Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    DDA: Developmental Disabilities

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Program by Invited Tutorials: Sunday, May 29, 2016


 

Invited Tutorial #23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Reducing Impulsivity: Current Knowledge & Future Directions
Sunday, May 29, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Gregory J. Madden, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Odum (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: GREGORY J. MADDEN (Utah State University), JILLIAN RUNG (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Steeply discounting the value of delayed outcomes is robustly correlated with addictions and poor health decision-making. Longitudinal studies suggest that this form of impulsivity precedes and predicts acquisition of substance use, and animal studies reveal a similar pattern. Despite the evidence that delay discounting is a trait, this tutorial will review studies that have discovered methods for decreasing impulsive choice. We will discuss procedures that produce acute, context-dependent effects (e.g., framing effects), and when these may prove useful in positively influencing human decision making. We will also discuss learning-based procedures that have proven effective in humans (e.g., delay fading and working memory training) and nonhumans (e.g., interval-timing or delay-exposure training) in reducing impulsive choice. Finally, we will discuss practicality issues that will need to be addressed if learning-based approaches are going to impact human behavior. We will not discuss effects of drugs or neurological manipulations on impulsive choice.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) define delay discounting and discuss why it is of relevance to health decision-making; (2) discuss the direction in which it is therapeutic to change delay discounting; (3) discuss the methods that have proven successful in changing delay discounting among humans and among non-humans.
 
GREGORY J. MADDEN (Utah State University), JILLIAN RUNG (Utah State University)
Dr. Madden received his training from the University of North Texas, West Virginia University, and the University of Vermont. Dr. Madden's research is largely focused on the behavioral economics of addiction and health decision-making. His early research documented extreme impulsivity in individuals addicted to illicit drugs and cigarettes. Later research revealed that impulsive decision-making predicted cocaine self-administration in rats. His current work explores methods that may be used to therapeutically reduce impulsivity. Dr. Madden's second, line of research explores game-based behavioral-economic approaches to influencing children's health decision-making. These research endeavors have been supported with more than $4 million in grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the US Department of Agriculture. Dr. Madden frequently serves on NIH grant-review panels, he has published more than 70 papers in 25 different journals, and his peer-reviewed publications have been cited more than 4,500 times. From 2011 until 2015, he served as the Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He has edited two books including the two-volume APA Handbook of Behavior Analysis. He is currently co-writing an introductory behavior analysis textbook.
Jillian Rung completed her BA at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is completing her third year of graduate training at Utah State University. Her previous work involved decision-making in dynamic environments, and her current research involves the environmental determinants of impulsivity and how processes, such as reward valuation, affect impulsive decision-making. Jillian has served as ad-hoc reviewer for the APA Graduate Student Association’s Basic Psychological Science Grant, and has also guest reviewed for several journals such as the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, and Cognition. When she finishes her Ph.D., she plans to continue her research on impulsive-decision making, with the goal of developing preventative behavioral training and treatment programs for addictions and related behavioral maladies.
Keyword(s): Delay disounting, Impulsivity
 
 
Invited Tutorial #51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Philosophy of Science and the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior
Sunday, May 29, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Lewis A. Bizo, Ph.D.
Chair: Lewis A. Bizo (University of New England)
Presenting Author: RANDOLPH C. GRACE (University of Canterbury), Brian Haig (University of Canterbury)
Abstract:

Single-subject methodology and Skinner's caution against inferential statistics based on group averages have been very influential with researchers in behavior analysis. Here we review recent developments in the philosophy of science and methodology, including the "new statistics," and consider their implications for the quantitative analysis of behavior. We describe an account of scientific methodology—the Abductive Theory of Method (ATOM; Haig, 2005)—which details how empirical phenomena are detected and contribute to theory construction via inference to the best explanation, and show how it is relevant for behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) describe and contrast important themes in the philosophy of science, including realism and empiricism, and how these relate to radical behaviorism; (2) describe the Abductive Theory of Method (ATOM) and how it relates to research and applied practice in the experimental analysis of behavior; (3) contrast current and historical conceptions of validity.
 
RANDOLPH C. GRACE (University of Canterbury), Brian Haig (University of Canterbury)
Randolph C. Grace is Professor of Psychology at the University of Canterbury (Christchurch, New Zealand).  He received his PhD from the University of New Hampshire in 1995 and has published over 120 articles and book chapters in a variety of basic and applied research areas including choice behavior and decision making, behavioural economics, methodology, comparative cognition, conditioning and learning, clinical/forensic psychology, tobacco control and neuropsychology.  He is past President of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. 
Keyword(s): Science
 
 
Invited Tutorial #72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Characterization of Delay Discounting Using Multiple Models and Effective Delay 50
Sunday, May 29, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Amy Odum, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Odum (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: CHRISTOPHER FRANCK (Virginia Tech)
Abstract:

The study of delay discounting, or valuation of future rewards as a function of delay, has contributed to understanding the behavioral economics of addiction. Accurate characterization of discounting can be furthered by statistical model selection given that many functions have been proposed to measure future valuation of rewards. This tutorial will present a convenient Bayesian model selection algorithm that selects the most probable discounting model among a set of candidates chosen by the researcher. The approach assigns the most probable model for each individual subject using an asymptotic approximation to model probability based on the Bayesian Information Criterion. Importantly, effective delay 50 (ED50) functions as a suitable unifying measure that is computable for and comparable between several popular functions, including both one- and two-parameter models. Software to execute the combined model selection/ED50 approach is illustrated using empirical discounting data collected from a sample of 111 undergraduate students with five discounting models proposed between 1937 and 2006. The work this tutorial is based upon was published in the January, 2015, special issue of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior studying experimental manipulations of delay discountingand related processes.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the devaluation of future rewards as a function of delay in terms of delay discounting; (2) recognize several proposed models of delay discounting both mathematically and graphically, and state the computational approach to fit these models to observed data; (3) explain Effective Delay 50 (ED50); (4) execute approximate Bayesian model selection to choose among candidate models given observed data using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Make informed decisions about the merits and caveats of choosing among candidate models on the basis of observed data.
 
CHRISTOPHER FRANCK (Virginia Tech)
Christopher Franck received his Ph.D. from the Department of Statistics at North Carolina State University in 2010. Dr. Franck is an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Statistics at Virginia Tech, where he also serves as the assistant director of the Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Statistical Analysis (LISA). Dr. Franck collaborates with researchers from the Addiction Recovery Research Center (ARRC) in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute studying a variety of psychological, behavioral economic, and statistical aspects of those who suffer from addiction and are successful in recovery. Dr. Franck's research interests include non-additivity in unreplicated studies with a focus on the identification of latent-groupings, predictive modeling of health outcomes, spatial modeling, and bioinformatics.
Keyword(s): Bayesian Model, Delay Discounting, Effective Delay50
 
 
Invited Tutorial #99
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Associative Symmetry, Emergent Relations, and Stimulus Class Formation
Sunday, May 29, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Gregory J. Madden, Ph.D.
Chair: Gregory J. Madden (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: PETER URCUIOLI (Purdue University)
Abstract:

Associative symmetry is one of a number of derived relations that can emerge after explicit training on other conditional relations. Here, untrained but accurate B?A conditional discrimination performances arise from training A?B conditional relations, a finding indicative of stimulus class formation (i.e., the development of sets of disparate but interchangeable stimuli). Recent research shows that human language capabilities are not necessary for associative symmetry; it can also reflect basic reinforcement and stimulus control processes.This tutorial will describe the history of the now-successful search for symmetry in an animal other than humans (viz., the pigeon) and show how this important finding led to demonstrations of other rarely or never-before seen emergent relations in a non-human animal. Central to these demonstrations is the presenter's theory (Urcuioli, 2008) of the origin of stimulus classes in pigeons, specifically, the reinforcement contingencies of training, the nature of the functional stimuli, and the effect of common functional stimuli across different reinforced relations. The theory makes precise, testable and often confirmed predictions about the training conditions that should, and should not, yield emergent relations such as symmetry, transitivity, and reflexivity.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe associative symmetry and why it is an example of an untrained or “emergent” relation; (2) define a “stimulus class” and describe how stimulus classes develop and are demonstrated; (3) cite newly discovered emergent relations in non-human animals and outline a theory to explain these behavioral effects.
 
PETER URCUIOLI (Purdue University)
Peter Urcuioli is Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. He received his undergraduate degree in psychology at the University of New Hampshire where he worked with Tony Nevin, and his Master's degree and Ph.D. in experimental psychology at Dalhousie University (Nova Scotia, Canada) where he was a graduate student of Vern Honig. After a two-year postdoctoral research fellowship with Tony Wright at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston, Peter joined the faculty at Purdue University in 1981. Peter has made significant contributions to the areas of discrimination learning and stimulus control, differential outcome mechanisms, animal memory and cognition, and stimulus-class formation. His research has been continuously funded since 1983 by NIH and NSF, and he has over 70 peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Behavioural Processes, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Learning and Behavior, Learning & Motivation, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. His recent ground-breaking work on equivalence relations in pigeons reveals a wide range of never-before-seen emergent relations that are predicted by his innovative theory of stimulus-class formation that incorporates basic stimulus control and reinforcement assumptions.
Keyword(s): Emergent Relations, Reflexivity, Symmetry, Transitivity
 

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