Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Second Annual Autism Conference; Atlanta, GA; 2008

Program by Day for Sunday, February 10, 2008


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Invited Paper Session #11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Developing Active Learner Participation by Children with Autism: Capturing the Motivational Variables

Sunday, February 10, 2008
8:30 AM–9:30 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Dr. Partington is the director of Behavior Analysts, Inc., in Pleasant Hill, California. He is a licensed psychologist and a board certified behavior analyst (B.C.B.A.), and has 35 years of experience working with children with developmental disabilities. His expertise is in language-based intervention with children who are experiencing language delays as a result of autism and other related developmental disorders. Dr. Partington is the co-founder of a school that specializes in language-based instruction for children with autism (STARS School) and has helped several public school systems establish similar classrooms within their own districts. He has been a faculty member of several universities including West Virginia University, University of San Francisco and St. Mary’s College. Dr. Partington is a former President of the Northern California Association for Behavior Analysis and has served as a member of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Dr. Partington has received several professional awards including the Public Service Award for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis in Florida, presented by the Florida Association for Behavior Analysis and the Award for Effective Presentation of Behavior Analysis in the Mass Media that was presented by the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis. He has served on the editorial review boards of the Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Education and Treatment of Children, Behavioral Interventions, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and has served as a guest reviewer for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Dr. Partington has published several papers on teaching strategies for children with disabilities. Additionally, he has co-authored with Dr. Mark L. Sundberg the book, Teaching Language to Children with Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities. He is the author of The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills-Revised (The ABLLS-R): An assessment, Curriculum Guide, and Skills Tracking System for Children with Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities. He has also produced an instructional video, Teaching Verbal Behavior: An Introduction to Parents Teaching Language.
Abstract:

Two of the major defining characteristics of an autism spectrum disorder are qualitative impairments in language and in social interaction. Behavioral teaching strategies have been documented to be effective in helping children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder to develop many critical skills. There is a considerable amount of information available regarding a variety of issues related to the selection of learning objectives and specific strategies to teach skills. However, parents and professionals often find it difficult to motivate a child to participate in learning activities to acquire those skills, to initiate social interactions, and to spontaneously use the skills in their everyday activities and interactions. Some of the most important concerns of those who interact with these children relate to the motivation to participate in learning activities and spontaneously use newly acquired skills outside of specific training sessions. Parents and professionals must address issues involving the evaluation and development of effective social reinforcers that will directly impact the motivation of the child to spontaneously interact with others. Why should a child want to participate in learning activities, to interact with us, or to tell us about something important to them? Answers to these questions are related to the issue of effective reinforcement. There are multiple sources of reinforcers readily available to children, many of which do not require their interaction with others, and can often be obtained with very little effort on the childs part. This presentation will provide an analysis of motivational factors that are involved in both structured teaching sessions and in everyday activities. Methods will be presented to help identify and capture effective motivational factors that influence the childs willingness to participation in structured learning sessions and lead to the child running to rather than running from those who are involved in instruction. Techniques for helping to create motivational conditions that will lead to increased spontaneous language and other social interactions will be reviewed. Additionally, methods will be presented to help praise, smiles and other subtle forms of social feedback from parents and instructors acquire reinforcing properties.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Comprehensive ABA Programming: Matching Learner Needs with Instructional Strategies

Sunday, February 10, 2008
9:30 AM–10:30 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
MARY JANE WEISS (Rutgers University)
Mary Jane Weiss received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1990. She became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst in 2000. She is an Associate Research Professor at Rutgers University, and she is the Director of Research and Training at the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center at Rutgers University. Her clinical and research interests center on defining best practice ABA techniques, on identifying the specific utilities of various instructional methodologies within ABA, on evaluating the impact of ABA in learners with autism, and in maximizing family members’ expertise and adaptation. She has written numerous articles and three books on autism, Right from the start: Behavioral Intervention for young children with autism (co-authored with Sandra Harris, 2nd edition 2007), Reaching out, joining in: Teaching social skills to young children with autism (co-authored with Sandra Harris, 2001), and Sibling stories: Reflections on life with a brother or sister on the autism spectrum (co-authored with Lynne Stern Feiges, 2004). She is also a regular presenter at regional, national, and international conferences on topics relevant to ABA and autism. She is currently the President of the Autism Special Interest Group of the Association for Behavior Analysis.
Abstract:

In recent years, there has been a proliferation of instructional techniques for teaching students with autism. Even within ABA, there are many different instructional approaches which can be used effectively to teach skills to students. Educators and parents can be confused with the array of options, and can have difficulty deciding on which approach to use in a given educational context. This presentation will summarize different ABA approaches for teaching skills, and will highlight the potential relevance and utility of each approach. Specifically, well-documented methods which will be covered include discrete trial instruction, incidental teaching, and other naturalistic strategies. In addition, some promising directions which have become clinically prevalent in recent years will also be discussed, including the use of the Verbal Behavior classification system and rate-building to achieve fluency. The presentation will highlight the unique applications and specific advantages of each approach. It will also summarize how the use of multiple methods of instruction results in a more comprehensive program, thereby meeting the needs of learners in more complete and efficient ways.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Individualized Treatment Protocols for Children with Autism

Sunday, February 10, 2008
10:30 AM–11:30 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Laura Schreibman, Ph.D.
LAURA SCHREIBMAN (University of California, San Diego)
Laura Schreibman is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of California, San Diego where she has been on the faculty since 1984. She earned her Ph.D. at UCLA where she focused on the field of behavior analysis and treatment of children with autism. Her research since her degree has continued in the same vein and she currently directs a federally-funded research program focusing on the experimental analysis and treatment of autism. Her general research interests have included the analysis of speech and attentional deficits, generalization of behavior change, parent training, self-management, peer training, and issues of assessment. Her current lines of funded research involve evaluation of pictorial versus verbal communication teaching strategies for very young children with autism (funded by NIMH), development of classroom Pivotal Response Training strategies (funded by the Department of Education), and the development of individualized treatments for children with autism and their families. She also heads a new research program to assess brain correlates to treatment outcome for infants with autism (a Core of an Autism Center of Excellence Award funded by the NIH). She is the author of over 120 research articles and book chapters as well as three books. Her latest book, The Science and Fiction of Autism, published by Harvard University Press, was released in November of 2005.
Abstract:

Treatment outcome research consistently shows a great deal of variability in outcome for children receiving even the best of behavioral interventions. What is needed is a methodology for identifying which behavioral intervention would lead to the best outcome for a specific child. Thus how do we tailor our treatments to the needs of the individual child? Given the importance of early intervention, how can we make sure we choose the best treatment initially in order to take advantage of this early window of opportunity? This presentation will describe recent research looking at specific child characteristics that may suggest particular treatment strategies.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Special Event #14
Concluding Remarks
Sunday, February 10, 2008
11:30 AM–12:00 PM
Regency Ballroom

Dr. Heward will provide concluding remarks for the conference.

 

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