Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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34th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2008

Program by Workshops: Saturday, May 24, 2008


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB
Activity Schedules: Beyond Independent Activities.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Waldorf
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joseph M. Vedora, M.S.
JOSEPH M. VEDORA (BEACON Services), DAVID M. CORCORAN (BEACON Services), ROBERT K. ROSS (BEACON Services)
Description: The purpose of this intermediate workshop is to train participants in the use of various forms of visual activity schedules. Activity schedules will be described and explained, and instruction on how to effectively establish stimulus control using activity schedules will be provided. Activity schedules have been employed with individuals with autism to promote independence and increase on-task behavior. In addition to addressing their use with individuals with autism, this workshop will describe their expanded use to a variety of conditions at home and school. Specifically, this workshop will focus on novel uses of activity schedules including the use of activity schedules to: increase social and play skills, food acceptance, self-help skills; incorporate choice; facilitate transitions, and address community behavior. Lastly, instruction on the use of computer schedules will be provided. This will include hands on training on how to create computerized activity schedules that incorporate sounds and video clips.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. Describe and set up basic activity schedules. 2. Identify settings and occasions to use them and learners to use them with. 3. Describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals� learning styles. 4. Implement basic activity schedules. 5. Troubleshoot and describe modifications enhancing usefulness of activity schedules. 6. Create a computerized activity schedule.
Activities: 1. Review of Activity Schedule instructional methodology 2. Review video- taped exemplars of activity schedules 3. Small group practice in implementation of activity schedules to establish play skills, social skills, acceptance of non-preferred food, and independent toileting. 4.Demonstration of computerized activity schedule 5. Participants will create a computerized activity schedule.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers, parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: BACB
Developing Successful Programs to Meet the Needs of Adults with ASD.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Joliet
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joanne Gerenser, Ph.D.
JOANNE GERENSER (Eden II Programs), PETER F. GERHARDT (Organization for Autism Research), ERIN SPARACIO (Eden II Programs/The Genesis School), RANDY I. HOROWITZ (Eden II Programs), FRANK R. CICERO (Eden II Programs)
Description: There has been considerable research done in the past twenty years in the area of autism and related disorders. Clinical research in speech and language, social skills, education, and behavior problems have resulted in a much better understanding of the complex nature of autism. The research clearly supports the use of applied behavior analysis in the treatment and education of learners with autism. One problem, however, is that very little of this research has included adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While many of the findings with children with autism can be relevant in our work with adults, there remain significant gaps in the literature that unfortunately leave many more questions than answers. The lack of available literature to guide service providers in their work with adults with autism is particularly problematic today. The dramatic increase in the incidence of autism began almost 15 years ago and we are just now beginning to see this impact in the field of adult services. Many of the schools that opened, in the past decade, to meet the demands of parents who wanted good behavioral education programs are now facing the real challenge of how to address the needs of these learners as they become adolescents and adults. Still other programs that have been providing adult services for years to other populations are now being asked to expand their programs and accept learners with ASD. This workshop will address key aspects of developing an effective program for adolescents and adults with autism. Specifically the workshop will review the available literature in the areas of employment, recreation and leisure skills, sexuality, speech and language, promoting independence, community integration, and quality of life. In addition, assessment and programming to address each of these areas will be presented. Video tapes of program implementation as well as other relevant visual supports will be incorporated within the workshop. The workshops primary focus will be on adolescents and adults with autism who continue to demonstrate significant challenges and limitations. The essential components needed to specifically address individuals with ASD will be highlighted. In addition, the important modifications and adaptations that are necessary to meet the needs of individuals with ASD as they grow older (and typically bigger) will be presented.
Learning Objectives: Participants will 1. Become familiar with the relevant literature relating to services and treatment of adults with ASD 2. Identify key components of an effective program to meet the needs of adults with ASD 3. Become familiar with programming to address employment, sexuality, recreation and leisure as well as other key areas in adults with autism 4. Describe strategies for promoting independence in adults with ASD
Activities: Participants will participate in lecture as well as group discussion. In addition, participants will watch videos of different aspects of service delivery for adults with ASD. Finally, participants will review different data sheets, program forms and assessment materials used within a behavioral program for adults with ASD.
Audience: Service Providers, Program Administrators, Behavior Analysts, Parents of Adolescents and Adults with ASD
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: BACB
Generalization in Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorders.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 2
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Christina Whalen, Ph.D.
CHRISTINA WHALEN (TeachTown, Inc.), MANYA C. R. VAUPEL (Spectrum Circles), SHANNON CERNICH (TeachTown, Inc.)
Description: Generalization is one of the most important measures of treatment outcome, if a child can learn a variety of skills and use them in a variety of settings, it is the best measure of whether or not an intervention was effective. However, not all treatment programs for autism adequately incorporate or measure for generalization. In this workshop, the basics of generalization will be reviewed, along with a discussion of why generalization is particularly important for children with autism. Research on generalization in autism treatment will be reviewed and various treatment approaches will be discussed in terms of how they tend to address generalization (or not). Suggestions for how to make sure generalization is accounted for and measured will be provided along with a group discussion of how the audience members include and measure generalization in their treatment approaches.
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will be able to describe and give examples of all the different types of generalization and identify the strengths and limitations of each of type 2) Participants will be able to discuss several research studies on generalization as it relates to the treatment of autism, as well as discuss what we know and need to know from the existing literature 3) Participants will be able to identify how generalization is incorporated into at least 5 different common treatment approaches for autism spectrum disorders and what the strengths and limitations of those approaches are in terms of generalization 4) Participants will be able to share with the group the specific efforts they have made to enhance generalization in their treatment approaches and discuss what has worked well and what hasn't 5) Participants will be able to discuss how future researchers and clinicians can advance the field of autism intervention through more focused efforts on generalization outcome
Activities: Lecture, group discussion, video clips
Audience: BCABA & BCBA interventionists, speech-language pathologists, teachers, paraprofessionals, parents, and anyone interested in a focus on generalization as a major outcome measure for autism intervention
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: BACB
Using the Verbal Behavior Approach to Teach Children with Autism.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 1
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, M.S.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (PA Verbal Behavior Project)
Description: Children with autism, regardless of age or severity of symptoms, need effective, individualized programming. This workshop will provide an overview of The Verbal Behavior Approach and will give participants specific ways to improve language skills for a variety of learners. In addition, this workshop will review basic principles of Applied Behavior Analysis used to reduce problem behaviors. Through lecture, video examples and small group activities, participants will leave with a good understanding of implementing the Verbal Behavior Approach when teaching children with autism.
Learning Objectives: Describe two similiarities and two differences between traditional discrete trial teaching and the Verbal Behavior Approach. Describe the importance of pairing with reinforcement and mand training when working with children with autism Give one example of a mand, tact, intraverbal and listener responding skill. Name two antecedent and two reactive strategies that may decrease problem behavior.
Activities: This workshop will include video examples, small group activities and lecture to meet listed objectives.
Audience: Professionals working with children with autism including behavior analysts, speech pathologists, educators, psychologists, and therapists. Parents of children with autism are also encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: BACB
Visual Stimulus and Response Modifications in Programming for Children with Autism.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Boulevard A
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jonathan J. Tarbox, Ph.D.
SCOTT BRAUD (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.), JONATHAN J. TARBOX (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.)
Description: Clinically, some children with autism have demonstrated slow progress when traditional vocal teaching strategies are used. Visually based teaching strategies are one possible program modification that can be used to accelerate a childs rate of acquisition and teach new skills. The current workshop will review visually based stimulus and response modifications that can be used to teach skills that are traditionally targeted in intensive behavioral treatment programs for children with autism. Examples from clinical cases will be provided.
Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will become familiar with research on teaching children with autism with visually modified materials 2. Attendees will learn how to identify when a lack of progress in teaching in vocal modalities may indicate that a shift to visually-based program modifications may be useful. 3. Attendees will learn how to modify commonly used teaching procedures by switching stimulus presentation modalities from vocal to visual. 4. Attendees will learn how to modify commonly used teaching procedures by switching required response modalities from vocal to manual or stimulus selection based.
Activities: Attendees will listen to lecture, participate in group discussion, provide practical examples from their clinical experience, write visually-modified teaching programs, and discuss the strengths and limitations of visual modifications for teaching programs for individuals with autism.
Audience: Service providers who work with children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: BACB
"Why Should I?" Implementing Individualized Motivational Systems with Challenging Learners.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford B
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel E. Hursh, Ph.D.
KARRIE GRAMA (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), AARON WOOD (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.), DANIEL E. HURSH (West Virginia University)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to equip participants to effectively coach staff/clients on how to develop, implement and monitor effective motivational systems. Workshop participants will become proficient with using and coaching others to use various motivational systems, including a token economy, to develop and maintain learner participation across home, school, and community environments. Participants will receive instruction on assessing learners to identify potential reinforcers, conditioning potential reinforcers to have value, and determining which type of motivational system might be most compatible with a particular learner. Participants will learn to incorporate various schedules of reinforcement that are commonly used in conjunction with motivational systems to establish, strengthen, and maintain desired behavior. Step-by-step strategies for utilizing motivational systems will be discussed in detail, with a focus on functional, feasible application across settings. Each participant will be coached on how best to develop and assist others to develop these systems. They will be provided with materials to create a token economy system that can later be utilized with their own learners or clients, and will engage in practice sessions where they will be coached on effective use of the system they have created.
Learning Objectives: Upon completing the workshop participants will be able to: 1. Identify (potential) reinforcers and/or condition neutral stimuli to have value for specific learners. 2. Identify an appropriate motivational system i.e., token economy, points system, etc. 3. Develop the motivational system. 4. Effectively implement and coach others to implement the system using the appropriate schedule(s) of reinforcement for establishing, strengthening and/or weakening selected behavior. 5. Determine when and how to alter the motivational system to ensure for continued learner success.
Activities: Participants will practice creating a motivational system/token economy that is useful for both a) implementation with their learners and b) teaching staff or clients how to effectively apply the system to increase successful participation among students. The presenters will illustrate (via video examples) experiences in coaching public education staff and parents in delivery of motivational systems/token economies used to maintain and increase participation across instructional conditions. The presenters will also provide coaching for overcoming some of the obstacles and common mistakes involved in implementing a motivational system. Participants will work in small groups to actively practice utilizing a variety of motivational systems presented by the instructors.
Audience: Classroom Teachers, Instructors, Direct Service Providers, Parents, Paraprofessionals, Trainers, BCABAs, BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: BACB
Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Boulevard B
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel J. Moran, Ph.D.
DANIEL J. MORAN (Trinity Services), PATRICIA BACH (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Description: This workshop will provide a step-by-step framework for functionally conceptualizing client behavior problems, and will discuss selection and application of specific ACT interventions. The workshop will also help attendees develop their own ACT consistent interventions, exercises, and metaphors. Process and outcome measures will be discussed. The workshop will also discuss first order and second order therapeutic approaches, and help the attendees discriminate when to use the appropriate therapeutic intervention. This workshop will be based on content from the forthcoming publication ACT in Practice: Case Conceptualization in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, (Bach & Moran, 2008, New Harbinger).
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will become familiar with the six core ACT principles of defusion, self-as-context, acceptance, values, committed action, and contacting the present moment, which will be described from a strict behavior analytic perspective Workshop participants will be able to conceptualize clinically relevant behaviors as functional response classes, and discriminate when they are amenable to an ACT approach. Workshop participants will be able to select ACT interventions appropriate for addressing specific core principles. Workshop participants will learn how to apply specific ACT interventions based on the case formulation Workshop participants will learn to use ACT case conceptualization to facilitate creating one�s own ACT consistent metaphors, exercises, and interventions for application in the context of a client�s unique history and presenting complaints. Workshop participants will learn methods of assessing effectiveness of interventions
Activities: The workshop will use a case-based approach beginning with instructor supplied cases and later using participants� clinical cases for practice in ACT case formulation, selecting interventions, and assessing the effectiveness of interventions, and outcomes. There will be a 60 minute slide presentation, demonstrations, large group exercises and case-based practice. Participants will be provided with handouts to use with their clients for assessment and homework assignments to augment in session interventions.
Audience: This workshop is suitable to clinicians with little exposure to ACT who would like to learn how to apply ACT broadly. It is also suitable for participants who have attended ACT experiential workshops and would like to improve their skill in functional contextual case formulation and deciding when to apply specific ACT interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: BACB
Don't Shoot the Trainee: Functional Assessment of Non-adherence in Applied Environments.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
PDR 2
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Advance Inc.), LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Inc.)
Description: Using Iwata's model defining the four functions of behavior, this workshop utilizes the technology to analyze adherence challenges faced by behaviorists in applied settings of homes and schools. Detailed environmental analysis strategies based upon Allen & Warzak (2000) are presented to assess the possible contingencies that may improve or prevent adherence. Data collection and individual skills profiles are explained and demonstrated via lecture, video examples, and hands-on activities for participants. Materials include sample questionnaires to assess readiness of trainees, as well as formats to measure environmental aspects that may strengthen or weaken consistent implementation of protocols. Also included are sample individual development plans (IDPs) for staff and
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will learn to use a functional assessment approach to address treatment non-adherence with teachers in classroom settings 2) Participants will learn to use a functional assessment approach with parents in home/community environments 3) Participants will learn intervention strategies to improve adherence per function 4) Participants will learn to measure effectiveness of adherence interventions
Activities: Lecture Demonstrations/data samples Video examples Group break-outs
Audience: Behavior consultants in school and home settings
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: BACB
Designing Effective Behavior Intervention Plans for Residential, Educational and Community Settings,
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Astoria
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jose D. Rios, M.S.
JOSE D. RIOS (Private Practice), HOLLY PARK (Pacific Child and Family Associates, apc.)
Description: This workshop is aimed at professions who review, design, evaluate or implement functional assessment and behavior intervention plans in residential, school, agency or home settings. A primary characteristic of treatment protocols, based on applied behavior analysis, is a clear, specific, step-by-step description of all interventions being recommended. Treatment protocols based on applied behavior analysis require an absolutely clear and precise description of each step of the plan. All procedures must be clearly delineated for staff to follow them-otherwise, recommendations are only loosely followed or their implementation is left up to staff. Clinical accuracy begins at the assessment phase of an intervention plan. The assessment of the function of a behavior forms the basis of behavior analysis, and therefore, is the foundation of a clinically-accurate behavior plan. In this workshop, we will examine the basic foundations of a behavior intervention plan, including common problems that affect the effectiveness and accuracy of such plans. We also will review the various components that should be included in intervention plans and we will discuss and stress the indisputable direct link between assessment findings and treatment strategies that are recommended in such plans. We will discuss the layout and design of a written plan so that it follows a logical progression. A portion of this workshop also will cover ethical considerations and ethical guidelines that must be adhered to when designing and implementing behavior interventions across various settings. This presentation is an intermediate level workshop so participants should have a basic knowledge of behavior intervention strategies as well as functional assessment methodology.
Learning Objectives: The primary objectives of this workshop are for participants to learn to write and design more comprehensive, systematic and accurate behavior intervention plans and to teach participants to better evaluate intervention plans that they (or others) design with the intent of improving service provision. Participants will review and learn to: � Identify common inaccuracies and errors often encountered in the assessment, intervention and evaluation sections of written plans (with the aim of avoiding such errors). � Ensure that their assessment produces the most accurate results possible in their setting (and how to report the assessment findings in the plan). � Ensure that the recommended treatment strategies are linked to the findings of a well-done functional assessment. � Design a plan with a procedural description follows standardized protocols. � Have an understanding of ethical issues related to the development and implementation of behavior intervention plans.
Activities: Participants will be provided with a lecture and presentation of the subject matter. Handouts also will be provided in addition to several exercises in which participants will review and evaluate actual plans that we have determined to be "clinically-challenged." Other handouts on related material also will be made available.
Audience: BCBAs, BCABAs, behavior specialists and consultants, educators, school psychologists and other professionals who review, design, evaluate and/or implement functional assessment and behavior intervention plans in residential, school, agency or home settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB
Solving Ethical Dilemmas in the Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford C
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Regional Center of the East Bay, California)
Description: This workshop is designed to increase participants ability to ethically practice applied behavior analysis (ABA) by describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas, discussing Guidelines for Responsible Conduct, and introducing an ethical decision making model. This approach incorporates codes of ethics for behavior analysts and ethical reasoning strategies. When making ethical decisions, many behavior analysts tend to believe that these decisions are solely based on the analysis of objective data and relevant evidences. However, in reality the decision-making process is also influenced by behavior analysts values, as well as societal values including those of services recipients. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas when these values conflict. In facing ethical dilemmas, behavior analysts need codes of professional conduct and ethically sound strategies to reach reasonable and practical resolutions. The Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts is helpful in many situations. In some cases, however, ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved by appealing to the existing guidelines or regulations. Part of this workshop is aimed at providing applied behavior analysts with ethical reasoning strategies in the event that the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct alone are insufficient. These strategies are based on the relevant experience of the presenters and the available literature in the field of behavior analysis and related areas. The emphasis of the discussion will be on the application of the model to various clinical settings, including natural homes, residential facilities, day programs, and educational programs.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Recognize ethical issues in the field and their importance to the general public as well as to behavior analysts. - Understand primary ethical principles that underline both societal values and the content of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts. - Identify and analyze ethical dilemmas that are often encountered by behavior analysts and other service providers. - Assess and realize the usefulness of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct as a tool in making ethical decisions. - Use the six steps delineated in the Ethical Decision Making Model to resolve ethical dilemmas that are likely to occur in the ABA service delivery process.
Activities: This workshop will use cases both provided by the presenters and generated by participants to illustrate the implementation of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and the steps in the Ethical Decision Making Model. Participants of this workshop will be encouraged to (1) identify their values and to associate these values with primary ethical principles; (2) recognize the characteristics of ethical dilemmas in the field of ABA; and (3) apply codes in Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and six steps specified in the Ethical Decision Making Model to cases that involve ethical dilemmas.
Audience: Behavior analysts, Psychologists
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB
How to Use Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) with Children with Learning Disabilities.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
PDR 4
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joseph D. Cautilli, Ph.D.
HALINA DZIEWOLSKA (Private Practice/Behavior Analyst Online), JOSEPH D. CAUTILLI (Children Crisis Treatment Center/St. Joseph's University), MICHAEL WEINBERG (Orlando Behavior Health Services, LLC)
Description: Response to intervention is critical to the new IDEAI for the diagnosis of children with learning disabilities. Given the background and training of most BCBAs in scientifically based reading instruction, graphical representation of data, and evaluation of performance, BCBA's have a critical role in helping school psychologist to diagnose learning disabilities. This workshop aims to refresh BCBAs in the basics of curriculum based measurement, a scientifically based method using fluency to judge children's reading, writing and math performance. Current practices in education allow for school psychologists to refer to BCBAs to measure reading performance, implement a scientifically based instructional program for reading, evaluate the child's performance and state if child is progressing under scientifically based reading instruction. This workshop will deal mainly with the evaluation and measurement of student performance using CBM, as well as interpreting the data.
Learning Objectives: 1). When given a child to assess reading performance, workshop participants will select three suitable paragraph's at the child's possible grade levels. 2). When given a child to assess reading performance, workshop participants will conduct the reading probes. 3). When given a child to assess reading performance, workshop participants will take the probe data and compare it to norms 4). When given a child to assess reading performance, workshop participants will select the appropriate grades that the child is reading independent, instructional, and frustrated. 5). Given a child's current reading performance, participants will graph data and project future performance. 6). Given a child's current reading performance, participants will be able to plot an minimum progress line and determine if the child is making progress to instructional sessions. 7). When given a child to assess for writing, participants will select proper story starters. 8). When given a child to assess for writing performance, participants will generate a 3 minute reading probe. 9). When given a child to assess for writing performance, participants will use probe data to determine the child's writing levels for writing instruction. 10). When given a child to assess for writing performance, participants will graph data and create a minimum progress line. 11). When given as child to assess for writing performance, participants will evaluate if the student is making progress to scientifically based writing instruction.
Activities: Participants will practice skills in: o Data gathering methods for CBM; o Conducting and scoring probes; o Developing performance-based measures; o Implementing a reading program using CBM; o Implementing a writing program using CBM
Audience: Educators, special educators, behavior analysts working in educational settings, and those interested in learning CBM approaches
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: BACB
Applying Group Contingencies in Classrooms to Prevent and Remedy Academic and Behavior Problems.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 3
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Christopher Skinner, Ph.D.
CHRISTOPHER SKINNER (The Univesity of Tennessee)
Description: This workshop focuses on the application of group-oriented contingencies designed to alter academic and social target behaviors in general and special education classrooms. Individual and independent, dependent, and interdependent group-oriented contingencies will be described, analyzed, compared, and contrasted across pragmatic characteristics and positive and negative side effects associated with the application of such contingencies in a group (e.g., classroom) contexts. Many practitioners are familiar with and apply individual and independent group-oriented contingencies with clearly established target behaviors, criteria, and/or rewards. This workshop will focus on the application of interdependent group-oriented contingencies. Research will be presented supporting the application of group-oriented contingencies for decreasing incidental antisocial and inappropriate behaviors, increasing incidental prosocial behaviors, and enhancing desired academic behaviors and academic achievement. Research supporting a) randomly-selected, resource-efficient, activity rewards, b) cumulative and/or randomly selected criterion, and c) randomly selected target behaviors will be analyzed. Basic research on maintaining behaviors will be applied as recommendations are made for enhancing maintenance by adding, adjusting and/or randomly selecting target behaviors, criteria, and/or rewards. By focusing on contingencies components, as opposed to programs, this workshop will allow attendees to develop their own contingencies to address their own concerns.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to a) differentiate between and identify strengths and weakness associated with the application of group-oriented contingencies, b) develop and adapt contingency components to enhance their effectiveness in altering and maintaining desired behaviors. c) alter contingency components to reduce the negative side effects associated with contingencies, and d) develop a large pool of rewards that are resource-efficient and effective reinforcers for groups.
Activities: Attendees will participate by helping generate a list of individual and group rewards, target behaviors, and criteria for various populations. Attendees will be asked to provide their own incites of possible pragmatic and social side effects associated with specific applied scenarios.
Audience: Those who work with or consult with those who work with groups of students or clients.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB
Teaching The Whole Class To Behave: Classroom Wide Behavior Management Strategies.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Marquette
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.S.
JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (McGrale and Associates), CHERYL J. DAVIS (Crossroads School for Children Consultant), JOSH PLAVNICK (McGrale and Associates; Michigan State University), LINDA J. LOCKHART (McGrale and Associates; Eastern Michigan University)
Description: The increasing trend for inclusion of students with a variety of diagnoses in public school classrooms has resulted in teachers often serving a diverse group of students. Often times these teachers have little if any formal training or support in behavior management strategies. The bulk of available resources focus on reinforcement systems and token economies for individual students, response cost, and self-monitoring and management strategies, all of which may not be practical for application in a classroom of 25-30 students. Additionally, while these interventions can be very successful, the scope and comprehensiveness of the systems have been minimal and often targeted to isolated populations. Furthermore, the dissemination has frequently been in a format lacking in appropriateness for classroom teachers. This workshop is designed to teach participants to use classroom wide behavior management systems that are based on the principals of Applied Behavior Analysis to increase appropriate classroom behavior. Strategies will focus on practical, well validated, data-based approaches to solve common classroom behavior problems.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. Identify and define classroom behaviors that they would like to increase and decrease within their settings. 2. Create a behavior management system to increase success of learners to demonstrate appropriate classroom behaviors. 3. Create a user friendly data collection system that will enable teachers to monitor the progress of their behavior plan. 4. Determine when and how to individualize classroom plans to meet individual learners needs. 5. Promote the use of best practices and ethical standards into classroom management strategies.
Activities: Didactic instruction Development of behavior plan including definitions of behaviors, criteria to increase expectations and criteria to fade plan over time Development of data collection system Peer review of additional behavior plans
Audience: General Education Teachers, Special Education Teachers, support staff and specialists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: BACB
Improving Your Interpersonal Effectiveness as a Behavior Analyst.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 4
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Raymond G. Miltenberger, Ph.D.
RAYMOND G. MILTENBERGER (University of South Florida), STACIE NEFF (University of South Florida)
Description: Because behavior analysis procedures are carried out by people in every day life, behavior analysts must develop not just technical ABA skills, but the skills needed to work effectively with people. This workshop will teach important interpersonal skills behavior analysts need to interact effectively with their clients, other professionals, and the public. Through the use of behavioral skills training (BST) procedures, participants will learn to use differential reinforcement and noncontingent reinforcement judiciously in their interactions to increase the effectiveness of their communication, conduct more effective behavioral assessment interviews, and build rapport with (set themselves up as positive reinforcers for) their clients. This workshop will also use BST to teach participants the skills needed to make effective presentations and gain acceptance for behavioral services. The goals of this workshop are to teach participants the interpersonal skills needed for promoting successful interactions with others and presenting themselves and the field of behavior analysis in a positive manner so that they can achieve the most positive outcomes.
Learning Objectives: Learn skills to make good initial impressions on others Learn skills to engage in mutually reinforcing interactions (rapport) with clients Learn to present yourself and behavior analysis in a good light to individuals outside of the field Learn the skills for making effective presentations Learn the skills needed to promote cooperation from clients
Activities: Listen to instructors' presentation View key points on Powerpoint slides Observe role plays of interpersonal skills presented by the workshop leaders Participate in role plays to practice the skills taught in the workshop
Audience: This workshop is intended for behavior analysts in practice who work with clients, consumers, and/or the public.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: BACB
The ABC's of Consulting in School Districts.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
PDR 1
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kristen M. Villone, Ph.D.
KRISTEN M. VILLONE (Melmark), NOELLE M. GREEN (Haddonfield School District)
Description: One of the biggest challenges behavior analysts face when consulting in school districts is balancing the role of "invited guest" with the role of "professional with expertise." Consultants working in school districts may also be challenged more by the behavior of the service providers than that of the identified student(s). The experiences of veteran consultants (with 19 and 11 years of clinical experience) who made the transition from clinical settings to school districts will offer unique perspectives on strategies and approaches they have found invaluable.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: --Describe common types of services most often requested by school districts. --Identify/address the primary "client" and/or presenting problem(s) --Understand the importance of body language, staff perceptions, documentation, and communication during classroom observations. --Have a better sense of a consultant's role (and how to establish boundaries). --Learn common mistakes made by consultants and how to avoid them. --Obtain a "blueprint" of how to set up/conduct classroom observations. --Obtain a "blueprint" of the veteran consultant's basic ABA training seminar. --Learn strategies that build teamwork and motivate staff when you're a "visitor" in their "home." --Have a better understanding of the interpersonal dynamics and contingencies in school districts. --Develop a better understanding of how to address ethical issues which may arise during consultations.
Activities: Participants will receive handouts to aid reviewing the workshop�s learning objectives during the first part of the workshop. The second part of the workshop will consist of a problem-solving discussion of different types of obstacles, scenarios and case examples the presenters have experienced. As time permits, audience members will be encouraged to present their own obstacles/issues for problem-solving.
Audience: Anyone interested in consulting in school districts, especially relatively new consultants who have ABA experience teaching children with developmental disabilities and training staff in clinical settings
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: BACB
Overcoming Severe Deficits in Vocal Behavior with The Association Method.
Saturday, May 24, 2008
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
PDR 3
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Teresa A. Grimes, M.S.
JUDY POLLARD- LICKLIDDER (Pollard Licklidder Clinic), TERESA A. GRIMES (Whole Child Consulting LLC)
Description: The Association Method has proven to be an effective paradigm for establishing vocal repertoires after other approaches have failed. Brief case studies of 5 such learners will be presented in this workshop. This workshop will also describe the etiology of disorders affecting vocal behavior. Lecture, video, and data will be utilized to familiarize attendees with the techniques of The Association Method. The instructors will describe how The Association Method can be integrated with the rest of a learner's programming.
Learning Objectives: 1. Be able to define The Association Method and describe how it is different from other approaches. 2. Be able to list multi-dimensional aspects. 3. Create fundamental materials. 4. Apply the method at basic/entry level.
Activities: 1. Break out groups to practice new terminology with flash cards. 2. Use of guided notes to facilitate acquisition. 3. Break out into groups to create introductory materials. 4. Break out into groups to practice entry level applications.
Audience: Parents and advanced professionals who work with learners demonstrating little or no vocal behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced

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