Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

38th Annual Convention; Seattle, WA; 2012

Program by Day for Friday, May 25, 2012


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Tour of Morningside Academy, With a Precision Teaching Focus
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Diamond A (Sheraton)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy), JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), JENNIFER REILLY (Morningside Academy)
Description: Join us for a tour of Morningside Academy, a school that helps elementary and middle school students to catch up and get ahead by integrating a number of research-based instructional technologies, including direct instruction, Precision Teaching, and talk aloud problem solving, all within a behavior analysis framework. Most Morningside students did not perform to their potential in their previous schools, have average to above average IQs, and may have diagnoses such as ADHD and mild learning disabilities. Our Foundations program includes reading, language arts, and math, with both basic skills and thinking, reasoning, and problem solving skills embedded in each. Students enrolled in the Middle School program master foundation skills, how to succeed in content courses, and project based learning strategies. Morningside Academy offers a money-back guarantee for progressing 2 years in 1 in the skill of greatest deficit, and in 32 years has returned less than 1%. After the tour, we will conduct a mini workshop in Precision Teaching procedures. Participants will have many opportunities to discuss ways to connect what we do with their work settings. We will also offer an afternoon tour that will focus upon direct instruction. Participants may register for both morning and afternoon sessions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Define and describe the population of Morningside Academy's students, the curriculum taught to students, the instructional methods used to teach the curriculum,the six essential ingredients of Precision Teaching, the advantages of measuring performance celeration, and how to use the timings chart with the daily chart

Activities: Participants will participate in an introductory presentation, a school tour, and a 1-hour workshop about Precision Teaching. Meet at the designated workshop room, and we will walk together to our transportation to Morningside, about 1 mile away.
Audience: Anyone interested in learning more about Morningside Academy is welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How Do They Do That? An Introduction to Operant Conditioning at the Zoo
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
204 (Convention Center)
Area: AAB/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eduardo J. Fernandez, Ph.D.
EDUARDO J. FERNANDEZ (University of Washington), CHRISTY A. ALLIGOOD (Disney's Animal Kingdom)
Description: Over the past several decades, zoos around the world have begun to use operant conditioning to implement husbandry training for the species in their care. Animals living in managed circumstances need regular veterinary monitoring and care to maintain optimal health. Traditionally, animals are restrained or chemically immobilized to receive this care. A well-planned program of husbandry training can reduce the need for these practices. In addition, the number of physical captures and handlings can be minimized, reducing safety hazards to both animals and caretakers. Training can also facilitate research at zoos and aquariums; results from these studies can enhance our ability to understand and care for animals. In this exciting workshop, participants will have the rare opportunity to learn about various techniques used in husbandry training with exotic species, and then to apply their newfound knowledge to hypothetical animal behavior scenarios. Following the classroom portion, participants will travel off site to Woodland Park Zoo, where they will observe applications of operant conditioning first hand. The registration fee includes workshop materials and transportation to and from the zoo. Net proceeds will benefit the Applied Animal Behavior Special Interest Group's student and membership support programs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Give three examples of husbandry goals that can be facilitated through the use of operant conditioning and describe the benefits of training in each case

List five behaviors commonly included in husbandry training programs and describe a typical procedure for training each behavior

Identify three obstacles commonly experienced in husbandry training programs and describe potential solutions for each obstacle

Create a training plan to meet the needs described in various animal behavior scenarios

Activities: Presentations, including video examples, will be interspersed with dynamic problem-solving activities in the classroom portion. Participants will then travel to Woodland Park Zoo, where they will have the opportunity to directly observe operant conditioning at work with several different exotic species.
Audience: Have you ever wondered how zookeepers conduct a physical examination of a crocodile, move an elephant or tiger voluntarily throughout its exhibit, or weigh a giraffe? This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of operant conditioning to the behavior of animals at zoos. Participants will learn how zoos develop training programs to facilitate husbandry goals in a variety of species. Following classroom activities, participants will travel off site to Woodland Park Zoo to observe applications of operant conditioning first hand. The registration fee includes workshop materials and transportation to and from the zoo. Net proceeds will benefit the Applied Animal Behavior Special Interest Group's student and membership support programs. Participants must be at least 18 years of age.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Getting Learners With Autism and Their Teachers Started in Fluency Based Instruction
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
202 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kelly J. Ferris, M.Ed.
KELLY J. FERRIS (Organization for Research & Learning), REBECCA PHILLIPS (Organization for Research & Learning), TERESA M. MCCANN (Organization for Research & Learning)
Description: Fluency based instruction is becoming a more widely applied teaching arrangement for delivering behavior analytic services to students with autism. Teachers new to fluency based instruction or teachers new to children with autism face a number of questions related to the logistics of getting instruction started. The questions frequently asked are, "How do you get them responding?" "How do you get them staying at the table through the timing?" and "How do you get their rate of responding to increase?" This workshop will present procedures for a) developing rapport with students, b) necessary teacher repertoires for high quality instruction, c) getting programs started for new learners, and d) getting programs started for experienced learners new to fluency based instruction. The presentation will include charted examples of student and teacher performance data, as well as video of our staff working to shape both teacher and student repertoires, and hands on practice for participants. The workshop will NOT teach how to chart—activities will assume knowledge of the Standard Celeration Chart.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify data based decision making rules

Identify measurement techniques for shaping early learning

Use teaching procedures helpful for getting students ready for timed practice

Use staff training procedures to get teachers ready to implement fluency based instruction

Select the first few programs

Activities: This workshop will involve practice generating rapport pinpoints and measurement systems, practice designing measurement tools for evaluating teacher and student readiness, practice implementing timings and making data based decisions, and practice setting up programs for timed practice.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for parents and professionals interested in beginning fluency based instruction programs for students with autism and related disabilities who already know how to chart on the Standard Celeration Chart or who will also attend the Standard Celeration Society workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, fluency, precision teaching
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Social Skills That Change Lives: Developing Meaningful Relationships for People Diagnosed With Autism
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
612 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Justin B. Leaf, Ph.D.
MITCHELL T. TAUBMAN (Autism Partnership), RONALD B. LEAF (Autism Partnership), JOHN JAMES MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership), JUSTIN B. LEAF (Autism Partnership)
Description: Children with autism and other autism spectrum disorders (ASD) typically have qualitative impairments in social interaction. Such impairments can range from a child's inability to develop appropriate peer relationships to a lack of enjoyment and interest in others, which can lead to a lower quality of life. Therefore, clinicians must teach social skills to children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD; however, it may be difficult for clinicians to find appropriate social curricula and effective ways to teach children with ASD social skills. The presenters will discuss the importance of teaching social skills; why social skills may be overlooked as part of a comprehensive curriculum; ways to select a comprehensive curriculum; what this comprehensive curriculum consists of; two teaching procedures (i.e., teaching interactions and cool versus not cool) that have been found to be effective in teaching social skills; the research behind these procedures; and ways clinicians can implement the intervention in the home, school, and community. The procedures and curriculum that will be discussed will mainly focus on high functioning children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD but can be applied to children and adolescents of different cognitive functioning levels or diagnoses.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the importance of teaching social skills to children and adolescents diagnosed with autism

Identify procedures to implement to facilitate friendship development

Identify the steps in implementing a teaching interaction procedure

Identify the steps in implementing the cool versus not cool procedure

Identify how to set up a social curriculum

Activities: The workshop will consist of lectures from the presenters, videos of children and adolescents with autism, other videos to highlight points on the importance of social skills, discussion with audience members, and questions from members of the audience.
Audience: The targeted audience for this workshop is clinicians who implement behavioral interventions for children and adolescents with autism. Teachers, professors, school administrators, parents, and graduate students would also benefit from attending the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): friendship development, social skills, teaching interactions
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Competency-Based Staff Training Within an Applied Verbal Behavior Program
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
206 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Miklos, M.S.
MICHAEL MIKLOS (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network), AMIRIS DIPUGLIA (PaTTAN/ Autism Initiative)
Description: Derived from a large scale behavior analytic public schools consultation program, this workshop will describe a model to train instructional staff to deliver protocols for intensive teaching and mand training. The session will review training methods for establishing both behavior analytic conceptual skills as well as effective instruction for students with autism. Emphasis will be placed on training methods to establish the use of transfer of stimulus control procedures across both verbal and non-verbal operants. The workshop will review processes used to establish skill sets in analogue training and through on-site guided practice. Analogue training procedures will include competencies for intensive teaching, mand training, and data collection procedures. On-site guided practice as a training model will focus on options for providing objective feedback on performance in relation to treatment integrity. The workshop will provide participants with training materials that have been developed as part of the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network Autism Initiative.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

State five characteristics of effective group instruction as a form of staff training

Demonstrate skills needed to complete competency checks for processes including errorless teaching, error correction procedures, tacting trial types (by verbal and non-verbal operants), and transfer of operant control procedures

Structure and administer codes for tracking transfer of operant control during intensive teaching sessions and during mand training

Organize basic materials and forms used in staff training

Activities: Participants will be provided models of effective competency-based staff training, and they will practice administering various skill-based competency checks, practice administering observational codes for instructional competency and deriving relevant recommendations based on observational data, and review various materials including video models used in staff training.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts providing consultation and training in school based settings, particularly autism support programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, public schools, staff training, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Increasing Appropriate Behaviors of Children With Autism—Part 1 in a Series
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
212 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Helen P. Mader, M.A.
HELEN P. MADER (Behavior Frontiers, LLC)
Description: Learn to use research-based ABA methods, which are effective in increasing appropriate behaviors for children with autism. Each technique discussed will have a definition, guidelines/procedure, video examples, questions, and role play or discussion. Participants will receive a take-home training manual, which includes sample data sheets, as well as professional on-line access to Behavior Frontiers Applied Behavior Analysis Training Program With an Autism Specialization, so that they may take the on-line examination to become a Certified Behavior Instructor for Autism-1.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Use ABA methods such as discrete trial teaching, naturalistic teaching strategies, token economies, Premack Principle, shaping, chaining, prompting, fading, discrimination teaching, and more to increase appropriate behaviors in children with autism and other special needs

Activities: Participants will watch video demonstrations of ABA methods while filling in their interactive training manual. They will also engage in role play activities to practice using ABA methods under the guidance of the training consultant. Participants will engage in break-out and group discussions, as well as Q and A of specific participant issues.
Audience: This workshop will benefit individuals such as behavior analysts, assistant behavior analysts, line therapists, teachers, paraprofessionals, speech pathologists, and psychologists working directly with children with autism or other special needs who desire comprehensive information on the ABA methods effective to teach appropriate behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Discrete Trials, Naturalistic Teaching, Verbal Behavior, Video Demonstrations
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Effective Use of Self-Monitoring as a Motivational System for Individuals With Autism and Other Related Disabilities
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
303 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, M.Ed.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education)
Description: This workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring strategy. It will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will also be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match system, a user-friendly, easy to implement system. Self-monitoring used as a motivational tool will also be discussed. The Self & Match system has been used nationally to support children with emotional disturbances, autism spectrum disorders, and learning disabilities, as well as unidentified students in general education. It has been implemented in special education settings, general education settings, home settings, camp settings, clinic settings, public schools, private schools, and sports program settings. It can be employed as an individualized behavior system and/or a class-wide management procedure. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. A case study will illustrate the application of the Self & Match system implemented with a public school student diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Data will be reviewed to assess the student's increase of appropriate classroom behavior and decrease of inappropriate behavior. Practical variations on application, progress monitoring (data collection), and fading procedures will be discussed. Additionally, necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system will be analyzed. Participants will get the opportunity to walk through these considerations to create their own systems. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, but will also cover areas of interest for consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who are seeking to increase their knowledge of systematic self-monitoring and motivational systems as behavioral interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the benefits of self-monitoring

Identify the basic components of the Self & Match system

Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system

Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system

Create a Self & Match system to implement in their workplace

Activities: This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and a case study with longitudinal data. Additionally, participants will complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation activity.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, but will also cover areas of interest for consultants, school psychologists, teachers, autism specialists, administrators, students, parents, or others who are seeking to increase their knowledge of systematic self-monitoring combined with a motivational component as a behavioral intervention.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior, Motivational System, Self-Monitoring
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Applied Behavior Analysis and Speech Language Pathology: An Integrated Approach to Promoting Language in Learners With Autism
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
203 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mareile A. Koenig, Ph.D.
JOANNE GERENSER (Eden II Programs), MAREILE A. KOENIG (West Chester University)
Description: There is an extensive body of literature in the area of speech and language development and processing that is not typically reviewed by behavior analysts. This literature may be useful in enhancing services for learners with autism as well as filling in some gaps that may exist. It is essential, however, to interpret this literature correctly and incorporate this information into effective behavioral programming. This workshop will provide a model for integrating research in the areas of psycholinguistic development, early social development, and lexical development within behavioral programming for children with autism. Research in the development of joint attention will be reviewed with implications for the deficits present in children with autism. Strategies to promote joint attention behaviors will be provided. Critical skills for the development of speech will be reviewed as well as programs to promote early vocal and verbal behaviors. The workshop will provide an overview of the literature on word learning as well as the nature of the deficits within this area present in children with autism. Concepts such as fast and slow mapping will be reviewed. Programs to develop and expand vocabulary as well as to promote abstract and higher level language will be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the specific language learning challenges associated with autism

Describe the concept of lexical organization and its impact on language processing

Describe intervention strategies to enhance language processing in learners with ASD

Identify common mistakes made when prompting sounds and speech in learners with ASD

Identifythe current research in joint attention and its implication for program developing for learners with ASD

Activities: This workshop will be a combination of didactic instruction, videotape presentations, discussion and brainstorming, and small group activities.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts, speech language pathologists, teachers, and program administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): language, autism
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Successive Approximations: Useful Shaping Strategies and Tactics to Improve Your Teaching
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
305 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (University of North Texas)
Description: Shaping is a powerful tool for teaching new complex behaviors and producing engaged and confident students, but poor shaping can easily lead to learning plateaus and frustrated learners and teachers. Shaping is often described as an art and as a difficult skill to learn; however, shaping is an orderly and predictable process with rules. This workshop will teach several tactics and strategies for successful shaping and show different ways to engineer behavior (e.g., shaping, micro-shaping, and adduction). Participants will leave with a newly developed understanding of how to look at the shaping process beyond the general concept of successive approximations. Students will learn the rules regarding the mechanics of shaping, the requirements of a conditioned reinforcer, how to arrange the environment to facilitate shaping, what to reinforce, how to reinforce, how to shape movements and actions, and how to shape the stimulus control based on characteristics of the stimuli (e.g., touching red objects) or characteristics of the response (e.g., stacking objects).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Deliver cues, conditioned reinforcers, and primary reinforcers efficiently

Deliver reinforcers in a way that facilitates shaping

Isolate movements through environmental arrangements

Establish stimulus control of behavior

Evaluate students' behavior to decide where to begin shaping

Teach complex behaviors and concepts from simple behaviors

Activities: The workshop will use video examples to illustrate key concepts about shaping. Participants will implement these concepts in interactive games designed to allow them to practice and master the strategies and tactics discussed. During the games participants will play the role of both teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the games as a teacher and student.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone interested in the processes of shaping and learning or anyone interested in improving their teaching techniques. The concepts of the workshop can be applied to any population in any learning setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Complex Behavior, Shaping, Stimulus control, Teaching
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Proloquo2Go et al.: The Ins, Outs, Ups, and Downsof Using iTechnology as a Communication System
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
308 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rebecca Godfrey, Ph.D.
REBECCA GODFREY (Central East Autism Program), MARIO NOTARIANNI (York Behaviour Management Services), KATELYN FERGUSON (York Behaviour Management Services)
Description: Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) augments or replaces vocal speech when spoken language does not develop or is not sufficient to communicate effectively. The main focus of the workshop is on teaching clients to use apps like Proloquo2Go from picture exchange to a voice-output device in a behavior analytic framework. The workshop begins with a brief introduction to why and when AAC should be considered. Then it covers AAC strategies and types of devices available. This discussion centers on the advantages and disadvantages of these devices. The third section provides case studies of the communicative histories of children and youth with autism including AAC as both long-term and short-term communicative needs. The next section covers the ins and outs of Proloquo2Go and then details how to teach the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS; Bondy & Frost, 1984) using Proloquo2Go. The final section covers the advantages and disadvantages of Proloquo2Go and compares it to several other applications. This workshop leads the participant to the conclusion that moving from one form of communication (e.g., picture exchange) to another form (e.g., electronic augmentative device) needs to be a planned process that involves ongoing and systematic interventions, that there needs to be a back-up plan, that availability of a communication system always needs to be present, and that this sort of technology is not suited for all. It will also lead to some innovative ways in which to teach new skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Summarize types of AAC approaches such as manual signs, picture exchange systems, and speech-generating devices

Identify the potential benefits of AAC interventionto the development of natural speech and functional communication in children with ASD

Describe the advantages and disadvantages of some available devices and apps

Utilize the application Proloquo2Go (e.g., how to change the settings)

Identify the prerequisite or corequisite skills that need to be taught

Create a task analysis to teach an individual how to use Proloquo2Go and to design further treatment programs based on the skill set of the individual

Identify how to teach a variation of the PECS using Proloquo2Go

Identify potential advantages and disadvantages of this technology

Activities: Lecturing will provide an initial overview of AAC interventions and the "wh" questions surrounding them (e.g., Which device should I buy?). Practical exercises will be given in group format that address individual programming needs (e.g., How should I teach a non-vocal child with poor fine motor imitation skills to communicate?). Video clips will be used to present case studies of the systematic interventions used to teach youth to move on from a picture exchange system to an iPhone application and how you could potentially replace the traditional PECS system with iTechnology. Participants will be able to practice using the Proloquo2Go application (e.g., adding a new picture, switching an array, moving items between categories, changing the voice). Group discussion will focus on the prerequisite or corequisite skills needed to learn to use such apps and the ways in which this technology can be used to program beyond learning to express basic needs and wants. It will provide programming plans that target other skill areas (e.g., social questions, independent activity schedules, fine motor skills). Resources will be provided so that participants can further their skills on using Proloquo2Go. Participants will be provided with handouts of the information covered in the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is intended for professionals, teachers, and parents working with children, youth, or adults who have limited or no functional speech or with individuals who require a more mainstream way of communicating.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy With Children and Parents: A Practical Guide
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
205 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christopher Mccurry, Ph.D.
CHRISTOPHER MCCURRY (Associates in Behavior and Child Development, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide clinicians with the background and fundamentals of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as it applies to clinical work with children and parents. Background will be established first through a comparison of the formal DSM approach to diagnosis with a functional-contextual approach. I will briefly describe the similarities and differences between ACT and other acceptance-based therapies that have been applied to children's issues (e.g., MBCT-C, DBT-A). The theoretical and historical foundations of ACT (radical behaviorism, relational frame theory, etc.) will be discussed. ACT fundamentals concerning problem formulation (e.g., experiential avoidance), success criteria, therapeutic stance, and basic technique will be discussed. Moving into the realm of child clinical work, a survey of early child social-emotional and cognitive development will show the developmental origins of ACT concepts such as fusion, literality, and psychological inflexibility. Childhood disturbances of emotion and behavior will be examined within this developmental framework with particular emphasis on the role of the parent-child relationship in teaching and encouraging psychological flexibility. Case examples will describe an ACT approach to treating some of the more common presenting problems in child practice: anxiety, oppositional behavior, ADHD, and depression. Clinical examples will include children from age 5 through adolescence.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe the origins of and basic concepts underlying acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and related acceptance-based therapies

Place ACT within the contexts of normal development and parent-child transactions

Present ACT-consistent strategies and techniques for treating childhood behavioral and emotional problems with special emphasis on the parent-child dyad

Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, discussion, and role play.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinicians who work with children (psychologists, clinical social workers, psychiatrists, master's-level counselors) with an interest in applying ACT in their work.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP): Theory and Practice
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
401 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mavis Tsai, Ph.D.
MAVIS TSAI (Independent Practice), ROBERT J. KOHLENBERG (University of Washington), MARY PLUMMER LOUDON (Independent Practice), GARETH I. HOLMAN (University of Washington)
Description: With behavioral roots, functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) considers a caring, genuine, sensitive, and emotional client-therapist relationship to be the most important element in the change process. FAP focuses on the subtle ways clients' daily life problems occur in the therapy session; all interventions are informed by clearly stated and understandable behavioral principles. FAP uses awareness, courage, love, and behaviorism in the therapist-client relationship to produce significant change, and can be applied to a wide range of clinical problems, including depression, anxiety, intimacy difficulties, personality disorders, problems of the self, substance abuse, OCD, and couples work. Considered one of the new generation innovative cognitive behavior therapies identified as "third wave," FAP is integrative and provides a conceptual and practical framework that will help super-charge your next therapy session. The workshop will include videotaped therapy sessions, experiential exercises, demonstrations, and handouts that can be used with clients.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Name five strategies and concrete exercises to increase connection and intensity in therapeutic interventions

Use functional analysis to help them decide the most effective techniques for clients with diverse histories and issues

Determine when commonly used interventions can be inadvertently counter-therapeutic

Make the hidden meanings of clients' communications more visible

Use innovations in therapeutic rationales and treatment planning that lead to going beyond clients' symptoms into their purpose and passion for living

Activities: This workshop will involve a didactic introduction to FAP including theory, empirical evidence, and videotaped segments of real therapeutic interactions; experiential exercises in pairs and small groups; and audience discussion.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinicians doing individual psychotherapy with adults.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): FAP
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Treating Children With Behavioral and Emotional Disorders: Integrating Emotional and Moral Behaviors to Promote Generalization
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
211 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional treatment for children with emotional and behavioral problems often follows the medical model with the assumption that behavioral symptoms are the result of underlying psychopathology. In contrast, behavior analysts conduct observations of behavior in a variety of settings to determine the effect of stimulus conditions and setting events, functional assessments to determine the causes and maintainers of behaviors, and careful analysis of learning histories to determine the efficacy of specific reinforcers and punishers. Behavioral treatment facilities for these children often use a contingency-based focus when teaching appropriate behavior that works well for managing children's behavior in a structured setting where individuals follow through with predictable contingencies. However, these children are often not prepared to function in a generalized setting where they are expected to respond to a relationship-based focus for dealing with problem behavior. Additionally, although they may have learned social, academic, and vocational skills, they may be lacking in emotional and moral skills. The presenter will discuss the impact that learning history has on current behavior and ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based and focus on emotional and moral skills. Case examples will be provided, along with opportunities to get feedback on the cases of participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Name several emotional and immoral behaviors of children and adolescents who are diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders

Tell how the learning histories of children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders affect their emotional and moral behaviors

Describe several behavioral techniques that can be used to treat children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders

Explain the limits of typical behavioral interventions and suggest alternative interventions that can be used to treat children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders

Describe how to apply these techniques to assist children diagnosed with behavioral/emotional disorders in their own professional settings

Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools, and community settings; take notes; ask questions; view a PowerPoint presentation; present their own cases for feedback; and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants will include Board Certified Behavior Analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers, and/or teachers who serve children who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): emotional, generalization, moral
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Using Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Smoking Cessation
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
611 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Barbara S. Kohlenberg, Ph.D.
ELIZABETH GIFFORD (Center for Health Care Evaluation), BARBARA S. KOHLENBERG (University of Nevada School of Medicine)
Description: A heavy smoker can take 800–1,000 puffs per day for years. This kind of history establishes powerful patterns of behavior that are not easily altered. Because smoking functions in part to help smokers manage thoughts and feelings, quitting smoking requires facing what has been avoided and learning to participate differently in the world. Although smoking is often described perfunctorily as a "habit," changing such entrenched behavior is a raw, painful process that confronts us with the heart of what it means to be human: to yearn, to suffer, to struggle for meaning. This workshop provides training in applying and integrating functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for smoking cessation. The treatment involves shaping alternative responses to intense, personally meaningful, and emotionally laden material. Acceptance and relationship repertoires can be used to strengthen one another, and understanding their interaction is at the core of this behavior analytic approach to smoking treatment, which has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials. The behavioral treatment developed by the workshop leaders (Gifford, Kohlenberg, Hayes, Piasecki, Antonuccio, Pearson, & Palm, 2011) will be presented both didactically and experientially.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Conceptualize acceptance and relationship as functional processes and identify their role in changing smoking and addictive behavior

Provide a rationale for FAP and ACT for smoking cessation to clients

Practice one-on-one FAP approaches to shaping emotional acceptance repertoires

Practice group ACT approaches to applying emotional acceptance to smoking cessation

Integrate standard CBT approaches with FAP and ACT

Activities: Workshop attendees will participate in didactic learning as well as clinical interactions demonstrating techniques. Participants will participate in role playing activities and group discussions. The workshop will be very hands on with opportunities to practice and apply the material in an interactive, supportive environment.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for anyone with an interest in clinical behavior analysis and smoking cessation.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ACT FAP, smoking cessation
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Ethics of Supervision Workshop, Part Deux
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
4C-1 (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (TheBehaviorAnalyst.com), MARTA T. FIOL (Behavior Services of Brevard)
Description: In behavior analysis, supervision takes many forms. Last year we focused on basic ethical difficulties, documentation, and supervisory sessions with some interesting ethical dilemmas. This year we continue to interact with the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct, and, by studying the feedback from last year's session, we have expanded the interactive scenario exercises and feedback. Many assume supervision is a matter of assisting a practitioner in tweaking rates of reinforcement, or giving advice about functional assessments. However, sometimes your supervisees may feel as though they are trying to practice on an alien planet. Clinical supervision is a responsibility many BCBAs assume regardless of professional experience. Some perform it as a practical method of filling in the gaps in their schedule while imparting some of their training and experience. Others have it thrust upon them by employers because of clinical policy or practice. Through the use of video clips, real-to-life supervision sessions will be presented, complete with the environmental problems faced by many supervisee-clinicians. Participants will be divided into triads where multiple opportunities to practice brief supervisory scenarios, as supervisor, supervisee, and observer, will be given. Participant laptops are suggested, but not required.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe their role, and that of their supervisee, in the supervisory experience

Describe multiple ethical considerations, as experienced through discussion and role play

Describe supervision skills and strategies, as experienced—with feedback—through discussion and role play

Describe the experience of "supervising" a clinician who has just started working with an individual whose environment may or may not be supportive of an intervention

Describe the experience of being presented with novel situations, and then being expected to give their supervisee tasks to perform before the next supervision, much like real life supervision

Activities: This workshop will involved didactic lecture; critique of video scenarios; participation in multiple scenario triads, taking the role of supervisor, supervisee, and observer; and a question and answer period.
Audience: This workshop is for intermediate and advanced BCBAs who are currently providing supervision, who are considering becoming supervisors, or who are considering providing supervision to community-based clinicians.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical, Ethics, Supervision, Video
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Addressing Problem and Replacement Behaviors in Home and School Settings
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
4C-2 (Convention Center)
Area: DDA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ennio C. Cipani, Ph.D.
ENNIO C. CIPANI (National University)
Description: This 6-hour workshop will cover a function-based diagnostic system for operant problem behaviors exhibited in home and school settings by children with disabilities. A four category diagnostic system for classifying problem behaviors (direct access; DA 1.0, direct escape; DE 3.0, socially mediated access; SMA 2.0, socially mediated escape; SME 4.0), as well as sub-categories under each category (e.g., SME 4.1, unpleasant social situations) will be presented. A brief overview of functional behavioral assessment methods will also be covered as related to the above system. The remainder of the workshop will cover the three category system for diagnosing the current strength and breadth of the replacement behavior in the repertoire of the client/child. Assessing whether the relative absence of a desirable behavior is due to a mis-directed contingency or a skill deficit (inept repertoire) has significant implications for treatment design.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the four major diagnostic categories of problem behavior

Identify the factors involved in deciding the function and diagnostic category of problem behavior in both home and school settings

Identify several major functional behavioral assessment methods and generate a plan for conducting such an assessment method with a specific problem behavior (particularly analogue and in vivo experimental analysis)

Identify the three diagnostic categories for assessing the strength and breadth of the current replacement behavior in the repertoire of the client

Generate experimental tests to determine the diagnostic category of the replacement behavior

Activities: This workshop will involve active student responses (ASRs) contained within the presentation.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs, licensed professionals, other professionals in practice settings, and students at the graduate level.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Standard Celeration Charting
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
306 (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kerri L. Milyko, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), JOHN W. ESHLEMAN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Families for Effective Autism Treatment of Washington), KERRI L. MILYKO (Precision Teaching Learning Center)
Description: This workshop will teach participants the steps of precision teaching with particular emphasis on reading and charting human performance on the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). Participants will learn a) to write precise performance statements (pinpointing), b) the three important dimensions of behavior to monitor, c) the features of the SCC, d) standard charting conventions, and e) how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The instructors will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of setting to illustrate key concepts taught in the workshop. The presenters will use examples from university teaching, educational intervention with special needs and regular education students, and the monitoring of private events. Participants will receive a copy of the Handbook of the Standard Celeration Chart, all materials used in the workshop, and a CD containing selected articles and an electronic version of the SCC.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Write precise performance statements (pinpointing)

Read performance data charted on the SCC

Chart performance data charted on the SCC

Describe the frequency, celeration, and bounce of the data on the SCC

Describe changes in performance using SCC change terminology

Describe appropriate data-based change decisions

Activities: Applying principles derived from behavior analysis of well-designed instruction, our world-class group of workshop instructors will use a range of activities to ensure participants learn the skills targeted in the objectives. Participants will engage in choral responding and paced practice, timed practice on key concepts and skills, and both small and large group discussions.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for anyone seeking an introduction (or refresher) to precision teaching and standard celeration charting, including persons interested in using the SCC to improve their teaching or clinical practice and individuals planning to take the BACB examination.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Celeration Charting, Precision Teaching
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Developing Social Skills Groups for Students With Autism and Other Development Disabilities
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
4C-4 (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.S.
BENJAMIN R. BRUNEAU (Crossroads School for Children), MICHELE D. BROCK (Crossroads School for Children), RACHEL ABRAHAM (Crossroads School for Children), KEVIN HARDY (Crossroads School for Children), IAN T. MELTON (Crossroads School for Children), JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Crossroads School for Children)
Description: One of the most prevalent challenges for students with autism is in the area of social skills, including difficulty with play interactions, social pragmatics, and sharing enjoyment. To date, instructional models have been minimally successful in the acquisition, durability, and generalization of meaningful social skills (Bellini, S., Peters, J., Benner, L., & Hopf, A., 2007; Quinn, Kavale, Mathur, Rutherford, & Forness, 1999). Moreover, when faced with the task of developing and implementing social skills groups, practitioners are confronted with resources that are insufficient and incomplete, and that fail to meet the needs of students with a variety of learning profiles. The model used in the current workshop utilizes an empirically validated social skills group model to teach children to emit novel discrete social skills, as well as strategies for generalization. This workshop will provide participants with a comprehensive model intended to teach a systematic method of designing, implementing, and evaluating homogenous social skills groups for children on the autism spectrum. Skills acquired will be generalizable across all age groups as participants will review the process from development of the social skills assessment, grouping students, writing lesson plans, running groups, designing data collections systems, training staff, and evaluating progress.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify skill domains and develop an initial scope and sequence, including behavioral definitions, to create a social skills assessment

Develop a format to expand on their social skills assessment

Create guidelines for constructing homogeneous groups

Identify key components of a staff training program

Write a lesson plan for a group, including selection of appropriate activities for teaching skills, using empirically based group management techniques and interventions for addressing challenging behaviors

Determine empirically based teaching techniques, including prompting strategies and reinforcement systems

Develop data collection systems that target up to three behaviors for individual students

Develop a plan to teach generalization strategies to students' family members

Incorporate the use of best practices and ethical standards into social skills groups

Activities: This workshop will involve didactic instruction, role-play, development of data collection systems, development of reinforcement systems, development of staff training protocol, development of assessment protocol, practice data collection, and development of lesson plans.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practitioners and administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Social Skills
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Positive Behavior Support at the Tertiary Level: Red Zone Strategies
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
613/614 (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.
LAURA A. RIFFEL (Behavior Doctor Seminars)
Description: This workshop will focus on teaching participants how to use antecedent, behavior, and consequence data (ABC data) to make data based decisions for building a proactive multi-modal behavioral intervention plan. Participants will be shown a free, user friendly tool that will graph ABC data, giving the behavior support team access to data for day of the week, time of day, context, antecedent, and consequence occurrences as they relate to behavior. This tool is extremely easy to use by classroom teachers and provides relevant data to environmental predictors for behavioral patterns. Specific interventions will be shared for students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and learning disabilities (LD), as well as typical students who have impeding behaviors. The examples used in this workshop will show how data were utilized to determine the function and build a competing pathway of behavior interventions. This workshop is based on practical knowledge from more than 31 years in the classroom and 10 years of working as a consultant in various states. ABC data collection has been studied according to established procedures of scientific scrutiny that can be reasonably relied upon.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify environmental settings and antecedents for modification, plan replacement behaviors that will compete with targeted behaviors, and modify their own reactions so the behavior is no longer being fed by reactive practices

Identify the value of ABC data collection as it relates to building a proactive multi-modal behavior support plan for students whose behaviors impede their learning or that of others

Enter their own ABC data into a useful tool that will graph the data for them in an easy to understand format

Activities: Participants will fill in competing pathway charts based on data presented as they create behavior support plans for students with behaviors similar to their own situations in the classroom. Participants will leave with ideas for students with ADHD, autism, oppositional defiant disorder, learning disabilities, and other disruptive behaviors. Participants will share their own successes and barriers to behavior intervention planning in small group settings. Participants will actually tally real data from a case study and see how valuable the information is in developing a behavior support plan. Participants will learn how to introduce the concept of data collection to nominally trained educators.
Audience: The target audience will be educators and service providers who work with pre-K through 12th grade students. "Educators" is defined as anyone who works within the educational setting: counselors, teachers, administrators, directors, behavior specialists, psychologists, therapists, etc.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Organizational Performance Engineering to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
302 (Convention Center)
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with the progress that your clients are making towards achieving their goals? Behavior analysis has developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system, process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems; analyze their causes; recommend the best solutions; solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices; and evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of your solutions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Pinpoint a client’s performance problems—after collecting information about the client’s desired results and the performance necessary to achieve those results—by a) defining the client’s desired results and performance and b) evaluating current results and performance to decide whether the problem is worth solving.

Analyze a client’s performance problems, given information about the causes of those problems, classifying them as “can-do,” “know-how,” and/or “want-to” problems and identifying their causes as defective resources, training programs, and management practices

List possible solutions, given an evaluation of current performance problems and an analysis of their causes, considering the estimated value, cost, and compliance of each solution with ethical standards, and recommend those solutions with the best return on investment

Solve a performance problem by designing and implementing the solutions—given a list of recommended solutions to the performance problem, which may include resources, training, and performance management—such as more efficient resources, training, or performance management practices

Evaluate solution effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment, and recommend design changes needed to produce further improvements, after collecting measures of improvement in performance and results, as well as of the time and costs to produce that improvement

Activities: This workshop will involve the following activities:

Fluency practice—participants will gain fluency in component skills of organizational performance engineering by practicing with flashcards and measuring and graphing their own learning efficiencies.

Practice solving organizational performance problems—participants will practice solving organizational performance problems with case studies provided by the instructor.

Discussion of performance engineering projects—participants will discuss their performance-engineering projects, present their work to the instructor and fellow students, and help their fellow students solve project-related problems.

Audience: This workshop will be of interest to anyone responsible for solving human performance problems, whether these exist at the organizational, process, or individual levels. It can help agency directors change the flow of resources and feedback to and within their organizations so that their agencies can achieve their missions of helping clients achieve their goals. It can help agency managers redesign work processes so that staff are able to work together more efficiently to help clients achieve their goals. And it can help agency supervisors and trainers provide more efficient resources, training, and management practices so that individual staff will be more effective in helping clients achieve their goals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
"Why Won't They Listen to Me?" Improving Interactions With Consumers, Treatment Providers, and Other Professionals
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
309 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: W. Larry Williams, Ph.D.
WILLIAM C. FOLLETTE (University of Nevada, Reno), JORDAN T. BONOW (University of Nevada, Reno), SABRINA DARROW (University of California, San Francisco), CLAUDIA DROSSEL (Mental Illness Research, Education & Clinical Center), W. LARRY WILLIAMS (University of Nevada,Reno)
Description: Behavior analysts work in a variety of settings requiring regular interactions with treatment and care providers unfamiliar with behavior analysis (e.g., teachers, parents). Because even the most brilliant behavioral plans are futile when not implemented, overcoming barriers to implementation often takes center stage when working with these providers. Techniques developed in clinical research to address client "resistance" are aplenty but not widely known within the broad behavior analytic community. The primary goal of this workshop is the dissemination of clinical behavior analysis to improve behavior analysts' effectiveness in bridging the language and interpersonal barriers experienced with many providers. This workshop will teach participants to apply behavioral principles to their own behavior and to their relationships with providers. While there is no research directly testing the efficacy of the approach used in this workshop, the materials rely upon the theoretical extension of core behavioral principles with extensive empirical foundations. Moreover, the presented materials are in part adapted from a clinical behavior analytic modality with empirical support (functional analytic psychotherapy, or FAP). Thus, the content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, and theoretical concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Give a behavior analytic account of "resistance"

Give a behavior analytic account of interpersonal relationships

Analyze specific interpersonal interactions using behavior analytic terms and concepts

Preliminarily identify how their own stimulus properties may affect others in professional settings

Preliminarily identify the strengths and weaknesses in their interpersonal repertoires

Present a functional analytic account of private events in relation to their interactions with others

Begin to generate and test informal interventions aimed at improving their interactions in real professional settings

Activities: This workshop will consist of a number of different instructional methods including didactic presentations, small and large group discussions, and experiential application exercises. During the didactic portions, participants will listen to brief presentations of theoretical material and watch videos of illustrative examples. Active participation (e.g., asking questions) will be encouraged throughout the didactic portions of the workshop. Small group discussion will involve groups of approximately three to five participants engaging in personally relevant discussion (e.g., identification of interpersonal strengths and weaknesses, identification of interpersonal stimulus properties). Large group discussion among all participants and presenters will be used to summarize small group discussions and encourage contemplation of broad issues (e.g., types of interactions commonly difficult for behavior analysts, attributions behavior analysts often make regarding lay persons). Finally, experiential application exercises will encourage participants to practice the strategies encouraged during didactic instruction. This will allow participants to receive direct feedback regarding their interpersonal repertoires, shaping them to exert more effective social influence. Experiential application exercises will commonly begin with video vignettes of interpersonal situations regularly encountered by professional behavior analysts. Participants will identify how they would respond to the situation and their rationale for their stated response.
Audience: While any behavior analyst could potentially benefit from an improved repertoire for interpersonal interactions, the primary target audience of this workshop consists of behavior analysts who work in applied settings and have direct contact with persons unfamiliar with behavior analysis. In particular, this workshop is designed for those professional behavior analysts who often find themselves asking questions such as "Why won't they listen to me?" when their expert advice is not followed by those without formal behavior analytic training. Ideally, audience members will be BCBAs, though this workshop is also appropriate for BCaBAs, as they will have adequate knowledge of the foundational behavioral principles used to analyze interpersonal interactions. Although some of the material presented in the workshop is adapted from clinical behavior analytic applications, no preexisting knowledge of psychotherapy is assumed or required. As a whole, nonprofessionals (e.g., undergraduate students, parents) and those without a basic understanding of behavioral principles are discouraged from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Increasing Compliance, Overcoming Resistance, Rapport Building
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Functional Behavior Assessments in School/Home Settings: Balancing Rigor With Practicality
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
213 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Aaron Barnes, Ph.D.
AARON BARNES (University of Wisconsin - Stout), BILLIE JO RODRIGUEZ (University of Texas at San Antonio), JESSICA HORWITZ TURTURA (University of Oregon), AMY CAMPBELL (Grand Valley State University)
Description: The scope of what constitutes a functional behavior assessment (FBA) in many educational and home settings is broad and varied. Practice may range from informal interviews and anecdotal narrative observation summaries to analog functional analysis, and everything in between. Both policy and resources play a role in determining what the FBA process entails for a particular case in a particular setting, but in many cases steps can be taken to increase both the efficiency and effectiveness of our efforts. This workshop will address practices to increase both the scientific rigor and treatment utility of FBA in natural settings. The presented practices will include selecting indirect and direct assessment methods; conducting assessments with focused efficiency to yield more useful data in less time; utilizing data from indirect assessments to help guide direct assessment procedures; linking data collection from baseline to intervention progress monitoring; and troubleshooting common problems encountered in the assessment and intervention stages of service delivery. The presentation will incorporate the use of technology to enhance data collection procedures. A focus of the workshop will be to share how increased precision during the assessment phase of FBA enhances the development and efficacy of behavior support plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe the rationale for selecting particular indirect and direct assessment tools in natural (e.g., school, home, community) settings

Increase the efficiency of FBA interviews by gathering information that contributes to a functional hypothesis and to the efficiency of conducting direct observations

Utilize technology to enhance data collection

Conduct targeted direct observation procedures with minimal disruption to naturally occurring contingencies

Collect data with high treatment utility in less time

Demonstrate the link between assessment data and behavior support strategies

Activities: This workshop will alternate between lecture and hands-on activities, including reviewing assessment methods, evaluating initial assessment data to inform subsequent assessment and support plans, demonstrating different ways technology can be utilized to enhance assessment, and reviewing videotaped exercises to practice newly acquired skills.
Audience: The workshop requires participants to have foundational knowledge of applied behavior analysis methods and terminology. The presentation is intended for professionals who design, implement, fund, support, and evaluate functional behavior assessment and subsequent interventions in natural settings including schools, homes, day programs, and residential facilities. This target audience may include educators, therapists, social workers, clinic or school-based psychologists, graduate-level students, and behavior specialists or analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): FBA, observation technology, Routines Analysis, School/Home Setting
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Special Education Law and the Practicing Behavior Analyst: Legal and Ethical Considerations
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
201 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Walden University), REBECCA RYAN (Applied Behavioral Strategies)
Description: This day long workshop will focus on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analysts should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments (FBAs), writing behavior intervention plans (BIPs), understanding the term "positive behavior supports" as used in the IDEIA, and understanding the requirements for independent educational evaluations, including FBAs. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive questions and answers. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the major components of the IDEIA

Identify the areas of the IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst

Identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may address under the IDEIA

Identify the legal requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation

Identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA

Identify when a BIP must be developed under the IDEIA

Identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA

Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, discussion, case study, and questions and answers.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practicing behavior analysts, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts, and school administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Education Law, Ethics, School Services, Special Education
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
214 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Wenig, M.S.
JESSICA WENIG (Advances Learning Center), ALYSSA FAMIGLIETTI (Advances Learning Center), LIBBY PAIGE ADAMS (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language; conversation; independent, pretend, and cooperative play; social conventions; and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues

Facilitate activities that teach body language; conversation; independent, pretend, and cooperative play; social conventions; and perspective-taking

Group students into effective learning clusters

Use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency

Collect data on multiple students

Individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students

Take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders

Activities: Following a personalized system of instruction approach, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and role plays. There will be some lecture, but the majority of the workshop will be hands on.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs who train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Practical Applications of Relational Frame Theory to Early Intensive Behavior Intervention Programs: Training Generative Verbal Behavior
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
310 (Convention Center)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Siri Morris Ming, M.A.
IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway), JOHN D. MCELWEE (VB3), SIRI MORRIS MING (VB3)
Description: Generative verbal behavior (GVB)—the ability to understand and produce novel verbal behavior in the absence of direct instruction—is key to the flexibility and complexity of language and should, therefore, be a core goal of any language training program. However, achieving GVB has been extremely difficult for many children with autism spectrum disorder. Relational frame theory (RFT), which conceptualizes generalized or derived relational responding as the core process underlying language and cognition, may constitute an important resource for the training of GVB when designing early intensive behavior intervention (EIBI) instructional programs. This theoretical approach also allows an important expansion of Skinner's influential analysis of verbal behavior. This workshop will demonstrate how RFT concepts can be incorporated into EIBI programs with the design of instructional program sequences for early to advanced learners. This workshop will discuss RFT as a behavior analytic account of GVB, and provide demonstration and discussion of specific instructional programs and their sequencing to facilitate GVB, including analysis of the correspondence between Skinnerian verbal behavior programs (specifically those using the VB-MAPP) and core RFT skills, and an introduction to the Training and Assessment of Relational Precursors and Abilities (TARPA), a computer-based protocol for systematic assessment and training of relational framing skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Define and describe examples of generative language

Identify the core concepts of relational frame theory's approach to language:

a) define and describe arbitrarily applicable relational responding

b) describe the key theoretical concepts of mutual entailment, combinatorial entailment, and transformation of stimulus function

Describe the relationship between the Skinnerian and relational frame theory approaches to language:

a) distinguish between Skinnerian and RFT definitions of language

b) describe a potential synthesis of the Skinnerian classification of verbal operants and RFT concepts of derived relational responding

Assess students' relational framing abilities using the TARPA or tabletop activities

Use and develop instructional programs to teach higher order operants:

a) describe several aspects of basic RFT research and the implications for EIBI instructional design

b) design instructional programs to teach non-arbitrary derived relational responding

c) design instructional programs to teach early relational frames (e.g., derived naming)

d) design instructional programs to teach intermediate to advanced relational frames (e.g., comparative, spatial, hierarchical, and perspective-taking relations)

Activities: This workshop will include didactic presentation and video examples, whole-group active responding exercises, and dyadic role play.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, speech pathologists, and other professionals with experience developing EIBI programming for children with autism based on an analysis of verbal behavior.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): derived responding, language programming, RFT
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Advanced Verbal Behavior Programming for Intermediate Learners
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
4C-3 (Convention Center)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, Ph.D.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Barbera Behavior Consulting)
Description: Once students with autism acquire basic language abilities and can mand for and tact items and actions, some professionals are unsure how to implement more advanced ABA/VB programming. This workshop will cover programming for vocal children, adolescents, and adults who need to learn more advanced language skills. Through the use of lecture, video examples, role playing, and hands-on activities, Mary Lynch Barbera will demonstrate how to rapidly train staff and parents to name the verbal operants and conduct intensive teaching sessions. She will then present information about teaching students to mand for information and tact new items as well as teaching students to tact features, prepositions, and pronouns. In addition, this workshop will cover how to teach students to answer questions related to personal information and how to teach categorization and intraverbal webbing to intermediate learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Train staff and parents to fluently name the verbal operants and participate in intensive teaching sessions

State the reason why primers are sometimes used to teach mands for information

Teach intermediate students to tact four prepositions and four pronouns

Teach students how to answer three questions related to personal information

State six categories that promote basic intraverbal webbing and conversational skills

Activities: Lecture, video examples, role playing, and hands-on activities will be used throughout the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs, SLPs, teachers, and psychologists with previous basic knowledge of ABA/VB terminology and VB programming.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Critical Elements in the Development and Design of Behavior Intervention Plans: A Guide for Practitioners
Friday, May 25, 2012
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
307 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jose D. Rios, M.S.
JOSE D. RIOS (Private Practice), HOWARD TSERNOV (Inclusive Education & Community Partnership), NATALIE STAFFORD (Inclusive Education & Community Partnership), KRISTINE DICKSON (California State University, Los Angeles), ISAAC BERMUDEZ (Behavior Functions, Inc.), TAMMY H HEO (Sage Behavior Services)
Description: This presentation will cover a variety of issues related to the development and creation of behavior intervention plans. This presentation will enhance the skills and knowledge of participants in areas such as understanding common errors in treatment and assessment; functional assessment methodology; forms and formats of functional assessments; intervention formulation derived from functional assessment findings, forms, and formats for behavior plans; methods to evaluate treatment outcomes; and methods to conduct treatment integrity. This is an intro/intermediate presentation that requires participants to have basic knowledge of applied behavior analysis methods and terms. This presentation is targeted towards professionals who design, implement, and evaluate functional assessment and behavior intervention plans in settings such as schools, day programs, clinical settings, and residential facilities.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe how functional assessment methodology logically relates to the development of an effective behavior intervention plan

Include the assessment information in a written plan

Review how to place functional assessment results into a functional assessment report

Select effective, research-based interventions based on the assessed function of the problem behavior

Review the steps for implementing many research-based intervention strategies

Place behavior intervention plan recommendations into a report and create a behavior intervention plan that is easy to use by staff members

Discriminate between correctly and incorrectly written behavior intervention plans

Describe the ethical concerns related to assessment and interventions in behavior intervention plans using evidence-based best practices

Activities: In addition to a presentation on the topic, we will provide two small group exercises that will allow participants to review and critique plans using a checklist format. Other exercises to be included are aimed at improving participants' skills and knowledge of behavior plan formulation.
Audience: This workshop is aimed at new and seasoned practitioners who are involved in writing, creating, reviewing, and supervising behavior intervention plans in various settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Tour of Morningside Academy, With a Direct Instruction Focus
Friday, May 25, 2012
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Diamond A (Sheraton)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy), JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), JENNIFER REILLY (Morningside Academy)
Description: Join us for a tour of Morningside Academy, a school that helps elementary and middle school students to catch up and get ahead by integrating a number of research-based instructional technologies, including direct instruction, Precision Teaching, and talk aloud problem solving, all within a behavior analysis framework. Most Morningside students did not perform to their potential in their previous schools, have average to above average IQs, and may have diagnoses such as ADHD and mild learning disabilities. Our Foundations program includes reading, language arts, and math, with both basic skills and thinking, reasoning, and problem solving skills embedded in each. Students enrolled in the Middle School program master foundation skills, how to succeed in content courses, and project based learning strategies. Morningside Academy offers a money-back guarantee for progressing 2 years in 1 in the skill of greatest deficit, and in 32 years has returned less than 1%. After an introductory presentation and tour, we will conduct a mini workshop in direct instructional technologies, including direct instruction and Tom Gilbert’s behaviorally based predecessor, Mathetics. We will also offer a half-day morning tour that will focus on Precision Teaching technologies. Participants are welcome to register for both morning and afternoon tours.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Define and describe the population of Morningside Academy's students, the curriculum taught to students, the instructional methods used to teach the curriculum, the six essential ingredients of direct instruction (DI), DI advanced correction procedures, and the generic basis of DI in Mathetics

Activities: Participants will participate in an introductory presentation, a school tour, and a 1-hour workshop about direct instruction. Meet at the designated workshop room, and we will walk together to our transportation to Morningside, about 1 mile away.
Audience: Anyone interested in learning more about Morningside Academy is welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Special Event #1
Closed Meeting: Affiliated Chapters Leadership Training
Friday, May 25, 2012
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Aspen (Sheraton)
Chair: Gordon Bourland (Trinity Behavioral Associates)

At the affiliated chapters leadership training, learn strategies for building and growing vibrant chapters. Network and brainstorm with other leaders—from chapters of all sizes, types, and locations. This session will focus on practical steps you can take to ensure the health of your chapter. Although the training is free for up to three officers per chapter, advance registration is required. This event is closed; attendance is by invitation only.

 
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Advanced Language and Verbal Behavior Skills to Students With Autism: Inference Training, Reading Comprehension, and Communication Skills
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
305 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
NISSA INTARACHOTE (Behavior Analysts, Inc.), JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: Children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate the ability to tact and often discuss items or events that they are able to experience. With proper program planning and teaching, children with autism can master intraverbal skills in relation to recalling past events and discussing these events with peers and family. One area in which children with autism demonstrate significant delays is the ability to infer and make predictions about pictures, events, and feelings during reading comprehension in texts. To develop these skills, it is necessary to teach many examples of situations and stories in which one would infer or predict an outcome. Using tact to intraverbal transfers as well as recall of experiences and emotions, students with ASD can begin to infer future events. Intervention programs that develop these skills can improve a child's ability to predict outcomes in everyday experiences as well as with stories. This workshop will discuss different strategies to task analyze and teach decoding along with comprehension techniques for students using advanced language skills. Attendees will also learn how to develop more advanced language programs that include inference training, prediction of outcomes, and conversation skills. Specific strategies will be presented that professionals and educators can use to develop these advanced skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Design and task analyze skills for inference and prediction of outcomes (this includes how to break down reading comprehension activities according to the different verbal operants as they relate to students)

Activities: Video modeling, in vivo training, and audience participation will be included in this workshop to allow educators and professionals to problem solve specific situations.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate forprofessionals and educators working with students with autism in clinic settings, in home settings, and in classroom settings. This workshop will target students with more advanced language skills.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Autism, Imitation, and the Reciprocities: Emotional, Social, Communication, and Motor Exchanges
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
613/614 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Bob Ellis, Ph.D.
BOB ELLIS (The Resource Center)
Description: Autism is characterized by compromises in an individual's ability to reciprocate at the emotional (i.e., empathy), social, communication, and motor levels. It has been suggested by several experts that these compromises are the result of an inability, possibly of a genetic origin, to imitate. The discovery of the class of neurons called mirror neurons, and the finding that they are compromised for those on the spectrum, appears to provide a neurological foundation for that suggestion. Evidence for the argument that that compromise of the mirror neuron system is the key to the imitation problems in autism is controversial and will be reviewed. Finally, new developments in the use of imitation as a motivational tool for those on the spectrum will be introduced and reviewed, including the Blank Face Protocol (Nadel) and Reciprocal Imitation Training (Ingersoll).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe the role of compromised reciprocities in autism

Describe the role of imitation in making the reciprocities possible

List the basic steps of the Reciprocal Imitation Training protocol

Activities: Participants will describe their experience with autism and their efforts to motivate/activate their students on the spectrum, and they will discuss their experiences using imitation as a teaching tool.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for special education teachers, BCBAs, consultants, ABA professionals, academics, and clinical professionals.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Mirror Neurons, Reciprocal Imitation
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
POWER-Solving: A Systematic Approach to Teaching Social Skills
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
612 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rita F. Gordon, M.Ed.
STEVEN GORDON (Behavior Therapy Associates, P.A.), RITA F. GORDON (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey)
Description: Youth with social skills impairments include those with a range of DSM-IV diagnoses such as autism, Asperger's disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Social skill deficits have been associated with negative outcomes in future adjustment (i.e., educational achievement, interpersonal relationships, and psychological well-being). The scientific research on social skills training has generally found a weak effect with limitations as to the manner in which it has been implemented. POWER-Solving has been adapted from the social information processing literature related to improving problem solving skills. POWER-Solving is an acronym that addresses the core deficits seen in many of these children: put the problem into words, observe and measure feelings, what is the goal and how strongly is the goal desired, explore and evaluate solutions, and review and reward. POWER-Solving was implemented in a 6-week summer day program for children with social skills impairments known as Helping Improve Social Skills Through Evidence-Based Practices (HI-STEP). Principles associated with applied behavior analysis (ABA) such as pinpointing target behaviors, functional behavior assessments, positive behavior supports, antecedent/consequence interventions, and data collection are the backbone of the summer program. This workshop is at an intermediate level and assumes participants have prior knowledge of ABA principles.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the five steps associated with POWER-Solving

Identify the components of applying POWER-Solving social skills

Identify evidence-based strategies that contribute to success in social skills and problem-solving

Apply POWER-Solving to a specific social skill of their choosing

Activities: Participants will view a PowerPoint presentation regarding the history and concepts of POWER-Solving. Videotapes of learners using POWER-Solving will be viewed. An opportunity to apply behavioral strategies to teaching a social skill of participants' choosing will be provided.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for teachers, paraprofessionals, parents, and mental health professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evidence-Based Practices in Error Correction
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
205 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michelle Turan, M.A.
LIANNE M. MOROZ (Surrey Place Centre), MICHELLE TURAN (University of Windsor), NATALIE P. CROTEAU (Surrey Place Centre)
Description: This workshop will give participants an overview of the literature surrounding error correction strategies in discrete trial training and applied verbal behaviour programs. Specific strategies will be recommended regarding the selection of error correction strategies for the individual learner. Participants will view video examples of different strategies, practice particular strategies, and receive data collection materials to track error correction data. It is expected that participants will have some knowledge of and practice in discrete trial training.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe the literature base on error correction

Demonstrate at least two error correction procedures

State the conceptual foundation between different error correction strategies

Measure effectiveness of error correction strategies via data collection templates

Activities: This workshop will involve video viewing, role plays, data collection, discussion, etc.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for instructors, therapists, ABA supervisors, behavior analysts, and psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, discrete trial, error correction, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Intensive Early Intervention: Staff Training and Management Through a Dynamic Programming System
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
4C-4 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest), ANGELA M. KEENE (University of Kansas), KARA L. RIEDESEL (Lovaas Institute Midwest), CHARRYSE M. LUCKEY (University of Kansas)
Description: In order to deliver effective early intervention services to children with autism, staff must possess a complete set of behavior analysis skills. The demands for sophisticated staff skills are extreme, requiring extensive individualization of each child's program. The purpose of this workshop is to identify a comprehensive set of programming and implementation skills and present a training and management program that has been developed and validated to both establish these skills and maintain the staff's behavior so that the skills are used consistently throughout the child's life. A particular challenge is to train staff to use independent clinical judgment and make the dynamic programming decisions on a daily basis that support optimal rates of child behavior development. In addition, the team leaders must possess the skills to organize and progress programming as the child's behavior rapidly develops. The skills necessary in the third year of programming are much more complex and varied than are those in the first year of programming. Dynamic self-feedback systems give staff daily, weekly, and 6-month feedback on the success of their treatment decisions, enabling the most cost-effective therapy for achieving the best outcomes. This workshop will make use of videos of actual staff training activities. The workshop will also present a data-collection system for staff management at the child and programmatic levels.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify a comprehensive array of programming and implementation competencies

Identify effective methods for teaching these competencies

Identify a system of management to manage consistent staff behavior

Identify an evaluation system for staff training

Identify a system of dynamically self-adjusting staff training

Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and problem-solving sessions. Video models of staff training activities will be used. Participants will obtain specific program materials provided by the instructor.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for supervisors in intensive early intervention programs, supervisor trainees, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): dynamic programming
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Executive Functioning Skills to Adolescents With Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
307 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Holly Almon, M.S.
HOLLY ALMON (West Coast Behavioral Consultants, Inc.), PAUL ROGERS (West Coast Behavioral Consultants, Inc.)
Description: In order to develop a more active and independent role in society, learning executive functioning skills is essential. Students must develop these skills to manage their own behavior and to take responsibility for their actions and well-being. Teaching executive functioning skills to adolescents with challenging behavior requires a thorough analysis and careful scoping and sequencing. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to how Blueprints designs, implements, and monitors instruction in order to establish executive functioning skills for adolescents with challenging behavior. The importance of teaching self-advocacy and perspective taking skills will also be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

List three major subgroups of skills within the executive functioning skills repertoire

Describe at least three component skills under one major composite skill area

List several ways to measure these skills in the natural environment

Activities: Participants will generate a scope and sequence for an executive functioning skill set for a client on their caseload, identify measures to track client progress on these skills, and develop a plan for transferring these skills to the natural environment.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practitioners interested in teaching executive functioning skills to children, adolescents, or young adults with challenging behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Executive Functioning, instructional design, self-management
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB
Use of Web, Apple, and Android Applications to Increase Information Management and Skill Acquisition in Intensive Community-Based Instruction for Individuals With Autism and Other Disabilities
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
203 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Zane, Ph.D.
PETER F. GERHARDT (The McCarton School), THOMAS L. ZANE (Institute for Behavioral Studies), GLORIA M. SATRIALE (Preparing Adolecents and Adults for Life (PAAL)), AVI GLICKMAN (Preparing Adolecents and Adults for Life (PAAL))
Description: Community-based instruction is a complex process made more complicated by the stigma associated with overt and conspicuous levels of prompting. Independent functioning in community settings can be increased and the stigma associated with such instruction decreased through the use of technology devices such as smart phones, mp3 players, and tablet computers. This workshop will give specific competency-based instruction on the use of five applications that are used on the Android, iPhone, iPod, and/or iPad: Gee Tasks, Wikispaces, iReward, Behavior Tracker Pro, and Steps. Participants will be trained to use these applications to complete various tasks for staff or learners. Anyone registering for this workshop must bring: a) an Android, iPhone, iPod touch,or iPad, b) these apps loaded on to the device (some apps have cost), and c) a computer with Internet capability. Go to autismpaal.org for a more complete description of this workshop. Disclaimer: none of the workshop presenters have any financial connection to any of these applications.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Develop one or more educational programs on each of the applications taught

Create a Wikispaces account

Create sub-accounts at the Wikispaces site

Upload files and other documents to Wikispaces

Activities: In this workshop participants will create and design a "Wiki Page" from scratch, create a visual schedule using the "Gee Tasks" application, create a picture schedule with audio cues using the "Steps" application, create a picture schedule using the smart phone/iPod sideshow feature, create a virtual token board using the "iReward" application, and program and collect data using the "Behavior Tracker Pro" application.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for people who are interested in the use of technology as teaching tools and to increase independence of learners. No previous knowledge is required, although participants must bring the required software and hardware to the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Establishing Meaningful Social Interactions
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
201 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Steven J. Ward, M.A.
STEVEN J. WARD (Whole Child Consulting)
Description: Social interaction is a generally well-accepted staple of programming for students with disabilities, especially for those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Some treatment paradigms recommend following the child's lead, whereas others recommend a coach-apprentice relationship. Ultimately, the "right" option for the right student at the right time is always an empirical question. Participants in this workshop will learn how to gauge learner motivation, and therefore how to determine which social interventions are the most effective. Participants will also receive extensive training in methods of expanding learners' community of reinforcers, and in ways to enhance teacher creativity. Basically, teachers will learn to have fun with their students. The author will provide recommendations for data collection.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Gauge learner motivation

Provide at least three rationales for teaching play within appropriate motivational contexts

Identify at least three templates for brainstorming new play ideas

Identify relevant methods for data collection

Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, questions and answers, interactive brainstorming related to familiar students, video analysis, and role play.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for experienced tutors and parents, and also for well-seasoned BCBAs and professors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Facilitating Inclusion of Preschool Children With Autism
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
309 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Anna Matchneva, M.Ed.
ANNA MATCHNEVA (I Step Ahead Services, Inc.), JOLENTA P. URBANIAK-PAZURA (I Step Ahead Services, Inc.)
Description: Children with autism benefit from participation in inclusive early education programs. However, most children with autism require specialized supports to experience success, and implementation of such programs is not an easy task. This presentation will describe how children with autism are included in preschool settings and will review procedures and key components contributing to the success of an inclusion program, including curriculum development, effective teaching strategies, classroom set-up, and staff development.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Implement effective behavior intervention strategies to facilitate students' learning in inclusive classrooms

Implement specific strategies to teach independent work, peer interaction, social initiation, play, and classroom routines

Use methods to analyze program effectiveness and to evaluate student progress

Activities: This workshop will involve lecture and video review.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts, teachers, and administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Effective ABA in Applied Settings
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
304 (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan E. Henson, M.S.
SUSAN E. HENSON (Wellspring)
Description: Routinely providing services in applied settings, we've become very good at using strategies as written in our textbooks; however, implementing strategies exactly as written in a textbook is not exactly applied, is it? It is imperative that we as behaviorists individualize programs to the consumer while remaining effective and ethical. How do we strike the balance between effective for a client and true to our science in an applied setting? This workshop will review how to implement specific principles, such as extinction and parameters of reinforcement, in applied settings to achieve significant changes in behavior while building and maintaining buy-in and compliance from staff, parents, and additional caregivers. Learning objectives of this workshop will include such topics as motivation, parameters of reinforcement, preventative strategies, types of differential reinforcement, and applying additional strategies to minimize extinction bursts. Interaction is a must in this workshop. A comprehensive teaching style will be used, including but not limited to active verbal discussion, video, tricky case examples, and practice activities. Take-home materials will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Implement differential reinforcement effectively

Use parameters of reinforcement to decrease maladaptive behavior and increase alternative skills

Problem-solve motivation for the consumer

Practice strategies to minimize extinction bursts and increase buy-in and compliance with staff, parents, and additional caregivers

Activities: This workshop's introduction will review common videos that come up when searching for ABA on the Internet, showing rigidity and limited scope of ABA in applied settings. We will also engage in interactive verbal discussion, demonstration, role play, and interactive practice activities. One such activity includes practicing observation while showing that short-term change can be easy but long-term change can be difficult, demonstrating the need for effective use of ABA in applied settings to achieve long-term change in those settings.
Audience: This workshop's target audience includes introductory and intermediate level BCBAs, as well as additional professionals looking for more information regarding ABA and effective strategies in applied settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): applied settings, extinction, motivation, reinforcement parameters
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
202 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (California State University, Fresno)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppen's (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppen's (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, they will be taught how to assess URT using the BRS.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Position their own bodies in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT)

Write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in their own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors

Give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures

Observe, record, and assess another individual's performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS)

Activities: Below are the areas and activities involved in this workshop.

Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological and physical disorders, and Poppen's (1998) development of Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT) and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS).

Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically.

Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other nine relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as a model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time.

Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each participant individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback.

Criterion Tests: Take the URT Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion tests. Take the BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion tests.

Assessment: BRS scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers, including the instructor, will simultaneously score the BRS for the model.

Audience: The target audience for this workshop is comprised of BCBAs and BCaBAs who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals with traumatic brain injury or developmental disabilities; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of "stress." Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, clinical behavior analysis, family and child therapy, and/or health and fitness training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Shaping Behavior and Schizophrenia
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
401 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jannette Cross, Ph.D.
JANNETTE CROSS (Independent Practice)
Description: An approach to shaping behavior among those with schizophrenia will be discussed. Included in the presentation will be the shaping of attention and cognitive functions (i.e., cognitive remediation). This approach was presented in the landmark research by Gordon Paul, Ph.D. (Paul & Lentz, 1977) and has a long line of empirical support. An integrated assessment system, the Clinical Frequency Recording System, is utilized to guide and monitor the shaping process. Both inpatient and community applications are relevant. Basic principles and procedures will be discussed and rehearsed across a range of behavior settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Apply learning principles to shape target behaviors for persons with schizophrenia

Identify important areas of treatment focus

Apply an assessment strategy that guides and monitors the shaping process

Identify the concepts and methods of the Clinical Frequency Recording System

Complete some of the Clinical Frequency Recording System forms

Activities: In addition to the presentation of information, participants will engage in active discussion and role play of shaping procedures. Participants will practice recording on the Clinical Frequency Recording System.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for mental health providers or administrators who provide treatment services to the seriously mentally ill, either in the community or inpatient settings, as well as researchers interested in assessment of behavioral functioning. A compiled, multivariate behavioral assessment strategy with established validity and reliability will be presented.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): assessment, cognitive remediation, schizophrenia, shaping behavior
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performances
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
611 (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic proportions for many populations, including populations served by behavior analysts, it is vital that behavior analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles as effectively as possible. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness, and healthy living are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively assess and optimally improve their own or their clients' physical fitness, health related lifestyles, and, if desired, athletic performances. Emphasis will be placed on behavior analytic "gradual change techniques"; optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and how the use of behavior analytic experimental designs, such as multiple baselines across situations and bounded changing criterion designs, may be used not just to measure change, but to actually facilitate effective behavioral change. Finally, participants will learn how improved health and physical fitness allow individuals to live valued lives and aid in the pursuit of chosen life directions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

State many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy life

Perform functional assessment of current health and fitness related behaviors

Perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors; safe, effective exercise; and skilled athletic performances

Identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness, and athleticism

Use goal setting, task analysis, and pinpointing; identify skill gaps; set realistically achievable goals; and effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance

Use behavior analytic experimental designs not only to measure and assess behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness, and athletic behavioral changes

Use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program

Use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors

Activities: Participants will be guided though presented information with PowerPoint slides, worksheets, and lecture handouts that will provide the information necessary to learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; and use behavior analytic experimental designs to assess and facilitate desired behavioral change.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs, BCaBAs, psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to promote healthy lifestyles and fitness, or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): diet, health, physical fitness, sport psychology
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ethics Is Like Duct Tape
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
308 (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: R. M. (Duke) Schell, Ph.D.
R. M. (DUKE) SCHELL (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: The workshop will use direct presentation and small group interactions to review ethical and unethical practices that arise in the delivery of behavior analysis services across clients and settings. Case studies of ethical issues from the ABAI Hotline and workshop participants will be discussed along with their possible resolutions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe examples of ethical and unethical behavior in behavior analysis practice

Describe recent conflicts between psychology and behavior analysis that affect ethical practice

Work with colleagues, ethics materials, and other sources to discuss and attempt to resolve ethical issues

Activities: The participants will be involved with the workshop materials via a visual presentation and questions from the presenter. They will also be involved in discussions about ethics in behavior analysis and discussions of ethical dilemmas they face in their own practice.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for professional behavior analysts and behavioral psychologists currently working with varied populations in varied settings. This would also include people supervising the work of professional behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
EthicsLab 2012: Navigating Complex Ethical Dilemmas
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
310 (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D.
JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University at Panama City), MARY R. BURCH (BaileyBurch Workshops)
Description: This EthicsLab workshop is designed to be primarily a problem solving session for BCBAs and BCaBAs who work in applied settings. The goal is to work through a series of scenarios brought by participants and provided by the instructors for practice in applying the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct. We will start by outlining a new dimension of ethical dilemmas we call "complexity." This model involves analyzing the potential outcomes of the scenario in terms of risk to the client and the behavior analyst. In addition, we present a model for understanding factors that make the solution to the problem challenging for the behavior analyst. These range from simple solutions that any behavior analyst can implement to multi-step solutions involving other parties and other agencies. We also describe certain political and legal circumstances that can make some ethical challenges nearly impossible to solve without someone getting hurt.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Describe and give examples of risk and complexity in ethics cases

Discuss alternative solutions for three cases

Describe the challenges of producing ethical solutions for complex cases

Use the BACB guidelines to determine ethical solutions for three cases

Outline the major factors that pose a risk to the behavior analyst if the case is not resolved properly

Activities: Participants will learn to write ethics scenarios in a way that allows them to be de-constructed and analyzed. They will work in small groups to present their case and receive feedback from colleagues.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who have been actively engaged in developing solutions for ethics dilemmas for at least 5 years. In addition, we welcome those who teach ethics courses in ABA graduate programs. Attendees are encouraged to bring to the workshop any difficult cases that they are struggling with as well as those where they have found success. We assume attendees are well acquainted with the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and encourage them to bring a copy of the guidelines to the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, complexity
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: The Ethics of Supervision and Practical Applications to Supervisor/Supervisee Feedback
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
212 (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cathy Lynn Carpenter, M.A.
CATHY LYNN CARPENTER (Inclusive Education), SALLY TORRENS (Inizio Interventions, Inc.), CARA ENTZ (Inizio Interventions, Inc.)
Description: BCBA and BCaBA candidates play multiple roles in their work, are required to balance multiple tasks at once, have varied hands-on skills and education, and have splintered training to prepare them for the field. The BCBA supervisor, on the other hand, is able to access myriad effective training methods that are empirically based so that supervisees perform services ethically, proficiently, and responsibly. Yet what remains is a large disparity in supervision experiences. Is our training knowledge not as fluent as we thought? Are we cutting corners by using a one-size-fits-all approach to training that dismally fails for multiple reasons? Is it time to re-evaluate our training policies and practices? A review of the evidence-based research in training methodologies, an examination of these training models, and an evaluation of our training programs as well as our own competency—what are our own strengths and challenges?—will be presented and discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Assess and measure supervision on a frequent basis

Identify elements of the optimal experience BCBAs should be providing BCBA and BCaBA candidates through supervision

Examine their own strengths and weaknesses in terms of supervision experience

Identify the current research and future implications for research in evidence-based supervision

Examine the effects of a rating form on the supervisor/supervisee relationship; on the provision of quality ABA to clients; and on the supervisee's rate of learning, follow-through, staff turnover, and ability to pinpoint areas of strength or weakness of the supervision

Measure the supervisor/supervisee interaction by using a rating or measurement form

Use a rating form

Pinpoint areas to work on and strengths and weaknesses of the supervision session

Activities: The presentation will report on the results of the implementation of the supervision survey form completed by eight supervisees over a 6-month period. Participants will engage in live role play demonstrating the use of the supervision form, as well as hands-on activities where participants will have the opportunity to provide supervision to a partner while using the rating form with their partner and sharing and processing feedback about the results of the form with each other.
Audience: Because this session examines the Behavior Analyst Certification Board Guidelines for Responsible Conduct as well as discusses the optimal experience BCBAs should be providing candidates through supervision, this workshop targets BCBAs who practice in the field and who supervise BCBA and BCaBA candidates.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Supervision
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
DIY Behavioral Tool Kit: Developing and Implementing Behavior Support Plans in a Private School Setting
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
306 (Convention Center)
Area: DDA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dipti Mudgal, Ph.D.
DIPTI MUDGAL (May Institute), JENNIFER M. DERDERIAN (May Institute)
Description: A behavior support plan (BSP) is developed to serve as a guide for treatment agents to proactively and reactively address maladaptive behaviors and increase appropriate behaviors (e.g., social skills). This workshop is designed to train professionals to adapt the BSP development process from our program into their existing practice and skill set. Various stages of the BSP development (e.g., data collection, behavioral assessments, development of function based intervention, and antecedent manipulation) will be explained. Case examples will be presented to illustrate the BSP process across different target behaviors. Overall, participants will gain skills in how to define target behaviors, collect data, design behavior support plans based on the function of the behavior, train staff, and monitor treatment integrity. Participants will receive handouts (e.g., data sheets, forms, BSPs, and other materials) and participate in small- and large-group activities to practice various stages within the BSP development process such as identifying and defining target behaviors in objective and measurable terms, developing hypotheses about the function of behaviors, and designing function based intervention strategies based on case data.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
  • Employ the process used by a private school for students with brain injury to develop behavior support plans
  • Practice identifying and defining target behaviors and collect relevant data
  • Practice developing hypotheses about the function of behaviors
  • Practice designing interventions linked to function of the behavior
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation, discussion, and interactive activities.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinicians working with developmentally disabled children with behavior problems. Master's level therapists, psychologists, and family members are welcome. Participants should have a fundamental understanding of the principles of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Response Cost, Token Economy, Visual Schedule
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing and Implementing an Activities of Daily Living Program
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
213 (Convention Center)
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jill Hunt, M.Ed.
JILL HUNT (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), MICHELLE HARRINGTON (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center)
Description: Activities of daily living are among the most important skill sets that can be taught to clients. Learning to take care of one's body independently increases a client's quality of life and often allows access to more settings and experiences. Being able to complete chores around one's own living space has the potentia lto allow a client to live in a more independent setting. This workshop will give participants the tools necessary to implement an activities of daily living program on an individual basis or on a large scale basis. Presenters will discuss how activities of daily living programs have been implemented in their settings and what specific challenges they faced. Data will be presented on various age groups and what activities of daily living clients were learning. Generalization of these skills to outside the teaching setting will be discussed, and finally retention of these skills over a long period of time will be addressed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Assess what skills a client possesses

Identify five activities of daily living they would like to implement

Develop a thorough task analysis of each daily living skill

Determine what type of prompting is best suited for their setting

Collect data while working with clients

Determine what to do with the data that have been collected

Analyze data over a period of time

Determine how to effectively fade prompting when working with a client

Develop meaningful interventions when a client is not progressing

Activities: This workshop will involve brainstorming what activities of daily living are most important in each setting, viewing videos to assist with development of task analysis, role playing to gain skills needed to collect data on different types of prompting, practice in different methods of data analysis, and brainstorming interventions when faced with different scenarios.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for teachers, residential staff, parents, and behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ADL, Task Analysis
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Effective Reading Strategies for Adolescent Learners
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
4C-1 (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nancy Marchand-Martella, Ph.D.
NANCY MARCHAND-MARTELLA (Eastern Washington University), RONALD C. MARTELLA (Eastern Washington University), AMEDEE M. MARTELLA (Mead High School)
Description: This workshop will focus on the elements of effective adolescent literacy instruction. Specifically, participants will learn about the top five elements of reading for this population of students including word study, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and motivation. Strategies and programs designed to teach skills and promote learning in these areas will be highlighted. An emphasis will be placed on systematic and explicit instruction. Recommendations of how to differentiate instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners will be covered as well. Study and test-taking strategies to promote academic success will be discussed. Participants will learn about the Common Core State Standards as they relate to accessing literature and informational text.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify the elements of effective adolescent literacy instruction

Identify programs and strategies to help adolescents acquire important skills in reading

Identify systematic and explicit instruction

Differentiate instruction in the area of reading

Identify study and test-taking strategies for older students

Identify the Common Core State Standards as they relate to reading

Activities: Students will participate in discussion, practice using skills and strategies, and design an adolescent literacy program.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for teachers, educators, and practitioners.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preparing for Adulthood: Skill Assessment and Design of Vocational and Life Skills Programming for Young Adults With Autism
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
302 (Convention Center)
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Martineau, M.Ed.
ELIZABETH MARTINEAU (Nashoba Learning Group), STEPHANIE DANIELS (Nashoba Learning Group), JESSICA TILLEY (Nashoba Learning Group), HEATHER M. REGO (Nashoba Learning Group)
Description: Teenagers with moderate to severe autism who have received quality ABA school programming generally develop a strong repertoire of skills. As those students reach 14 years of age and above, it is critical that programming be geared towards building those skills into routines that will allow them to obtain employment and live as independently as possible as adults. Although there is a substantial body of research to assist in teaching early learners, there is significantly less documented work to assist practitioners in designing vocational and life skills programming for older students who still require individualized ABA instruction. At Nashoba Learning Group (NLG), we have developed a curriculum for teaching vocation and life skills that has allowed our students to significantly increase their employability and independence. Our curriculum utilizes well researched ABA techniques, such as task analyzed instruction, incidental teaching, discrete trial teaching, and stimulus fading to build linked routines of skills essential to success in adulthood. This workshop will review NLG's vocation and life skills curriculum, the intake process, and the skills that we assess and teach. We will demonstrate how to modify teaching procedures for students' varying skill levels and supervision needs, including three case studies of students performing skills at different levels. We will review NLG's vocation and life skills assessment tool and how we use it to identify skills to target and to measure progress over time.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Design integrated vocation and life skills programming for teenagers with autism

Create learning objectives for students for vocation and life skills

Teach specific skills using task analyzed instruction

Adapt teaching procedures to students' varying skill levels and supervision needs and complete a portion of NLG's vocation and life skills assessment for a presented student

Activities: Participants will engage in a variety of activities throughout the workshop. We will begin with an overview of NLG's vocation and life skills curriculum and assessment tool. Participants will engage in a structured activity, such as completing a task analyzed activity in the role of a student or adapting a task analysis to address differing student ability. Participants will watch a video of a student completing vocational skills and will complete the corresponding portion of NLG's vocation and life skills assessment.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BCBA level teachers and clinical directors, as well as program coordinators. Presenters will assume that participants are familiar with a variety of ABA techniques and with individualized curriculum design for students up through the teenage years. Participants should have a strong interest in developing individualized programs for teenagers and young adults with autism that result in the students achieving job readiness and as high a degree of independence as possible.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Adulthood, Employment skills, Life skills, Vocational skills
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Academic Advising for Faculty Advisors: How to Improve the Quality of Advising Given Increased Demand and Fewer Resources
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
206 (Convention Center)
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mitch Fryling, Ph.D.
GENEVIEVE M. DEBERNARDIS (University of Nevada, Reno), NATASHA MONTABELLO (University of Nevada, Reno), MITCH FRYLING (California State University, Los Angeles)
Description: Academic advising faces considerable challenges in the current economic climate. Professional academic advising positions and academic centers are being cut and fewer resources are available, while the workload is greater than ever for faculty advisors. Additionally, a majority of faculty are put into the role of advisor with little or no training. However, assessment and improvements to academic advising still need to be conducted. Therefore, there is an escalating demand for integrating technology into academic advising, reducing in-person appointments, and increasing the use of remote advising through web-based and computer program technologies. Over the course of the workshop, participants will engage in a variety of activities aimed at providing a comprehensive understanding of the role of faculty academic advising in assisting students in their educational and career goals. Participants will be exposed to numerous and readily accessible academic advising resources including an overview of the National Academic Advising Association and an introduction to how to use the vast amount of resources available through this organization's website and publications to improve advising practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify strengths and deficits in advising practice

Discuss the role of the developmental advising approach in an oftentimes prescriptive advising world

Develop best practices suited for their own unique advising role

Use an academic advising syllabus to make "advising as teaching" clear to advisees

Collect data for assessment of advising

Utilize their institution's general, academic advising, and department mission statements to create meaningful objectives for the academic advising interaction between advisor and advisees

Select effective web-based and computer program technologies to assist in advising

Activities: Please note that it is highly recommended that participants bring a laptop with Internet connection to assist in the participation of workshop activities. Participants will create an academic advising syllabus specific to their practice. Additionally, participants will review their current institution's general, advising, and department mission statements to determine how to align the syllabus objectives with the goals of the institution. Participants will learn how to create and implement academic advising evaluations as a means of ongoing assessment. There will be multiple opportunities to view and analyze sample videos to identify best approaches to common advising encounters.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts, faculty, instructors, educators, and administrators with interest or experience in academic advising. This workshop is also appropriate for individuals (e.g., graduate students) considering careers in academia where academic advising is often a required component.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): academic advising, assessment, online learning, program evaluation
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: BACB
Using iMovie to Create Video Modeling Presentations for Clients, Staff, and Caregivers
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
214 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ainsley Thompson, M.A.
AINSLEY THOMPSON (Kennedy Krieger Institute), SAMANTHA L. HARDESTY (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Description: Video modeling is a well-documented behavioral intervention used to facilitate observational learning with clients, staff, and caregivers. It also allows for a wide variety of exemplars to be used that may help promote generalization and maintenance, as well as ensure treatment integrity and eliminate drift in training procedures. Video modeling can also be used to teach students and individuals with disabilities basic social, community, and self-care skills. This workshop will demonstrate how you can use video modeling to train staff and parents in behavior intervention plans and basic behavior management using iMovie. Workshop participants will learn how to create individualized video files that can be used on a computer or converted to a DVD. Note: This workshop is for MacBook, iMac, and iPad users who have a copy of iMovie on their device. Participants will need to bring their own computer for the interactive portion of this workshop. Sample videos will be provided to practice editing and uploading.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify tasks and activities that would be most amenable to video modeling in the setting in which they work

Capture, import, and edit video material in iMovie

Add text, titles, transitions, and narration to a presentation

Add PowerPoint slides to a video presentation

Convert footage into compatible formats for use on a computer

Create DVDs using iDVD

Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, video viewing, hands-on exercises, discussion, etc.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior consultants, certified behavior analysts, supervisors of home-based intervention programs and community agencies, special education teachers, psychologists, and researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): video modeling
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Physical Activity and Games to Enhance Learning, Social Skills, and Self-Control With Autistic and Typical Populations
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
4C-3 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College)
Description: The presented model emphasizes the uniqueness of movement and games as ideal contexts enabling teachers and clinicians to design a challenging learning atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real life situations. It can support a specific clinical goal such as developing self-control, support a school curriculum, or serve as an extended behavioral program for individuals/groups. The model has recently been implemented with autistic children, supporting communication and social skills on an individual level and as a preparation for inclusion. The rationale behind developing the model will be discussed, and specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited. In addition, the structure of the model will be described, followed by different examples of its optional implementation. Components of the model, modified during the past 18 years, will then be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of educational and clinical settings applicable to various populations. Attention will be devoted to the potential of using these procedures as part of an individual program for ASD populations and for supporting their inclusion in the regular education system.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as supportive learning contexts

Cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts

Present the general structure of the model and describe its components

Design various physical activities as clinical scripts serving specific behavioral goals

Use and modify observation forms to evaluate students' progress

Adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs

Explain the rationale of the model to parents and practitioners

Activities: This workshop will include a) a presentation of the theoretical background of the model, defining the rationale behind it; b) an open discussion of how physical activity can serve as a learning context; c) a video presentation illustrating the implementation of the model in various settings and in different cultures; d) active demonstration of games involving the workshop's participants; and e) planning trials, in which participants will practice activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts, teachers, consultants, lead therapists, line therapists, and students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Game, physical education, self-control, value education
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Capacity Building Consultation: Systemic Interventions That Increase Accessibility to Best Practice Interventions
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
211 (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mark J. Palmieri, Psy.D.
SHAUNESSY M. EGAN (The Center for Children with Special Needs), MARK J. PALMIERI (The Center for Children with Speical Needs)
Description: Program development is an increasingly common task for those providing consultation within educational settings. Often, however, the consultative relationship lacks the clarity necessary to establish meaningful and sustainable change for both the student and the educational system. These relationships often achieve gains for specific individuals without expanding, with high fidelity, the ability of the broader system to maintain the needs of all learners. A capacity building consultation model that incorporates specific system-level assessment procedures to map the needs of both the individual learners and the system as a whole offers a framework for achieving valuable and sustainable change. Consultative relationships that are founded in comprehensive assessment are well positioned to establish strong motivation for change, develop interventions that are clearly matched to the current needs, and most importantly, access the resources necessary for realizing outcomes. Such models of program consultation consider all factors that impact program development, such as administrative support, parent buy-in, materials, time, staffing, and professional training. This workshop will address the critical elements of such consultative models by identifying the core elements of building system-level relationships, executing comprehensive assessments of individual and system needs, and establishing short and long term capacity building interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify steps necessary to develop best practice educational programming and affect system-level capacity development

Outline the program development tasks necessary to establish a sustainable infrastructure within an educational setting

Identify the elements of systems based needs assessment and its application to program development

Activities: Didactic lectures, handouts, case study descriptions, and question/answer periods will provide participants with the information necessary to develop the strong consultative relationships necessary for creating programs that institute sustainable best practice interventions.
Audience: Behavior analysts with an interest in working within educational settings and who would like to expand their skills regarding system wide program development will benefit from this workshop. In addition, school administrators, related service providers, and educators looking to create or expand internal capacity within their systems may find the information presented valuable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Consultative Model, Needs Assessment, Program Development
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Instruction Is More Than a Discrete Trial: What Your Staff Really Need to Know to Provide Quality Services
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
303 (Convention Center)
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Gina Marie Feliciano, Ph.D.
GINA MARIE FELICIANO (Bilinguals, Inc.), ANYA K. SILVER (Bilinguals, Inc.), ANIKA COSTA (Bilinguals, Inc.)
Description: Identifying resources for training staff to provide intensive behavior analytic services in overtaxed, underfunded programs is a common challenge in the current economy. Providers of such instruction need more than the ABCs of ABA, and need it quickly. This workshop will provide employers, managers, supervisors, and/or behavior analysts with a set of training modules to accomplish just that. Out of necessity, we developed, implemented, tested, and revised this staff training series. This training package emerged from the needs of a large, urban behavior analytic program where supervision requirements were high due to the abilities of the staff. The package can, however, be customized to fit the needs of any organization trying to capitalize on limited resources. Each of the five modules incorporates three repertoires per topic per trainee: verbal behavior about the science, a verbally mediated activity, and requirements of contingency shaped behaviors. Workshop participants will be provided with an overview of literature related to training modules, training sequence, accompanying PowerPoint presentations, strategies for implementation, data collection procedures, and written or practical assignments for each module. Each of the workshop instructors is well practiced in high intensity, high volume training for staff of all levels; come learn from our mistakes!
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify three behavior analytic repertoires that their staff will be able to demonstrate following implementation of modules

Define the terms "verbally mediated," "contingency shaped," and "verbal behavior about the science"

Implement a staff training protocol

Activities: Attendees will participate in an interactive workshop that will provide them with a bundled instructional package to be pyramid or turnkey trained to providers/teachers/frontline staff of varying skills/academic backgrounds. Data, procedures, and materials used to train will be reviewed and demonstrated. Participants will leave the workshop with the ability to train staff immediately.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for those responsible for devising, implementing, and monitoring staff training in DTT, EIBI, or other behavior analytic teaching settings. Attendees will hold an advanced degree in education/special education, psychology, and/or behavior analysis with advanced skills in staff training. Attendees should have a demonstrated ability in arena style or large group trainings and presentations.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, staff training, Teaching ABA, teaching modules
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Role of Motivation in Teaching Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 25, 2012
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
204 (Convention Center)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kristin M. Albert, M.Ed.
KAITLIN GRACE CAUSIN (Carbone Clinic), LEANNE B. REID (Carbone Clinic), KRISTIN M. ALBERT (Carbone Clinic), VINCENT JOSEPH CARBONE (Carbone Clinic)
Description: In the history of behavior analysis the treatment of motivation as a source of behavioral control has a long-standing and conflicting history (Sundberg, 2005). Traditionally, the authors of applied behavior analytic textbooks have considered motivation only within the topic of reinforcement and have ignored the role of motivation as an independent variable. However, Keller and Schoenfeld (1950) and then Michael, in a series of writings since 1982, continually emphasized the role of motivation as an antecedent variable. Following Keller and Schoenfeld's identification of the establishing operation, Michael refined and extended the analysis to include conditioned establishing operations. Michael's refinements have been heavily relied upon in the functional analysis literature. More recently, conditioned motivating operations have been implicated as behavioral variables related to the teaching of verbal behavior and other skills to persons with autism and other developmental disabilities. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a review of the literature related to conditioned motivating operations and to present video illustrations as an instructional tool for the clinical application of these important behavioral variables.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

Identify and define a motivating operation and its defining features

Discriminate between the three conditioned motivating operations (CMO-R, CMO-T, and CMO-S)

Provide examples of each of the conditioned motivating operations

Identify the role of motivation in teaching learners with autism and other developmental disabilities

Utilize the analysis to provide more effective instruction

Activities: Active participant responding will be included within the context of lecture and video demonstrations. Questions and comments will be encouraged throughout the presentation.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, practitioners, educational service providers, speech language pathologists, and other individuals who supervise or are directly involved in providing instruction to learners with autism and other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Autism, Motivating Operations, Verbal behavior
 
Special Event #2
Friends of SABA Reception
Friday, May 25, 2012
5:30 PM–6:30 PM
Willow A (Sheraton)
Chair: Michael J. Dougher (University of New Mexico)

The Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis (SABA) benefits every year from the generosity of many ABAI members. Those who made donations in 2011 and 2012 are invited to a reception in their honor to show our gratitude for their commitment to the welfare and future of behavior analysis. Donations fund student research fellowships, the Doctoral Dissertation and Master’s Thesis Research Endowment Fund, and grants for students who are presenting authors at ABAI events.

 
 
Special Event #3
International Reception
Friday, May 25, 2012
6:30 PM–8:00 PM
Grand Ballroom A (Sheraton)
Chair: Martha Hübner (Universidade de Sao Paulo)

All convention attendees are invited to the International Reception, where we will welcome international members and review ABAI’s efforts to develop and disseminate behavior analysis around the world. We will also recognize the recipients of the 2011 International Development Grants from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis (SABA): Amy Durgin (Western Michigan University), Judith Mathews (University of Nebraska Medical Center), and Tracy Pierce Bender (Brent Woodall Foundation for Exceptional Children).

 
 
Reunion #4
Behavior Side Story
Friday, May 25, 2012
6:30 PM–8:00 PM
Grand Ballroom D (Sheraton)
Chair: A. Charles Catania (UMBC)

With lyrics set to the music of Bernstein's West Side Story, this show is about a student on the cognitive side, Tony, who has been persuaded to move to the behavior side by a newfound colleague, Maria. Together they must now defend the behavior analytic position against cognitive opposition. The last performance of Behavior Side Story was at a Concord, MA, meeting of the Board of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies in November 2001. This revival performance includes new numbers and a larger cast, and its sponsors include the Cambridge Center/Sloan Publishing Century Series in Behavior Analysis, the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and Karen Pryor Clicker Training.

 
 
Special Event #5
Welcome Reception organized by the ABAI Student Committee
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 PM–10:30 PM
Grand Ballroom BC (Sheraton)
Chair: Antonio M. Harrison (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology-Los Angeles)

ABAI welcomes all of its members to Seattle. Join us for a night of fun and entertainment organized by the ABAI Student Committee. This is an opportunity for students to meet and greet with each other as peers and get the chance to speak to some great behavior analysts. It's a great time and place for students to come together with all the members of ABAI.

 

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Modifed by Eddie Soh
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