Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

CE by Type: QABA


 

Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/QABA/NASP
The Intersection of Autism Intervention and Applied Positive Psychology: The Science and Skill of Flourishing
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Katie Curran, M.D.
KATIE CURRAN (Proof Positive Psychology)
Description: Positive Psychology is the scientific study of human strengths and virtues that enable us to thrive. Simply put, the study of who we are at our best and how to get more of it. Positive Psychology was founded by Dr. Martin Seligman at The University of Pennsylvania nearly 30 years ago. Since that time, researchers at universities around the globe have developed a substantial body of work that instructs us on how best to apply the science of wellbeing to enhance our lives. In this workshop, participants will learn the science and skills that lead to the development of The PERMA (Positive Emotions, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment) Theory of Wellbeing which posits that there are 5 elements critical to human thriving. Within each element of PERMA, there are practical strategies and skills that can be learned and applied. Participants will hear a case study of what is possible when you consider the elements of PERMA in autism intervention and will leave with immediately applicable strategies to increase wellbeing, develop resilience, and drive performance in themselves and those they serve. Participants will also receive a list of resources directing them to books, peer-reviewed journal articles, and websites where they can learn more about Positive Psychology.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical context of Positive Psychology and its potential impact on autism intervention currently. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of The PERMA Theory of Wellbeing and be able to design data collection strategies to measure the elements of PERMA to program for wellbeing. 3. Apply at least 3 evidence-based positive interventions in their own lives to enhance their wellbeing. 4. Explain at least 3 evidence-based positive interventions to someone else in order to train their teams, staff, or clients.
Activities: The workshop will be highly interactive utilizing as much time as possible for guided practices and group discussions. Information will be presented using a balance of lecture, video, and skill demonstrations.
Audience: Participants should have significant experience designing programs and data collection systems for individuals and/or organizations. They ought to have demonstrated experience training others to implement programs and systems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Happiness, Positive Interventions, Professional Development, Wellbeing
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Severe Problem Behavior: From Research to Evidence-Based Practice
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Queens College, City University of New York), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: Severe problem behavior is a debilitating and chronic repertoire that can significantly impact an individual’s quality of life. Although a multitude of different behavioral interventions have been developed to reduce problem behavior, there is rarely a comprehensive demonstration of a successful program from beginning (intake of client) to end (reintegration into classroom and home) of clinical services. In this workshop we will start with an introduction to a practical functional assessment and skill-based treatment model. We will describe the research that has led to the development of the model and how it has been applied to school, home, and outpatient settings. In addition, we will provide a guide to conducting the practical functional assessment and how to use those results to build caregiver-informed communication skills, tolerance skills, and cooperation skills. Considering that the goal of the entire assessment and treatment process is to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires of individuals who exhibit problem behavior, we will spend the second half of the workshop describing how to maintain treatment effects once the individual is returned to the home or school environment by training staff members and caregivers and programming for generalization of outcomes.
Learning Objectives: Participants will describe evidence-based approaches to 1. conducting a safe and practical functional assessment of problem behavior 2. teaching function-based skills to replace problem behavior 3. training caregivers using behavior skills training 4. programming generalization of caregiver training 5. managing restraint and restrictive behavior management practices 6. managing treatment integrity and relapse.
Activities: The workshop will include lectures, case presentations, and problem solving exercises.
Audience: Participants should have an understanding of common behavioral concepts as described in Cooper et al. (2020) and some experience and basic knowledge of ABA applied to severe problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Caregiver Training, Functional Analysis, Problem Behavior
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Providing Internet-Based Consultation Services to Teach Parents of Children With Autism to Effectively Assess Skills and Implement Evidence-Based Teaching Interventions
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to help consultants to remotely provide effective assessment, program development, and consultation services. This workshop will focus on the many factors that must be considered both when initiating and conducting internet-based consultation including: clearly establishing the expectations and roles of both the parent and the consultant, determining the parents’ knowledge of critical distinctions in the various types of language skills, their motivation and ability to participate in and follow through with specific teaching activities. In order to obtain and maintain the parents’ active participation, it is necessary to select the initial teaching activities that will help the parent quickly develop instructional control. Once the parents have obtained reinforcement from the observing the child’s performance, parents are more likely to maintain their motivation participation to extend the child’s existing skills, and develop new skills and repertoires. Therefore, consultants need to know and be able to teach parents about the peer-reviewed research involving patterns of typical child development so as to determine appropriate learning objectives that will allow the child to more readily learn from their everyday interactions with others (Partington, Bailey & Partington, 2018).
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. state four strategies that will increase successful parent participation in teaching skills to their child when provided with internet-based consultation services; 2. state steps to ensure that parents establish instructional control during their initial teaching interactions with their child; 3. state the steps to effectively teach parents how to teach skills to their child; 4. compare the existing skill levels of a child with an autism spectrum disorder to the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children; 5. state at least two strategies to maintain a parent’s motivation to teach when provided with remote consultation services; 6. state internet-based resources that are available to parents and consultants to facilitate the documentation of skill development and increase data-based communications when delivering remote consultation services.
Activities: Instructional activities will mainly be in a lecture and demonstration format due to the workshop being conducted remotely. However, extensive efforts will be made to have interaction with the participants through frequent question and answer periods.
Audience: Participants should be BACB level consultants who have obtained training in criterion-referenced assessments and have had direct experience implementing educational programs with children with autism or other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Curriculum planning, Parent training, Skills assessment, Telehealth
 
Invited Paper Session #25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Systemic Behavior Analysis: A Therapeutic Approach for Optimizing Best Practices for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Families
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: PRA
Chair: Paula Ribeiro Braga-Kenyon (Kadiant)
CE Instructor: Angeliki Gena, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Abstract:

This presentation will address the question of effective practices for the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, from both an epistemological and a therapeutic perspective, and suggest the importance of a synthesis of two paradigms—behavior analysis and general systems theory—as a means of optimizing our assessment of the needs and the services provided to people with disabilities. Despite the development and the use of a wide array of behavior analytic practices that help all children with ASD to reach their full potential, a question that remains under-researched has to do with the effort expected from the child and his/her family and whether this effort can be somehow lessened without compromising the benefits. The answer to that question led to investigating the properties of another epistemological paradigm—general systems theory—its merits, its compatibility, and its complementarity to the discipline of behavior analysis. This presentation aims to demonstrate that the two paradigms are compatible and complementary and that their combination may lead to optimizing the therapeutic and pedagogical outcomes of behavior analytic practices. If we are to adapt a systemic perspective, according to which the joining of two or more systems leads to an outcome that exceeds by far the additive effects of those systems, it will be interesting to assess the potential emergent benefits of the synthesis of two compatible and complementary epistemological paradigms and how those translate into therapeutic outcomes.

Target Audience:

Researchers and therapists in the field of autism spectrum disorder.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation the participants will be able to: (1) utilize the main principles of Systemic Behavior Analysis to evaluate a treatment program for people with ASD; (2) assess whether the breath of a Systemic Behavior Analytic treatment program is feasible and appropriate for the population of people with ASD of his/her interest; (3) plan for changes in the development of a behavior analytic intervention that incorporate systemic elements.
 
ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Angeliki Gena is Professor at the School of Philosophy, Department of Philosopsy-Pedagogy-Psychology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece (EKPA). She received her BA in Psychology and Sociology, her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology and her Ph.D. from the “Learning Processes” program of the Psychology Department of the City University of New York. She conducted her Doctoral Dissertation at the Princeton Child Development Institute, in Princeton, New Jersey. She worked in various institutes in the USA and became the director of the Alpine Learning Group, a prominent center for children with autism in Alpine, New Jersey. She also taught as an adjunct professor at the City University of New York. In Greece she started her teaching career at the University of Thessaly, was elected at the University of the Aegean, and since 1998 teaches at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Her research is predominantly in the area of Behavior Analysis and its applications for early intervention in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Was general secretary of the Association of Behavioral Research for 11 years, is an associate of the Institute of Behavioral Research and Therapy, and a founding member and current president of the Institute of Systemic Behavior Analysis. She has served as an elected member of the Senate of EKPA, since 2016 she is a member of the board of trustees of IKY – National Organization of Scholarships, Greece – has been appointed to national committees of the Greek Ministry of Education, and has served on the board of various non-for-profit organizations. She has received several scholarships and awards for distinguished research and clinical practices addressing children with autism and grands from the European Commission and various Greek organizations. She has published numerous books, empirical and theoretical articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as book chapters. The main focus of her research is in systemic behavior analysis and its applications for children with ASD and their families.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
SQAB Tutorial: Using Quantitative Theories of Relapse to Improve Functional Communication Training
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Brian Greer, Ph.D.
Chair: Timothy A. Shahan (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: BRIAN GREER (Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Abstract:

Functional communication training (FCT) has strong empirical support for its use when treating socially reinforced problem behavior. However, treatment effects often deteriorate when FCT procedures are challenged, leading to the recurrence of problem behavior, decreased use of the functional communication response, or both. Recent prevalence estimates suggest that treatment relapse is common in the clinic. Researchers have accordingly described a number of strategies for improving the long-term effectiveness of differential-reinforcement-based procedures (e.g., FCT), and quantitative theories of relapse (i.e., Behavioral Momentum Theory, Resurgence as Choice) provide falsifiable predications regarding modifications for mitigating treatment relapse. In this presentation, I share recent research on the prevalence of treatment relapse during routine, clinical service delivery and discuss our work on applying quantitative models of relapse to improve treatment durability. Future steps for advancing promising relapse-mitigations strategies will also be discussed, as will clinical considerations that limit the practicality of otherwise effective mitigation procedures.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, applied and basic researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain FCT and describe its efficacy; (2) describe at least one common challenge to FCT treatment effects; (3) describe at least two specific strategies for mitigating relapse of problem behavior following FCT.
 
BRIAN GREER (Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Brian D. Greer is the founding director of the Severe Behavior Program within the Rutgers University Center for Autism Research, Education, and Services. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and a core member of the Brain Health Institute. He received a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of Florida in 2008, a Master of Arts in applied behavioral science in 2011 and a Ph.D. in behavioral psychology in 2013, both from the University of Kansas. He later completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He has served on the board of editors and as a guest associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is the 2013 recipient of the Baer, Wolf, and Risley Outstanding Graduate Student Award and the 2019 recipient of the B. F. Skinner Foundation New Researcher Award in the area of applied research. Dr. Greer is the Executive Director of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and he currently supervises three R01 grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development on preventing relapse of destructive behavior using Behavioral Momentum Theory and Resurgence as Choice. He has helped to acquire and carry out over $10 million in federal grant funding.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
SQAB Tutorial: How Advanced Computer Technology can Advance Research and Practice in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Ellie Kazemi, Ph.D.
Chair: David Roth (B. F. Skinner Foundation; Tuscarora Intermediate Unit 11 (TIU-11) )
Presenting Author: ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

The rapid growth in computer technology means that nearly anything imaginable is either possible or will soon become possible. Behavior analysts, as specialists in learning and behavior, are uniquely trained to become strong collaborators on multidisciplinary teams focusing on projects to advance machine learning, simulation-based experiences, and much more. In this tutorial, I will discuss how we currently leverage such technology in my lab and integrate robotics, virtual reality (VR), and artificial intelligence (AI) in our behavior analytic research. I will share the outcomes of some of our current research projects as well as my collaborative efforts on the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) grants.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how advanced computer-technology can be utilized in experimental analysis of human behavior; (2) discuss how computer-technology can be utilized to increase accessibility and efficiency of behavior skills training through simulation-based trainings; (3) explain how integration of computer-technology in behavior analytic research and practice can help extend the reach of behavior analysis.
 
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Dr. Kazemi is a Professor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis for the past 10 years. She founded the Masters of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. She currently has two different lines of research. Her applied research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. Her laboratory research involves leveraging technology (e.g., robotics, virtual or augmented reality) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She is currently working on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award. She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.
 
 
Symposium #75
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Recent Developments in Applying Behavioral Skills Training in Contemporary Services
Saturday, May 29, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Sarah Davis (Brock University)
CE Instructor: Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar, Ph.D.
Abstract: Today, training staff and family members takes place in many different service contexts outside of the university-based laboratory or demonstration project. Although Behavioral Skills Training is a well established evidence-based practice for caregivers in autism and developmental disabilities services, we still need more demonstrations from the field of applications and related issues. This symposium will illustrate those issues with three empirical papers. The first illustrates the application of telehealth. The second addresses organizational issues in ABA organizations. The second addresses large-scale application of behavioral skills training over several years.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Caregiver training, Staff turnover, Telehealth
Target Audience: Audience members should have basic graduate level skills and knowledge in behavior analysis, such as knowledge of staff training methods, evidence-based practices, basic teaching strategies and behavior analytic concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the use of telehealth methods to train parents to teach adaptive behavior skills to older children and adolescents with autism; (2) Describe factors, including independent variables that could be manipulated to influence staff turn over; and (3) Describe the strategies used to implement large scale application of behavioral skills training over extended periods of time.
 

Parent-Implemented Behavior Interventions via Telehealth for Older Children and Adolescents

(Applied Research)
CHRISTINE DREW (Auburn University), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
Abstract:

This study used independent ABAB withdrawal designs to determine whether BPT increased parent fidelity of implementation of function-based intervention which then resulted in decreasing rates of child challenging behavior while increasing rates of appropriate replacement behavior. Four participants aged 8-17 were included in the study with their parents serving as interventionists. The routines of concern were mealtime, toothbrushing, and room cleaning with various topographies of challenging behavior impacting the quality of these family routines. Each parent achieved high treatment fidelity with one session of BPT and bug-in-ear coaching. Three participants had an immediate decrease in challenging behavior upon the introduction of the intervention. Three participants showed reliable reversals to their challenging behavior with the withdrawal of the intervention and corresponding decreases in challenging behavior when the intervention was reintroduced. All parents reported high acceptability, ease of use, and contextual fit pre- and post-intervention. Results and implications for practice and future research were discussed.

 

An Examination of Variables That Predict Turnover, Staff and Caregiver Satisfaction in Behavior-Analytic Organizations

(Applied Research)
DANIEL J CYMBAL (Florida Tech), Sara Gershfeld Litvak (Behavioral Health Center of Excellence), David A. Wilder (Florida Institute of Technology), Gary Burns (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Staff turnover can pose a significant problem for human service organizations. For Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) service providers, turnover may be particularly problematic due to the resources required for training. Accreditation organizations such as the Behavioral Health Center for Excellence® (BHCOE®) collect large amounts of organizational data that can point to trends in ABA organizations and provide a basis for problem identification and intervention. In this study, we evaluated BHCOE® data to examine potential predictors of staff turnover as well as staff and caregiver satisfaction in ABA organizations. Results of multiple regression analyses suggest that high rates of turnover among job classes (i.e., technicians and supervisors) correlate with each other’s turnover. Behavior Technicians are also more likely to turnover when wages are lower and caregiver satisfaction wanes. Staff satisfaction was not a significant turnover predictor but was generally predicted by caregiver satisfaction. These findings suggest that turnover and satisfaction are multi-faceted processes worthy of examination; we provide broad recommendations for improvement and avenues for further study.

 
Pyramidal Behavioral Skills Training, Productivity Monitoring, Goal Setting, Feedback and Teacher Incentives Across Three Schools: Six Years of Data
(Service Delivery)
LINDSAY MAFFEI-ALMODOVAR (Quality Services for the Autism Community (QSAC)), Cynthia E. Martinez (Quality Services for the Autism Community), Lillian Rothmaler (QSAC), Peter Sturmey (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Abstract: Adequate training productivity is an important goal for schools serving students with autism due to frequent staff turnover and a need for newly hired staff to implement behavior analytic protocols correctly soon after being hired. The presenting author monitored the weekly and cumulative number of behavior analytic skills trained to staff by clinical coordinators and classroom teachers across three schools over six years. Weekly permanent product counts before and after the implementation of pyramidal behavioral skills training, public posting, goal setting and feedback, and teacher incentives indicated that these practices may have contributed to an increased proportion of weekly training completed by teachers over time and increased overall training productivity from year to year. Variables including staff and trainer turnover, staffing additions and shortages, differing numbers of students and behavioral support needs in classrooms, and new or different job responsibilities assigned to clinical coordinators or teachers made training productivity an important aspect of service delivery to monitor, but also interfered with isolating responsible factors when increased productivity occurred.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #107
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
SQAB Tutorial: Back to the Lab: Human Behavioral Pharmacology Methods, Outcomes and Meanings
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
BACB/PSY/QABA CE Offered. CE Instructor: William Stoops, Ph.D.
Chair: Derek D. Reed (University of Kansas)
Presenting Author: WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Abstract:

Human behavioral pharmacology methods have been used to rigorously evaluate the effects of a range of centrally acting drugs in human beings under controlled conditions. Methods like drug self-administration and drug-discrimination have been adapted from non-human laboratory animal models. Because humans have the capacity to communicate verbally, self-report methods are also commonly used to understand drug effects. This presentation will provide an overview of these traditional human behavioral pharmacology methods, as well as more novel measures that have been introduced to the field. Representative data will be shared and the benefits, challenges and translational relevance of each method will be discussed. This session will cover guiding principles in the design of human behavioral pharmacology studies (e.g., using placebo controls, testing multiple doses) along with ethical (e.g., avoiding enrollment of individuals seeking treatment, determining capacity to consent) and safety (e.g., dose selection, pre-screening of participants for exclusionary health problems) that must be addressed when conducting these types of studies.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand basic methods used in human behavioral pharmacology research; (2) know how ethical and safety issues are addressed in human behavioral pharmacology studies; (3) appreciate the clinical relevance of human behavioral pharmacology findings.
 
WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Dr. William W. Stoops, a Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Science, Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Kentucky, earned his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Davidson College in Davidson, NC and his Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky. His research evaluates the behavioral and pharmacological factors that contribute to drug use disorders, focusing primarily on stimulant drugs. Dr. Stoops’ research contributions resulted in receipt of the 2016 Psychologist of the Year Award from the Kentucky Psychological Association, the 2013 Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and the 2008 Wyeth Young Psychopharmacologist Award from Division 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse) of the American Psychological Association (APA). Dr. Stoops currently serves on the College on Problems of Drug Dependence Board of Directors and is Editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #111
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Bidirectional Naming and Problem Solving
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: VRB
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
CE Instructor: Caio Miguel, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CAIO MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

We often solve problems by engaging in mediating strategies such as talking to ourselves. In order to accurately use and respond to these strategies, we must understand what we are saying. The term bidirectional naming (BiN) has been used to describe the integration of both listener and speaker behaviors that leads to speaking with understanding. In this talk, I will describe a series of studies showing that in the absence of either speaker or listener behaviors, participants often fail to solve problems in the form of matching-to-sample and categorization tasks. These results suggest that to solve complex tasks participants must be verbal. Thus, I will propose that the BiN repertoire is one of the most important skills learned during language development and must be prioritized in early intensive behavioral intervention.

Target Audience:

Basic and applied researchers, clinicians.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) distinguish between tasting and naming; (2) explain how bidirectional naming is developed through typical child-caregiver interaction; (3) discuss how derived stimulus relations research conducted with adults may be influenced by BiN.
 
CAIO MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Dr. Caio Miguel is a professor of psychology and director of the Verbal Behavior Research Laboratory at California State University, Sacramento. He holds adjunct appointments at Endicott College, MA., and at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. He is the past-editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and past-Associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis Dr. Miguel's research focuses on the study of verbal and verbally-mediated behaviors. He has given hundreds of professional presentations in North America, South America and Europe, and has had over 70 manuscripts published in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. He is the recipient of the 2013-2014 award for outstanding scholarly work by the College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies at Sacramento State, the 2014 Outstanding Mentor Award by the Student Committee of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), the 2019 Award for Excellence in Teaching Verbal Behavior from the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group of ABAI, and the 2019 Alumni Achievement Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University.
 
 
Panel #153
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
The Ethical Considerations of Assent in the Development of Instructional Motivation
Saturday, May 29, 2021
6:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
Chair: Megan Miller (The Do Better Collective)
MEGAN MILLER (The Do Better Collective)
EMILY WILSON (Blossom Behavioral Services)
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Robert Schramm Consulting Knospe-ABA Meridian Rehab)
Abstract:

Behavior analytic intervention programs frequently include the use of forced prompting to earn compliance with demands and reduce escape maintained challenging behavior. This approach is "effective" but raises ethical concerns relating to providing the least restrictive and most humane intervention that maintains the assent of the learner throughout the learning process. The purpose of this panel is to explore ethical considerations regarding the use of forced prompting and other extinction procedures by drawing from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's Ethical and Professional Compliance Code (2014), Van Houten et al. (1988), and Pritchett et al. (2020). Each panelist will explore how which aspects of the 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control addresses these ethical considerations and share what modifications they have made to their own practices to ensure they are maintaining assent with learners in delivering behavior analytic services and developing a strong teaching relationship focused on instructional motivation.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The target audience for this presentation are individuals who have implemented extinction procedures and address challenging behavior in their day to day practice when teaching in a school, clinic, or home.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Identify at least 1 benefit to using advancements in functional analysis technologies 2. Explain at least 1 ethical consideration regarding extinction 3. Describe the importance of maintaining analysis in developing behavior intervention plans 4. Describe at least 1 general guideline to follow when addressing challenging behavior 5. Describe the importance of maintaining learner assent during the intervention process
Keyword(s): assent, extinction alternatives, instructional control, instructional motivation
 
 
Panel #157
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission Bridging the Gap: The Establishment of Behavior Analysis Professional Associations Across Latin America
Saturday, May 29, 2021
6:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Estefania Carla Alarcon Moya, M.A.
Chair: Amanda Bueno dos Santos (CEDIN)
ESTEFANIA CARLA ALARCON MOYA (Florida Institute of Technology; CeABA Chile)
CAROLA SCOLARI (Casita ABA)
GRICEL PEZZOTTI (ABA DOMINICANA)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is an emergent field in Latin America (LATAM). The popularity of ABA evidence-based practices led to rapid growth in demand, rising faster than services could be supplied. The quality of services available is a concern. Furthermore, the absence of local regulations (both legal and ethical) to practice ABA is a common detriment that all countries in LATAM share. Until recently, most efforts to create support systems for the education of new qualified ABA practitioners were mostly linked to the BACB certification. Nevertheless, the discontinuation of the international scope of the credential posed a challenge for the region, opening the opportunity for several countries to discuss and reflect on how to bridge the gap. In the present discussion, panelists will share their experiences on how they have been actively collaborating in the creation of local task forces. They will also discuss the process by which they have established a consensus on the competencies and ethical standards representing their communities. Additionally, panelists will discuss the diversity of challenges across the region and outline potential solutions to support other countries with fewer resources to advance in the development of local ABA practice standards.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Basic
Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the challenges to regulate practice in Latin American Countries 2) Outline solutions to overcome the main challenges Latin American Countries face in the development of their own regulatory bodies. 3) List actions to create collaborative forces in the design of standards representative of Latin American countries
Keyword(s): Dissemination, Latin America, Practice Standards, Professional Associations
 
 
Panel #186
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Unchartered Territories for Behavior Analysts: New Frontiers for the Science We Love (A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Contributor Series)
Sunday, May 30, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Liliane Rocha, DBH
Chair: Robyn M. Catagnus (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
MARGARET UWAYO (Michigan State University; By Your Side Autism Services)
KOZUE MATSUDA (Children Center Inc)
LILIANE ROCHA (The Behavior Web, LLC)
Abstract:

If we truly intend to improve and impact the world with behavior analysis, it is imperative for researchers and clinicians alike to embark on new areas in which the field of behavior analysis has the ability to address cultural injustices that limit marginalized populations, women, and black, indigenous people of colour (BIPOC). Our field has the ability to inform and create change that will have collateral impacts on society to combat systemic barriers that limit those without societal privilege. An overview will be conducted of current societal norms with respect to racism, healthcare, and economic inequalities and ways in which behaviour analysis can analyze contingencies to improve access and opportunities for marginalized populations. Behaviour analytic interventions centred around processes highlighting how to deconstruct racism, remediate the healthcare system using behavioral economics, and income inequality will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Advanced. BCBAs and BCBA-Ds. Discuss how we can effectively implement behavior change at any larger scale, such as community wide… Our field has struggled to apply change initiatives beyond small groups and individuals.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) create change that will have collateral impacts on society to combat systemic barriers that limit those without societal privilege; (2) dissect current societal norms with respect to racism, healthcare, and economic inequalities and ways in which behaviour analysis can analyze contingencies to improve access and opportunities for marginalized population; (3) identifying cultural injustices in one's own environment and how to address injustices ethically and within one's competence
Keyword(s): behavioural economics, health care, income inequality, racism
 
 
Panel #191
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Changing Workplace Culture: Making the Workplace Inclusive for All (A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Contributor Series)
Sunday, May 30, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/CSS; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Kate Elizabeth Harrison, M.Ed.
Chair: Kate Elizabeth Harrison (Brett DiNovi & Associates, BCBA)
NATALI WACHTMAN PERILO (Behavior Momentum Group)
JANANI VAIDYA (Louisiana Contextual Science Research Group)
STEPHANIE D BOLDEN (Student / RBT)
Abstract:

Our Ethics Code guides us to promote an ethical culture in work environments (7.01) and to not engage in discriminatory practices (1.05d). As behavior analysts we have the capacity to promote better work environments for marginalized groups that face discrimination because of their sexual orientation, gender discrimination, or skin colour. Factors that are known to be impacted include: recruitment and retention, participation numbers and representation of women and black, indigenous people of colour (BIPOC) in management positions, compensation for equal work and equal pay, microaggressions, and organizational policies and hiring practices that tend to favor biases towards white cis-gendered men (Cirincione-Ulezi, 2020; Iwata & Lent, 1984; Johns, 2013; Li et al., 2019; and Odum, 2000). Behaviour analytic interventions centred around processes highlighting equality, aligning organizational values amongst employees, as well as diversity appreciation will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Supervisors and business owners

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Ability to implement interventions centred around processes highlighting equality, aligning organizational values amongst employees, as well as diversity appreciation; (2) Identify discriminatory practices and behaviors in the work environment and develop interventions to reduce microagressions and gender discrimination; (3) Discuss organizational practices that can lead to a more inclusive, value-oriented work environment
Keyword(s): discrimination, ethics, microaggressions, organizational culture
 
 
Panel #209
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission The Future of ABA: The Direction of the Field and How We Will Advance the Utility of the Science (A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Contributor Series)
Sunday, May 30, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Michelle L Zube, M.Ed.
Chair: Barbara Gross (Missouri Behavior Consulting; Special School District of St Louis County)
BOBBY NEWMAN (Proud Moments)
SARAH ELIZABETH TRAUTMAN (CalABA)
MICHELLE L ZUBE (CB Consultants LLC.)
Abstract:

The field of behaviour analysis has seen recent exponential growth however we are surrounded by punishment, inequality, injustice, and anti-science rhetoric. For our science to realize its far-reaching impact, we must conceptualize a society, like Walden 2, as our terminal goal and shape societal responses to that achievement. This panel discussion will discuss current systemic problems within culture and how we, as behaviour analysts, can establish systems that are rooted in data and behavioural science. Topics that will be discussed include utopian behaviour society, perspective taking, and compassion.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Advance ~ BCBAs and BCBA-Ds. Complex concepts that go beyond introductory literature or the course sequence.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Extending Walden II and concept of utopia using behaviour analysis; (2) Discuss barriers to utopian existence with current cultural contingencies; (3) Using behaviour analytic principles to prospective taking, compassion, and overcoming societal norms that limit marginalized populations
Keyword(s): compassion, culture, perspective taking, society
 
 
Symposium #210
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Key Behavior-Analytic Applications During the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Experimental Analysis of Online Academic Performance, Mask Wearing, and Face Touching
Sunday, May 30, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Translational
Chair: Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain) & The University of Auckland (New Zealand))
CE Instructor: Javier Virues Ortega, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The current COVID-19 pandemic has claimed the lives of over 1.5 million people across the world and have changed the lifestyle of humanity, possibly, for years to come. In this context, specific behaviors that had received minimal or no attention in the past have been moved up the social validity scale overnight. In this symposium we will evaluate various interventions addressing some key COVID-related behaviors. Online teaching and internet use has exploded during the pandemic. The first study looks at the potential role of social media in facilitating academic performance during online university-level courses. There are essentially no experimental analyses in the literature evaluating whether social media engagement (in the context of closed Facebook learning groups) could be an important channel for multi-component behavioral interventions. The second study presents a telehealth mask-wearing training program for children with autism presenting mask-induced problem behavior. The study evaluates a caregiver-delivered intervention among an international sample of participants from Belgium, India, Mexico, and Costa Rica. In the final study we turn to face touching. Face touching is thought to account for tens or hundreds of thousands of Sars-CoV-2 infections across the world due to physical contact with contaminated surfaces. It has been suggested that face touching, a high frequency behavior, may limit the protective role of hand washing, which occurs inevitably at lower rates. In this third presentation we evaluate the suppressive effect of contingent vibrotactile stimulation on face touching in a group of typical adults as they go about their daily lives. In addition to the treatment evaluation side of the study, it also provided an opportunity to conduct a thorough quantitative and descriptive analysis of face touching in ecologically relevant settings. Overall, these studies give a perspective of the diversity of behavioral applications that can be brought to bear in order to mitigate the effects of the current pandemic.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): COVID, Face touching, Mask wearing, Social media
Target Audience:

Students, practitioners and applied researchers.

Learning Objectives: 1. Learn the mechanisms by which social media closed groups can be used to deliver reinforcement-based interventions and understand their likely effect on academic engagement and performance. 2. Understand the proposed treatment model for mask wearing acquisition among clients with developmental disability in cross-cultural settings. 3. Understand the behavioral processes underlying face toaching and its importance as a health risk behavior.
 
An Experimental Evaluation of a Facebook Group’s Contribution to Academic Engagement and Performance among Postgraduate Students
(Applied Research)
AIDA TARIFA RODRIGUEZ (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid & ABA España), Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain) & The University of Auckland (New Zealand))
Abstract: This study examines the effectiveness of a multi-component package designed to increase engagement between faculty and professional specialization students in an online course. We hypothesized that enhancing online interaction can be an active element of teaching effectiveness and can have a measurable impact on performance. The intervention was delivered through a closed Facebook group. The multi-component package was comprised of peer reinforcement and cooperative learning, student self-monitoring, self-evaluation, goal setting, and teacher antecedent- and consequent-based strategies. A total of 46 students participated in a concurrent multiple baseline design across groups. The intervention was staggered across the groups over a period of eight weeks. The results indicated that the intervention was effective in increasing social media engagement in the learning group and academic performance. A post hoc multi-level analysis suggested that social media interaction responses (observing and intraverbal responses) mediated the effect of the intervention on academic performance. We will discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the widespread use of online teaching during the current pandemic.
 

Telehealth Mask-Wearing Training for Children With Autism and Mask-Induced Problem Behavior During the COVID-19 Pandemic

(Service Delivery)
Maithri Sivaraman (Ghent University, Belgium), AGUSTIN PEREZ-BUSTAMANTE PEREIRA (Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain), Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid & The University of Auckland), Herbert Roeyers (Ghent University, Belgium)
Abstract:

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus causing COVID-19 and is spread through close person-to-person contact. The use of face masks has been described as an important strategy in the combat to contain and slow down its transmission while a vaccine is not made widely available. We evaluated the effects of telehealth training for caregivers to teach mask wearing to children with ASD. Six participants with a history of challenging behavior associated with mask wearing were recruited from different parts of the world, and trained using a combination of graduated exposure, shaping and contingent reinforcement. By the end of the intervention all participants wore a face mask for a target period of 10 min without exhibiting challenging behavior, and generalized the skill to a novel mask and a community setting. The findings support previous tolerance training treatment evaluations in children with developmental disability exhibiting resistance to healthcare routines. Clinical recommendations and areas for future research are discussed.

 

Suppressive Effect of Contingent Vibrotactile Stimulation on Face Touching During the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Experimental Treatment Evaluation

(Applied Research)
JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid & The University of Auckland), Maithri Sivaraman (Ghent University), Agustin Perez-Bustamante Pereira (Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain), Aida Tarifa Rodriguez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid & ABA España), Carolina Trujilo-Sánchez (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain), Rebeca Pardo-Cebrian (ABA España, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid), Peter A. Krause (University of California Santa Cruz), Neil Timothy Martin (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract:

Facial contact behavior is a high frequency, high duration behavior that contributes to the transmission of communicable diseases by interaction with contaminated surfaces. Studies indicate that the Sars-CoV-2 virus remains viable for hours on surfaces such as paper, plastic, or metals. Hand-face contact has a long history among mammals and primates and is likely maintained by sensory consequences. It is estimated that thousands of infections may be mediated by hand contact with contaminated surfaces with pathogens being subsequently transferred to mucous membranes by hand contact with the mouth, nose, or eyes. We used contingent vibrotactile stimulation as an intervention to reduce hand-face contacts in ecological settings. Ten consecutively recruited adults wore one or two bracelets that delivered vibrotactile stimuli following face touching. Stimuli were delivered through Bluetooth-connected devices that were calibrated for each participant. We also evaluated the social validity of the intervention and how various environmental events were related to the level of face touching. In addition, the study provides an opportunity to discuss the quantitative characteristics of face touching. The results indicated that the face touching can be reduced considerably with this simple intervention.

 
 
Symposium #229
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Emerging Conceptual Underpinnings for Culturo-Behavior Science
Sunday, May 30, 2021
11:00 AM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Mark A. Mattaini (Jane Addams College of Social Work-University of Illinois at Chicago; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility)
Discussant: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago)
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
Abstract:

In elaborating a natural science capable of exploring social behavior and large-scale cultural structures and processes, Skinner (1953) defined culture “as the contingencies of social reinforcement maintained by a group.” Over several decades, Skinner and others expanded on this work. Glenn (1986, 2004) offered, and in collaboration with others subsequently refined the heuristic of the metacontingency for understanding the dynamics of collective behavior. This construct proved particularly helpful in organizational and similar settings in which desired outcomes were relatively specific, and steps required to achieve those outcomes relatively constrained. Contemporary culturo-behavior scientists, however, are gaining the capacity and carry the obligation to contribute to addressing critical social and environmental challenges. Explorations of possible integrations of emergent or revised scientific models have become essential. Included in this symposium are sometimes contrasting examples of such frameworks (e.g., ecosystemic, evolutionary, systems analytic, or return to behavior-centered interventions); discussion of commonalities and distinctions among them; and potential contributions of these perspectives to a transdisciplinary culturo-behavior science powerful enough to contribute to “conditions under which human beings will show the productivity, the creativity, and the strength inherent in their genetic endowment and which are essential to the survival of the species” (Skinner, 1975).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Culturo-Behavior Science
Target Audience:

Master's level students, BCBAs, other behavioral professionals with graduate degrees.

Learning Objectives: 1) identify the steps of an iterative ecosystems approach for observing, modeling and testing cultural processes; 2) state the contributions of adopting a systems analytic framework in culturo-behavior science and criticisms thereof 3) understand how behavior analysis can contribute to promote changes at social/cultural level by proposing behavior-centered interventions 4) understand how positive feedback dynamics contribute to self-organization in culture-behavioral systems 5) identify the culturant hypercycle as one potential process through which cultural selection occurs
 
Ecosystemic Cultural Systems Modeling
MARK A. MATTAINI (Jane Addams College of Social Work-University of Illinois at Chicago; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), Kathryn M. Roose (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract: In his efforts to elaborate a natural science capable of exploring social behavior and large-scale cultural processes, Skinner (1953) defined a culture “as the contingencies of social reinforcement maintained by a group.” Over several decades, Skinner and others expanded on this work. Glenn (1986, 2004) with collaborators, outlined and refined an approach for understanding the dynamics of selection at the cultural level, grounded in the heuristic of the metacontingency. The approach has been demonstrably useful in many settings, primarily for achieving specific desired outcomes within tightly constrained environmental contexts. As contemporary culturo-behavior scientists intensified attention to critical social and environmental challenges, however, cultural analytic models drawing on a broader scope of systemic variables within accessible models (Bates, 1950; Wolfram, 2002), have proven essential. In this presentation, the authors outline principles for modeling complex cultural and collective behavior, using an iterative, ecosystemic approach grounded in observation, conceptualization, and testing (Bates). Adequate ecosystemic models draw extensively on systems science (e.g., Mobus & Kalton, 2015), while remaining securely grounded in interlocking contingencies, equivalence relations, and other forms of relational responding as foci for intervention. An analysis of some of the dynamics of police-community relations will be presented as an example (Mattaini & Rehfeldt, 2020).
 
Back to Basics: For Big Changes, We Need to Rely on Behavioral-Level Interventions
DIEGO ZILIO (Federal University of Espirito Santo )
Abstract: Starting with the distinction between context of understanding and context of intervention, I will argue that culturo-behavior science has flaws in both contexts. The context of understanding relates to the different domains relevant in the process of understanding (and explaining) social/cultural phenomena. Instead of aiming for an interdisciplinary approach, behavior analysis seems to try to “become” part of the other domains. For instance, instead of dialoguing with anthropological theories, behavior analysis tries to become an anthropological theory itself. The context of intervention, by its turn, relates to the strategies for changing social/cultural practices. The effort to become part of other domains can neglect well established facts about behavior selection in favor of pursuing explanations at other levels. I will argue here that behavior analysis should instead pursue an interdisciplinary approach in the context of understanding and a behavioral-level approach in the context of intervention (i.e., interventions should rely on what we know about the behavior of organisms and not what we allegedly know about cultural selection). I will discuss the advantages of this alternative by using examples from the theory of social networks and complex contagion along with examples from behavior analysis itself.
 
Modeling Cultural Selection: Networking Evolutionary Organisms to Demonstrate the Emergence of Culturant Hypercycles
JONATHAN KRISPIN (Valdosta State University)
Abstract: There has been rapid development in some areas of Culturo-Behavioral Science, namely in research on the metacontingency, but there are many other areas where empirical research is needed. One such area is in the realm of cultural selection. Couto and Sandaker (2016) proposed a new perspective on this third level of selection, defining two new selection process – selection of cultures and cultural-selection. Krispin (2017; 2019) described a specific process through which these new selection process might be realized via the self-organization of culturant hypercycles. This presentation will propose a potential methodology for studying the emergence of culturant (and operant) hypercycles, built upon the Evolutionary Algorithm, a computer simulation of reinforcement learning (see McDowell, 2004; 2013). By networking interactions between simulated Evolutionary Organisms, we may be able to observe the emergence of operant and culturant hypercycles, and develop methods for modeling and studying them. Operant and culturant hypercycles may be identified using information entropy as a measurement of the extent of a system’s organization. By comparing the entropy of the emergent system with the entropy of its surroundings, we should be able to clearly distinguish these hypercycles.
 

Building a Systems Analytic Framework in Teaching, Research, and Practice in Culturo-Behavior Science

TRACI M. CIHON (University of North Texas; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), Kyosuke Kazaoka (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Culturo-Behavior Science (CBS), a recently formalized specialization in behavior analysis, brings together principles and techniques from Behavior Analysis, Behavioral Systems Analysis, Cultural Selection/Analysis, and Cultural Systems Analysis in order to understand how cultural phenomena develop and change over time. Culturo-behavior scientists are united by the philosophy of radical behaviorism and by their commitment to the application of the natural science of behavior to advance our understanding of behavior in its social and cultural environments. However, often debated among culturo-behavior scientists is both the extent to which a systems analytic framework should be adopted in CBS, and the role that basic laboratory preparations play in enhancing our understanding of cultural phenomena. With much still to discover about how behavior science can contribute to solving some of the world’s most pressing problems, the goal of this presentation will be to describe strategies for incorporating the diversity of thought embodied in CBS into teaching, research, and practice in CBS.

 
 
Symposium #232
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Passport Pedagogy: Excellence in Applied Behavior Analysis from China and Italy
Sunday, May 30, 2021
11:00 AM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Discussant: Jeremy H. Greenberg (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
CE Instructor: Jeremy H. Greenberg, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This collection of applied and descriptive research studies push our science in China and Italy. The first paper titled All For One And One For All used behavioral observation techniques to determine socially valid performance criterion for attending behaviors in typically developing students during group instruction. The second paper used functional behavior assessment and a conditioning procedure to replace stereotype with toy with a student having autism in an international primary school. The third paper outlines current dimensions of applied behavior analysis research in China. The fourth paper tested the effects of a different intensity CABAS®-based intervention packages using an alternating (ABACA) treatment design for 9 children diagnosed with Autism, aged 2 to 6 years old in Italy.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): aba, autism, china, school
Target Audience:

Designed for Supervisors, Directors, and Administrators

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will understand conditioning reinforcement to replace stereotypy as an effective tactic for students with autism. 2. Participants will be able to name some reference in our field from China. 3. Participants will have an understanding of a CABAS systems approach to a school in Italy.
 
Diversity submission All For One And One For All: Establishing Social Validity Measures for Inclusion
(Applied Research)
HIU CHING CHEUNG (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Abstract: Inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) and especially autism spectrum disorder (ASD) into general education curricula is a challenging practice. In recent years, the practice of inclusion has been expanding within the international school community. Outside of the United States, the process of inclusion is developing rapidly due to an ever increasing demand mostly. The demand is fuelled by families and is compounded by the scarcity of international schools with developed programs and inclusive classrooms. Applied Behavior Analysis provides strategies and tactics that support educators and those responsible for inclusion of students SEN and ASD. The purpose of the present study was to use behavioral observation techniques to determine socially valid performance criterion for attending behaviors in typically developing students during group instruction. Direct observations occurred in situ using partial interval recording procedures across typical students across primary grades one through eight, inclusive. Data were collected under two types of conditions, lecture style instruction, and independent desk work for boys and girls across all grades. Results add to our evidence-based criterion that are used to determine the level of services needed, if any, to support our students in the general education setting.
 
Diversity submission 

Using Functional Behavior Assessment and Conditioning Procedures to Replace Stereotypy in an International School Student With Autism

(Applied Research)
JAMIE SO (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Abstract:

The present study used functional behavior assessment and a treatment package including conditioning of toy play with a student with autism in an international primary school. The functional behavior assessment confirmed that the behaviors were being maintained through automatic reinforcement. The procedure was a partial replication from research conducted with adults and preschool students. Our student was 11 years old and had a long history of stereotypy behaviors and a limited community of reinforcers. This study tested for the external validity of the treatment package.

 
Diversity submission 

Current Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis in China: A Critical Review of Research

(Basic Research)
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) was introduced into Mainland China at the beginning of the 21st century as a direct result of the rise of autism spectrum disorder. The following decades can roughly be divided into two phases in terms of the development of ABA in China. Phase one was the time period with a focus on dissemination of ABA practice in China and it lasted from 2000 to 2009. In phase two, which lasted from 2010 to the current date, initial research on ABA emerged in China while dissemination of ABA practice continued and accelerated. The objective of this presentation is to critically evaluate ABA studies conducted by Chinese researchers. For this purpose, the author conducted a systematic search for literature on ABA published by Chinese scholars. In this presentation, the author will use seven ABA dimensions (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968) to measure the quality of the ABA literature and present results from quantitative analysis and qualitative evaluation of empirical studies published by Chinese ABA researchers. The author will also attempt to explain the unique feature of ABA research published by Chinese scholars by analyzing relevant cultural contingencies. Based on these descriptions and analyses, the author will make recommendations for the future development of ABA research in China.

 
Diversity submission 

Comparing the Effects of Different ABA Interventions for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder During a Pandemic

(Service Delivery)
FABIOLA CASARINI (Scuola delle Stelle)
Abstract:

We tested the effects of a different intensity CABAS®-based intervention packages using an alternating (ABACA) treatment design for 9 children diagnosed with Autism, aged 2 to 6 years old. The study was conducted in a learning and research centre in Italy prior and during the COVID-19 Pandemic, and is still ongoing. The obligation to stop the CABAS® intervention created an opportunity to change the treatment frequency while keeping the treatment integrity for all participants, and provide the experimenters with an opportunity to collect data and compare them on the optimal treatment intensity. Condition A constituted high educational intensity where each participant received 1:1 intervention for 12 hours a week, while Condition B constituted 1:1 intervention for 3 hours a week (during the first lockdown), and during Condition C, intervention was delivered for 6 hours a week (during the second lockdown).The dependent variables in the study were the changes in participant’s ADOS-2 and CARS-2 scores prior and after each treatment change, and participants number of Learn Units to Criterion rate. The early results showed a significant difference between before and after the low-frequency package was implemented, for the total scores and each sub-test of both instruments. So far, results suggest that normative tests, together with individual graphs’analysis, can help differentiate between treatment effectiveness and efficiency for each child. Further research is needed in order to make more generalized conclusions into the optimal intensity of intervention, especially in countries, such as Italy, where children with Autism can’t attend special schools or have insurance-covered intensive treatments.

 
 
Symposium #238
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Innovations and Outcomes: Exploring Real-World Application and Evaluation of ABA Services via Telehealth
Sunday, May 30, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Kristine Rodriguez (Autism Learning Partners)
CE Instructor: Kristine Rodriguez, M.A.
Abstract:

The COVID-19 global pandemic of 2020 and the ensuing emergency guidelines had potential to limit the delivery of essential ABA-based Autism services. While literature outside of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has demonstrated efficacy of remote, video-conference modality for medical care, (i.e. telehealth or telepractice), replicable models of ABA-based telehealth were limited in ABA literature prior to 2020. In response to the public health crisis, a protocol modification assessment (PMA) and treatment selection matrix for modifying ABA programs for direct telehealth was developed and published in an emergency issue of Behavior Analysis in Practice (Rodriguez, 2020). The first panelist will present a model for training and implementation of the PMA in a multi-site provider organization, including confidence self-assessment results from the participating behavior analysts; the second panelist will present client outcomes in the form of pre- and post-implementation assessment change scores. A third panelist will share an innovative applied research approach to modification of a well-known curriculum (PEAK), in which the materials were transformed into an interactive video game that allowed for remote, highly engaging implementation. The panelists will offer guidance for future implementation and evaluation.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): applied research, client outcomes, PEAK, telehealth
Target Audience:

Participants should be familiar with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB(R) 2014, including considerations for competence to practice and efficacy of services); a review of literature related to telehealth service delivery (e.g. Ferguson et al., 2019); and PEAK Curriculum (Dixon, 2008) and its applications (Belisle, 2018) will offer participants context for engagement.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: 1. Identify skills that improve a client's readiness for various modalities of telehealth ABA 2. Evaluate clinical outcomes of their clients using available assessment data 3. Modify programs and teaching resources to improve engagement and outcomes
 
A Model for Training Behavior Analysts in Program Modification for Telehealth
(Service Delivery)
JO ANNA MAZZACANE (Autism Learning Partners)
Abstract: Regional restrictions and emergency mandates related to the Covid-19 pandemic resulted in a necessary shift in delivery of essential ABA services, requiring a methodology for evaluating appropriateness of a rapid shift to telehealth for existing programs. Using the Program Modification Assessment (PMA) and treatment selection matrix for telehealth services (Rodriguez, 2020), a multi-site provider organization provided training, coaching, and resources for behavior analysts (BAs). BAs first evaluated the abilities and needs of the client, coupled with those of the caregiver, to determine the magnitude of modifications necessary to ethically transition to telehealth. Clients were designated as candidates for direct (1:1) telehealth, telehealth supervision, or a traditional (in-person) model. This presenter will review the training topics offered, the coaching model used (including live, remote Behavioral Skills Training and in-office case review), and the interactive resources provided to aid BAs in the transition. The presenter will additionally share survey data indicating a rapid and dramatic improvement in self-assessment of BA competence in delivering telehealth services.
 

Evaluating Client Outcomes Across Treatment Modalities: Telehealth vs. Traditional In-home Models of ABA

(Service Delivery)
ALLYSON MARIE KRONEBERGER (Children's Learning Connection; Autism Learning Partners)
Abstract:

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, roughly 1400 clients were transitioned to telehealth ABA services across 50+ regions of a multi-site provider organization. Many clients’ services were shifted within 1-2 weeks of the emergency orders; some were transitioned within days. While the modality of treatment offered clear benefits (i.e. continuity of care; provisioning of essential services without the risk of viral transmission), telehealth ABA has not been evaluated widely. Questions of efficacy are central to ethical compliance and provision of evidence-based, medically necessary treatment; therefore, clinical outcomes are urgently needed in order to determine whether funders will continue to adopt telehealth once the pandemic ends. This presenter will show an initial view of aggregated outcomes data, using pre- and post-assessment assessment change scores. The Vineland 3 is the primary measure of clinical outcomes in this presentation; the author will make recommendations for complementary measures to be used in future analysis.

 
Automating and Gamifying PEAK Programming and Delivery Through Telehealth
(Applied Research)
LINDSEY AUDREY MARIE DENNIS (Missouri State University), Leah Clarke (Pender Public School), raymond burke (Apex Regional Program), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Abstract: School closures due to COVID-19 presented enormous challenges to staff and students as well as opportunities to innovate and automate behavior analytic technologies. As part of a large-scale collaboration, we developed and transported technologies used to automate discrete trial training with children with autism for remote delivery. First, we discuss the development and initial testing of an automated learning game similar to Whack-a-Mole that we used to augment existing PEAK programming. Results suggest that this strategy was successful in teaching new language and cognitive skills. Second, we will discuss how this technology was transferred to an online format leveraging interlocking social contingencies between the direct therapist and the learner. Successful results retained in this new format. Finally, we adapted the telehealth strategy to chain life skills using the PEAK Life curriculum and these strategies were combined within a Premack strategy with two learners with autism. Both showed mastery of the target vocational skills in this remote delivery format.
 
 
Panel #266
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Behavioral Pharmacology, Autism, and Comorbidities: The Role of the Applied Behavior Analysis Practitioner
Sunday, May 30, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: BPN/AUT; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Carlos Zuluaga, M.S.
Chair: Carlos Zuluaga (ABA Technologies, Inc. and Florida Institute of Technology)
AMANDA BUENO DOS SANTOS (CEDIN, Florida Institute of Technology)
THOMAS R. FREEMAN (ABA Technologies Inc. - Florida Tech)
MICHAEL CRIPE (Agency for Persons With Disabilities-State of Florida)
Abstract:

When behavioral services are utilized to reduce problem behavior, psychotropic medication is also often prescribed by attending physicians. When a comorbidity is present, coordinating services between disciplines can present special challenges. This presentation will describe the need to reduce confounds between different treatment modalities, and present some techniques to reduce those confounds while evaluating and promoting ongoing treatment effectiveness. We will review several of the medications that are most commonly used to address problem behavior, describe some of the most common side effects as well as secondary behavioral effects that can impact treatment planning and documentation. We will discuss some common symptoms of various comorbidities, list steps for data collection, and suggest techniques on how to most effectively report and utilize data in coordination with both medical and non-medical professionals. Finally we will discuss the ethical requirement to closely coordinate ABA and medical services, and explore some of the related issues that are likely to arise in clinical practice.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The target audience should have as prerequisite skills knowledge autism spectrum disorder, behavioral service delivery, and behavior intervention plan.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) recognize some common symptoms of various autism spectrum disorder comorbidities, list steps for data collection, and suggest techniques on how to effectively report and utilize data in coordination with both medical and non-medical professionals; (2)know medications that are most commonly used to address problem behavior, describe some of the most common side effects as well as secondary behavioral effects that can impact treatment planning and documentation; (3) how to address ethical requirements to closely coordinate ABA and medical services, and explore some of the related issues that are likely to arise in clinical practice.
 
 
Symposium #268
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Acceptance and Commitment Training Across Applied Clinical Settings
Sunday, May 30, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Tammy Lee (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis )
CE Instructor: David Legaspi, M.S.
Abstract:

Acceptance and commitment training (ACT) is an approach to language and cognition that is growing in traction across several practitioners inside and outside of the field of behavior analysis. ACT has been seen to be effective in interacting with levels of stress, burnout, and psychological flexibility. Given this, there has been limited research demonstrating ACT in a variety of clinical settings. Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and clients alike may experience distress and burnout. The following three talks will discuss three different implementations of ACT-based interventions across three different clinical applications. The first talk will discuss the potential value in an online-based ACT intervention targeted for behavior technicians and their levels of burnout and overt levels of values-based actions. The second talk will discuss an application of a two-day ACT-based workshop designed to interact with three BCBAs and their indirect levels of psychological flexibility and burnout, weekly reported values-based actions, and performance on a values based check in system. The third talk will discuss the application of an ACT-based approach to rigid habit following in an individual with a dual diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ACT, Burnout, Psychological Flexibility
Target Audience:

Intermediate

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to:1. Define psychological flexibility as it pertains to Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) 2describe how psychological flexibility influences levels of burnout and stress 3. Define how to define and collect data on objective measures of values-based committed actions
 

The Effects of an Online Acceptance and Commitment Training on Employee Burnout and Values-Based Behavior

(Service Delivery)
MIGUEL FLORES (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

Within the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA), behavior technicians can be described as a highly valuable employee within their organization due to their direct one to one work with clients. Over time, a behavior technician’s level of burnout may increase due to the prolonged emotional exhaustion that accompanies the work. One possible intervention to incorporate into the workplace is acceptance and commitment training (ACT). ACT is an evidence-based intervention that focuses on enhancing six processes (i.e., self-as-context, values, committed action, contacting the present moment, defusion and acceptance) to increase psychological flexibility. While there is research on ACT in various modalities, one emerging method of delivery is through online-based modules. The present study evaluates an online-based ACT intervention targeted to behavior technicians while simultaneously teaching them to engage in overt behavior directly tied to their values. It is hypothesized that the online acceptance and commitment training will be effective in influencing a behavior technician’s perception of burnout, increasing psychological flexibility, and stabilizing and or increasing values-based behaviors.

 

Exploring Effects of a Acceptance and Commitment Training Workshop on Weekly Overt Values-Based Behaviors, Psychological Flexibility, and Check-in Checklist Performance

(Applied Research)
DAVID LEGASPI (Center For Applied Behavior Analysis), Heidi Eilers (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Elizabeth Ashton Benedickt (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis ), Tammy Lee (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis )
Abstract:

Acceptance and commitment training (ACT) has been growing in acceptability within the scope of behavior analysis (Enoch, & Nicholson, 2020). Since the start of the current COVID-related pandemic, researchers have moved to include programs related to psychological flexibility to mitigate possible effects the current shelter in place may have on our wellbeing and potential feelings of stress (Fieberg, Gould, Ming, Watson, 2020). Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) are often described as those who have stressful jobs that could lead to stress and burnout. ACT has been shown to mitigate workplace stress and increase levels of psychological flexibility (Pingo, Dixon, & Paliliunas, 2019). The following study explored the potential effect a two-day ACT workshop may have on the weekly overt values-based behaviors a BCBA reports to have completed, indirect measures associated with psychological flexibility (AAQ, CAQ-8) and stress, and performance on a check-in system designed to help aid BCBAs to check in with the colleagues they supervise. Using a multiple baseline design across three BCBAs, the results suggest the ACT workshop affected overt weekly reported values-based actions. Results also suggest the workshop was successful in improving performance on the check-in checklist. Further implications and suggestions will be discussed.

 

Acceptance and Commitment Training and Self-Monitoring Habit Reversal for the Reduction of Compulsive Behaviors

(Applied Research)
ELIZABETH ASHTON BENEDICKT (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis ), David Legaspi (Center For Applied Behavior Analysis), Tyler James Arauza (TCSPP), Michele D. Wallace (California State University, Los Angeles; Center for Applied Behavior Analysis )
Abstract:

The majority of current behavior analysts are working within the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) population (BACB, 2020). ASD is often comorbid with other diagnoses including obsessive and compulsive disorder (OCD) (Lewin, Wood, Gunderson, Murphy, & Storch, 2011). Behavior analysts may not have experience with individuals who have this comorbid presentation(Broadhead, Quigley, Wilczynski, 2018). Research demonstrating the application of behavior analytic treatment of behaviors associated with comorbid diagnoses are necessary in the development of our field’s overall utility. In this paper, we will demonstrate the efficacy of a treatment package utilizing acceptance and commitment training (ACT), and mindfulness-based training for the reduction of compulsive behaviors in an 11-year-old individual diagnosed with OCD and ASD. Sessions were conducted via telehealth for 2 hours each day, 3 days per week, across 4 consecutive months. A reversal design was utilized to test for treatment efficacy. In baseline, the participant was engaged in a variety of compulsive behavior in the bathroom for up to 9 hours per day. Results indicated that the treatment package was effective in the reduction of the duration of engagement in compulsive behaviors. Overall duration of engagement dropped from 9 hours to 45 minutes. Results, implications, and overall social validity will be discussed.

 
 
Invited Tutorial #283
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Building Independence and Complex Social Play in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Photographic Activity Schedules and Social Scripts
Sunday, May 30, 2021
3:00 PM–4:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Thomas Higbee, Ph.D.
Chair: Sarah Frampton (May Institute, Inc. )
Presenting Author: THOMAS HIGBEE (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Many students with autism and other developmental disabilities have difficulty sequencing their own behavior during free-choice situations. Rather, they rely on adults to prompt them to engage in particular activities. Many do not interact appropriately with play materials or may select one activity and engage in it for an extended period of time. Photographic activity schedules have been shown to be an effective tool to teach children to sequence their own behavior and transition smoothly between multiple activities. Children learn to follow the visual cues in the activity schedule to make transitions instead of relying on adult-provided prompts. Activity schedules also provide a context for teaching basic and complex choice-making behavior. As children develop verbal behavior, social scripts can also be added and then later faded to promote social interaction. Activity schedules have been used successfully in a variety of settings with both children and adults with various disabilities. They are easy to use and can be adapted to most environments. In the present tutorial, participants will learn how to use activity schedules with clients/students as well as learn about recent research on using these techniques to promote complex social play.

Target Audience:

Practitioners and applied researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the prerequisite skills for using photographic activity schedules; (2) describe how to use photographic activity schedules to promote independent behavior; (3) describe how to use photographic activity schedules to promote choice making; (4) describe how to use social scripting and script fading to promote spontaneous language; (5) describe how to use photographic activity schedules and script fading to promote complex social play.
 
THOMAS HIGBEE (Utah State University)
Dr. Thomas S. Higbee is a Professor and Interim Department Head in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University and Executive Director of the Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training (ASSERT) program, an early intensive behavioral intervention program for children with autism that he founded in 2003. He is a doctoral-level Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D) and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in the state of Utah. He is also chair of the Disability Disciplines doctoral program at Utah State University. His research focuses on the development of effective educational and behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders and related disabilities as well as the development of effective training strategies for teaching parents and professionals to implement effective interventions. He is a former associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) and the European Journal of Behavior Analysis. Dr. Higbee is committed to the dissemination of effective behavioral interventions and has helped to create intensive behavior analytic preschool and school programs for children with autism and related disorders in Brazil, Russia, Portugal, and throughout his home state of Utah. He is the past president of the Utah Association for Behavior Analysis (UtABA) and has served as a member of the Practice Board of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the Psychologist Licensing Board of the state of Utah.
 
 
Symposium #294
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission Lessons Learned by Behavior Analysts From Areas Working on Fully Implementing an ABA Medicaid Benefit
Sunday, May 30, 2021
4:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Gordon Bourland (Trinity Behavioral Associates and TxABA Public Policy Committee)
Discussant: Katherine Miriam Johnson-Patagoc (Texana Center and TxABA Public Policy Group)
CE Instructor: Katherine Miriam Johnson-Patagoc, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Many people who could benefit greatly from ABA services cannot gain access to them due to lack of financial resources and insurance. Medicaid funding of ABA services is one mechanism to enable financially and socially disadvantaged people to benefit from ABA services. The session will involve discussions by behavior analysts from 4 areas of the United States regarding how behavior analysts have and could address public policy issues related to Medicaid programs funding ABA services. The activities and contributions of behavior analysts in 3 states and the Washington DCs will be presented. The sequences of events in each jurisdiction differ, but some general strategy recommendations will be addressed along with suggestions regarding with issues unique to a jurisdiction. Audience participation will be encouraged.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Medicaid coverage, public policy, social disadvantage
Target Audience:

Attendees will be most likely to benefit from the presentations if they are not only knowledge regarding behavior analysis principle, ABA services, but also have some exposure to and/ or experience regarding public policy, Medicaid funding if possible.

Learning Objectives: The attendee will: 1. State the importance of Medicaid funding for behavior analysis services, 2. State the importance of having qualified professionals provide ABA services in state funded waiver programs, 3. State why behavior analysts should participate in the process of educating fellow professionals about the value of their services in the context of a team approach, 4. Identify at least 2 barriers that have arisen with Mediciad funding of ABA services, 5. Identify the importance of collaboration across stakeholders 6. Identify advocacy strategy for overcoming barriers to services 7. Identify strategies for navigating complex legislative landscapes
 
Diversity submission Illinois Medicaid for Applied Behavior Analysis Services
JOHN M. GUERCIO (Benchmark Human Services)
Abstract: This talk will detail the recent changes that have transpired with regard to the Illinois Association for Behavior Analysis (ABAI) and efforts to obtain Medicaid funding through the Department of Human Services in the state of Illinois. This talk will detail that sometimes arduous task of securing the appropriate professional qualifications to deliver ABA services in the Medicaid system. The many different service categories will be detailed along with how each service provider can sure that they are providing the appropriate services. The presentation will also detail the importance of active involvement by Behavior Analysts in the development of services at the state level. Suggestions will be provided related to the appropriate advocacy behavior for behavior analysts to engage in related to educating state lawmakers about the importance of ABA services and ensuring that the providers of these services have the appropriate credentials.
 
Diversity submission Texas’ Journey to Full Implementation of the Medicaid Funding for ABA Autism Services
BERENICE DE LA CRUZ (Texas A&M University-San Antonio and TxABA Public Policy Group), Jeffrey E. Dillen (Texana Center and TxABA Public Policy Group), Rany Thommen (ABA Today and TxABA Public Policy Group), Mariel C. Fernandez (Blue Sprig Pediatrics and TxABA Public Policy Group), Duy D. Le (Child Study Center Cook Children's and TxABA Public Policy Group), Gordon Bourland (Trinity Behavioral Associates and TxABA Public Policy Group), Katherine Miriam Johnson-Patagoc (Texana Center and TxABA Public Policy Group)
Abstract: The TxABA Public Policy Group will share information on the journey towards full implementation of the Medicaid coverage of Autism Services through Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment. On July 15, 2019, Texas became the 43rd state to have Medicaid coverage of ABA therapy. The signing of House Bill 1, including Rider 32, by Governor Greg Abbott authorized ABA as a benefit for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder under the age of 21. Behavior analysts from Texas will share barriers, solutions, and lessons learned. The integral goal of partnerships with local, state, and national organizations and the inclusion of parents and self-advocates will be examined. The vital role of a paid advocate and how fees were covered will be shared. Behavior analysts learned how to educate legislators at district and capitol offices, advocate for the needs of the community, become resources for legislators. The role of visibility and mutual benefit will be highlighted. Lastly, challenges in fully implementing the Medicaid benefit in Texas will be discussed.
 
Diversity submission Advocating for Medicaid in a Complicated Legislative Space
AMANDA P. LAPRIME (University of Rochester Medical Center ), Maureen O'Grady (NYSABA Legislative Co-Chair and New Alternatives for Children), Deborah A. Napolitano (NYSABA Legislative Chair, Daemen College Department of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Golisano Institute for Developmental Disabilities Nursing at St. John Fisher College )
Abstract: The presenter will describe the complicated legislative landscape in New York as context for the fight for Medicaid funding of applied behavior analysis services for individuals with autism. The history of insurance-based services for individuals with autism and the current challenges faced by practicing behavior analysts in NY State will be described. The speakers will identify and define the barriers to implementation of Medicaid reimbursed ABA services and share problem solving approaches. The intensive collaboration across stakeholders will be highlighted, including NYSABA, medical/clinical providers, Autism Speaks, Community Based Organizations, and several lobbying firms. A model will be presented for translating the unique service tiers of insurance funded behavior analytic services for evaluation by state legislative and regulatory bodies. In addition, speakers will explain why this approach is a necessary step to overcoming the barriers of service delivery in NY State. Speakers will further identify the components of a large scale needs assessment, with a focus on the identification, operationalization, and remediation of barriers across multiple systems.
 
Diversity submission 

ABA Service Provision and Medicaid in the District of Columbia

MARY CARUSO-ANDERSON (DC ABA), Lera Joyce Johnson (DC ABA; George Mason University), Cynthia Escobar (J &C Behavioral Therapy, LLC), Keven M. Schock (Aveanna ), Elena Zaklis (Rutgers University), Jacqueline Landa Jackson (DC ABA), Colleen Williams (BACB), Flor De Amelia Lizette Hoffman (DC ABA)
Abstract:

Medicaid is an important source of funding for medically-necessary services for children with autism. Although State Medicaid programs vary in their reimbursement practices, children receive a variety of services that address core deficits and behavioral challenges in autism, some of which may not be covered under commercial insurance plans due to benefit exclusions or other limits under private insurance. Data from 2005 showed that only 29 states provided Medicaid reimbursement for applied behavior analysis (ABA). The District of Columbia was excluded from this study due to poor quality data. Therefore, the purpose of this talk is to examine the process by which ABA services are obtained and reimbursed through Medicaid in the District of Columbia. The impact of this process on service providers will be evaluated to help identify barriers to obtaining ABA-based treatments through Medicaid in the District. Finally, we will explore the relationship between state licensure of BCBAs and Medicaid reimbursement.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #366
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Interaction Between Development and Instruction
Monday, May 31, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: DEV
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Kieva Hranchuk, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: KIEVA HRANCHUK (St. Lawrence College)
Abstract:

The difference between curricula and pedagogy is highlighted best when we consider what we teach versus how we teach it. There exists an interaction between development and instruction such that instruction can only be effective if the educator considers the learner’s level of verbal development. The ways in which we teach must cater to the current verbal developmental cusps found within the learner’s repertoire. While the progression of instructional objectives targeted within a curriculum will change as the learner acquires the necessary prerequisite skills to move forward, attention should be placed on modifying the ways in which we teach those subsequent objectives. Research in the field of verbal behavior development has proven time and time again that the acquisition of skills can be accelerated if the method of teaching is consistent with the capabilities that the learner exhibits, i.e. the presence of verbal developmental cusps within their repertoire.

Target Audience:

Educators, Practitioners, and Researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss verbal developmental cusps; (2) identify how verbal development relates to pedagogy; (3) modify instruction to better suit the learner.
 
KIEVA HRANCHUK (St. Lawrence College)
Kieva is both a certified special education teacher and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst. She specializes in teacher training as well as in supervision of evidence-based service delivery to students with and without disabilities. Her interests include effective delivery of instruction, analyzing rates of learning in young children, inclusion/integration, kindergarten readiness, verbal behavior development, and the CABAS® model. Her research focuses on how teaching procedures can be effectively modified to accelerate student learning. Kieva received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and a Behavioural Science Technician post-graduate certificate from George Brown College in Toronto, Ontario. She then worked at both Surrey Place Centre in Toronto and at the CHEO Autism Program in Ottawa before making the big move to New York City. There, she earned her M.A. in Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis and her Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis at Columbia University. She has taught at both Columbia University and Arizona State University as an Adjunct Assistant Professor. Additionally, Kieva helped to pioneer the Scottsdale Children’s Institute, an integrated kindergarten readiness program in Arizona where she then served as the Clinical Director for two years before moving back to Canada to begin her career as a full-time Professor at St. Lawrence College.
 
 
Symposium #372
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
So You Have a Behavior Analyst Licensure Law: Now what?
Monday, May 31, 2021
9:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University and ABAI Licensing Committee)
Discussant: John Walter Scibak (Retired Massachusetts State Representative and ABAI Licensing Committee)
CE Instructor: Gordon Bourland, Ph.D.
Abstract: Once a state, province, or other governmental jurisdiction has enacted a statute establishing licensure of behavior analysts, can behavior analysts finally breathe a sigh of relief and relax? Statues and experience clearly indicate the answer is an emphatic “NO!” Once a behavior analyst licensure law is enacted, behavior analysts still need to be very vigilant and active with respect to it. The presentations will address some of the crucial tasks in which behavior analyst need to engage once licensure is established.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA Licensure, Maintaining licensure, Public policy
Target Audience: Intermediate instruction level Attendees familiar with applied behavior analysis and interested in or familiar with behavior analysis licensure and public policy activities will benefit the most from this symposium.
Learning Objectives: Participants will: 1. Outline and plan post licensure law passage activities that will enable the law to be carried out as efficiently as possible. 2. Describe how to move to the execution and implementation stage of recently past licensure legislation laws in their states. 3. State an activity involving behavior analyst licensure regulations in which they should be prepared to engage, 4. State an activity involving other professions with which behavior analysts should be prepared to engage, once behavior analyst licensure is established. 5. State the basic components of sunset review. 6. State what can happen to a state’s behavior analyst licensure program as a result of a sunset review.
 

We Have a Behavior Analyst Licensure Law, Can’t We Relax Now?

JOHN M. GUERCIO (Benchmark Human Services and ABAI Licensing Committee)
Abstract:

The passage of a licensure law is by no means the end of the road for the behavior analysis community in states that have just reached this milestone. The local chapter that supports behavior analysis activities should immediately begin to identify potential members of the licensing board that can be nominated and ultimately will be put in place to serve on the board. This panel will enable those that are on the brink of implementing licensure to be equipped with a step-by-step protocol by which to fully participate in this process. A number of things need to be identified that help to maintain the momentum that led to the passage of the licensure law in the first place. These catalysts will be identified and outlined for interested Behavior Analysts in states that are at this process step in their licensure law.

 
Licensure Laws and Regulations Are In Place: Now We Can Relax, Right?
GORDON BOURLAND (Trinity Behavioral Associates and ABAI Licensing Committee), John Walter Scibak (Retired Massachusetts State Representative and ABAI Licensing Committee)
Abstract: After a behavior analyst licensure law has been enacted and the initial version of the relevant regulations to guide implementation have been established, behavior analysts are wise to remain vigilant regarding and engaged with licensure issues. The initial version of regulations may require updating as new issues germane to behavior analyst licensure arise and as regulations requiring clarification. In addition, licensure opponents may try to have the statute repealed or suggest onerous regulatory changes. Behavior analysts need to monitor carefully any proposed changes and provide comment regarding them. Behavior analysts should monitor meetings of the regulatory bodies involved with licensure to stay informed with decisions and ongoing discussion as well as provide input regarding issues that should be considered by the body. Additionally, behavior analysts should closely monitor possible activities of other governmental entities and other professions that could have an impact on behavior analysts and their licensure and be prepared to address those activities.
 
Watching the Sunset!
GRANT GAUTREAUX (Nicholls State University and ABAI Licensing Committee)
Abstract: Many states require state agencies and programs periodically to be reviewed and evaluated by a designated group of people. That group makes recommendations to legislators regarding whether each agency and program should be continued as it is, be revised in some manner, or be eliminated. The legislature then decided what course of action to take. This process is called sunset review. The sunset review process differs across states. The sunset review process has occurred, is occurring, or soon will occur in several states. Given the possible changes that could occur to behavior analyst licensure due to the sunset review process, behavior analysts should be aware of when their licensing program is to be reviewed and actively participating in public input regarding the initial review and regarding the subsequent legislative action. Examples of sunset review activity related to behavior analyst licensure in several states will be discussed.
 

So, What Should You Do Next?

JOHN WALTER SCIBAK (Retired Massachusetts State Representative and ABAI Licensing Committee)
Abstract:

An overview will be provided of the range of activities that behavior analysts should consider for maximizing the likelihood of behavior analyst licensure adequately protecting the public and supporting the profession of behavior analysis. Elaboration of particular strategies and tactics for doing so will be tailored to address questions raised by attendees.

 
 
Panel #396
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Why Language Matters in a Social Justice Framework: Exploring the Implications of Language on Social Issues and Developing New Verbal Repertoires (A Compassion and Social Justice: Contributor Series)
Monday, May 31, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Lauren Schnell, Ph.D.
Chair: Meredith Andrews (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
ERIN DONOVAN (Beautiful Humans Change; Capella University)
LAUREN SCHNELL (Hunter College)
LAUREN ALICIA GOODWYN (Seton Hall University)
Abstract:

Our verbal behaviour is an essential skill for navigating our social world and our inability to understand the value of the words we use can contribute to social conflicts, aggression, racial bias, prejudice, discrimination, and many other social issues. In an effort to combat these societal limitations and move towards an inclusive culture in which everyone’s individuality is championed; our language must be explored and compassion, perspective-taking, and empathy must be promoted. In this panel we will discuss a behavior-analytic description of perspective-taking and its role in establishing compassion skills and utility in social justice, overcome the deeply ingrained societal gender binary system in favour of a compassionate, gender expansive society, and how our language establishes and can topple societal prejudice. Behaviour analysis can replace current behaviours around social relations and replace them with compassion. The anticipated result would lead to impactful acquisition of social justice rights for those from marginalized populations.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Intermediate - BCBAs and BCBA-Ds ~ A discussion on verbal behaviour and ways in which our language informs our social world and the need to see the value of the words we use as it relates to social conflicts (e.g., aggression, racial bias, prejudice, discrimination, and many other social issues).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) learn verbal behavioural strategies to engage in compassion, perspective-taking, and empathy; (2) recognizing the importance of language in societal injustices towards marginalized groups; (3) promoting a workplace culture in which language matters and developing anti-discriminatory practices and policies
Keyword(s): Compassion, perspective taking, relational frame, verbal behavior
 
 
Invited Tutorial #402
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Realizing the Potential of Applied Behavior Analysis to Improve Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Autism
Monday, May 31, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Peter Gerhardt, Ed.D.
Chair: Bobby Newman (Proud Moments)
Presenting Author: PETER GERHARDT (The EPIC School)
Abstract:

In their seminal article, Baer, Wolf and Risley (1968), stated that behavior analytic intervention is expected to result in strong, socially important, and generalizable behavior change which, in this case, should mean more positive adult outcomes in ASD. Unfortunately, despite a nearly three decade-long emphasis on evidence-based, behavior analytic intervention in ASD, adult outcomes remain poor “for almost any outcome you choose.” (Roux, et al, 2015, p. 8). While there may be several reasons for continued poor outcomes (including the challenge of simply defining “good outcome”), the potential of behavior analytic intervention to develop more positive adult outcomes has yet to be fully realized. Such outcomes, however, are well within the reach of our behavior analytic technology. But to do that, the contingencies governing our behavior will, most likely, need to shift. For example, we will need to shift from contingencies that reinforce the technical precision of our classroom-based interventions to contingencies the reinforce the somewhat less technical precision of community-based intervention (assuming the target has a fair degree of social validity). This tutorial will identify a number areas, both internal and external to the field, where a “contingency shift” may be necessary if the power of behavior analytic intervention to significantly improve outcomes for adults with autism is to be more fully realized.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: PENDING.
 
PETER GERHARDT (The EPIC School)
Peter Gerhardt, Ed.D., is the Executive Director of the EPIC School in Paramus, NJ. Dr. Gerhardt has nearly 40 years of experience utilizing the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis in support of adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders in educational, employment, residential and community-based settings. He is the author or co-author on a number of articles and book chapters on the needs of adolescents and adults with ASD and has presented nationally and internationally on this topic. Dr. Gerhardt serves as Co-Chairman of the Scientific Council for the Organization for Autism Research and is on numerous professional advisory boards including the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He received his doctorate from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey’s Graduate School of Education.
 
 
Panel #446
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Changing Culture Within the Field of ABA: Addressing the Need for Cultural Shifts Across the Field (A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Contributor Series)
Monday, May 31, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/TBA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: R. Nicolle Nicolle Carr, Ph.D.
Chair: Shaneeria K Persaud (United Behavior Analysis, Inc.)
R. NICOLLE NICOLLE CARR (University of Oklahoma)
WAFA A. ALJOHANI (Endicott College)
CHERELLE MASCHE WILLIAMS (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Neither behavior nor culture are static and as a field, we have an ethical obligation to promote an ethical culture in work environments for staff and clients (7.01) and to not engage in discriminatory practices (1.05d). As behavior analysts, are responsible for promoting culturally sensitive programming and to build the capacity for cultural responsiveness through training, supervision, and workplace values. As we broaden our consumer base, work with more diverse populations and practitioners, and with the rise of telehealth consultations, it is important to understand the many variables that should be taken into consideration when working across settings and populations. This panel will discuss frameworks for building cultural responsiveness, the implications of microaggressions, the dissemination of the services across rural settings, the ethics of culture, and breaking down professional stigmas in the field.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Intermediate ~ for BCBAs, BCaBAs, supervisors and those getting supervision.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Learn how to promote an ethical culture and recognize and address discrimination in one's workplace including microagressions; (2) Building cultural responsiveness skills to improve client outcomes (3) Learn best practices for dissemination in rural settings.
Keyword(s): Cultural Responsiveness, Culture, Diversity, Ethics
 
 
Symposium #469
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Service Delivery in ABA: Are We Following Our Values and Our Heart?
Monday, May 31, 2021
4:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/TBA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Ana Carolina Carolina Sella (Private practice)
Discussant: Glauce Carolina Vieira dos Santos (ABA fora da mesinha Clínica de Psicologia Comportamental)
CE Instructor: Glauce Carolina Vieira dos Santos, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The purpose of this symposium is to discuss issues in behavior analysts training and practice. In the first presentation, authors discuss how empirically supported interventions are sometimes viewed as more important than client context and values. Authors discuss that contingencies must be analyzed, including those that generated the systematic reviews and meta-analysis, and a solid behavior analytic training should be the focus, instead of replicating different packaged interventions. In the second presentation, authors will discuss possible problems that the indiscriminate and non-analytical use of manualized interventions might bring to our field, such as the decreased probability of new problem-solving responses when it comes to clinical practice. In the third presentation, authors will discuss if the problem posed by Michael in 1980, the shift in?emphasis, away from the general concepts and methods of the science of behavior, is still a current problem in behavior analytic training and practice. In the fourth presentation the authors will discuss the selection and definition of behavioral goals as part of a process that should value family culture and what they consider important for themselves and their child/adolescent/adult with developmental disabilities. Questions raised by all presentations bring forward the need for reflections about practices that would allow us to provide culturally competent and socially valid services, within a radical behaviorist perspective.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavior analysis, radical behaviorism, service delivery, social validity
Target Audience:

Audience should have at least basic knowledge of Skinner`s articles and books on Radical behaviorism. They should also be updated on evidence-based practices for autism spectrum disorder. They should be service providers for developmental disabilities and be in a graduate program in Behavior Analysis, Psychology or Education.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the differences between empirically supported interventions and evidence-based practices (2) discuss how a superficial education, not focused on analytical skills, might increase the probability of using evidence-based and manualized interventions in a harmful or unethical way (3) describe why the indiscriminate use of manualized interventions can lead to the decrease in response variability in the practitioners repertoire (4) discuss how complicated procedures and explanations can harm our field of behavior analysis (5) describe how cultural competencies and social validity can be part of an ethical practice
 

Highly Complicated Explanations and Procedures: Where is Parsimony?

(Service Delivery)
CINTIA GUILHARDI (Cintia Guilhardi Serviços de Psicologia Comportamental), Helena Furan Duran Meletti (Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo), Thais Martins Sales (ABA Braços Saúde Comportamental), Cássia Leal Da Hora (Paradigma - Behavioral Science and Technology Center), Ana Carolina Carolina Sella (Private practice), Ariene Coelho Souza (Universidade de São Paulo - Brasil), Glauce Carolina Vieira dos Santos (ABA fora da mesinha Clínica de Psicologia Comportamental)
Abstract:

Parsimony is a concept that must guide the behavior of all scientists, not only behavior analysts. This concept means that we should select the simplest and most logical explanation for the phenomenon under study, instead of competing views or interpretations. It does not mean that we investigate simple things or explain it simple, but that we should use the simplest account of the phenomena before moving on to more complex interpretations. In 1980, Jack Michael made a “state of union” message, alerting our community about clinicians or eclectic professionals adding behavior analysis to their techniques. These new professionals learned and practiced Behavior Analysis without knowledge of basic research methodology and without commitment to behaviorism as a world view. In Michael’s opinion, this fact resulted “… in ‘packaged’ independent variables of such complexity that they simply can’t be analyzed into behavior components, especially when they involve highly verbal subjects.” (p.9). In this presentation the authors aim to discuss if the problem posed by Michael in 1980 (the shift in emphasis, away from the general concepts and methods of the science of behavior), is still a problem in ABA research and practices for autism.

 

On Evidence, Standards, Authority, andFaith

(Service Delivery)
CÁSSIA LEAL DA HORA (Paradigma - Behavioral Science and Technology Center), Ana Carolina Carolina Sella (Private practice), Ariene Coelho Souza (Universidade de São Paulo - Brasil), Glauce Carolina Vieira dos Santos (ABA fora da mesinha Clínica de Psicologia Comportamental), Cintia Guilhardi (Cintia Guilhardi Serviços de Psicologia Comportamental), Helena Furan Duran Meletti (Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo), Thais Martins Sales (ABA Braços Saúde Comportamental)
Abstract:

Professional providers and consumers of services for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often warned about the need to base decisions regarding the choice of intervention on evidence-based practices (EBPs). These interventions can be labeled “evidence-based”, “best practices”, etc., when they meet criteria specified by certain individuals. This type of intervention has a authority impact on people’s behavior. Thereby, implementing EBPs in addition to trying to fulfill the seven dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), seems to be acquiring more importance in the decision-making process than context and values of the client, especially when these practices and dimensions are implemented superficially. There should not be a set of rules that, dogmatically guides the decision-making process of a practitioner (or scientist), mainly because there is not one single set of rules that is impartial. Trustable guidelines that favor good professional practices should not function as “objects of faith”. Education and training in behavior analysis that favors solid analytical skills and that take into consideration both clients context peculiarities and the available evidence, could increase the probability of professional providing socially valid services that are compatible with the behavior analytic philosophy.

 

Manualization of Procedures: Where Did the Analysis Go?

(Service Delivery)
HELENA FURAN DURAN MELETTI (Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo), Thais Martins Sales (ABA Braços Saúde Comportamental), Cássia Leal Da Hora (Paradigma - Behavioral Science and Technology Center), Ana Carolina Carolina Sella (Private practice), Ariene Coelho Souza (Universidade de São Paulo - Brasil), Glauce Carolina Vieira dos Santos (ABA fora da mesinha Clínica de Psicologia Comportamental), Cintia Guilhardi (Cintia Guilhardi Serviços de Psicologia Comportamental)
Abstract:

Behavior analytic services have seen an increase in demand, especially in the last two to three decades. Most of this increase is due to service delivery for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). One of the issues with this increase has been training and education for new professionals. In an attempt to regulate the profession, ensure the quality of intervention and avoid harmful mistakes, different certifications, standards, training packages and manualization of procedures have been set forth. This manualization can be advantageous to some degree, as it increases the probability that the behavior analyst will perform all the necessary steps when implementing a procedure. However, this standardization may also lead to narrow education and training of professionals in our field. In this presentation we will discuss these issues that might result from standardization and manualization, such as a lower probability of practitioners' response variability and of new responses when problem solving is needed. Additionally, we will discuss how standardization and manualization may result in less focus on the analytical skills.

 
Applied Behavior Analysis Service Delivery Models for Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Role of Parents and Caregivers
(Service Delivery)
THAIS MARTINS SALES (ABA Braços Saúde Comportamental), Glauce Carolina Vieira dos Santos (ABA fora da mesinha Clínica de Psicologia Comportamental), Cássia Leal Da Hora (Paradigma - Behavioral Science and Technology Center), Ana Carolina Carolina Sella (Private practice), Ariene Coelho Souza (Universidade de São Paulo - Brasil), Cintia Guilhardi (Cintia Guilhardi Serviços de Psicologia Comportamental), Helena Furan Duran Meletti (Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo)
Abstract: One of the important dimensions of an Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Service for children/adolescents/adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is parent or caregiver participation. Parents/caregivers are often trained on problem behavior management procedures, self-help skills teaching procedures, procedures to promote positive relationships between the client and other family members, such as siblings, and on procedures that favors generalization of skills to out of session contexts (CASP, 2020). However, the participation of parents/caregivers in selecting intervention goals and procedures may vary. Brookman-Frazee (2004) distinguishes between two models of relationship that might be established in service provision: the expert model, in which the professional defines goals and solutions to the demands of the family, and the partnership model, in which goals and procedures are defined collaboratively between family and professionals. In this presentation, the authors will discuss these two models of caregiver participation. The discussion about caregiver participation in the selection of goals and procedures seems important if we aim to provide culturally competent and socially valid services.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #479
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Improving Observed Parenting and Enhancing Well-Being in Parents of Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 31, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: DEV
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Jessica Singer-Dudek, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MARLA BRASSARD (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

Research has shown that parents of children with ASD are among the most stressed as compared to all other parents, including those who have children with other psychiatric conditions and developmental disabilities (Hayes & Watson, 2013). Parents of children with ASD are chronically stressed because the demands of the family environment often exceed the parent’s ability to cope. There are few evidence-based interventions available for professionals to use with parents of a child with ASD: some use cognitive therapies, such as meditation, some use social support to reduce stress and mental health problems, and others use implement parent training to improve child behavior. Few if any combine both mental health and behavioral approaches, and none of these are designed for implementation by school personnel. This presentation describes findings from a multi-year transdisciplinary investigation into the most common stressors for parents of preschool children with ASD attending a CABAS® model school. Specifically, in two studies we surveyed parents to determine their reported levels of stress and common stressors, as well as parents’ mental and physical wellbeing, self-care, and self-efficacy skills. In the first study we also examined mother-child interactions during free-play and demand situations in order to determine possible target behaviors for intervention. Implications of the findings and suggestions for interventions will be discussed.

Target Audience:

Those interested in parent education and interventions to help parents cope with the stresses of parenting a child with ASD. These may include practitioners, educators, researchers, or parents themselves.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the evidence as to whether a child’s negative behaviors are manipulative (and thus should be ignored) OR important signals of a child’s needs (and thus should be attended to); (2) describe how child characteristics (e.g., temperament, verbal behavior developmental level, rate of learning in the ABA school, co-morbid diagnoses, severity of ASD) relate to the quality of observed parenting and the implications of these findings for interventions; (3) describe the stressors and mental health of mothers and fathers and the implications for intervention; (4) list the self-care practices that are related to lower stress and better observed quality of parenting.
 
MARLA BRASSARD (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Marla R. Brassard, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. For 37 years her research has focused on parenting, especially psychological maltreatment (PM) of children by parents, a non-physical form of abuse and neglect, that research shows is the equivalent in adverse causal impact to other forms of maltreatment and the most related to depression and suicidal behavior. Recently her work has expanded to include parenting in other high stress contexts, specifically parenting a young child with autistic spectrum disorder, with a focus on interventions that enhance parental wellbeing and increase quality of parenting. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and past president of the Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #481
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Experimental and Behavioral Psychology at Harvard From William James to B. F. Skinner
Monday, May 31, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: PCH
Chair: Darlene E. Crone-Todd (Salem State University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SARA SCHECHNER (Harvard University)
Abstract:

In 1892, William James brought Hugo Münsterberg from Freiburg to direct the new, Harvard Psychological Laboratory that James had created in the Philosophy Department. Münsterberg had trained under William Wundt in Leipzig, who had pioneered an experimental method to explore the relationship between mental events and physical experience. The New Psychology banished the old method of introspection. Instead, it relied on highly controlled experiments with equipment borrowed from the domains of physics and physiology. Researchers studied the psychology of the senses, the timing of mental acts, judgement, memory, and attention. Starting with these “prism, pendulum, and chronograph philosophers,” as James called them, this talk will conclude with B. F. Skinner and his experiments on operant conditioning, reinforcement, and learning. Special attention will be paid to early apparatus such as reaction keys, prototype operant chambers, cumulative recorders, and teaching machines. The apparatus, laboratory records, memoranda, and correspondence of James, Munsterberg, and Skinner survive at Harvard University and can be accessed by scholars interested in the development of their thought.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the history of experimental psychology at Harvard University between 1875 and 1965; (2) list the types of research and teaching apparatus used by experimental psychologists William James, Hugo Munsterberg; BF Skinner, and others; (3) state how to gain access to historical scientific instruments and documents in the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments and Harvard University Archives.
 
SARA SCHECHNER (Harvard University)
Sara Schechner, Ph.D. is the David P. Wheatland Curator of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard University, where she is also on the faculty of the History of Science Department. She has served as Secretary of the Scientific Instrument Commission of the International Union of History and Philosophy of Science and Technology. She has published widely on the history of astronomy, scientific instruments, and material culture and has curated numerous exhibitions, including several on the history of psychology.

Schechner earned degrees in physics and the history and philosophy of science from Harvard and Cambridge. Before returning to Harvard, she was chief curator at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, and curated exhibits for the Smithsonian Institution, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society. Schechner’s research, teaching, and exhibition work has earned her many awards. She is the 2019 recipient of the Paul Bunge Prize from the German Chemical Society and the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry, which is regarded worldwide as the most important honor in the history of scientific instruments. She has also received the prestigious LeRoy E. Doggett Prize for Historical Astronomy from the American Astronomical Society, the Joseph H. Hazen Education Prize of the History of Science Society, and the Great Exhibitions Award of the British Society for the History of Science.
 

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