasurer), PAMELA G. OSNES (Education Board Coordinator), CAROL PILGRIM (Publications Board Coordinator), KATHRYN SAUNDERS (Science Policy and Research Board Coordinator), RACHEL S. F. TARBOX (Membership Board Coordinator)
Abstract:

ABA Business Meeting

KEITH D. ALLEN (Professional Affairs Board Coordinator)
THOMAS S. CRITCHFIELD (Program Board Coordinator)
RAMONA HOUMANFAR (Senior Program Co-Chair)
R. DOUGLAS GREER (Affiliated Chapters Board Coordinator)
MARIA E. MALOTT (Executive Director/Secretary Treasurer)
PAMELA G. OSNES (Education Board Coordinator)
CAROL PILGRIM (Publications Board Coordinator)
KATHRYN SAUNDERS (Science Policy and Research Board Coordinator)
RACHEL S. F. TARBOX (Membership Board Coordinator)
 
 
Special Event #303
CE Offered: BACB
2006 ABA Tutorial: Professional Development Series: Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Monday, May 29, 2006
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Centennial Ballroom II
Area: CBM
Chair: Marianne L. Jackson (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
 

2006 ABA Tutorial: Professional Development Series: Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Abstract:

Behavior analysis has had a hard time penetrating the mainstream of psychology since the rise of cognitive psychology. The two primary barriers underlying this problem are a lack of clarity and understanding of the philosophical core of radical behaviorism, and the need for a comprehensive and experimentally adequate account of language and cognition. The first is primarily a terminological problem that is rectified by functional contextualism; the second is an empirical and theoretical problem that is rectified by Relational Frame Theory. With these two barriers removed, there is nothing to prevent behavior analysis from capturing center stage in many areas of psychology, but the form of behavior analysis results is decidedly post-Skinnerian -- that is, true to the Skinnerian tradition philosophically and empirically, but distinct in its approach to complex human behavior as a consequence of empirical developments. The empirical and political success of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is offered as a concrete demonstration of the success of this strategy. Other possible extensions are briefly explored.

 
STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
 
Dr. Steven C. Hayes is Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of twenty five books and 340 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition from a behavior analytic point of view and the application of this to the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. In 1992 he was listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as the 30th "highest impact" psychologist in the world during 1986-1990 based on the citation impact of his writings during that period. Dr. Hayes has been President of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association, of the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology and of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy. He was the first Secretary-Treasurer of the American Psychological Society, which he helped form. He has received the Don F. Hake Award for Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association and was appointed by US Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala to a 5-year term on the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse in the National Institutes of Health.
 
 
 
Special Event #393
CE Offered: BACB
Presidential Address: Aversively Motivated
Monday, May 29, 2006
4:30 PM–5:20 PM
Centennial Ballroom I & II
Chair: Frances K. McSweeney (Washington State University)
CE Instructor: Thomas S. Critchfield, Ph.D.
 

Presidential Address: Aversively Motivated

Abstract:

Behavior analysis once supported a rich tradition of studying aversive control, that is, behavior change through punishment or negative reinforcement. A variety of factors have shifted our contemporary emphasis -- almost exclusively -- to the study of positive reinforcement. This status quo is most easily justified for service delivery (especially with vulnerable populations) in which we are concerned about excessive reliance on aversive control and the side effects that this can cause. I will argue, however, that our collective disregard for the study of aversive control has left us in an untenable position, both scientifically and practically. Where science is concerned, the past three decades have seen important advances in the understanding of positive reinforcement for which no parallel insights exist regarding aversive control. Moreover, scientists outside of our field have revealed robust aversive-specific phenomena that behavior analysts have largely ignored. Our silence about these effects allows them to be explained within, or even seen as evidence for, nonbehavioristic theoretical frameworks. Where practice is concerned, a lack of new behavior analytic data on aversive control may suggest that we have nothing to say on the topic. As a consequence, perhaps, policy makers and others seeking consensus on issues like corporal punishment may not consult our field for guidance. Moreover, because aversive control is ubiquitous in the everyday world, it is difficult to see how a thorough analysis of socially important behavior can proceed without a proper understanding of aversive control. For instance, emerging notions about aversive control may generate counterintuitive treatment predictions that cannot be reached by thinking about positive reinforcement alone. In summary, the world out there encompasses, and is fascinated by, aversive control, and we should be motivated to reanimate our tradition of studying it.

 
THOMAS S. CRITCHFIELD (Illinois State University)
 
Dr. Thomas S. Critchfield graduated from West Virginia University, where he received his M.A. (1984, under the direction of Dr. Ernest Vargas) and his Ph.D. (1989, under the direction of Dr. Michael Perone). At Auburn University, he coordinated the doctoral program in Experimental Analysis of Behavior and served as Undergraduate Program Coordinator. He currently is Professor of Psychology at Illinois State University. Dr. Critchfield completed terms on the ABA Executive Council as Student Representative (1986-1989) and Experimental Representative (2002-2005), and has held positions with the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, with Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, and on the editorial boards of a number of behavior analysis journals. His scholarly interests focus on basic operant processes, on verbal behavior, and on scientific translation within behavior analysis.
 
 
 
Special Event #412
ABA Social
Monday, May 29, 2006
10:00 PM–1:00 AM
Centennial Ballroom I & II

Please join us, your friends, and colleagues in the field for music and dancing at the ABA Social. Live music early on and a disc jockey later in the evening will be on hand to play a wide variety of tunes for all ages. A cash bar will also be available.

 

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