Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

10th Annual Autism Conference; New Orleans, LA; 2016

CE by Type: PSY


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ethical Issues in Assessment and Treatment in ABA Clinical Services
Monday, January 18, 2016
9:30 AM–12:30 PM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jennifer Zarcone, Ph.D.
TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), LAURA MCKEE (Autism Home Support Services), ROBERT ROSS (BEACON Services), STEVEN WOOLF (BEACON Services), JENNIFER ZARCONE (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Description: In the first part of the workshop—Contracting With Insurance Companies to Provide ABA Services: Using the CPT Codes and Ethical Business and Clinical Practices—the presenters will discuss ethical issues related to the assessment and treatment process for individuals with problem behavior. Issues related to doing an analog functional analysis and the required training, managing self-injurious and/or aggression safely, and limitations and alternatives to conducting time intensive and complex assessments. The presenters will also discuss the legal and ethical implications of treatment of severe problem behavior with respect to the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code and State Licensing laws. The second part of the workshop—Ethical Issues in the Assessment and Treatment of Problem Behavior—will focus on how to use the new CPT codes correctly and ethically using current guidelines. In addition, the presenters will provide information on how to negotiate contracts that allow you to provide quality of services correctly and ethically.
Learning Objectives: After completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1)identify and understand billing codes and apply billing codes consistent with the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts; (2)list operational and practice considerations when negotiating contracts with payers; (3)use appropriate strategies to address common ethical challenges encountered by ABA practitioners.
Activities: Instruction, discussion, Q and A
Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Integrating Behavioral Economics Principles With Assessments and Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, January 18, 2016
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Henry S. Roane, Ph.D.
HENRY S. ROANE (State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
"Dr. Henry Roane received his Ph.D. in Psychology with an emphasis in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) from Louisiana State University. He completed a pre-doctoral internship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Roane has held previous clinical and faculty positions at the Marcus Institute/Emory University School of Medicine and the Munroe-Meyer Institute/University of Nebraska Medical Center. At present, Dr. Roane is the Gregory S. Liptak MD Professor of Child Development in the Department of Pediatrics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse NY. In this capacity, Dr. Roane serves as the Chief of the Division of Development, Behavior and Genetics where he directs medical and behavior analysis clinics that provide treatment services for children affected by autism and related disorders. Dr. Roane is a former Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice, and serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals in the field. Dr. Roane previously served on the Board of Directors for the Behavior Analysis Certification Board and presently served on the Board of Directors for the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Dr. Roane has co-authored over 75 research articles and chapters as well as three books on ABA and the assessment and treatment of behavior disorders. He also has been the principle investigator on grants funded by National Institute of Health and the New York State Department of Health and serves as a consultant to programs nationwide."
Description: Positive reinforcement contingencies are common in response acquisition and behavior reduction programs for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Given the ubiquity of this process, it is critical to identify stimuli that will function as effective reinforcers, especially under conditions in which access to those stimuli might be delayed. Based on the nature of a socially mediated positive reinforcement contingency, positive reinforcement-based programs may be viewed as an economic system in which responding is considered an interaction between several variables, such as the price of the reinforcer, demand for a particular reinforcer, and the magnitude of reinforcement. This basic conceptualization of positive reinforcement contingencies permits practitioners to apply principles of microeconomics to the development and refinement of positive reinforcement-based interventions. This workshop will provide an introduction to basic principles of behavioral economics. After introducing these topics, the focus of the workshop will shift to translational research in behavioral economics whereby laboratory findings have been extended to treatments for behavioral correlates of ASD. Examples will focus on the use of economic principles to identify differentially effective position reinforcements, to conduct schedule thinning, and to modify behavior in token economies. Throughout the presentation, clinical examples of these concepts will be provided to demonstrate application for the treatment of behaviors associated with ASD.
Learning Objectives:
  1. Participants will describe the basic clinical procedures and designs that are commonly used in behavioral economic-based treatments for ASD.
  2. Participants will describe basic principles of behavioral economics.
  3. Participants will describe recent research-based extension to the use of behavioral economics in applied settings.
Activities: Activities will consist oflecture, discussion, video observation, and question/answer.
Audience: BCaBAs, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Invited Symposium #3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Expanding Access to ABA Services via the Latest Telehealth Technologies
Tuesday, January 19, 2016
8:30 AM–10:20 AM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Discussant: Cathleen C. Piazza (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
CE Instructor: Wayne W. Fisher, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Recent advances in telecommunication technologies make it possible to conduct a variety of healthcare services remotely (e.g., behavior analytic intervention services), thereby bridging the gap between consumers in isolated locations and qualified providers. A growing body of empirical research suggests that many behavior analytic training and treatment procedures can be highly effective when delivered remotely via the latest telehealth technologies. In this symposium, we will bring together a cadre of the field’s leading experts on the remote delivery of ABA interventions using telehealth. Each presenter will describe one or more empirical investigations on the use of telehealth methods to expand access to ABA services. The discussant will review the highlights of each study, identify the general themes and important implications that cut across studies, and provide directions for future investigation.

 

Preliminary Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial of a Web-Based Program for Training Parents With a Child With an Autism Spectrum Disorder to Implement Early Intensive Behavior Intervention

KEVIN C. LUCZYNSKI (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Mychal Machado (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Aaron D. Lesser (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Stephanie A. Hood (Briar Cliff University), Andrew Blowers (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Maegan Pisman (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Megan E. Vosters (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Abstract:

Estimates indicate that autism affects about 1 in 68 American children. Research has shown that Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions (EIBI) is effective when implemented by appropriately trained and supervised technicians. In additional to services provided by technicians, parents often contribute to their child's EIBI programming by extending teaching opportunities throughout the day. However, few empirically supported programs are available for training parents that include performance-based measures. We are conducting a randomized clinical trial to evaluate a 20-hour, web-based, e-learning program for training parents in EIBI protocols. The two primary dependent variables are the Behavioral Implementation Skills for Play Activities (BISPA) and the Behavioral Implementation Skills for Work Activities (BISWA). To date, 10 participants have completed pre-test and post-test assessments on these measures, three in the treatment group and seven in the control group. Mean component skills implemented correctly on the pre-test and post-test for the treatment and control groups for the BISPA were 4.0%, 6.1%, 89%, and 0%, respectively. For the BISWA, the results were 23.6%, 16.9%, 100%, and 27.3%, respectively. The results provide strong preliminary support for the efficacy of our web-based program, which can be delivered to parents anywhere in the world that has broadband internet access.

"Dr. Kevin Luczynski is an Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and the Director for the recently initiated Virtual Care Program at the Munroe Meyer Institute. From 2004 to 2006, Dr. Luczynski worked as a Clinical Specialist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Kennedy Krieger Institute where the intensity of the clinical services improved his understanding of within-subject methodology, environmental determinants of behavior, and the value of working within a community of clinical experts. During this period, he also earned a Master's degree in Applied Behavior Analysis from the University of Maryland at Baltimore County. Dr. Luczynski earned his Ph.D. in Behavior Analysis at Western New England University under the supervision of Dr. Gregory P. Hanley in 2011 and completed a pre-doctoral fellowship at the Munroe-Meyer Institute under the mentorship of Dr. Wayne Fisher in the same year. Currently, he specializes in leveraging web-based technologies to provide parent training, early intervention services, and assessment and treatment of sleep disturbances to families who live in areas where there are few or no professionals trained in applied behavior analysis. This direction for expanding services in applied behavior analysis is supported, in part, by a grant from the Department of Defense because access to high-quality services is especially important to military families with a child with autism who tend to serve in remote areas. In 2013, Dr. Luczynski and colleagues partnered with Autism Action Partnership to leverage web-based technologies to provide teacher training and assist in designing and monitoring skill-acquisition and behavior-management programs to schools throughout Nebraska. Kevin's area of service delivery had led to several new lines of research: (a) comparing the accuracy, reliability, and efficiently of different measurement systems for scoring child-parent interactions in their home over extended observation periods, (b) determining the accuracy and reliability of infrared-capable cameras with motion-detection software for measuring children's nighttime sleep disturbances and comparing the additive and interactional effects of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for improving children's sleep, and (c) evaluating the extent that parent-training procedures promote generalization and maintenance of parents ability to teach functional-communication and delay-tolerance skills at home and identify potential barriers to sustained treatment implementation.
 

Treatment of Pediatric Feeding Problems: Comparison of Follow-Up Outcomes in Clinic Versus via Telehealth

KATHRYN M. PETERSON (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Cathleen C. Piazza (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center), Valerie M. Volkert (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Jason R. Zeleny (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Abstract:

Many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have feeding difficulties, such as food selectivity (i.e., consumption of a limited variety of foods by type or texture). Inadequate dietary intake is associated with learning and behavior problems. If left untreated, children with ASD and feeding difficulties also may suffer from weight loss or malnutrition. Currently, treatments for pediatric feeding disorders based on ABA research have the most empirical support (Volkert & Piazza, 2012). However, there are a limited number of clinics and professionals in the country that specialize in the behavioral treatment of pediatric feeding disorders. Telehealth methods allow a professional in one location to provide services to a patient in another location. Research has not yet evaluated the effectiveness of using telehealth methods to treat pediatric feeding disorders using behavioral techniques. In the current study, we compared the outcomes (e.g., levels of acceptance, mouth clean [product measure of swallowing], inappropriate mealtime behavior) of children discharged from an intensive day treatment program who were followed up in the clinic versus via telehealth. The children's parents implemented treatment with both methods. Results suggest that clinically relevant outcomes can be achieved regardless of the location of outpatient follow-up.

Kathryn Peterson, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is an assistant professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Munroe-Meyer Institute. Dr. Peterson earned her Master’s degree in applied behavior analysis from Pennsylvania State University in 2008 and spent several years working as a behavior consultant specializing in the assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). During that time, Dr. Peterson also served as the editorial assistant for Behavioral Interventions. Dr. Peterson then earned her doctoral degree in applied behavior analysis from the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s (UNMC) Munroe-Meyer Institute under the mentorship of Drs. Valerie Volkert and Cathleen Piazza. Dr. Peterson currently serves as a research faculty member and case manager within the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program at UNMC, where she conducts research on the assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders. She has published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and has secured grant awards through UNMC’s Pediatrics and Diversity funds to conduct research on effective treatments for food selectivity in children with ASD. Dr. Peterson recently served as the President of the Heartland Association for Behavior Analysis.
 

Training Community Mental Health Providers to Conduct Quality Functional Behavior Assessments Using Teleconsultation Strategies: Outcomes and Issues

STEPHANIE M. PETERSON (Western Michigan University), Denice Rios (Western Michigan University), Rebecca Renee Wiskirchen (Western Michigan University), Yannick Schenk (Western Michigan University), Marissa Allen (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

This presentation will describe an ongoing project, in which we are attempting to train community mental health workers in Michigan to conduct quality functional behavior assessments, including functional analyses, using web-based technologies for teleconsultation. The procedures we are using will be discussed, and outcome data for selected children as well as summary data for trainees will be presented. Issues, problems, and positive developments from the project will also be discussed.

Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is a professor of psychology at Western Michigan University. She also serves as the director of the Graduate Training Program in Behavior Analysis there. Recently, the state of Michigan enacted insurance billing laws requiring insurance companies to pay for autism treatment. In addition, at the time of this writing, Medicaid changes are in the process of being enacted. As a result, Dr. Peterson has had the opportunity to work though certification and licensure issues with state and local agency personnel. Dr. Peterson has taught in a number of university programs that offer behavior analytic training, and specifically coursework geared toward the BCBA credential, as well as teacher-certification programs. In her current position, Dr. Peterson directs graduate training in behavior analysis in a program that offers the coursework and practicum experiences for the BCBA credential.
 

Treating Severe Behavior Problems via Telehealth

DAVID P. WACKER (The University of Iowa), Alyssa N. Suess (The University of Iowa)
Abstract:

This presentation will provide a summary of how we have used telehealth to implement functional analyses and functional communication training to assess and treat the severe behavior problems of young children with autism. The participants were 30 children with diagnosed autism spectrum disorders who ranged in age from 21–84 months. All assessment and treatment sessions were conducted by parents in their homes with remote coaching provided by behavior analysts located at a tertiary level hospital. The functional analyses were conducted within multi-element designs and social functions were identified for all children. Functional communication training (FCT) was then implemented by the parents and matched to the identified functions of problem behavior. FCT was most often conducted during 1-hour weekly sessions, with individual cases conducted within a reversal design, and the overall group analysis conducted within a randomized clinical trial (3 month delay for second group). The average reduction in problem behavior was 97% (range=77–100%). Interobserver agreement was conducted on approximately 30% of sessions and averaged over 90%.A description of the telehealth and behavioral procedures conducted in the projectwill be presented withvideotaped case examples.

Dr. David Wacker is a professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Special Education at the University of Iowa, where he has directed one of the country's leading clinical research programs in developmental disabilities for more than 20 years. He and his students have conducted important research on a number of topics, but he is most well-known for his pioneering work in behavior disorders. His brief functional analysis, an experimental approach to assessment in outpatient clinics, has revolutionized outpatient research by replacing the clinical interview as the basis of treatment with an empirical model whose utility has been established in dozens of studies. Most recently, he has extended the impact of the brief functional analysis beyond his clinic's boundaries through the creative use of real-time video conferencing. He is a past editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), a Fellow of ABAI, and a recipient of distinguished research awards from both APA and the Arc of the United States.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Implementing ABA at Scales of Social Importance: Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports

Tuesday, January 19, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert H. Horner, Ph.D.
Chair: Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
ROBERT H. HORNER (University of Oregon)
Rob Horner is professor of special education at the University of Oregon. His research has focused on behavior analysis, positive behavior support, instructional strategies for learners with severe disabilities, and systems change. He has worked for the past 15 years with George Sugai in development and implementation of school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS). Over 21,000 schools are implementing SWPBS nationally. Research, evaluation and technical assistance outcomes from this effort indicate that investing in the development of a positive social culture is associated with improved behavioral and academic gains for students. Dr. Horner has been the editor of the Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, co-editor of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, and associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the American Journal on Mental Retardation.
Abstract:

This session will focus on scaling up implementation of applied behavior analysis. Emphasis will be given to lessons learned from implementing Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports (PBIS) across 20,000 schools in the United States. Participants will leave with information about the key role of fidelity measures, organizational systems needed to support effective practices, and the linking of coaching with effective training.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Assessing and Programming for Emergence of Verbal Behavior in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Language Delays

Tuesday, January 19, 2016
1:30 PM–2:20 PM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Alice Shillingsburg, Ph.D.
Chair: Henry S. Roane (State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
ALICE SHILLINGSBURG (Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine)
Dr. Shillingsburg received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Auburn University. She is currently an assistant professor in the division of Autism and Related Disorders in the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University and the Program Director of the Language and Learning Clinic at the Marcus Autism Center. Dr. Shillingsburg is a licensed psychologist and Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the Doctoral level. Her clinical expertise includes developing language and behavioral programming to address a variety of behavioral difficulties and communication deficits associated with developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Dr. Shillingsburg is associate editor and editorial board member of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and former editorial board member of Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Her current research interests include theoretical and practical applications of verbal behavior and the assessment and treatment of language deficits particularly strategies to promote language acquisition in children with autism.
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit deficits in language development. While typically developing children demonstrate adult-like language production by age 5 (Luinge, Post, Wit, & Goorhuis-Brouwer, 2006), expressing abstract and hypothetical ideas across a variety of topics (Tager-Flusberg et al, 2009), children with ASD often have difficulty with more complex language that has not been directly taught. Further, studies have found that some children with autism do not combine known words at the same time as typically developing peers (Paul, Chawarska, Klin, and Volkmar, 2007; Weismer et al., 2011), pointing to a deficit in generative language. Strategies to promote the emergence of untrained verbal operants are of critical importance for learners with ASD. However, few procedures have been developed to program and test for emergence of untrained skills. Additionally, few studies have addressed remediation strategies when emergence fails to occur. The current presentation will present several lines of research focused on assessing emergence of untaught verbal behavior during treatment as well as strategies to promote emergence and generative language. Specific interventions to promote emergence of listener and tact skills as well as intraverbals will be presented.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Evolution of Certification Standards for Behavior Analysts: A History

Tuesday, January 19, 2016
2:30 PM–3:20 PM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James E. Carr, Ph.D.
Chair: Melissa Coco Raymond (Milestones Behavioral Services)
JAMES E. CARR (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
James E. Carr, PhD, BCBA-D, is the Chief Executive Officer of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. His professional interests include behavior analyst credentialing, behavioral assessment and treatment of developmental disabilities, verbal behavior, and practitioner training; Dr. Carr has published over 125 scientific articles on these and other topics. Dr. Carr is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International. He is the editor-in-chief of the journal The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and has served on the editorial boards of 10 other behavior analysis journals, including 4 appointments as associate editor. Dr. Carr is the president of the Colorado Association for Behavior Analysis and past president of the Mid-American and Alabama Associations for Behavior Analysis. He received his doctorate in 1996 from Florida State University under the mentorship of Dr. Jon Bailey and previously served on the behavior analysis faculties at University of Nevada-Reno (1996-1999), Western Michigan University (1999-2008), and Auburn University (2008-2011).
Abstract:

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) has been certifying and developing professional standards for behavior analysts since it emerged in 1999 from the state of Florida's behavior analyst certification program, which had been in operation for two decades earlier. In 2007, the BACB's Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA) credentials were accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). The NCCA accredits certification programs that adhere to the best practices of the credentialing and testing industries, including highly prescribed procedures for establishing and revising key standards. This presentationwill describe the evolution of certification standards in behavior analysis over the decades, including the systematic NCCA-mandated procedures the BACB has followed to develop and revise its standards over the years. This process has been akin to shaping and has allowed behavior analyst certification to grow and flourish alongside consistently increasing standards towards an eventual steady state. Special focus will be paid to standards where the steady state appears to have been reached. Concluding remarks will describe how BACB certification standards align with the licensure of behavior analysts in approximately two dozen states.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Parent Training in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Disruptive Behavior: A Multisite Randomized Trial

Tuesday, January 19, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Naomi Swiezy, Ph.D.
Chair: Jennifer R. Zarcone (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
NAOMI SWIEZY (HANDS in Autism, Indiana University School of Medicine)
Dr. Swiezy specializes in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), caregiver training, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). She is the Alan H. Cohen Family Scholar of Psychiatry and Professor of Clinical Psychology in Clinical Psychiatry as well as the Founder and Director of the HANDS in Autism Interdisciplinary Training and Resource Center at the IU School of Medicine. The HANDS in Autism framework and curriculum provides engaging and interactive training of the comprehensive curriculum and process for serving those with ASD and related neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders to a range of consumers and disciplines. Participants at the Center learn through shadowing, coaching and mentoring for more active learning processes. Bridging of information and resources across the community facilitate collaboration, local capacity and sustainability of efforts towards supporting the growth, development and success of individuals with ASD. Dr. Swiezy provides consultation relevant to the lifespan in clinic and community through state and local contracts and collaborations. Dr. Swiezy has served as a board member and committee member to a number of hospital, university and community organizations and is currently an editorial board member of the peer-reviewed journal, Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders and also serves as a standing member on an NIH review committee (SERV). Dr. Swiezy’s research interests focus on implementation science and efforts towards the empirical support for HANDS-developed measures, process and programming, implementation and local capacity building with ABA-based strategies and procedures in community-based settings. Dr. Swiezy presents and publishes widely in the area of autism and the development of the HANDS program.
Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) presents as a major public health concern. In addition to the core features of ASD, available evidence suggests that as many as 70% of children with ASD exhibit disruptive behaviors such as tantrums, noncompliance, aggression, and self-injury. Such behaviors can significantly limit the child's ability to make use of educational and other services, thereby interfering with the acquisition and performance of daily living skills as well as the exacerbation of social isolation. Given the rising prevalence of ASD and inadequate accessibility of specialists adequately trained in the disorder, our multisite network determined that the development of an exportable and cost-effective intervention was essential. Parent training (PT) has already been well-established and empirically supported as an intervention for children with disruptive behavior uncomplicated by ASD but not in those with ASD. Single-subject designs have established that behavior modification can be effectively trained to parents to reduce the behavioral problems of children with ASD. This presentation will describe more about the premise for the multisite development and testing of the manualized and potentially exportable PT model as a stand-alone intervention for young children with ASD and disruptive behaviors.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

CPT Training Update

Wednesday, January 20, 2016
8:30 AM–9:20 AM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Wayne W. Fisher, Ph.D.
Chair: Wayne W. Fisher (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
TRAVIS THOMPSON (University of Minnesota)
Dr. Travis Thompson received his doctoral training in psychology at the University of Minnesota and completed postdoctoral work at the University of Maryland with Joseph V. Brady and at Cambridge University (UK) with Robert Hinde. His earliest work dealt with the relations among concepts from behavior analysis, ethology, and pharmacology. He was director of the John F. Kennedy Center for Human Development at Vanderbilt University and Smith Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Kansas Medical Center before returning to Minnesota in 2003. Dr. Thompson co-authored, with Charles R. Schuster, the first textbook in behavioral pharmacology and has done basic and applied interdisciplinary research in developmental disabilities, including genetics, pharmacology, and neuroscience. He was involved in developing one of the first large-scale behavioral intervention programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and for the past several years has directed home-based early intervention services for young children with autism in Minnesota. Dr. Thompson's publications include 225 articles and chapters and 29 books. A total of 48 doctoral students have completed their training under his mentorship. He has received numerous awards, including the APA Division 1 (Society for General Psychology) Ernest Hilgard Award, Division 25's Don Hake Award, and the Division 33 (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities) Edgar Doll Award. He is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.
Abstract:

For the past several years, ABAI has been working with the American Medical Association (AMA) to establish new billing procedures for ABA-related services for children and youth with autism. Recently, the AMA adopted Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) Category III codes. The AMA codes recognize that applied behavior analysis is an empirically supported and medically necessary intervention. Dr. Travis Thompson, who was instrumental in the approval of these codes, is the instructor for this training, which will explain the how the new codes define procedures and services performed by behavior analysts. These codes will improve access to ABA services for families of children with autism and severe behavior disorders and reduce financial burdens on these families. Additionally, these codes will result in systematic and standardized valuation of ABA services and will simplify and streamline the billing and collection processes for ABA services (e.g., facilitate electronic billing).

 
 
Invited Paper Session #11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

What's the Emperor Wearing These Days?: Communication, Speech Generating Devices, Apps, and the Picture Exchange Communication System

Wednesday, January 20, 2016
9:30 AM–10:20 AM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
Chair: Grant Gautreaux (Nicholls State University)
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Andy Bondy, Ph.D., has more than 40 years of experience working with children and adults with autism and related developmental disabilities. For more than a dozen years he served as the director of a statewide public school program for students with autism. He and his wife, Lori Frost, pioneered the development of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). He designed the Pyramid Approach to Education as a comprehensive combination of broad-spectrum behavior analysis and functional communication strategies. He is a co-founder of Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc., an internationally based team of specialists from many fields working together to promote integration of the principles of applied behavior analysis within functional activities and an emphasis on developing functional communication skills.
Abstract:

Over 25 years ago, the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) was developed and used a training protocol that incorporated Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior to help rapidly establish manding and other key verbal operants in students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental issues. Many research reviews describe PECS as an evidence-based practice, including a recent publication in Pediatrics. In that 2012 publication, which supported the strong evidence in support of ABA, it also noted that there was as yet no evidence for the effectiveness of "AAC devices." However, with the advance of technology involving the use of speech generating devices (SGDs) and iPad apps, many parents and professionals are convinced that the technological advances and the voice associated with such devices will help lead to better communication skills as well as speech. This talk will review recent research regarding such devices as well as apps; it will also review why the PECS protocol is effective with regard to the rapid development of verbal behavior under the stimulus control of the audience (or listener). A similar analysis will then be usedto review whether some of the uses of SGDs and apps ensures that verbal behavior is being established.Finally, the presentation will point out some simple ways to demonstrate whether an electronic device is being used as a toy or as part of a communication strategy.

 
 
Invited Symposium #12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Global Autism Public Health Initiative and Autism Researchers Without Borders
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
The Celestin Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Kara Reagon (Autism Speaks)
Discussant: Andy Shih (Autism Speaks)
CE Instructor: Kara Reagon, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium will discuss applied behavior analysis as it relates to autism globally.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

TBD

Learning Objectives: TBD
 

Behavior Analytic Introduction to Global Autism Public Health Initiative and Autism Researchers Without Borders

KARA REAGON (Autism Speaks)
Abstract:

This presentation will use Stokes and Baer's 1977 seminal article on generalization and Wolf's 1978 paper on social validity as platforms to discuss why behavior analysts should consider a public health framework for dissemination of ABA principles in the treatment of autism globally and correcting some of the misconceptions of behavior analysis. Strategies and tactics for promoting acceptance, implementation, and dissemination of evidence-based practices in low-resource settings will be reviewed. Theories of why global acceptance of ABA has not occurred and more importantly why behavior analytic fallacies still exist in the world will be examined. Strategic planning steps for students, families, practitioners, researchers, and organizations to influence public health policy and educational reform will be outlined. The need for both single-subject design research and randomized-controlled trials will be proposed in evaluating low-intensity/large scale programs, and the training of non-specialist facilitators in low-resource settings to meet the treatment gap needs of individuals and families affected by autism spectrum disorders.

 
Developing a Parent Skills Training Program for Non-Specialist Facilitators in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
STEPHANIE SHIRE (University of California, Los Angeles)
Abstract: Review of epidemiological data demonstrates that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a global public health matter (Elsabbagh et al., 2012). Although intervention science has led to the development of efficacious parent-mediated early intervention programs, these services are resource intensive and available to a select few of the many who could benefit from them. For children with ASD who are growing up in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), few if any services may be available to target the core social communication challenges experienced by many children with ASD. This presentation will focus on the process of development of a parent skills training program designed to be delivered by non-specialist facilitators in LMICs. Considerations and challenges regarding the development and scientific evaluation of the trainer intervention model will be discussed.
 

Improving Developmental Trajectories of Toddlers With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Strategies for Bridging Research to Practice

AMY WETHERBY (Florida State University)
Abstract:

The need for community-viable evidence-based intervention strategies for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a priority with earlier diagnosis. The Early Social Interaction Project (ESI) uses the SCERTS curriculum to teach parents of toddlers with ASD how to embed evidence-based intervention strategies and supports in everyday activities in natural environments to promote their child's active engagement. Research findings from the randomized controlled trial of ESI, funded by Autism Speaks and NIMH, will be presented. Plans for rolling out Autism Navigator, a collection of web-based courses and tools that uses extensive video footage to bridge the gap between science and community practice will be highlighted.

 

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