Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Sixth Annual Autism Conference; Philadelphia, PA; 2012

CE by Type: BACB


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Promoting Complex Social Skills in Individuals With Asperger's Disorder and High Functioning Autism
Friday, January 27, 2012
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Grand Ballroom D
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert L. Koegel, Ph.D.
ROBERT L. KOEGEL (University of California, Santa Barbara), LYNN KERN KOEGEL (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Description: Individuals with Asperger's disorder and high functioning autism (HFA) often have difficulty with developing friendships, living independently, and obtaining and maintaining employment. This workshop will present various intervention procedures for improving social communication, pragmatics, self-help areas, and so on in individuals with Asperger's disorder or HFA. The procedures presented will include video-modeling, self-management, routine-based interventions, school-based social groups, designing social programs within restricted interests, and visual frameworks. Target behaviors include initiations during social conversation, peer interaction, independent living skills, dating, job-related activities, and social activities in the community. Preliminary data from several studies, using a multiple baseline design across participants, will be presented. Results indicate that with systematic interventions, individuals with Asperger's and HFA can make significant improvements in socialization, social conversation, independent living, friendship development, and other areas. Video-tape clips of the interventions will be presented along with practical procedures for elementary school students through adults. Discussion relating to positive outcomes and quality of life will be presented.
Learning Objectives: _
Activities: _
Audience: Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Asperger’s disorder, self-management, socialization
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evidence-Based Communication Approaches for Children With Autism
Friday, January 27, 2012
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Grand Ballroom D
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: The selection of an approach to help children with autism acquire communication skills is remarkably challenging. This workshop will review many of the issues that relate to evidence-based practices that aim to improve broad language skills, including the acquisition of an array of verbal operants as well as skills associated with "the listener" (traditionally viewed as receptive skills). While the hallmark of applied behavior analysis involves many hundreds of single-subject designs looking at particular skills, many practitioners attempt to use "packages," that is, an organization of target skills and teaching strategies, including those involving generalization. We will review the evidence that particular packages work, either in terms of outcome measures or in comparison to other packages. We also will review other issues, including skills to be targeted, whether there is support for a particular ordering of these skills, and how modality impacts the acquisition of functional communication. We will review several modalities and also consider issues related to the successful transition from one modality to another, including issues related to our ethical responsibilities. Furthermore, consideration must be given to programs/packages that are derived from non-behaviorally based strategies with regard to their evidence for effectiveness. Rather than trying to provide a definitive answer to "Which strategy is universally the best?" guidelines for the most appropriate questions to ask will be offered.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: 1.Identify key language skills noted by behavioral and developmental perspectives 2.Identify key language packages and their level of empirical support 3.Identify key broad intervention packages and their level of empirical support
Activities: _
Audience: Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Invited Paper Session #7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Applied Behavior Analysis and Positive Behavior Support

Saturday, January 28, 2012
8:15 AM–9:15 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Robert H. Horner, Ph.D.
ROBERT H. HORNER (University of Oregon)
Rob Horner is professor of special education at the University of Oregon. He also is the co-director with Dr. George Sugai of the OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS), and co-director with Dr. Dean Fixsen, Karen Blase, and George Sugai of the OSEP Technical Assistance Center on State Implementation and Scaling of Evidence-based Practices (SISEP). Dr. Horner was an associate editor of JABA and AJMR and former editor of JASH and JPBI. His research has focused on stimulus control, instructional design for individuals with severe disabilities, generalization, positive behavior support, data-based decision-making, single-case research design, and the implementation and scaling of evidence-based practices.
Abstract:

The primary focus of this session will be on the implementation of applied behavior analysis in scales of social significance. The principles and practice of applied behavior analysis have dramatic relevance for our society. The goals of American education, health care, and business are tied to understanding and improving behavior. Yet even compelling research demonstrations of the impact of applied behavior analysis have not become an accepted part of major institutions. One emerging exception is adoption of school-wide positive behavior support. As of August 2011 more than 16,000 schools in the USA were actively engaged in implementing school-wide positive behavior support. Two important messages for ABAI members are that a) school-wide positive behavior support is implementation of applied behavior analysis and b) the reasons why schools are adopting school-wide positive behavior support are central to better understanding how to make applied behavior analysis more accessible. Data will be presented from a recent review of seven states that now implement school-wide positive behavior support in more than a third of their schools. Four key features were identified from this review as central to scaling up implementation of school-wide positive behavior support. The relevance of these features for extending applied behavior analysis principles and practices across U.S.A. institutions will be explored.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives:

1. Define six variables needed to make ABA more accessible       

2. Define Positive Behavior Support as an example of ABA 

3  Define a research agenda for expanding the implementation of ABA on a scale of social importance

 
 
Invited Paper Session #8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Randomized, Control Trial of the LEAP Model of Intervention for Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Saturday, January 28, 2012
9:15 AM–10:15 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Phillip S. Strain, Ph.D.
PHILLIP S. STRAIN (University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center)
Phil Strain, Ph.D., is professor of educational psychology and psychiatry at the University of Colorado Denver and director of the Positive Early Learning Experiences Center. He is the author of more than 300 professional papers in the early intervention field, has served on the editorial boards of more than 20 professional journals, has been the principal investigator of grants totaling more than $50 million, and has been recognized with distinguished career awards on three separate occasions. He authored the original grant that funded the development of the LEAP model in 1980 and recently received funding to conduct a long-term follow-up on participants in the randomized trial.
Abstract:

The lecture will provide an overview of the design, procedures, and results of what is to date the largest randomized trial conducted on any comprehensive early intervention model in the autism field. Inclusive classrooms from around the USA were randomly assigned to receive either intervention manuals alone or manuals and two years of intensive coaching to ensure high fidelity use of all LEAP practices. In all some 300 children participated in the study. At the end of 2 years large, statistically significant differences were found on all measures in favor of the full implementation group. Specifically, children who experienced full LEAP implementation showed significant reductions in autism symptoms; improved verbal language, social skills, and cognition; and sharp reductions in problem behavior. These data will be contrasted with the four other randomized trials available at the early childhood level.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives: forthcoming
 
 
Invited Paper Session #9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Pain and Challenging Behavior: Implications for Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism

Saturday, January 28, 2012
10:30 AM–11:30 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Frank J. Symons, Ph.D.
FRANK J. SYMONS (University of Minnesota)
Frank Symons, Ph.D., is professor of special education and educational psychology in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Symons�s research emphasizes understanding the severe behavior challenges of children and adults with special needs, primarily those with developmental disabilities and emotional or behavioral disorders. For these two groups, much of his research has focused on self-injurious behavior and classroom aggression, respectively. His two current general areas of interest are 1) the development, assessment, and treatment of behhavioral challenges among children and adults with a range of neurodevelopmental and emotional/behavioral disorders and 2) the problem of pain among children and adults with significant intellectual impairments and associated developmental disabilities. In terms of problem behavior, areas of specific research interest include a) characterizing self-injurious behavior in more detail descriptively (form, location, intensity) and experimentally (function); b) examining the intersection of behavioral and biological mechanisms underlying chronic self-injury by incorporating sensory (e.g., pain sensitivity, peripheral innervation) and autonomic (e.g., sympathetic/parasympathetic, HPA axis) nervous system variables; and c) translating findings from basic research into treatment applications. In terms of pain, areas of specific research include a) the reliable and valid assessment of pain in children and adults with significant cognitive, communicative, and motor impairments associated with intellectual disability; b) the relation between behavioral and biological variables as markers for altered pain; c) modifying/adapting quantitative sensory testing for individuals with specialized needs; and d) the relation between pain and problem behavior, specifically self-injury. Dr. Symons directs an observational methods lab and is highly collaborative across a number of research groups (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of British Columbia, and Dalhousie University), clinical sites (Gillette Children�s Specialty Healthcare), labs (University of Michigan Peripheral Nerve Lab), and centers (Center for Neurobehavioral Development and Minnesota Center for Pain Research).
Abstract:

Severe problem behavior among individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a significant public health problem. In addition to individual-level costs including restrictive environments, reduced learning opportunities, and compromised quality of life, there are substantial costs to family, educational, and health systems. The past three decades have seen tremendous advances in behavioral assessment technology and its translation into efficacious and effective behavioral interventions. Despite this, severe problem behavior in the form of self-injury persists for a significant number of individuals. One approach to increasing our scientific understanding of persistent self-injury is to adopt a "biobehavioral" approach that examines relevant environmental determinants in the context of biological systems. Based on this, our group has focused on biological markers relevant to pain and stress. The specific objectives of this presentation will be to 1) provide an overview of the clinical problem of self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with I/DD and ASD, 2) review current findings from ongoing studies trying to bridge the gap between pain-relevant biomarkers and sensory features associated with chronic SIB, and 3) suggest that nociceptive and immune mediated activity may be relevant to unraveling some of the mystery surrounding chronic SIB.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives: forthcoming
 
 
Invited Paper Session #12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Peer Mediated Interventions to Promote Social Communication in Children With Autism

Saturday, January 28, 2012
1:45 PM–2:45 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Howard Goldstein, Ph.D.
HOWARD GOLDSTEIN (The Ohio State University)
Dr. Howard Goldstein is research director of the Schoenbaum Family Center and professor of human development and family sciences at The Ohio State University. Goldstein received his Ph.D. in 1980 in developmental psychology and mental retardation research from Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals and has been a grant reviewer for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Education (DOEd) for many years. His research has focused on improving the communication and social skills of children with autism and other developmental disabilities. His recent work has sought to enhance the language and literacy development of students in high poverty schools who are at high risk for reading problems. He is the author of two books and more than 100 scholarly journal articles and book chapters, and is a nationally known scholar for his work and research in the field of child language intervention. His contributions have earned him recognition as a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Over the past 30 years, Dr. Goldstein has participated in more than 40 research and personnel preparation grants, mainly from NIH and DOEd.
Abstract:

Many meta-analytic reviews have misrepresented the literature evaluating interventions to promote social communication skills in children with autism. This is because they failed to include the bulk of the experimental research base, namely single-case experimental designs. This presentation will expand upon approaches to identify evidence-based practices (EBPs). A Consumer Reports framework will be used to evaluate social communication intervention studies and illustrate a way to fairly and comprehensively evaluate this literature. This framework evaluates the quality of both group and single-case experiments with respect to design characteristics and internal validity, measurement features, results, and external validity. The advent of effect size estimates also may improve the incorporation of single-case experiments into the EBP literature. The presentation will show how these analytic frameworks provide useful information that can be cross-referenced with descriptive information about the articles reviewed. This approach has the potential to improve the ease and effectiveness with which behavior analysts select efficacious practices that meet the particular needs of their clients.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives: forthcoming
 
 
Invited Paper Session #13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Peer Network Interventions in Inclusive Elementary School Settings

Saturday, January 28, 2012
2:45 PM–3:45 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Debra M. Kamps, Ph.D.
DEBRA M. KAMPS (Juniper Gardens Children's Project)
Debra Kamps currently hold appointments in the Departments of Applied Behavioral Science and Special Education at the University of Kansas (KU), and is a senior scientist with the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies. She serves as associate director of Juniper Gardens Children�s Project at the Children�s Campus in Kansas City, and as director of the recently established Kansas Center for Autism Research and Training. In 2009, she was awarded the KU Research Achievement Award from the KU Office of Research and Graduate Studies. She has served as principal investigator of 11 projects receiving federal research grants in the areas of autism and emotional and behavioral disorders/risk, and has been publishing her research since 1983. Kamps�s work in the areas of small group instruction and peer-mediated interventions for children with autism has been cited in Educating Children with Autism (National Research Council, 2001), and by the National Autism Standards Project (Luiselli, Christian, Russo, & Wilczynski, 2008). She has conducted three randomized studies including the current project, Peer Networks Project: Improving Social Communication, Literacy, and Adaptive Behaviors for Young Children With ASD, and two investigating multi-tiered interventions for students with behavior problems. Other accomplishments include publications in peer-reviewed journals addressing intervention and education-based research, e.g., Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders; terms as associate editor of four peer-reviewed journals; and national and international requests for training and information regarding social skills and peer networks for children with disabilities.
Abstract:

Beginning in the 1980s our work at the University of Kansas has focused on peer-mediated interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A series of related studies demonstrated that children with autism could learn academic skills in small groups with other students, and social behaviors within social and play groups with peers. Typical programs have included social skills groups, recess and lunch peer networks, and tutoring programs. We have consistently demonstrated that following participation in peer-mediated programs, children with ASD can learn to use similar communication skills and exhibit contextually appropriate initiations and responses during small groups with typical peers. Seventeen single case design studies including 48 participants have been published showing individual treatment gains. The presentation will describe peer networks, settings, and procedures for interventions. We will describe general findings of the research and discuss future directions.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives: forthcoming
 
 
Invited Paper Session #14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Working with Siblings of Children With Autism

Saturday, January 28, 2012
4:00 PM–5:00 PM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Sandra L. Harris, Ph.D.
SANDRA L. HARRIS (Rutgers University)
Sandra L. Harris received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Maryland (College Park) in 1964 and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York (SUNY/ Buffalo) in 1969. She is a Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor of Clinical Psychology (Emerita) at the Graduate School of Applied and Professiona1 Psychology and the Department of Psychology at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Dr. Harris is executive director of the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, a Rutgers University program for children, adolescents, and adults with autism that she founded in 1972. She has been a member of ABAI for more than a quarter century and views the organization as her primary intellectual home. She has published extensively on applied behavior analysis (ABA) and the impact on family members, including siblings, of raising a child who has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). She is an associate editor of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and the Autism Series editor for Woodbine House. Her honors from Rutgers University include the 2006 Daniel Gorenstein Memorial Award and the 2005 President’s Award for Research in Service to New Jersey.
Abstract:

Many behavior analysts have regular contact with families of children or adolescents on the autism spectrum. In most families, neurotypical (NT) siblings may be valuable resources for modeling/teaching adaptive skills, and may themselves be in need of support in understanding their brother or sister with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Fortunately there is a body of research documenting the role NT siblings can play in supporting the learning of their brother or sister on the spectrum. This talk describes how the role of siblings has been studied, what we have learned about the contributions the children can make, and what we learned about supporting the needs of NT siblings. We will look at the clinical role of NT siblings in the late 1970s and early 1980s and consider several studies demonstrating the value of teaching NT siblings basic principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We will review how the childs knowledge of ASD evolves, and how these developmental changes influence the ABA role NT siblings can assume. Specific target behaviors include teaching play skills and joint attention skills using ABA techniques adapted to the NT childs understanding. We will also describe cognitive behavior therapy techniques enabling NT siblings to solve problems that arise in their relationship with their brother or sister, and we will report research on the benefits of sibling support groups for helping children implement ABA methods to understand the behavior of their brother or sister with an ASD.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the perspective of siblings of children with ASD.       

2. Have an overview of research on the skills siblings can acquire.      

3  Be familiar with the objectives of sibling support groups.      

 
 
Invited Paper Session #22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Managing Challenging Behaviors

Sunday, January 29, 2012
8:15 AM–9:15 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Andy Bondy, Ph.D., has more than 40 years of experience working with children and adults with autism and related developmental disabilities. For more than a dozen years he served as the director of a statewide public school program for students with autism. He and his wife, Lori Frost, pioneered the development of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). He designed the Pyramid Approach to Education as a comprehensive combination of broad-spectrum behavior analysis and functional communication strategies. He is a co-founder of Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc., an internationally based team of specialists from many fields working together to promote integration of the principles of applied behavior analysis within functional activities and an emphasis on developing functional communication skills.
Abstract:

This session involves an introduction to broad-spectrum behavior analysis in the form of the Pyramid Approach to Education. Discussion focuses on the importance of addressing students’ skill deficits prior to or simultaneously with addressing behavior excess or other unwanted behavior. Other key elements of the training include the description and the design of effective educational settings that emphasize the use of systematic reinforcement. The link between functional activities, communication training and the reduction of unwanted behavior is explored. In addition, issues related to teaching skills are addressed. This teaches participants to determine and define unwanted behavior targeted for intervention. Participants are assisted with understanding the functional assessment of behavior, and the selection and teaching of alternative responses to replace unwanted behavior. Participants are exposed to antecedent strategies designed to reduce unwanted behavior as well as differential reinforcement procedures and consequence based strategies. Finally, issues related to the evaluation and monitoring of behavior plans are discussed.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, psychologists, educators, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, home therapists, parents, and others who support, teach and interact with individuals of any age who display unwanted or problematic behavior, regardless of the individual’s clinical label.

 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to: • Operationally define behavior
• Identify what functional assessment is and how to conduct an assessment
• Select and teach functionally equivalent behavior to unwanted behavior
• Identify consequence based strategies for reducing unwanted behavior
• Measure, assess, and maintain the efficiency of behavior intervention  
 
 
Invited Paper Session #23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Ethical Considerations in Behavior Analytic Treatments of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Sunday, January 29, 2012
9:15 AM–10:15 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Kennon A. Lattal, Ph.D.
KENNON A. LATTAL (West Virginia University)
Andy Lattal (Ph.D., University of Alabama, 1969) is Centennial Professor in the Department of Psychology at West Virginia University, where he has taught since 1972. His professional activities include service as editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior; associate editor of English language submissions to the Mexican Journal of Behavior Analysis; editorial board member of seven behavioral journals; and president of ABAI, the Division for Behavior Analysis of the American Psychological Association, and the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is a recipient of West Virginia University’s Award for Outstanding Teaching and its Benedum Distinguished Scholar Award. He has mentored 36 Ph.D. students at West Virginia and is the author of 120 refereed publications on many different topics, both basic and applied, within behavior analysis.
Abstract:

This presentation first will review how ethical behavior is viewed from a behavior analytic perspective, outlining unique features as well as those that overlap with other views on ethics. The review also will include the potential impact on ethical behavior of some general topics of concern to behavior analysts, such as values and value clarification, long- and short-term consequences of actions, the role of rules and contingencies in ethical behavior, behavioral control and counter-control, and the context in which actions occur. This will be followed by a review of how selected specific methods used in assessment and intervention and contemporary research findings in both the experimental analysis of behavior and in applied behavior analysis might influence ethical decisions and practices related to autism spectrum disorders.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives: forthcoming
 
 
Invited Paper Session #24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Promoting Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships: Helping Youth With Autism Flourish as They Transition to Adulthood

Sunday, January 29, 2012
10:30 AM–11:30 AM
Grand Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Erik Carter, Ph.D.
ERIK CARTER (Vanderbilt University)
Dr. Erik Carter is an associate professor of special education at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. He received his Ph.D. in special education from Vanderbilt University in 2004. Dr. Carter first worked as a high school transition teacher in Texas. He has since directed two large-scale research grants funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. The first focused on increasing employment outcomes and community engagement for youth with severe disabilities through innovative school-community-business partnerships. The second is evaluating the efficacy and feasibility of peer support and peer network interventions for improving social and learning outcomes of high school students with intellectual disabilities and autism. He was also co-primary investigator on the Natural Supports Project—a 5-year grant focused on increasing the employment, self-determination, and school engagement of youth with severe disabilities. He has co-authored over 85 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and books addressing transition supports for adolescents with disabilities. He received the Distinguished Early Career Research Award from the Council for Exceptional Children and the Early Career Award from the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. He serves on eight editorial boards, is an associate editor for two journals, and currently serves as co-editor of Remedial and Special Education.
Abstract:

For most transition-age youth, life after high school offers an exciting array of opportunities and new pursuits. Yet, far too many young people with autism leave school without the skills, supports, relationships, and connections needed to pursue their aspirations for adulthood. Follow-up studies consistently highlight the persistence and pervasiveness of disappointing outcomes in the years following graduation. This presentation will focus on what is currently known about effective approaches for promoting (a) access to rigorous learning opportunities in secondary school, (b) connecting youth to relevant school and community experiences, and (c) fostering supportive peer and adult relationships. Despite the rapidly expanding knowledge base, there remains much the field still does not know about how best to support these young people. Recommendations for research and practice aimed at promoting successful transitions will be offered.

Target Audience:

Certified behavior analysts, behavioral consultants, behavioral therapists, clinicians, educational consultants, psychologists, special education teachers, and individuals working with children with autism or other developmental delays.

Learning Objectives: forthcoming
 

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