Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AAB: Applied Animal Behavior

    AUT: Autism

    BPN: Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

    CSE: Community Interventions, Social and Ethical Issues

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PRA: Practice

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    TPC: Theoretical, Philosophical, and Conceptual Issues

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

    OTH: Other

42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Program by Invited Events: Monday, May 30, 2016


 

Invited Paper Session #174
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Final Fusillade

Monday, May 30, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Montreux, Swissotel
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Julie M. Slowiak, Ph.D.
Chair: Julie M. Slowiak (University of Minnesota Duluth)
BRADLEY E. HUITEMA (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Brad Huitema is professor of psychology, a member of the general faculty, and statistical consultant for businesses and several units of Western Michigan University. His 1980 text, The Analysis of Covariance and Alternatives, has been well received in the field. He is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of Behavioral Assessment. He is also a referee for several journals including The American Statistician; Behavioral Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers; the Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment; Psychological Bulletin and Psychometrika. His research interests include time series analysis, evaluation of preventitive health practices, and single organism and quasi-experimental design. His international travel includes teaching several short courses in Mexico.
Abstract:

A bevy of current methodological topics relevant to psychological researchers working in diverse areas is presented. Many of them are widely misunderstood. Among these topics are: (1) the recent efforts to ban null hypothesis significance tests (NHST), (2) interpretation problems surrounding both conventional (i.e., Fisher and Neyman-Pearson) and Bayesian statistical inference, (3) the relationship between p-values and replication, (4) unjustified hand wringing regarding effect declines (often claimed to cast doubt on scientific methods in general) that appear to occur in many or most areas of science, (5) the increasing salience of single-case research designs and associated analyses, and (6) the stunning effect of complex black-box statistical methods on judgment. The historical context for several of these topics is presented in order to facilitate an understanding how we have ended up in our current state.

Target Audience:

Behavioral researchers with a strong interest in research methodology.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe at least one reason that treatment effects tend to decline; (2) provide an example of a major public health problem solved with a very small n design; (3) identify a study in which a single-case design is very convincing.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #218
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Should the FDA Reduce the Nicotine Content of Cigarettes? The Science and Potential Public Health Impact

Monday, May 30, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Christine E. Hughes, Ph.D.
Chair: Christine E. Hughes (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
ERIC C. DONNY (Univerisity of Pittsburgh)
Dr. Donny is a Professor of Psychology (primary), Psychiatry and Behavioral & Community Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. His expertise includes behavioral pharmacology, biological and health psychology, addiction, and regulatory science. His research has included a wide range of topics and techniques including animal models of self-administration, human abuse liability of cocaine and heroin, functional neuroimaging, population-based surveys, and clinical trials of tobacco products. His current interests focus on regulatory approaches to reducing the health burden of tobacco. He co-directs the Center for the Evaluation of Nicotine in Cigarettes (CENIC), an NIDA/FDA-funded cooperative agreement involving 12 institutions that aims to increase understanding of how behavior and health might be affected in the vast majority of smokers who are either unable or unwilling to quit, if the nicotine content of combustible tobacco products is reduced.
Abstract:

In 2009, Congress gave the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the authority to limit the nicotine content of combusted tobacco products. Decades of research suggest that nicotine is the primary cause of tobacco addiction and that reducing nicotine might reduce the rate and/or prevalence of smoking and have a dramatic impact on public health. This presentation will focus on recent clinical and preclinical data that addresses the potential benefits and risks of reducing nicotine as a regulatory approach. Clinical studies indicate that marked reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes lead to fewer cigarettes smoked per day and reduced nicotine dependence with little evidence of compensatory smoking. Preclinical data from rat models of nicotine self-administration indicate that nicotine reduction would likely also decrease the initiation of use amongst nicotine na?ve adolescent users and that other non-nicotine constituents of tobacco smoke have little effect on behavior. The primary exception is MAO inhibition, which appears to shift the dose-response curve for self-administration to the left when the cost is low (i.e., low fixed ratio). Together, these data add to a growing literature that suggests that regulated reductions in nicotine may have a positive impact on behavior and health. Funding: Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) (U54 DA031659). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or the Food and Drug Administration.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) determine the evidence as to whether reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes is likely to lead to compensatory smoking; (2) determine the evidence as to whether reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes is likely to lead to significant nicotine withdrawal or other negative effects such as depression; (3) determine if altering the nicotine content of cigarettes impacts price elasticity.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #237a
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Therapeutic Utility of Employment in Treating Drug Addiction

Monday, May 30, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Kenneth Silverman, Ph.D.
Chair: Paul L. Soto (Texas Tech University)
KENNETH SILVERMAN (Johns Hopkins University)
Kenneth Silverman is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research has focused on developing operant treatments to address the interrelated problems of poverty and drug addiction. His primary research has focused on the development and evaluation of abstinence reinforcement interventions for the treatment of heroin and cocaine addiction in low-income, inner city adults; the development of the therapeutic workplace intervention and the use of employment-based reinforcement in the long-term maintenance of drug abstinence and adherence to addiction treatment medications; and the development of computer-based training to establish critical academic and job skills that chronically unemployed adults need to gain and maintain employment and escape poverty.
Abstract:

Research on a model Therapeutic Workplace has allowed for the rigorous evaluation of the use of employment in the treatment of drug addiction. Under the Therapeutic Workplace, adults with histories of drug addiction are hired and paid to work. To promote drug abstinence or adherence to addiction medications, participants are required to provide drug-free urine samples or take prescribed addiction medications, respectively, to gain access to the workplace and/or to maintain their maximum rate of pay. Research has shown that this intervention is effective in promoting and maintaining abstinence from heroin, cocaine and alcohol and in promoting adherence to naltrexone in heroin-dependent adults. This presentation will review research on the Therapeutic Workplace and summarize major lessons that have been learned in conducting this research. In addition, the presentation will describe three models that could be used to maintain employment-based reinforcement in the treatment of drug addiction: A Social Business model, a Cooperative Employer model, and a Wage Supplement model. Overall, this program of research suggests that employment could be useful as a means of arranging and maintaining therapeutic reinforcement contingencies in the treatment of drug addiction.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts interested in the application of operant conditioning to the long-term treatment of drug addiction.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the features and key parameters of abstinence reinforcement interventions used in the treatment of drug addiction; (2) describe the features the therapeutic workplace intervention and employment-based reinforcement; (3) describe the effects of employment-based reinforcement in promoting abstinence from heroin and cocaine and adherence to addiction medication.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #245
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Don Baer Invited Presentation: Taking EIBI to School: A Review of School-Based Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions

Monday, May 30, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Ilene S. Schwartz, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark D. Shriver (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
ILENE S. SCHWARTZ (University of Washington)
Dr. Ilene Schwartz is a professor in the Area of Special Education at the University of Washington and the Director of the Haring Center for Research and Training in Education at UW.  She earned her Ph.D. in child and developmental psychology from the University of Kansas and is a board certified behavior analyst (BCBA-D).  Dr. Schwartz has an active research and professional training agenda with primary interests in the area of autism, inclusive education, and the sustainability of educational interventions.  She has had consistent research funding from the U.S. Department of Education since 1990 and serves on a number of editorial review boards including the Topics in Early Childhood Special Education and the Journal of Early Intervention.  Dr. Schwartz is the director of Project DATA, a model preschool program for children with autism that has been in operation since 1997; and is currently involved in research projects examining the efficacy of the Project DATA model with toddlers and preschoolers with autism. 
Abstract:

It is well documented that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) benefit from early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI). The majority of programs for toddlers with ASD have been conducted in children's homes. Although there are some benefits to working in homes, there are a number of drawbacks such as isolation, cost, and lack of appropriate social and communicative models. The purpose of this presentation is describe the current state of knowledge about early intervention for children with ASD, including the results of two recently completed randomized clinical trials on school-based services. Implications of these results will be discussed as they apply to the basic dimensions of applied behavior analysis.

Target Audience:

Students, family members, researchers, school administrators, private practitioners providing EIBI to children with ASD.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the benefits of school based EIBI services; (2) describe characteristics of high quality EIBI services; (3) discuss how the concept of social validity can be used to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of behavioral programming for young children with ASD and their families.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #261
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Sleep Problems of Children With Autism: Prevalent, Relevant, and Treatable by Behavior Analysts

Monday, May 30, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Grand Ballroom EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Jessica L. Thomason-Sassi, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica L. Thomason-Sassi (New England Center for Children)
GREGORY P. HANLEY (Western New England University)
Gregory P. Hanley, Ph.D., has been applying the principles of learning to improve socially important behaviors of children and adults with and without disabilities for more than 20 years. He worked and trained at the Spurwink School, the Groden Center, and the Kennedy Krieger Institute; earned his Ph.D. at the University of Florida; and was tenured at the University of Kansas. He is currently a professor of psychology and director of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral Program at Western New England University and an adjunct professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Hanley has published more than 80 articles in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as the assessment and prevention of problem behavior, teaching tactics for young children, and evidence-based values. Dr. Hanley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 25), past editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP), and a past associate editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Behavior Analyst, and BAP.
Abstract:

Sleep problems are prevalent among children, especially children with autism. Sleep problems negatively impact the wellbeing of both the child and their family. The good news is that most sleep problems of children are treatable by applied behavior analysts. Critical features of empirically supported behavioral intervention for sleep problems will be described along with ideas for teaching consumers about the prevalence and relevance of applied behavior analysts for addressing children's sleep problems.

Target Audience:

Applied Behavior Analysts, BCBAs, intermediate

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the assessment process that allows for the identification of likely causes of persistent delayed sleep onset and night awakenings in young children; (2) describe aspects of nighttime routines, schedules, and dependencies that promote or inhibit healthy sleep; (3) describe the various function-based treatments for nighttime problem behavior that interferes with sleep onset or the resumption of sleep.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #269
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Science Needs Experiments, but Experiments Are Not Enough to Get People and Institutions' Consensus About Science: How to Spread Behavior Analysis in Italy

Monday, May 30, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Montreux, Swissotel
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Douglas A. Johnson (Western Michigan University)
FABIO TOSOLIN (Italian Scientific Society of Behavior Analysis (AARBA))
Since the 1980s, Fabio Tosolin has been introducing and spreading organizational behavior management (OBM) and performance management (PM) in Italy. In the 1990s, he applied Lindsley's precision teaching (PT) and fluency building approach to the rapidly growing e-learning applications: developing PT in a software application for the first time in Italy. From 2009 to 2012, he has been the leader of the Italian Cluster in the European ManuVAR Consortium that adopted Precision Teaching method in the operators' training through Virtual and Augmented Reality learning machines. Further, he led many Italian and European industries in their implementation of behavior-based Safety (B-BS) processes. He is currently professor of health, safety, environment, and quality at the Milan Polytechnic, Faculty of Engineering of the Industrial Processes. He has been the chair of the last seven editions of the European Behavior-Based Safety Conference and led the scientific committee for the certification of B-BS process and professionals. He is author of more than 100 scientific communications, experimental studies, articles and books on psychology of learning, didactic communication, learning technologies, behavior management and B-BS. He is the president of the Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis, the Italian Chapter of ABAI, and adviser of the Cambridge Center for Behavior Studies.
Abstract:

Behavior analysis expiates unfair preconceptions in Italy because of the lack of scientific culture and the psychoanalytic approach, both well spread in several clinical, educational, institutional, political and academic environments. Further, there are common misconceptions of our principles themselves and their applications. ABA Chapter of Italy (AARBA) has been committed to disseminating our science since its founding in 2001 and we have challenged all those prejudices. As professionals and members of the ABA community, we tried many ways before getting partially successful: AARBA tried to influence institutions and academics first, but the evidence provided by our experiments was not enough to move them forward their conflicts of interests. So, we changed the direction of our efforts, from top-down (from institutions to clients) to bottom-up (from clients to institutions). The efficacy of our application, especially in organizational settings, developed a community that got benefit from behavior analysis and that yearly have been gathering in our annual conference, since 2004. Invited institutions to our conference could not ignore the audience and have been obliged to endorse us, sometimes under negative reinforcement. It has been a hard work but worth it. This presentation will show the results of our successful applications and experiments and the impact they had on clients in terms of benefits and on institutions, in terms of consensus.

Target Audience:

Students and practitioners interested in reviewing a possible application of behavior analysis to business and e-learning, and in understanding how to nurture and value OBM in the civil society.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) avoid common errors in disseminations of science; (2) list the marketing activities to promote and sell behavior analysis to clients and institutions; (3) list the variety of business results and environments which behavior analysis may apply to, from sales to safety, from hospitals to industries.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #289
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Observing Behavior and Discrimination Processes in Children and Adults

Monday, May 30, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DEV; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Gerson Yukio Tomanari, Ph.D.
Chair: Iver H. Iversen (University of North Florida)
GERSON YUKIO TOMANARI (Universidade de São Paulo)
Dr. Gerson Yukio Tomanari is a full professor at the University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil, institution in which he has completed the Bachelor degree in Psychology (1993), as well as the master (1995) and doctoral (1997) degrees in Experimental Psychology - the latter in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Medical School - Shriver Center. At the University of São Paulo, Dr. Tomanari coordinates the Laboratory of Experimental Analysis of Behavior. From a comparative perspective involving humans and non-humans, his main interests have been: Behavioral and learning processes, attention, observing behavior, eye movements, visual discrimination, symbolic behavior and concept formation. On these topics, Dr. Tomanari has published more than 60 papers in peer-reviewed journals, books and chapters, and supervised more almost 30 master and doctoral students. He has lectured and taught in the United States, France, Norway, Peru, Japan, and served as “ad hoc” reviewer for the main journals in the field. Dr. Tomanari is the current dean of the Institute of Psychology, USP, as well as the adjunct coordinator of the National Psychology Graduate System of CAPES, an agency of the Ministry of Education in Brazil.
Abstract:

Observing behavior is an operant behavior that has the production of discriminative stimuli as consequence. This presentation will review the main course of the scientific production in this field, from early investigations up to some of the most recent works. To analyze this quite numerous and diverse literature, the speaker will identify and describe the basic observing-response procedures that employed humans as participants, especially children and adults. The maintenance of observing behavior by discriminative stimulus of extinction (that is, S-) compared to discriminative stimulus of reinforcement (that is, S+) will be addressed and two sets of empirical works involving adults and children with typical and atypical development will be presented. The first work will present the current advances in the study of observing behavior by tracking the participants' eye movements. The second work will focus on the role of observing responses in conditional discrimination processes that lead to the formation of equivalence classes. Based on these recent findings, the speaker will discuss how discrimination is established as the product of the main three-term contingency interlocked with the observing-response contingency.

Target Audience:

Basic and applied researchers interested in mechanisms of behavior change. Additionally, it should be of great interest to practitioners in a variety of applied settings.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) define and conceptualize observing behavior in theoretical and methodological terms; (2) describe different studies that investigated observing behavior in children and adults, comparing and discussing their results; (3) expand the role of observing behavior to a variety of learning contexts, including the formation of symbolic classes.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #309
CE Offered: PSY

Quantitative Modeling in Behavioral Analysis, Part 1: Why?

Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Federico Sanabria, Ph.D.
Chair: Blake A. Hutsell (Virginia Commonwealth University)
FEDERICO SANABRIA (Arizona State University)
Dr. Sanabria is an associate professor of psychology at Arizona State University and principal investigator at the Basic Behavioral Processes laboratory. He is also affiliated to the neuroscience program in Arizona State University. Dr. Sanabria received his professional degree in psychology from the Universidad de los Andes en Bogotá (Colombia), where he spent a few years as marketing research analyst. He received his doctoral degree in experimental psychology in 2004 from Stony Brook University, where he worked on self-control under the guidance of Dr. Howard Rachlin. He was a postdoctoral research associate under the supervision of Dr. Peter Killeen (2004–2008) and Dr. Janet Neisewander (2008) in Arizona State University. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed publications in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB), Behavioural Brain Research, Psychopharmacology, and other journals. He is the president-elect of the International Society for Comparative Psychology, board member of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and associate editor of JEAB and Learning and Behavior. His research is primarily concerned with the development and evaluation of quantitative models of basic behavioral processes (learning, timing, choice, and regulation) in psychiatric disorders (mainly, substance abuse and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder).
Abstract:

Quantitative modeling is increasingly common in behavior analysis. Performance on concurrent schedules, timing, delay discounting, behavioral momentum, schedule and stimulus control, variability of inter-response times, and many other aspects of behavior, are often characterized in terms of mathematical equations and computational algorithms. This presentation outlines the advantages, challenges, and pitfalls of a quantitative analysis of behavior. In particular, this presentation is focused on identifying the outcomes that quantitative models may and may not deliver, the assumptions and pre-requisites for quantitative modeling, the risks involved in this strategy, and the tactics that minimize such risks. The presentation will introduce the concepts of model-based inference, parameter estimation, stochastic vs. deterministic models, likelihood vs. probability, parsimony vs. goodness-of-fit, Bayesian modeling, and model selection. This introduction will set the stage for the practical implementation of some of these concepts.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and those interesed in quantitative modeling.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the advantages and challenges associated with a quantitative analysis of behavior, relative to conventional approaches to behavior analytic research; (2) identify and appropriately use the concepts of model-based inference, parameter estimation, stochastic and deterministic models, likelihood and probability, parsimony and goodness-of-fit, Bayesian modeling, and model selection.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #326
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Big Rats, Big Opportunities, and Big Challenges: HeroRATS and Me

Monday, May 30, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Alan D. Poling, Ph.D.
Chair: Christy A. Alligood (Disney's Animal Kingdom and Florida Institute of Technology)
ALAN D. POLING (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Alan Poling is Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. He received his B.A. from Alderson-Broaddus College, his M.A. from West Virginia University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. A Fellow of Divisions 3, 25, and 28 of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Poling has published 12 books and roughly 350 articles and book chapters and served as the research advisor of 35 Ph.D. recipients. They, and he, have conducted research and done conceptual work in several areas, including behavioral pharmacology, clinical psychopharmacology (with special emphasis on the effects of psychotropic drugs in people with developmental disabilities), applied behavior analysis, gender issues, animal welfare, quantitative analysis, learning processes, and research methods. Dr. Poling was recognized as a Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Western Michigan University in 1996 and as a Distinguished Alumnus of West Virginia University in 1999. In 2003, he received the Western Michigan University College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Achievement in Research and Creative Activity Award. In 2016, he will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the California Association of Behavior Analysis, a Translational Research Award from the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and an International Humanitarian Award from the American Psychological Association.
Abstract:

For more than a decade, APOPO, a Belgian NGO headquartered in Tanzania, has used scent-detecting giant African pouched rats (Cricetomys) to detect landmines and other explosive remnants of war and to detect human tuberculosis. APOPO has also explored other potential humanitarian applications of the rats. For several years, my students and I have worked with other APOPO personnel to ascertain how well the rats perform in detecting landmines and in finding tuberculosis, to devise strategies to increase the rats' effectiveness and efficiency, and to extend the range of valuable services they can provide. This presentation summarizes what we have learned.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) specify how pouched rats are trained and used operationally to detect target scents, such as though associated with landmines and human tuberculosis; (2) specify how the rats are currently used for humanitarian purposes, their value in these applications, and potential future uses of the rats; (3) specify challenges associated with conducting high quality scent detection research in general and in conducting such research under the auspices of a humanitarian organization that works under difficult conditions in resource poor areas.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #336
CE Offered: PSY

Quantitative Modeling in Behavioral Analysis, Part 2: How?

Monday, May 30, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Blake A. Hutsell, Ph.D.
Chair: Federico Sanabria (Arizona State University)
BLAKE A. HUTSELL (Virginia Commonwealth University)
Blake Hutsell received his doctoral training in experimental psychology at Southern Illinois University under the direction of Dr. Eric Jacobs. Subsequently he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Auburn University under the direction of Dr. Chris Newland and currently holds a postdoctoral position in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine under the direction of Dr. Matt Banks. He was the 2011 recipient of the APA Division 25 Basic Behavior Analysis Dissertation Award and his publications have appeared in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Drug and Alcohol Dependence and other journals. His research interests include novel applications of quantitative models to socially-relevant behavioral phenomena such as drug addiction and neurotoxicant exposure to target underlying behavioral mechanisms that mediate these phenomena.
Abstract:

While quantitative modeling has become increasingly common in the behavior analytic literature, many researchers have received little formal training in the practical implementation of these methods. The purpose of this presentation is to encourage quantitative analyses of behavior by providing an introduction to modeling in Microsoft Office Excel. Excel represents an advantageous platform due to its wide availability to researchers in various settings and relative ease with which prominent quantitative models may be implemented. This presentation has three major aims: (1)to provide an overview of how to simulate quantitative models commonly encountered in the literature for the purposes of gaining an understanding of the model's behavior; (2) demonstrate how to set up a workbook to perform regression analyses and basic visual analyses to assess the goodness of a model's fit to data; (3) provide an accessible introduction to model selection techniques comparing nested and non-nested models to aid the identification of candidate behavioral mechanisms.

Target Audience:

Licensed pschologists and those interested in quantitative modeling.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) set up workbooks for model simulation and visualization to understand model behavior; (2) perform regression and implement model selections techniques.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #337
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Designing Courses Based on Research and Theory in Behavior Analysis and Psychology

Monday, May 30, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Regency Ballroom C, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Henry D. Schlinger, Ph.D.
Chair: Nicole Luke (Surrey Place Centre)
HENRY D. SCHLINGER (California State University, LA)
Henry D. (Hank) Schlinger Jr. received his Ph.D. in psychology (applied behavior analysis) from Western Michigan University under the supervision of Jack Michael. He then completed a two-year National Institutes of Health-funded post-doctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology with Alan Poling. He was a full tenured professor of psychology at Western New England University in Springfield, MA, before moving to Los Angeles in 1998. He is now professor of psychology and former director of the M.S. Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlinger has published numerous scholarly articles and commentaries in 25 different journals. He also has authored or co-authored three books, Psychology: A Behavioral Overview (1990), A Behavior-Analytic View of Child Development (1995) (which was translated into Japanese), and Introduction to Scientific Psychology (1998). He is a past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, and on the editorial boards of several other journals. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.
Abstract:

There is currently widespread concern for effective teaching at all levels of education. A defining feature of teaching—perhaps more than any other profession—is the range of variability in styles and approaches. Unlike the practice of medicine, for example, teaching is still seen as an art. Moreover, few college professors are ever taught how to teach; their only qualification is a Ph.D. and expertise in their subject matter. But nowadays when colleges and universities are struggling to attract and then retain students, it is imperative that instructors take more responsibility for the success of their students. They can do this by designing their courses and classrooms according to existing research and theory in behavior analysis and psychology. This presentation describes (a) the purpose and goals of assessment; (b) the principles of a high-feedback instructional system; (c) the role of assessment in a high-feedback system; and (d) one model of a high-feedback system.

Target Audience:

Educators and teachers of applied behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) understand the purpose and goals of assessment in college teaching; (2) understand the principles of a high-feedback instructional system; (3) understand the role of assessment in a high-feedback system.
 

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