Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AAB: Applied Animal Behavior

    BPH: Behavioral Pharmacology

    CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    CSE: Community Interventions, Social and Ethical Issues

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

38th Annual Convention; Seattle, WA; 2012

Program by B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Events: Monday, May 28, 2012


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B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #320
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Conjoint Behavioral Consultation: Two Decades of Research on Family-School Partnerships and Problem-Solving

Monday, May 28, 2012
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
6E (Convention Center)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Cynthia M. Anderson, Ph.D.
Chair: Cynthia M. Anderson (University of Oregon)
SUSAN SHERIDAN (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Dr. Susan M. Sheridan is a George Holmes University Professor and Willa Cather Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  She is the Director of the Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools (CYFS) and the National Center for Research on Rural Education (R2Ed).  Her research revolves around the identification of effective interventions to support children’s learning and development, most typically through partnerships among families and schools.  Specific lines of inquiry include investigations of parent–teacher (conjoint) behavioral consultation, parent engagement and partnerships, social-emotional learning, early childhood intervention, and school readiness.  Dr. Sheridan has written more than 100 books, chapters, and journal articles on these and related topics. She is a Fellow of Division 16 of APA and past President of the Society for the Study of School Psychology (SSSP).  Dr. Sheridan was bestowed the 1993 Lightner Witmer award by APA’s Division of School Psychology for early career accomplishments, the 1995 University of Wisconsin School of Education’s Outstanding Young Alumnus award, and the 2005 Presidential Award from the National Association of School Psychologists. 
Abstract:

Methods to support students' competencies often target isolated contexts or activate individual treatment agents. Conjoint Behavioral Consultation (CBC; Sheridan, Kratochwill & Bergan, 1996; Sheridan & Kratochwill, 2008), on the other hand, is an indirect intervention focused on the attainment of students? goals through (a) collaborative and consistent implementation of evidence-based interventions across home and school settings, and (b) data-based problem solving with parents and teachers as partners. CBC is an indirect intervention wherein family members and school personnel work with a consultant to promote social-behavioral and academic competencies through coordinated problem solving, co-constructed intervention plans, shared responsibility for plan implementation, and progress monitoring of children's goals. Empirical investigations over the past two decades have documented CBC's efficacy for promoting behavioral, social-emotional and academic competencies among children facing a range of developmental and learning challenges. This presentation will chronicle the research base that has established the efficacy of the CBC intervention, including studies using single case experimental methods and randomized control trials. Outcomes at the child, parent, and teacher levels will be presented. New directions in the CBC trajectory will be discussed, including recent findings uncovering mechanisms responsible for its effects and conditions under which desired outcomes are maximized.

Target Audience:

School-based researchers and practitioners, psychologists and behavior analysts working with children and families.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Define conjoint behavioral consultation
  • Differentiate between CBC and other methods of school-based consultation
  • Describe data sources used in CBC
  • Describe the empirical support for CBC 5. Explain possible mechanisms underlying effects of CBC
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #343
CE Offered: BACB

Measuring Canine Behavior by Proxy: Benefits and Limitations

Monday, May 28, 2012
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
6E (Convention Center)
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: James Serpell, Ph.D.
Chair: Kennon A. Lattal (West Virginia University)
JAMES SERPELL (The University of Pennsylvania)
James Serpell is the Marie A. Moore Professor of Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, where he also directs the Center for the Interaction of Animals & Society (CIAS). He received his bachelor's degree in Zoology from University College London (UK) in 1974, and his PhD in Animal Behavior from the University of Liverpool (UK) in 1980. In 1985, he established the Companion Animal Research Group at the University of Cambridge before moving in 1993 to his current position at the University of Pennsylvania where he lectures on veterinary ethics, applied animal behavior and welfare, and human-animal interactions. His research focuses on the behavior and welfare of dogs and cats, the development of human attitudes to animals, and the history of human-animal relationships. In addition to publishing more than 100 articles and book chapters on these and related topics, he is the author, editor or co-editor of several books including Animals & Human Society: Changing Perspectives (1994), The Domestic Dog: Its Evolution, Behavior & Interactions with People (1995), In the Company of Animals (1986, 1996), and Companion Animals & Us (2000).
Abstract:

Because most dogs live inside people's homes where they are difficult, and sometimes impossible, to observe for extended periods of time, they are generally inaccessible to most of the standard methods of behavioral measurement. It is therefore necessary to develop different kinds of measurement techniques in order to study or evaluate their behavior. These techniques fall into two main categories: Behavioral tests that record dog's responses to specific sets of standardized stimuli, and questionnaire surveys that record indirect behavioral information provided by the dog's owner or handler. This presentation describes the development of one such survey method, The Canine Behavioral Assessment & Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ), and its various applications. Since its initial deployment in 2006, the C-BARQ has come to be widely used by working dog organizations, animal rescue groups, trainers and applied animal behaviorists, dog breeders, and behavioral researchers as a means of measuring individual differences in the behavior of dogs. Examples of some of the advances in our understanding of canine behavior that have emerged from this work will be presented and discussed.

Keyword(s): behavioral assessment, dogs
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #360
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

From Early Detection to Early Intervention for Autism: How to Bridge the Gap

Monday, May 28, 2012
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
4C-2 (Convention Center)
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Wendy Stone, Ph.D.
Chair: Martha Pelaez (Florida International University)
WENDY STONE (University of Washington)
Dr. Stone's primary clinical and research interests focus on early identification and early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Her research involves the characterization of early-emerging behavioral features of autism, with the dual goals of understanding the core deficits and mechanisms underlying development of the disorder, and designing targeted interventions to prevent or attenuate the expression of symptoms. Her current research projects address the social-emotional development of infant siblings of children with autism, the identification of social-communicative markers in children under 24 months, and the evaluation of a parent-implemented intervention for young children at risk for autism. She has studied several aspects of early social-communicative development, including social orienting, motor imitation, and prelinguistic communication, examining their contributions to later behavioral and diagnostic outcomes. She is particularly interested in identifying developmental pathways and risk/protective factors that contribute to variability in social, learning, and behavioral outcomes for children at elevated risk for autism. Dr. Stone is committed to translational science, and has worked to enhance knowledge and service capacity within community settings, through development of the Screening Tool for Autism in Two-Year-Olds (STAT) and provision of training and outreach activities for pediatricians, teachers, and other community professionals.
Abstract:

Dr. Stone's presentation will focus on early identification and early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Her research involves the characterization of early-emerging behavioral features of autism, with the dual goals of understanding the core deficits and mechanisms underlying development of the disorder, and designing targeted interventions to prevent or attenuate the expression of symptoms. Her presentation will address the social-emotional development of infant siblings of children with autism, the identification of social-communicative markers in children under 24 months, and the evaluation of a parent-implemented intervention for young children at risk for autism. She has studied several aspects of early social-communicative development, including social orienting, motor imitation, and prelinguistic communication, examining their contributions to later behavioral and diagnostic outcomes. She is particularly interested in identifying developmental pathways and risk/protective factors that contribute to variability in social, learning, and behavioral outcomes for children at elevated risk for autism.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, faculty, professionals, practitioners, academics and researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:
  • Describe assessment techniques in early childhood detection of developmental disorders and autism and the course of development.
 

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