Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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2008 Education Conference

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, September 6, 2008


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Invited Paper Session #3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evidence-Based Education: Can We Get There from Here?
Saturday, September 6, 2008
9:00 AM–9:45 AM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Ronnie Detrich, M.A.
RONNIE DETRICH (Wing Institute)
Dr. Ronnie Detrich is a Senior Fellow at the Wing Institute, a relatively new organization with the mission of promoting the use evidence-based practices in education. Prior to joining the Wing Institute, he was Clinical Director at Spectrum Center for almost 20 years. He has been providing behavioral services for children and youth since 1967. During that time he has served as a direct service provider as well as director of programs such as a statewide autism program in South Dakota and a residential treatment program for adjudicated adolescents in West Virginia. All of his work has been characterized by implementing programs that have an evidence base and data-based decision making.
Abstract: Recent federal policy has placed evidence-based interventions squarely in the middle of education policy. While this is encouraging, there are many issues that have to be resolved. The purpose of this paper is to review these issues and address the implications for behavior analysts. Among the issues to be considered are: What is meant by the term evidence-based? What constitutes evidence, and what is the process for validating interventions as evidence-based? How do we move beyond the identification of evidence-based interventions implementing them in usual educational settings? What role does progress monitoring play in evidence-based education? The field of behavior analysis has many points of overlap with the evidence-based education movement, but it is distinctly different from evidence-based practice. How behavior analysis responds to some of these differences will determine how well it fares in the evidence-based education movement.
Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts and licensed psychologists

Learning Objectives: N/A
 
 
Invited Paper Session #4
CE Offered: PSY
Solution Driven Research
Saturday, September 6, 2008
9:45 AM–10:30 AM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Lynn Okagaki, Ph.D.
LYNN OKAGAKI (Institute of Education Sciences)
Dr. Lynn Okagaki was appointed Commissioner of Education Research in the Institute of Education Sciences in December, 2005. She heads the National Center for Education Research, one of four centers within the Institute of Education Sciences at the U.S. Department of Education. Okagaki joined the U.S. Department of Education in 2002 as senior counselor to the assistant secretary of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement. She subsequently served as the first Deputy Director for Science at the Institute of Education Sciences. In that role, she established the scientific peer review procedures for grant application reviews and created the peer review process for Institute reports. Prior to joining the Department, Okagaki served as associate dean of the School of Consumer and Family Science and professor of Child Development and Family Studies at Purdue University. She has held appointments at Yale University, Cornell University, and the University of Houston. Okagaki served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy, on the editorial boards for the Early Childhood Research Quarterly and the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, and on review panels for the National Science Foundation. Okagaki’s research has focused on academic achievement as affected by culture and family values. She has authored numerous journal articles and chapters on minority students’ achievement and on parenting and school achievement and was co-editor of three books. Okagaki received her Bachelor of Science degree in applied behavioral sciences from the University of California at Davis and her doctoral degree in developmental psychology from Cornell University.
Abstract: In the last 60 years, there have been a number of occasions in which historical and cultural influences have converged to turn attention to the effectiveness of education in our country. Today we are in one such period. What are the implications for education researchers? What are the questions to which education practitioners, leaders, and policy makers seek answers? The over-arching priority of the Institute of Education Sciences is research that contributes to improving student outcomes. Through the National Center for Education Research and the National Center for Special Education Research, the Institute supports research to develop and evaluate education interventions, to develop and validate measurement instruments, and to gain fundamental understanding of the processes that underlie variations in the effectiveness of education programs, practices, policies, and approaches. This talk presents the Institute's perspectives on the future of education research.
Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Sources of Evidence-Based Education Recommendations
Saturday, September 6, 2008
11:00 AM–11:45 AM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Timothy A. Slocum, Ph.D.
TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University)
Dr. Timothy Slocum has been involved in applied behavior analysis in education since 1982. He has been a special education teacher, instructional designer, researcher, and teacher trainer. He received his Ph.D. in special education from the University of Washington in 1992. Since that time, he has been on faculty in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University. He was the founding co-editor of the Journal of Direct Instruction and has co-authored a textbook on Direct Instruction. He is currently President of the Board of Directors of the Association of Direct Instruction and is active in developing a consortium to support high quality research on Direct Instruction. His research interests include Direct Instruction, reading, vocabulary, and fluency. In addition, Dr. Slocum has been involved in developing and validating an alternate assessment for children with significant cognitive disabilities. He is interested in evidence-based practices (EBP) in education, especially in addressing the challenges of developing valid methods to identify such practices.
Abstract: In recent years a great many organizations have promulgated standards for evidence-based practices in education and have derived lists of practices that are said to be supported by stronger evidence bases. Standards vary across these organizations, and as a result recommendations vary as well. This session will describe several prominent sources of evidence-based practice recommendations with special attention to the standards that they use and how this influences practice recommendations. We will highlight: the topics and populations of interest; screening and rating of studies; systems for rating practices; and evidence regarding validity and reliability of the systems.
Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #6
CE Offered: PSY
Critical Issues in the Use of Randomized Clinical Trials and Control Groups Within Applied Settings: Rationale, Challenges and Benefits
Saturday, September 6, 2008
1:00 PM–1:45 PM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Hill Walker, Ph.D.
HILL WALKER (Center on Human Development)
Dr. Hill M. Walker is a professor of Special Education, Co-Director of the Institute on Violence and Destructive Behavior, and Director of the Center on Human Development, in the College of Education at the University of Oregon. He has a longstanding interest in behavioral assessment and in the development of effective intervention procedures for use in school settings with a range of behavior disorders. He has been engaged in applied research during his entire career, dating from 1966. His research interests include social skills assessment, curriculum development and intervention, longitudinal studies of aggression and antisocial behavior, and the development of early screening procedures for detecting students who are at-risk for social-behavioral adjustment problems and/or later school drop-out. Dr. Walker is the co-author, along with Herbert Severson, of Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders (SSBD) (Sopris West, 1990); author of The Acting Out Child: Coping with Classroom Disruption (2nd ed., Sopris West, 1995); co-author, with Phillip Strain and Michael Guralnick, of Children’s Social Behavior: Development, Assessment and Modification (Academic Press, 1986); co-author, with Geoffrey Colvin and Elizabeth Ramsey, of Antisocial Behavior in School: Strategies and Best Practices (Brooks/Cole, 1995); co-editor, with Michael Epstein, of Making Schools Safer and Violence Free: Critical Issues, Solutions, and Recommended Practices (PRO-ED, 2000); and co-editor, with Mark Shinn and Gary Stoner, of Interventions for Academic and Behavior Problems II: Preventive and Remedial Approaches (National Association of School Psychologists, 2002). His most recent books are the 2nd edition of Antisocial Behavior in School: Evidence-Based Practices (Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 2004) co-authored with Elizabeth Ramsey and Frank Gresham; and Safe and Healthy Schools: Practical Prevention Strategies (Guilford, 2005) co-authored with Jeffrey Sprague.
Abstract: Educatoral researchers and other applied professionals have recently become the targets of strong pressures to demonstrate effects using randomized control group designs. This session will review the source and rationale for these developments and present information on the appropriate use of RCTs in their various forms. Situations in which single case methods are used to good effect in combination with RCTs will also be discussed. The numerous challenges attendant upon implementing randomized designs in school districts will be described, including the presenter’s experience in this regard. Finally, recent developments in the application of levels of evidence in evaluating the efficacy of applied intervention programs will be reviewed.
Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Role of Single Subject Research Design in Establishing Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines
Saturday, September 6, 2008
1:45 PM–2:30 PM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (National Autism Center)
Dr. Wilczynski is the Executive Director of the National Autism Center. In her role as the Executive Director, she oversees the National Standards Project, updates public policy-makers about evidence-based practice related to educational and behavioral interventions, develops assessment clinics specializing in the evaluation of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, and establishes the parent education and professional training agenda of the National Autism Center. She authored numerous articles on the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Prior to her position at the National Autism Center, she developed and directed an intensive early intervention program for children with autism spectrum disorders at the Munroe-Meyer Institute. She has held academic appointments at the University of Southern Mississippi and the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Wilczynski holds a joint appointment with May Institute, where she serves as Vice President of Autism Services. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Wilczynski is a licensed psychologist and a board certified behavior analyst.
Abstract: Single subject research designs readily lend themselves to educational environments and are widely used to examine the effectiveness of educational interventions. It is unfortunate that they have been so widely ignored in the evidence-based practice movement. This presentation begins with a candid description of the advantages and disadvantages of single subject research design. In addition, the importance of including single subject research design when establishing evidence-based practice guidelines is discussed. The majority of the presentation will involve a description of the methodology used to incorporate single subject research design into the National Standards Report, an unprecedented effort to establish the strength of evidence supporting educational and behavioral interventions for school-aged individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Finally, the limitations and possible future modifications of the methods used to incorporate single subject research design in the National Standards Project will be considered.
Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #8
CE Offered: PSY
Nailing the Educational Pendulum to the Wall
Saturday, September 6, 2008
3:00 PM–3:45 PM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: W. David Tilly III, Ph.D.
W. DAVID TILLY III (Heartland Area Education Agency)
Dr. W. David Tilly currently serves as Director of Innovation and Accountability for Heartland AEA 11. Heartland serves 55 public school districts and 36 accredited nonpublic schools in central Iowa. Prior to joining Heartland AEA, Dr. Tilly was a consultant for assessment, research, and innovation at the Iowa Department of Education. In that role, he worked statewide to implement changes in the educational system throughout Iowa. Of particular note has been his work with Iowa’s Renewed Service Delivery System (RSDS). RSDS foundationally changed the way that special education is conceptualized and delivered in Iowa. RSDS practices and procedures are the same ones being advocated nationally as components of a Response to Intervention (RTI) approach to services. David is a school psychologist by training. He has worked as a practicing psychologist, a university trainer at Iowa State University, a state department of education consultant, and an administrator. He works regularly with states, school districts, federal offices and national organizations on improving educational results for all children. He is also the author or coauthor of 31 published journal articles, book chapters or books. Dr. Tilly is the 2005 Recipient of the Martha Fields Award of Excellence from the National Association of State Directors of Special Education.
Abstract: We’ve all experienced it: innovation, after strategy, after “bright idea,” all well meaning and all well intended. The problem is, most of ‘em don’t stick and next year we’re back on the bandwagon with the next “new thing.” Response to Intervention (RTI), however, is different. RTI will be presented as a framework for implementing and supporting evidence-based practices, and it will illustrate how one large educational agency “pinned the pendulum to the wall around RTI.” That is, once RTI was adopted, practices were institutionalized across the system in ways that support continued implementation and extension. Illustrations will be provided from the presenter’s experience implementing at the local, intermediate unit, state department and University levels. Good measure will be provided from the school of hard knocks.
Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #9
CE Offered: PSY
Using RTI to Accomplish System Change
Saturday, September 6, 2008
3:45 PM–4:30 PM
Grand Ballroom B
Area: EDC; Domain: Synthesis
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Amanda M. VanDerHeyden, Ph.D.
AMANDA M. VANDERHEYDEN (Education Research and Consulting, Inc.)
Amanda M. VanDerHeyden, PhD, is a private consultant and researcher living in Fairhope, Alabama. Dr. VanDerHeyden previously has held faculty positions at the Early Intervention Institute at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and in the School Psychology Program at University of California at Santa Barbara. She has also worked as a researcher and consultant in a number of school districts. In Vail Unified School District, Dr. VanDerHeyden led a district effort to implement the STEEP RTI model from 2002 to 2005. In this district, identification of children as having specific learning disabilities was reduced by half within 2 years, test scores increased, and the district was nationally recognized as a success story related to No Child Left Behind by the US Department of Education. Dr. VanDerHeyden has authored over 40 related articles and book chapters and has worked as a national trainer and consultant to assist districts to implement RTI models. In 2006, Dr. VanDerHeyden was named to an advisory panel for the National Center for Learning Disabilities to provide guidance related to RTI and the diagnosis of specific learning disability. She is associate editor of Journal of Behavioral Education and serves on the editorial boards for School Psychology Review, School Psychology Quarterly, Journal of School Psychology, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, Journal of Early Intervention, and Journal of Learning Disabilities. Dr. VanDerHeyden recently co-edited a handbook and special issues of Assessment for Effective Intervention and School Psychology Review, each focusing on RTI. In 2006, Dr. VanDerHeyden received the Lightner Witmer Early Career Contributions Award from Division 16 (School Psychology) of the American Psychological Association in recognition of her scholarship on early intervention, RTI, and models of data-based decision-making in schools.
Abstract: RTI can be a vehicle for broader system change. Dr. VanDerHeyden will discuss how to plan and implement RTI within schools in ways that promote the capacity of schools to use data to improve every day instruction and schooling decisions. District-wide implementation in Vail Unified School District will be described as a case example for participants. Data will be shared concerning effective ways to enhance learning within a system using RTI. Current data on educational decision-making as well as ideas for the future will also be highlighted.
Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists

Learning Objectives: N/a
 

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