Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

Program by Day for Saturday, May 25, 2024


 

Special Event #1A
CE Offered: BACB
Opening Event and Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis Award Ceremony
Saturday, May 25, 2024
8:00 AM–9:20 AM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Instruction Level: Basic
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
 
SABA Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis: Jay Moore
Abstract: The Importance of Contingencies Operant contingencies of reinforcement specify the relation among the antecedent circumstances of a response, the response itself, and a reinforcing consequence of the response. The study of contingencies is consistent with the thesis of selection by consequences in biological science, and forms the framework for the analysis and explanation of both nonverbal and verbal behavior. Just as nothing in biology makes sense except in light of evolution, nothing in a science of behavior makes sense except in light of contingencies.
 
JAY MOORE (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
 
Dr. Jay Moore is a native of Grand Rapids, Michigan. He received his undergraduate degree from Kenyon College in Ohio in 1967, and his master’s degree from Western Michigan University in 1969 under David Lyon. He served in the US Navy from 1969 to 1972, then returned to graduate school at the University of California-San Diego, where he received his doctoral degree in 1975 under the late Edmund Fantino. He joined the Psychology Department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1977, and retired from there in 2015. He served on the boards of editors of several major journals in our field, as well as editor of The Behavior Analyst and Behavior and Philosophy. He also served as president of the Association for Behavior Analysis - International, in addition to holding various leadership positions with ABAI and as a faculty member at UWM. His principal interests are in the experimental analysis of behavior, and theoretical- philosophical-conceptual-historical topics. In the domain of the experimental analysis of behavior, he is interested in choice, conditioned reinforcement, and the effects of temporal distributions of reinforcement such as seen in delay discounting. In the conceptual domain, he is interested in radical behaviorism as a philosophy of science. He has published articles and chapters on experimental and conceptual topics in numerous journals and books, and is the author of two books: Conceptual Foundations of Radical Behaviorism (2008) and From a Behavioral Point of View (2015). He and his wife Betty have two adult children, David and Sarah, who both live in New York City.
 
SABA Award for Scientific Translation: Jomella Watson-Thompson
Abstract: The Uncommitted: A Behavioral-Community Approach to Advance Collaborative Action There is a plethora of societal issues that challenge our community health, development, and well-being. The application of a behavioral community approach used to advance community change through multisector collaboration is examined. The Youth Violence Prevention Center- Kansas City, a Center for Disease Control and Prevention National Center of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention, demonstrates the use of a socially valid approach to address violence as an issue of significant societal concern. The importance of collaboration with those uncommitted to institutions and ideologies but rather working together through a common commitment to advancing change and sustained improvement with and in communities is discussed. A challenge is posed to foster broader application and adoption of our science for societal impact through a collective commitment to multisector collaboration and engagement with diverse scholars, practitioners, and communities.
 
JOMELLA THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
 

Dr. Jomella Watson-Thompson is a professor of Applied Behavioral Science and a researcher affiliated with the Center for Community Health and Development. Dr. Thompson leads the Youth Violence Prevention Research Center- Kansas City, a Center for Disease Control and Prevention National Center of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention. Her research focuses on behavioral-community approaches to youth and community violence prevention, adolescent substance abuse prevention, and neighborhood and community development. She has examined the effects of community-based processes and behavioral-community interventions to promote mobilization and change in communities. Dr. Thompson also works with community collaboratives to examine social determinants or factors, including educational attainment and access to resources and supports, that may contribute to disparities experienced particularly for racial and ethnic groups and in underserved communities. She researches and promotes community-academic partnerships through community-engaged scholarship as an approach to foster sustainable change and improvement in communities. Dr. Thompson has received numerous funding awards and co-authored articles on community capacity-building, youth and neighborhood development, and adolescent substance abuse, and youth and community violence prevention. She serves on the Executive Council for the Association of Behavior Analysis International. She attained a Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology, a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Kansas, and a B.A. in Urban Studies from Jackson State University.

 
SABA Award for International Dissemination: Dermot Barnes-Holmes
Abstract: Stronger Together: Fostering Cooperation and Collaboration inside Behavior Analysis In reflecting upon the international dissemination of behavior analysis, and my own role in this sphere, I think it is important to recognize that we are too small a field to divide ourselves into even smaller sub-groups. Disseminating our science is rendered even more difficult if we are constantly embroiled in, what some may argue are, petty in-house conflicts. Such conflicts are perhaps in stark contrast to the tremendous overlap in the research that we are all doing, even if we often use different terms and concepts to talk about the behavior we are studying. In my own area, that of human language and cognition, we all seem to be aiming to develop a behavior-analytic, monistic, and naturalistic account of human language and thought that is devoid of mentalistic theorizing and speaks directly to practical concerns in educational, clinical, organizational, and other settings. In calling for a more collaborative or cooperative approach I are not suggesting that we all have to agree with each other in an anodyne manner and engage in empty gestures of mutual respect. Debate and disagreement should be welcome but only if it serves to bring greater clarity or progress for the field. An excellent example of the type of debate I am thinking of here may be found in the exchange between Willard Day and Murray Sidman in the series of letters between the two that Murray (1994) published in his volume, Equivalence Relations: A Research Story. In my brief presentation, I will use this exchange to highlight the advantages for all concerned in fostering a more cooperative and collaborative approach within our field.
 
DERMOT BARNES-HOLMES (Ulster University)
 
Dr. Dermot Barnes-Holmes graduated from the University of Ulster in 1985 with a B.Sc. in Psychology and in 1990 with a D.Phil. in behavior analysis. His first tenured position was in the Department of Applied Psychology at University College Cork, where he founded and led the Behavior Analysis and Cognitive Science unit. In 1999 he accepted the foundation professorship in psychology and head-of-department position at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. In 2015 he accepted a life-time senior professorship at Ghent University in Belgium. In 2020 he returned to his alma mater as a full professor at Ulster University. Dr. Barnes-Holmes is known internationally for the analysis of human language and cognition through the development of Relational Frame Theory with Steven C. Hayes, and its application in various psychological settings. He was the world's most prolific author in the experimental analysis of human behaviour between the years 1980 and 1999. He was awarded the Don Hake Translational Research Award in 2012 by the American Psychological Association, is a past president and fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and a fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis, International. He is also a recipient of the Quad-L Lecture Award from the University of New Mexico and became an Odysseus laureate in 2015 when he received an Odysseus Type 1 award from the Flemish Science Foundation in Belgium.
 
SABA Award for Enduring Programmatic Contributions: Teachers College, Columbia University
Abstract: Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis: Teachers College, Columbia University In 1981 Doug Greer, in conjunction with his graduate students from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts and Science and Teachers College, developed the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) model of education. CABAS® was designed to incorporate the findings in the science of behavior and its philosophy to all components of the schooling system (students, parents, organizational administration, teacher trainers, parents, and the university). CABAS® schools are driven by students’ learning that is continuously and directly measured. Application of the science involves continuous measurement as teaching tools. Student outcomes and research drive the curriculum at the university level. PhD students function as strategic scientists of teaching in their classrooms and train their MA teacher assistants. CABAS® School salaries have funded MA and PhD students for 43 years (264 PhD dissertations, more than 450 MA students). Today accredited CABAS® schools (see www.cabasschools.org) are in the USA, Korea, and England, with hundreds more CABAS® trained professionals in Ireland, Italy, Spain, Brazil, and China. Research contributions include: a strategic science of teaching and accelerated independent learning, identification and establishment of verbal developmental cusps, how ontogenetic verbal development affects instruction, conditioned reinforcement by denial, and effects of verbal cusps on learning to read and reading to learn.
 
R. GREER (Professor Emeritus Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), JESSICA SINGER-DUDEK (Teachers College, Columbia University)
 
Doug Greer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Education, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Teachers College of Columbia University and currently Senior Research Scientist for the Foundation for the Advancement of a Strategic Science of Teaching (FASST). He has served on the editorial boards of 12 journals, published over 200 research and theoretical articles in more than 23 journals and is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of 14 books and the ELCAR curriculum and inventory of repertoires for preschoolers. Two of his most recent books are translated into Korean, Spanish, Chinese, Italian and Portuguese. Greer has sponsored 264 doctoral dissertations, taught numerous teachers and psychologists, founded the Fred S. Keller School and the CABAS? model of schooling used in the USA, Korea, Spain, Ireland, Italy, China, and England (www.cabasschools.org). He has been involved in basic and applied experimental research for 55 years in schools with students, teachers, parents, and supervisors as well as pediatric patients in medical settings. He and his students and colleagues have identified: (a) verbal and social developmental cusps and protocols to establish them when they are missing in children, (b) conditioned reinforcement by observation and denial conditions, (c) an organizational systems science of schooling, and (d) the stimulus control for incidental bidirectional naming. Doug is the recipient of the Fred S. Keller Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education from the American Psychology Association, a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, the ABAI award for International Contributions to Behavior Analysis, May 5 as the R. Douglas Greer Day by the Westchester County Legislature and the Jack Michael Award for Contributions to Verbal Behavior. The ABAI award for Enduring Contributions to Behavior Analysis to Teachers College Columbia University and CABAS® is scheduled for the May 2024 ABAI convention. He has served as guest professor at universities in Brazil, China, Spain, Wales, England, Japan, Korea, India, Ireland, Germany, Italy, USA, and Nigeria.
 
Dr. Jessica Singer-Dudek is the Director of Transdisciplinary Programs in ABA at Columbia University Teachers College. She also serves as a Senior Behavior Analyst Consultant to schools implementing the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) model, and serves as the CABAS® Professional Advisory Board Secretary/Treasurer. Dr. Dudek’s research interests include component analyses of successful behavior analytic models of education, teacher and supervisor training, verbally governed and verbally governing behaviors, establishment of early observing responses, verbal behavior development, conditioned reinforcement, and observational learning.
 
SABA Award for Effective Presentation of Behavior Analysis in the Mass Media: Stuart Vyse
Abstract: The Happy Accidents of a Writer’s Life I will offer some reflections on how I learned be a better writer and what drew me to write about behavioral science for a general audience. The talk will describe several ways the behavior analysis community supported my development as a writer and some fortunate events outside the field of behavior analysis that also contributed. I will give particular attention to the role of editors and reading for pleasure in the life of the writer.
 
STUART VYSE (Independent Scholar)
 
I am a behavioral scientist, teacher, and writer. I am a contributing editor for Skeptical Inquirer magazine, for which I write the “Behavior & Belief” column, both online and in print. I have written personal and professional essays in a variety of places, including the Observer, Medium, The Atlantic, The Good Men Project, Tablet, and Time. The first edition of my book Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition won the William James Book Award of the American Psychological Association and was translated into Japanese, German, and Romanian. An updated edition was published in 2014. My book Going Broke: Why Americans (Still) Can’t Hold On To Their Money is an analysis of the current epidemic of personal debt. The first edition was translated into Chinese, and the second edition was released in September of 2018 in both paperback and audiobook formats. In 2020, my book Superstition was published in the Oxford University Press Very Short Introduction series. The Spanish translation, Breve historian de la superstición, was published by Alianza editorial on January 13 (!), 2022. My latest book, The Uses of Delusion: Why It’s Not Always Rational to be Rational (Oxford, 2022), is out now in the US in hardcover, e-book, and audiobook. It will be published in the UK in August 2022. As an expert on superstition and irrational behavior, I have been quoted in many news outlets, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and have appeared on CBS Sunday Morning, CNN International, the PBS NewsHour, and NPR’s Science Friday. See the In the Media page for recent quotes and appearances. I hold a PhD in psychology and BA and MA degrees in English Literature and am a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. The majority of my teaching career was spent at Providence College, the University of Rhode Island, and Connecticut College. My academic interests are in decision-making, behavioral economics, philosophy, behavior analysis, and belief in the paranormal.
 
Target Audience:

All convention registrants are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 
1) Discuss how the study of contingencies is consistent with the thesis of selection by consequences in biological science, and forms the framework for the analysis and explanation of both nonverbal and verbal behavior,
2) Describe how the application of a behavioral community approach may be used to advance community change through multisector collaboration, 
3) Discuss the advantages of fostering a more cooperative and collaborative approach to behavior analysis,
4) Describe how the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) model of education incorporates the science of behavior and its philosophy to all components of the schooling system, and
5) Discuss the role of editors and reading for pleasure in the life of the writer.
 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #32
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Self-Injurious Behavior: Decades Past, Decades Ahead (The Problem Is Not Solved)
Saturday, May 25, 2024
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: AUT; Domain: Theory
Chair: Yanerys Leon (University of Miami)
CE Instructor: Timothy R. Vollmer, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TIMOTHY R. VOLLMER (University of Florida)
Abstract:

For the past several years, my colleagues and I have been developing models for a deeper understanding of factors related to the development and maintenance of severe behavior. The recent passing of my mentor and colleague, Brian Iwata, has set the occasion for reflection on the past decades of behavioral research specific to self-injurious behavior (SIB). I will provide some historical context of research and practice related to SIB, including some perspectives from Dr. Iwata’s lab and publications. I will summarize some of the key findings from the past several decades to date. But, in addition, I will make a case that there is a long path ahead to complete our understanding of SIB, and to continue Iwata’s work in developing effective interventions. I will suggest future research and practice in the following areas: a) a deeper understanding of negatively reinforced SIB, b) a deeper understanding of automatically reinforced SIB, c) translation of basic research on self-biting and aggression that may shed light on functional properties of SIB, d) the need for development of detailed and complex case studies, and e) the need for prevention science (and the conundrum that arises from our traditional methodology).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

behavior analysts interested in research, history of the field, and assessment/intervention for SIB.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe at least three variables that alter the value of escape as reinforcement; (2) describe at least two potential sources of automatic reinforcement for SIB; (3) describe at least one challenge related to evaluating the prevention of SIB.
 
TIMOTHY R. VOLLMER (University of Florida)
Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996 he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University of Florida in 1998, where he has been ever since, and is now a Professor and Associate Chair of Psychology. His primary area of research is applied behavior analysis, with emphases in autism, intellectual disabilities, reinforcement schedules, and parenting. He has published over 200 articles and book chapters related to behavior analysis. He was the recipient of the 1996 B.F. Skinner New Researcher award from the American Psychological Association (APA). He received another APA award in August 2004, for significant contributions to applied behavior analysis, and received the Don Hake translational research award in 2022. He served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis from 2014-2016. He is a fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis (ABAI), and he received the ABAI mentoring award in 2017. More recently, he received the University of Florida Dissertation Advisor Mentoring Award in 2022.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #35
CE Offered: BACB
Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Project ECHO: A Successful Partnership to Support Caregivers of Children With Autism and Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (I/DD)
Saturday, May 25, 2024
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center, 108 AB
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Ilene S. Schwartz, Ph.D.
Chair: Claudia Drossel (Eastern Michigan University)
Presenting Authors: : ILENE S. SCHWARTZ (University of Washington)
Abstract:

Supporting the needs of caregivers of children with disabilities is one of the most socially important problems behavior analysts address. While there are multiple methods to address this priority, since 2020 the importance of meeting the needs of caregivers remotely has been emphasized. Project ECHO is a data based virtual service delivery model that has been used to train professionals and paraprofessionals around the world. In this paper we describe Project ECHO and how we are using to support caregivers of children with disabilities who demonstrate challenging behavior at home and in the community. We will also discuss why Project ECHO is a useful tool for behavior analysts to disseminate successful interventions.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

General

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe Project ECHO; (2) discuss the benefits of providing support for parents of children with autism and I/DD via a case-based learning model; (3) discuss why Project ECHO could be a good partner for disseminating information about successful behavioral interventions.
 
ILENE S. SCHWARTZ (University of Washington)
Dr. Ilene Schwartz earned her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in Child and Developmental Psychology and is a Professor of Education at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is the director of the Haring Center for Inclusive Education on the UW campus, an interdisciplinary, research and training center focused on improving outcomes for children of all abilities. Dr. Schwartz has had continuous funding from the US Department of Education since 1990 to support her work in the areas of autism, developing educational interventions for young children, and preparing staff to work with people with disabilities. She is the author of 3 books and over 90 scholarly articles and book chapters. Dr. Schwartz has spoken to audiences around the world on topics such as “Understanding Autism” and “Why Inclusion is Important for all Children”. Her TED talk, “The Power of Inclusive Education” has been viewed by thousands of people. Her recent book, “The Project DATA Model for Teaching Preschoolers with Autism” describes her 25-year ground-breaking project designed to provide state of the art services for children with autism in public school settings. The Project DATA model is used across the country and internationally and is the standard of care for young children with autism in Washington state. Dr. Schwartz lives in Seattle with her husband and chiweenie and maintains an active research and teaching portfolio in addition to her work as an amateur gardener and avid Mariners fan.
 
 
Special Event #221
The Story of ABAI
Saturday, May 25, 2024
10:00 AM–12:50 PM
Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon H
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Domain: Theory
Chair: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

This session looks back on the 50-year career of the Association for Behavior Analysis with an eye to its future. The first presentation is focused on the development of ABA as organization, describing the challenges it has faced and overcome throughout its history. The second presentation looks at the mission of ABA and its role in the development and implementation of the organization’s strategic plan. The evolution of the science of behavior analysis, as reflected in ABA conference presentations over its history, is provided in the third presentation. The fourth presentation describes ABA’s longstanding commitment to the preparation of successive generation of behavior analysts as evident in its efforts to develop and sustain quality education programs. Following these presentations, the speakers will participate in a discussion with the audience, focusing on these and related issues as well as the aims and objectives of the Association for Behavior Analysis International going forward.

Instruction Level: Basic
 

An Inside Perspective on ABAI

MARIA MALOTT (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
Abstract:

I have had the honor and the privilege of serving ABAI for over 30 years as Executive Director/CEO. Since its inception and especially, during the last three decades, the field of behavior analysis, like other disciplines, has been impacted by significant socio-economic changes. ABAI has successfully adjusted to those constantly evolving vicissitudes, while remaining committed to preserving, developing, and disseminating the science of behavior with the ultimate objective of contributing to the well-being of society. With that vision in mind, ABAI has grown from a small membership association to the largest in our field; from producing a convention and a journal to offering a great variety of products and services; from having no employees to establishing a competent and caring team. This presentation offers an inside perspective of ABAI’s growing pains, conflicts, and successes—an account that only a few members in its leadership have benefited from living firsthand. As well, it offers some reflections for future directions.

Since 1993, Dr. Malott has served as Executive Director/CEO of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and Secretary Treasurer of the Society for the Advancement for Behavior Analysis. Previously, she was vice-president of manufacturing in a Midwest company in the United States. In addition, for more than 12 years, she worked as a consultant for a variety of businesses in service, retail, manufacturing, education, government, and others. She has served as affiliate faculty member at five universities and on five editorial boards. She coauthored a textbook on principles of behavior and authored two editions of a textbook on culturo-behavioral change. She has published dozens of peer reviewed publications and hundreds of presentations in 22 countries. In all applied and theoretical work, she specializes in cultural analysis and the management and improvement of behavioral systems. Dr. Malott is a fellow of ABAI and was the recipient of the 2003 Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis, the 2004 Award for Outstanding Achievement in Organizational Behavior Management, and the 2012 Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis. She also received the 2002 Outstanding Alumni Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University.
 

The ABAI Mission

CAROL PILGRIM (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Abstract:

The mission of the Association for Behavior Analysis, International is “to contribute to the well-being of society by supporting, developing, and enhancing the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis.” Indeed, the statement of our mission has remained a relative constant since ABAI’s inception in 1974, even as the field of behavior analysis has grown in number, diversity of interests, and professional and educational identifications. For this increasingly complex and varied discipline, it is essential to ensure the strength of, and support for, scientific behavior analysis and the philosophy that underlies it. As ABAI has worked to balance the many, and sometimes competing, priorities of its constituencies, our mission has provided the compass. This presentation will: 1) describe ways in which major challenges for ABAI throughout its history have often involved pressures to deviate from its central mission; and 2) review the role of our mission in determining content and implementation of the organization’s strategic plan as well as the decision-making of its Executive Council over the past 50 years.

Dr. Carol Pilgrim is professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Dr. Pilgrim has contributed substantially to behavior analysis through her leadership, teaching, and research. She has served as president of its major organizations, including ABAI (as well as its Southeastern ABA chapter), the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association. She also served as secretary of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and as a board member of that organization. She has advanced the dissemination of behavior analysis and the vitality of its journals in her roles as chair of the Publication Board of ABAI, editor of The Behavior Analyst, co-editor of the Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, and associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. She has served on the board of directors of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and other organizations, and chaired numerous committees. Dr. Pilgrim is known, in addition, as a stellar teacher and mentor. She served as associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UNCW for nine years, and has been recognized with numerous awards, including the North Carolina Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching and the ABAI Student Committee Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award. Dr. Pilgrim's research expertise and contributions traverse both basic experimental and applied behavior analysis. Her health related research has brought behavior analysis to the attention of scientists and practitioners in cancer prevention, and she is noted for her innovative work on the development and modification of relational stimulus control in children and adults.
 

The Program

LINDA HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

A science is identified by the products of its scientists as these are presented at its conferences and appear in its journals. The status of a science at any given time is especially evident in its conference presentations because these ordinarily (and ethically) precede their published appearances. The aim of this address is to examine the identity of the science of behavior analysis as revealed in the conference presentations of its scientists over the past fifty years. A retrospective analysis of these products, categorized in accord with present day program areas, will be presented. Changes to submission procedures, speaker invitations, and other relevant administrative actions will be noted as they occurred. The aims of these actions will be described, and their outcomes assessed to the extent possible. Some comments on the status of behavior analysis as a scientific enterprise at the present time will be offered along with some thoughts about its possible futures.

Linda J. Parrott Hayes is a distinguished international professor at the University of Nevada, Reno. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba and her graduate degrees from Western Michigan University. She was a member of the behavior analysis faculty at West Virginia University while completing her doctorate, after which she returned to Canada, taking a position at St. Mary’s University. Dr. Hayes co-founded the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno, on a self-capitalization model and served as its director for more than a decade. She has received numerous awards for her contributions to the training of behavior analysts including the Fred S. Keller Award for Teaching of Behavior Analysis from the American Psychological Association’s Division 25, an Outstanding Teacher Award from the College of Arts and Sciences at West Virginia University, an Outstanding Faculty Award from the Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Colleges and Universities, an Outstanding Alumna Award from Western Michigan University, and for the program she founded a Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis Award for Enduring Contributions to Behavior Analysis. Dr. Hayes also founded and directs UNR’s Satellite Programs in behavior analysis, aimed at meeting the ever-growing demand for qualified practitioners in regions where appropriate training has been unavailable or inaccessible. Her efforts in this regard have earned her an International Development Award from the Latin Association for Behavior Analysis and Modification, a Global Engagement Award from the University of Nevada, Reno, and a SABA International Development Award. She is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and has served the association in many capacities including coordination of its Practice and Education Boards as well as multiple terms on its Executive Council. Dr. Hayes’ scholarly interests range from the experimental analysis of animal behavior to the logic of science. She is best known for her contributions to behavior theory and philosophy.
 

Higher Education and the Future of Behavior Analysis

MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

The vitality, development, and growth of behavior analysis depends on many factors. Perhaps most important is the quality of the educational programs that prepare successive generations of behavior analysts. ABAI’s commitment to education started early in its history with the establishment of the Education and Evaluation Committee in 1977 (just the fourth year of the association’s existence), progressed to the accreditation of graduate and undergraduate programs and, in collaboration with the Behavior Analysis Certification Board, verification of graduate course sequences. This presentation will focus on the development of the accreditation system, the challenges it faces today, and the role that ABAI accreditation plays in securing a future for behavior analysis as a science and profession.

Dr. Michael Perone is a professor in the Department of Psychology at West Virginia University. He has made substantial contributions to behavior analysis through his research, service, administration, and teaching. He is well known for his programmatic research on conditioned reinforcement, avoidance, and transitions from rich to lean schedules of reinforcement, and more generally for the elegance and ingenuity of his experimental methodology. He has secured support from NICHHD, OSHA, and NSF for much of his research. His investigations with animals and extensions of basic mechanisms to humans serve as a prototype for research translation. Dr. Perone's accomplishments in administration, service to the discipline, and teaching are similarly noteworthy. Dr. Perone served for 12 years as chair of the West Virginia University Department of Psychology, one of the foremost programs in behavior analysis. He has served as president of ABAI, SABA, SEAB, and SEABA. He has been appointed to key editorial positions for major journals in behavior analysis, represented behavior analysis on the Federation of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences, and served on numerous committees. In each of those roles, his skill and humor have been instrumental in bringing a charge to effective completion. Dr. Perone has received numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring, which, along with the successes of his former students, are testaments to his effectiveness in that arena as well.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diversity submission Social Justice and Compassion in a Queer Context
Saturday, May 25, 2024
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: DEI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kaitlynn Gokey (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Kaitlynn Gokey, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MATTHEW SKINTA (Roosevelt University)
Abstract:

Through the 1970s and 1980s, behavior therapists slowly transitioned – mostly – from offering interventions intended to alter a client’s sexual orientation or gender identity. Some, with the encouragement of those within the LGBTQ community like the late Dr. Charles Silverstein, realized that continuing research and clinical practice in this direction contributed to a climate of bias. Others failed until much later to recognize that the work was harmful to individuals undergoing it – some clinicians may still be learning this lesson. Conversely, behavioral strategies were slow to be advanced in the service of mitigating the effects of anti-LGBTQ bias. Funding and institutional support in this direction has also appears to have been slow, relative to the support of historic change efforts. How do we reconcile the goals of behavioral science that advocate for social justice and improvement of the human condition with its history of neglecting the perspectives and voices of marginalized people? How must our field continue to grow and change to reduce the likelihood of causing such harm in the future? Particular attention will be paid in this exploration of the relationships between behavior therapy, sexual orientation, and gender toward how ongoing bias in the field creates a context that maintains and supports harm in a global context.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, students, practitioners, researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe harms to LGBTQ people due to behavioral interventions; (2) list current behavioral strategies to mitigate harms against LGBTQ people; (3) demonstrate an awareness of how anti-LGBTQ bias in the behavioral sciences fuels continued sexual orientation and gender identity change efforts in an international context.
 
MATTHEW SKINTA (Roosevelt University)
Dr. Matthew D. Skinta is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and affiliated faculty in the Department of Women and Gender Studies at Roosevelt University. He is board certified Clinical Health Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology, a peer-reviewed ACT trainer, a certified trainer of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, and a certified teacher of Compassion Cultivation Training. Dr. Skinta’s work over the past 15 years has been to (1) engage contextual behavioral clinicians to intervene in the functional elements of minority stress experienced by sexual orientation and gender diverse people, (2) to center the relational behavioral repertoires most harmed by bias and interpersonal rejection within LGBTQ communities, and (3) to consider the global impact of anti-LGBTQ animus within the behavioral sciences. His work in these areas, specifically, has led to being made a Fellow of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and the American Psychological Association (Division 44). Dr. Skinta is currently serving on the APA-SSCP-ABCT Inter-organizational Scientific Task Force on the Iatrogenic Effects of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression Change Efforts (SOGIECEs). He co-edited Mindfulness and Acceptance for Gender and Sexual Minorities: A Clinician's Guide to Fostering Compassion, Connection, and Equality Using Contextual Strategies (2016), and wrote Contextual Behavior Therapy for Sexual and Gender Minority Clients: A Practical Guide to Treatment (2020).
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #62
CE Offered: BACB
Origins of Human Cooperation
Saturday, May 25, 2024
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center, 108 AB
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jonathan W. Pinkston (University of Kansas)
CE Instructor: Jonathan W. Pinkston, Psy.D.
Presenting Author: MICHAEL TOMASELLO (Duke University)
Abstract:

Humans are biologically adapted for cooperation and cultural life in ways that other primates are not. Humans have unique motivations and cognitive skills for sharing emotions, experience, and collaborative actions (shared intentionality) that emerge in human ontogeny at around one year of age. Our nearest primate relatives do not seem to have the motivations and cognitive skills necessary to engage in activities involving collaboration, shared intentionality, and, in general, things cultural.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

For Everyone

Learning Objectives: TBD
 
MICHAEL TOMASELLO (Duke University)
Michael Tomasello is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University, and emeritus director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. His research interests focus on processes of cooperation, communication, and cultural learning in human children and great apes. His recent books include Origins of Human Communication (MIT Press, 2008); Why We Cooperate (MIT Press, 2009); A Natural History of Human Thinking (Harvard University Press, 2014); A Natural History of Human Morality (Harvard University Press, 2016); Becoming Human: A Theory of Ontogeny (Harvard University Press, 2019); and The Evolution of Agency (MIT Press, 2022).
 
 
Invited Paper Session #33
CE Offered: BACB
5 Steps to Supercharge Results in Any Organization
Saturday, May 25, 2024
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sharlet D. Rafacz (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Lori Ludwig, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LORI LUDWIG (Performance Ally)
Abstract:

Vital Behaviors are the select powerhouse actions that propel groups to astonishing success when consistently practiced together. When a core percentage of a population collectively adopts the critical few Vital Behaviors, a tipping point is reached, and the culture shifts – the new habits become "just the way we do things around here." Do you need that to happen for your project, initiative, or organization? Do you want to establish Vital Behaviors as habits on a large scale across your organization or work unit, or maybe even in the populations you serve? This presentation will walk through the foundations for building a Vital Behavior Network and real life stories of how this approach has transformed organizations.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Leaders and influencers in an organization who want to increase behavioral consistency on a large scale.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the value of identifying Vital Behaviors; (2) Describe why behavioral consistency can improve organizational results; and (3) Describe the 5 steps for building a Vital Behavior Network
 
LORI LUDWIG (Performance Ally)
Dr. Lori Ludwig is renowned for her extraordinary skill in guiding organizations to align strategy with processes, roles, behaviors, and results. With 20+ years of consulting experience spanning diverse sectors, from Fortune 500 titans to nonprofits and local startups, Lori’s work has had a transformative impact globally. Her projects—from pioneering performance-based learning strategies to fostering collaborations around shared goals—have elevated countless organizations. Serving as Chief Performance Architect at Performance Ally, her mission is to disseminate the science of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) to create large-scale positive change. Lori simplifies its application, empowering organizations to unleash human potential, amplify impact, and navigate complexity effectively. Lori also currently serves as a Board member of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and Executive Director of the Organizational Behavior Management Network.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Wearable Biosensing to Predict Imminent Aggressive Behavior in Psychiatric Inpatient Youths With Autism
Saturday, May 25, 2024
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center, 108 AB
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Patrick Romani (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus)
CE Instructor: Patrick Romani, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MATTHEW GOODWIN (The Groden Center)
Abstract:

Aggressive behavior is a prevalent and challenging issue in individuals with autism, especially for those who have limited verbal ability or intellectual challenges. This presentation investigates whether changes in peripheral physiology recorded by a wearable biosensor and machine learning can be used to predict imminent aggressive behavior before it occurs in inpatient youths with autism from 4 primary care psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Research staff performed live behavioral coding of aggressive behavior while 70 inpatient study participants wore a commercially available biosensor that recorded peripheral physiological signals (cardiovascular activity, electrodermal activity, and motion). Logistic regression, support vector machines, neural networks, and domain adaptation were used to analyze time-series features extracted from biosensor data. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values were used to evaluate the performance of population- and person-dependent models. A total of 429 naturalistic observational coding sessions were recorded, totaling 497 hours, wherein 6665 aggressive behaviors were documented, including self-injury (3983 behaviors [59.8%]), emotion dysregulation (2063 behaviors [31.0%]), and aggression toward others (619 behaviors [9.3%]). Logistic regression was the best-performing overall classifier across all experiments; for example, it predicted aggressive behavior 3 minutes before onset with a mean AUROC of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.79-0.81). Further research will explore clinical implications and the potential for personalized interventions.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Individuals with autism, caregivers of individuals with autism, health care providers, researchers, insurers, and policymakers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) decscribe profound autism; (2) discuss aggressive behavior in autism; (3) discuss the ways wearable autonomic nervous system sensing technology may be used to assess physiological indicators of stress and arousal in individuals with autism; (4) discuss machine learning classifiers to predict aggressive behavior in individuals with autism.
 
MATTHEW GOODWIN (The Groden Center)
Dr. Matthew S. Goodwin is an Interdisciplinary Professor with tenure at Northeastern University, jointly appointed in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences and the Khoury College of Computer Sciences, where he is a founding member of a new doctoral program in Personal Health Informatics and Directs the Computational Behavioral Science Laboratory. Goodwin has held appointments at Harvard Medical School as a Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics (2018-2020), Brown University as an Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior (2008-2018), and the MIT Media Lab as Director of Clinical Research (2008-2011). He has served on the Executive Board of the International Society for Autism Research (2005-2008), the Scientific Advisory Board for Autism Speaks (2014-2017), and helped write the bill establishing the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H) – a congressionally adopted research funding agency that supports transformative biomedical and health breakthroughs. He has over 25 years of research and clinical experience working with children and adults on the autism spectrum and developing and evaluating innovative behavioral assessment and intervention technologies, including video and audio capture, telemetric physiological monitors, accelerometry sensors, and digital video/facial recognition systems. Goodwin has received several honors, including a dissertation award from the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology, Peter Merenda Prize in Statistics and Research Methodology, Hariri Award for Transformative Computational Science, a career contribution award from the Princeton Autism Lecture Series, and named an Aspen Ideas Scholar by the Aspen Institute and Matilda White Riley Early-Stage Investigator by the National Institutes of Health. He has obtained research funding from various sources, including the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, Department of Defense, Simons Foundation, Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation, and Autism Speaks. Goodwin received his B.A. in psychology from St. Clare’s in Oxford and Wheaton College and his MA and Ph.D. in experimental psychology and behavioral science from the University of Rhode Island. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Affective Computing at the MIT Media Lab in 2010.
 
 
Invited Symposium #99A
Rate Dependency: Still Useful After All These Years
Saturday, May 25, 2024
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center, 108 AB
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: SCI/BPN; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Chris Hughes (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Discussant: Warren Bickel (Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at Virginia Tech University)
Abstract:

Over 70 years ago, behavioral pharmacology evolved as a scientific discipline integrating behavior analysis and pharmacology starting with the collaboration of B.F. Skinner and Peter Dews at Harvard. One of the first unifying principles that emerged from early research was the notion of rate dependency – that a drug’s effects on behavior was a function of the baseline rate of responding. This led to decades of experimental analysis in behavioral pharmacology. In this symposium, Dr. Jonathan Katz provides a brief history of behavioral pharmacology and rate dependency. Then others present data from several lines of research indicating that rate or baseline dependency remains a useful framework within a variety of domains including behavioral momentum, Dr. Jonathan Pinkston, impulsive and risky choice, Drs. Raymond Pitts and Chris Hughes, and contingency management of drug use, Dr. Stephen Higgins. Dr. Warren Bickel will be our discussant.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 

Response Rate Dependency of the Behavioral Effects of Drugs: A Brief History

JONATHAN KATZ (National Institute on Drug Abuse (ret.))
Abstract:

In the 1960s Peter Dews and associates published papers indicating that drug effects on operant responding under reinforcement schedules varied with response rates occurring under non-drug conditions. This so-called rate-dependency effect had precedents in physiological pharmacology, particularly in cardiovascular effects of drugs. It is also related to the Law of Initial Values (Wilder, 1962) which states that effects of any agent depend largely on initial levels of the studied variable. A 1964 paper by Dews using fixed-interval schedules examined the specificity of the effects of amobarbital on suppressed responding and was especially notable as it detailed how an evaluation of moderating environmental influences on drug effects could be conducted with due consideration of rate dependency. That analysis also occasioned critiques regarding how to properly express rate-dependent effects. One of these focused on absolute response rate, rather than change as the critical outcome after drug administration. The other considered that average response rates under fixed-interval schedules are unrepresentative of bimodal distributions of constituent response rates. Each critique can be shown to be of minimal significance. The empirical ubiquity across species, environmental conditions, and pharmacological agents indicates that rate dependency remains critical in consideration of factors influencing the behavioral effects of drugs.

Dr. Jonathan L. Katz received a Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Maryland (1978), studying with Dr. James E. Barrett, and post-doctoral training at the Harvard Medical School studying with Dr. William H. Morse. He subsequently joined the research faculty in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Michigan Medical School (1980-1982) working with Dr. James H. Woods. In 1983 he moved to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program where he remained until retirement in 2017. His research was funded with fellowships from the National Institute of Mental Health and NIDA, as well as NIDA grants and IRP funding. He has published over 290 papers primarily focused on understanding the pharmacological and behavioral mechanisms underlying the effects and abuse of stimulants, and the role of sigma receptors in that abuse. Other research focused on the abuse of various classes of compounds including opioids and benzodiazepines.
 

Rate-Dependency Dependencies: Reinforcer Magnitude

JONATHAN PINKSTON (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Rate dependency refers to empirical observations that the effects of an intervention depend on the baseline rate of behavior. Early work on rate dependency occurred in the context of behavioral pharmacology. Repeated demonstrations that drug effects depended on the rates of behavior, and accompanying mathematical descriptions, affirmed the importance behavior itself plays in pharmacological treatments. At the same time, behavior analysis has shown behavior to be determined by environmental factors, raising the question of what factors determine the rate upon which rate-dependency depends. Our group has focused on one factor in particular—reinforcer magnitude. In several experiments, pigeons earned food according to multiple fixed-interval schedules, where the components differed only in the magnitude of the reinforcer earned. In examinations of several classes of drugs, we showed rate-dependent effects across the interval varied inversely with reinforcer magnitude, that is rate-dependent effects were reduced as magnitude increased. Thus, it appears that increasing reinforcer magnitude has a protective effect on fixed-interval behavior. The findings are consistent with the view of behavior proposed by behavioral momentum theory, whereby schedules are seen to establish response rates and reinforcer magnitude (density) establishes resistance to change.

Dr. Jonathan Pinkston is Associate Professor of Applied Behavior Science at the University of Kansas. Dr. Pinkston’s research has contributed to a number of basic and translational research areas over the past 20 years, including schedule performance, extinction-related processes, choice, pausing and procrastination, and models of drug addiction. A common thread in all his research has been to “open” the response to understand how its properties relate to behavioral function. As he sees it, traditional operant approaches have focused too narrowly on bits of stimuli and responses, organized as discrete features of the three-term contingency. By using high-resolution, analog measurement systems, Dr. Pinkston’s research has provided new perspectives on the nature of operant behavior as a continuous quantity, and the defining features of the response itself as new sources of behavioral function. When he is not in the lab, he spends most of his time in the kitchen trying out new recipes or outdoors hiking and biking with his family.
 

Baseline/Rate Dependency: A Useful Framework for Clarifying Drug Effects on Sensitivity to Reinforcement

RAYMOND PITTS (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Abstract:

Despite substantial progress over the past two decides characterizing drug effects on impulsive and risky behavior and elucidating some of the relevant neurobiological mechanisms, considerable discrepancies remain in the literature, both within and across studies. In our hands, drugs invariably decrease sensitivity to the particular reinforcement dimensions controlling choice, but the degree to which this effect occurs varies both within and across subjects. As such, using these data to predict drug effects on impulsive and risky choice is tricky. In this talk, selected data from our lab investigating drug effects on sensitivity to reinforcement under continuous choice procedures will be presented. These data strongly suggest that effects of a variety of drugs are best described as baseline dependent. These analyses suggest that baseline/rate dependence, an example of the original Law of Initial Values (see Wilder, 1931,1962), remains a viable concept, one that behavioral pharmacologists and behavioral neuroscientists ignore at their peril.

Dr. Raymond C. Pitts is a Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Florida in 1989, with a specialty in the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Dr. Pitts’ research interests include basic experimental analyses of choice/preference and behavioral mechanisms of drug action. His work has been supported by grants from the NIH (NIDA) and has been published in a variety of outlets including Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavioural Processes, Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Psychopharmacology, Behavioral Neuroscience, and Clinical and Experimental Psychopharmacology. Dr. Pitts has served on several Editorial Boards and as an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He served as the Experimental Representative for the Executive Council of Division 25 of APA, served as the Experimental Representative on the Executive Council of ABAI, is a Fellow of ABAI and of APA Division 25, and is a two-time President of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis.
 

Baseline Rate of Drug Use and Initial and Longer-Term Treatment Response

STEPHEN HIGGINS (University of Vermont)
Abstract:

I will discuss how baseline rate of cigarette smoking or cocaine use are strong predictors of response to abstinence-contingent Contingency Management (CM) interventions. Similarly, duration of abstinence achieved during the treatment period is a strong predictor of the likelihood of sustaining longer-term abstinence. Regarding the latter, I’ll share experimental results from a randomized controlled clinical trial testing the validity of these observations in which 100 cocaine-dependent outpatients were randomly assigned to one of two abstinence-contingent CM treatment conditions (Higgins et al., 2007). In one condition, vouchers were set at twice the usual monetary value (maximum of $1,995 during the 12-week intervention) whereas in the other treatment condition they were set at half the usual value (maximum of $499 during the 12-week intervention). All else in the treatment conditions remained the same across treatment conditions. As illustrated in the figure shown below, increasing the value of the vouchers increased the mean duration of continuous cocaine abstinence achieved during the 24-week treatment period twofold, and as hypothesized, point-prevalence cocaine abstinence was consistently greater among those treated in the high-magnitude voucher condition compared to the low-magnitude condition in assessments conducted every 3 months throughout an 18-month follow-up period. This presentation will put particular emphasis the importance of a positive initial treatment response to achieving longer-term abstinence from drug use. remains critical in consideration of factors influencing the behavioral effects of drugs.

Dr. Stephen T. Higgins is Director of the University of Vermont’s Center on Behavior and Health, and Principal Investigator on multiple NIH grants on the general topic of behavior and health, including an NIGMS Center for Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) award, a NIDA/FDA Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science award, and a NIDA institutional training award. He is the Virginia H. Donaldson Endowed Professor of Translational Science in the Departments of Psychiatry and Psychological Science. He has held many national scientific leadership positions, including terms as President of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and the American Psychological Association’s Division on Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse. He has received numerous national awards for research excellence including a 2001 NIH-MERIT Award (NIDA), 2001 Don Hake Basic/Applied Research Award (Div 25, APA), 2011 Brady-Schuster Award for Outstanding Behavioral Science Contributions to Psychopharmacology or Substance Abuse (Div 28, APA), a 2017 Mentorship Award (College on Problems of Drug Dependence), and the 2022 SABA Award for Scientific Translation. He is the author of more than 425 journal articles and invited book chapters and editor of a dozen volumes and therapist manuals in behavior and health.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #113
AR and VR 101: A PRIMER on the What, Why, and How
Saturday, May 25, 2024
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon H
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sharlet D. Rafacz (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Sharlet D. Rafacz, M.Ed.
Presenting Author: LISA TOENNIGES (Innovative Learning Group)
Abstract:

Have you heard about Augmented Reality (AR) or Virtual Reality (VR) and are wondering how these fast-growing technologies can fit into your overall learning strategy? Innovative Learning Group CEO Lisa Toenniges will give you a high-level picture of AR and VR, describe which learning situations are best suited for AR and VR, and explain how you and your clients’ organizations can iteratively develop AR and VR capabilities and organizational experience.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Education and learning practitioners interested in using Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for learning

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe AR and VR, while developing familiarity with the most-used hardware and software development tools; (2) Showcase common training use cases through specific industry examples of successful implementations; (3) Highlight the full set of skills required to effectively implement AR and VR at different levels of immersion, interactivity, and scalability; (4) Guide development of AR and VR capabilities and organizational experience through a detailed roadmap from “Discovery” to “Pilot” to “Scale”
 
LISA TOENNIGES (Innovative Learning Group)
Lisa Toenniges is the owner and chief executive officer of Innovative Learning Group, a company she founded in March 2004. A dynamic and respected leader, Lisa has more than 30 years of experience in the performance improvement industry and has consulted with many Fortune 1000 companies about their learning and performance strategies and solutions. ILG was born out of Lisa’s passion for building a business, providing for her employees, and doing what is right for clients. Her entrepreneurial spirit, positive outlook, and hands-on leadership style have been the drivers behind ILG’s profitable annual compound growth. Lisa has been a member of the Board of Trustees for On My Own of Michigan since 2018. Currently, she is the Treasurer of the Executive Committee, having served as the Secretary from 2020-2022. Lisa is also a volunteer grant reviewer for Impact100 Oakland County. Lisa has a master’s degree in instructional technology from Wayne State University in Detroit and a bachelor’s degree in music education from Michigan State University.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #117
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Humans Learn Language Through Observation: A Verbal Behavior Development Account of Language Acquisition
Saturday, May 25, 2024
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Jessica Singer-Dudek, Ph.D.
Chair: Kelly Kohler (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
Presenting Authors: : JESSICA SINGER-DUDEK (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

Recent research developments in the identification and establishment of crucial verbal developmental cusps related to learning by observation provides a clearer picture of the trajectory of language development leading to incidental language learning (Incidental Bidirectional Naming or Inc-BiN). These findings suggest that a new account of Observational Learning (OL) is warranted, with particular attention to the role that it plays in language development. This reconceptualization of verbal behavior development includes cusps that encompass the following: a) imitating (see-do responding); b) emulating (duplication of outcomes); c) changing existing behavior; d) acquiring new respondents, operants, and higher-order operants; e) acquiring new reinforcers under denial conditions; f) learning listener and speaker responses from exposure alone; and g) learning multiple responses or arbitrarily applicable relations, all as a function of observation. This presentation will focus on the establishment of observational stimulus control that makes language learning possible.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Practitioners; researchers; theorists; students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) be familiar with the verbal behavior development theory; (2) be familiar with an updated account of the observational stimulus control cusps involved in language development; (3) be familiar with the role that observational learning plays in language development
 
JESSICA SINGER-DUDEK (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Dr. Jessica Singer-Dudek is the Director of Transdisciplinary Programs in ABA at Columbia University Teachers College. She also serves as a Senior Behavior Analyst Consultant to schools implementing the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) model, and serves as the CABAS® Professional Advisory Board Secretary/Treasurer. Dr. Dudek’s research interests include component analyses of successful behavior analytic models of education, teacher and supervisor training, verbally governed and verbally governing behaviors, establishment of early observing responses, verbal behavior development, conditioned reinforcement, and observational learning.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #66
CE Offered: BACB
Induction Versus Reinforcement and the Molar View of Behavior
Saturday, May 25, 2024
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon H
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: PCH; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Andres H. Garcia-Penagos (California State University, Chico)
CE Instructor: William M. Baum, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: WILLIAM M. BAUM (University of California, Davis)
Abstract:

Although behavior analysts have seen reinforcement as a basic principle of behavior for over 100 years, its range of application was always narrow. All it explained was the increase when behavior produced desirable consequences. As research advanced, the limitations of reinforcement and the molecular view it depended on—based on discrete responses and contiguity—became more and more apparent. Reinforcement failed with adjunctive behavior, with “misbehavior,” with avoidance, with originating new activities, and even explaining patterns engendered by simple schedules. It did not explain stimulus control. All of these shortcomings dissolve when one adopts a molar view and substitutes the concept of induction, which links behavior directly to evolutionary theory through the concept of Phylogenetically Important Event (PIE). When Segal introduced induction in 1972, she applied it only to non-operant activities, such as adjunctive behavior. When applied also to operant activities, induction explains all the phenomena that reinforcement fails to explain: the first instance, stimulus control, VI and VR performance, avoidance. Induction also offers a new way to think about verbal behavior. The explanatory power of induction far exceeds that of reinforcement.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

All behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Explain the concept Phylogenetically Important Event; (2) Explain the concept of induction; (3) Describe how induction explains operant behavior; (4) Describe how induction explains stimulus control; (5) Describe how induction explains avoidance.
 
WILLIAM M. BAUM (University of California, Davis)
Dr. Baum received his BA in psychology from Harvard College in 1961. Originally a biology major, he switched to psychology after taking courses from B. F. Skinner and R. J. Herrnstein in his freshman and sophomore years. He attended Harvard University for graduate study in 1962, where he was supervised by Herrnstein and received his Ph.D. in 1966. He spent the year 1965–66 at Cambridge University, studying ethology at the Sub-Department of Animal Behavior. From 1966 to 1975, he held appointments as post-doctoral fellow, research associate, and assistant professor at Harvard University. He spent two years at the National Institutes of Health Laboratory for Brain, Evolution, and Behavior and then accepted an appointment in psychology at the University of New Hampshire in 1977. He retired from there in 1999. He currently has an appointment as associate researcher at the University of California, Davis and lives in Walnut Creek. His research concerns choice, molar behavior/environment relations, foraging, cultural evolution, and behaviorism. He is the author of three books, Understanding Behaviorism: Behavior, Culture, and Evolution (3rd ed.), Science and Philosophy of Behavior: Selected Papers, and Introduction to Behavior: An Evolutionary Perspective.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #144
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Quiet Courage
Saturday, May 25, 2024
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: MERAL KOLDAS (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe Meyer Institute )
CE Instructor: Shahla Alai-Rosales, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHAHLA ALAI-ROSALES (University of North Texas)
Abstract: We live in a complex time, socially, politically, and spiritually. Global and disciplinary paradigms are interrogated and challenged; questions about our human response to power, justice, knowledge, ethics, and suffering emerge daily. The science, practice and training of behavior analysis is at the nexus of this complexity. How does a young professor of applied behavior analysis find their place, purpose, and effort in this context? Through a series of examples and drawing on the wisdom of social activists within and outside of the field, as well as her own experience, Shahla shares reflections and advice for young professors, who are often concurrently serving as teachers, researchers, and practitioners. Through stories and data, loving and responsible possibilities are explored and examined.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

New professors and advanced graduate students and researchers, and practitioners and advanced professors that are interested in supporting and nurturing the development of new professors in applied behavior analysis

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe 3 societal conditions that present challenges to young professors in applied behavior analysis; (2) Describe 3 conditions of the academy that present challenges to young professors in applied behavior analysis; (3) Describe 3 strategies for meeting these challenges.
 
SHAHLA ALAI-ROSALES (University of North Texas)
Shahla Alai-Rosales, PHD, BCBA-D, CPBA-AP is a Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at the University of North Texas. She has taught courses in Texas, Europe and the Middle East on a variety of topics, including ethics, early autism intervention, parent training, behavioral systems, applied research methods, technology transfer, behavior change techniques, and cultural diversity. Shahla has published and presented research on social justice, ethics in early intervention, play and social skills, family harmony, and supervision and mentoring. Shahla has more than four decades of experience working with families and has trained hundreds of behavior analysts. She has received awards for her teaching (SGA ‘Fessor Graham Award), her work with families (Onassis Scholar Award), and for her sustained contributions (UNT Community Engagement Award, TXABA Career Contributions Award, the GSU Lutzker Distinguished Lecturer and the 23-24 University of Kansas ABS Outstanding Alumni Award). She was a member of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board, the ABAI Practice Board, the ABAI DEI Board and an Associate Editor for Behavior Analysis in Practice. Shahla is co-author of Building and Sustaining Meaningful and Effective Relationships as a Supervisor and Mentor (LeBlanc, Sellers & Alai, 2020) and Responsible and Responsive Parenting in Autism: Between Now and Dreams (Alai-Rosales & Heinkel-Wolfe, 2022).
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #92
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Harmony in Analysis: Bridging Human Insight and Artificial Intelligence for Advanced Behavioral Understanding and Ethical Clinical Interventions
Saturday, May 25, 2024
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Downtown, Grand Ballroom Salon H
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Kerri L. Milyko (CentralReach)
CE Instructor: Jessica Jackson, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JESSICA JACKSON (Therapy Is For Everyone Psychological & Consultation Services, PLLC)
Abstract:

This presentation explores the transformative role of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning in enhancing our understanding of human behavior and informing clinical interventions. Synthetic intelligence provides novel perspectives on human intelligence, while machine learning enables the extraction of valuable insights from vast datasets. Emphasizing the inevitability of AI's integration, the presentation advocates for critical thinking in addressing concerns and engaging in conversations with technology developers. It underscores the collaborative relationship between AI and mental health clinicians, emphasizing that AI is a supportive tool rather than a replacement. The ethical considerations surrounding AI implementation are highlighted, emphasizing the necessity of nuanced discussions. Practical applications, such as using AI for early detection of developmental delays, leveraging diagnostic codes for classification, and the removal of geographical barriers through internet-based accessibility, demonstrate the tangible benefits of AI in clinical contexts. Overall, this presentation encourages a thoughtful embrace of AI's potential to revolutionize behavioral analysis and clinical interventions while maintaining a human-centric approach.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and mental health clinicians

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Explore Ethical Considerations in AI Integration: Learners will delve into the ethical considerations associated with the use of AI in clinical interventions, engaging in discussions on privacy, bias, and the responsible programming of AI tools. They will develop the ability to critically assess the ethical implications of AI applications in the context of human behavior; (2) Appreciate the Collaborative Nature of AI and Clinical Practice: Participants will recognize AI as a supportive tool for mental health clinicians rather than a replacement. They will explore the symbiotic relationship between AI technologies and human expertise, understanding the ways in which AI can enhance clinical interventions without diminishing the importance of human support; (3) Develop Strategies for Addressing Concerns and Embracing AI: Participants will cultivate critical thinking skills and practical strategies for navigating concerns related to AI integration. This includes engaging in open conversations with technology developers, conducting cost/benefit analyses, and fostering an openness to how AI technologies can alleviate administrative burdens in clinical settings.
 
JESSICA JACKSON (Therapy Is For Everyone Psychological & Consultation Services, PLLC)
Dr. Jessica Jackson is an award-winning licensed psychologist and mental health equity advocate. She is the founder of Dr. J. Lauren Psychological & Consultation Services, a Houston, TX based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. Dr. Jackson is also the co-founder of the non-profit Communicating Race Fully, focused on teaching youth and their caregivers how to have conversations about race and racism. In addition to providing mental health care services through her private practice, she also works in the digital mental health industry. Her research has focused on reducing barriers to treatment for underserved populations. She is a regular media contributor and serves as an elected member of the American Psychological Association Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest, Vice Chair of Therapist in Tech and Chair of the APA Mental Health Technology Advisory Committee.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #164
Elevate Your Therapeutic Impact: A Journey Into Self-Awareness and the Power of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy
Saturday, May 25, 2024
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Amanda M Munoz-Martinez (Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia)
Presenting Author: MAVIS TSAI (Independent Practice)
Abstract:

Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) creates deep, meaningful and healing therapeutic relationships by focusing on the subtle ways clients' daily life problems occur in the therapy session. FAP uses awareness, courage and love (behaviorally defined) in the therapist-client relationship to produce significant change. Yet, you can only take your clients as far as you yourself have gone. In this talk, I will discuss the five rules of FAP that are simple but profound, and help you explore how you can bring your best self into the therapy room by facing avoidances, fears, obstacles and challenges that prevent you from flourishing personally and professionally.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Clinicians

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the five FAP rules that increase connection, intensity, and effectiveness in your interventions; (2) Explain when commonly used interventions can be inadvertently counter-therapeutic; (3) Assess wounds, longings, avoidances and obstacles that prevent you from being your best therapeutic self.
 
MAVIS TSAI (Independent Practice)
Mavis Tsai, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and senior research scientist at the University of Washington’s Center for Science of Social Connection. She is the co-creator, with the late Robert Kohlenberg, of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP), a treatment that harnesses the power of the therapeutic relationship to transform clients’ lives. She is the co-author of five books on FAP and over 75 articles and book chapters, a recipient of Washington State Psychological Association’s Distinguished Psychologist Award in recognition of significant contributions to the field of psychology, and is a Fellow of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science. She is proud to be named by New Harbinger Publications as one of “13 Badass Psychologists… Who Happen to be Women”, and literally kicks ass as an advanced practitioner of the martial art of Kajukenbo. As Founder of the Nonprofit Organization “Awareness, Courage & Love Global Project”, she trains volunteers to lead chapters in six continents to create a worldwide network of open-hearted change-seekers who strive to meet life’s challenges through deepening interpersonal connection and rising to live more true to themselves.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #166
CE Offered: BACB
Language Development as the Behavior Scientist Sees It
Saturday, May 25, 2024
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center, 108 AB
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
CE Instructor: Martha Pelaez, Ph.D.
MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University), Gary Novak (California State University Stanislaus)
Abstract:

From the viewpoint of a natural science of behavior, language acquisition is a developmental process.. In this paper we present the core principles of behavioral systems theory (BST) combining current developmental systems concepts with behavioral ones. We outline the core principles of BST relevant to early language development. Developmental changes are marked by the transactions between genetic inheritance, interactional history, current physiological and environmental conditions, and behavior dynamics. Contingencies operating in the young child’s current social environment are catalysts coalescing conditions into organized patterns of verbal behavior. Some of these emergent patterns allow verbal behavioral cusps to develop. Early language skills are the result of an intensive, intuitive, and naturally occurring learning process consisting of reciprocal contingent interactions between children and caregivers. This naturally occurring process resembles the use of multiple exemplar training procedures employed by researchers in training language skills in children. We explore the role of basic cusps in early childhood including orienting responses, eye contact, joint attention, social referencing, manding, tacting, naming, intraverbals, autoclitics generalized vocal imitation, and stimulus equivalence. These cusps facilitate the emergence of new and more advanced socio-cognitive skills later in childhood such as perspective taking and complex rule-following.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, researchers, individuals interested in language development

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the basics of language development from a natural science perspective; (2) list and describe the basic concepts of behavioral systems theory; (3) list at least four behavioral cusps important in language development.
 
MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University)

Martha Pelaez is a Frost Professor of Psychology at the College of Arts, Sciences, and Education (CASE), School of Human Development, Florida International University. Dr. Pelaez teaches courses in Educational Psychology, Child Development, Single-Subject Designs, and directs infant and early childhood research. Her research has been supported by NIH and March of Dimes. Dr. Pelaez research involves mother-infant interactions and early social–learning processes, as well design applied early interventions with infants with developmental delays, child depression, early signs of autism, and language development Dr. Pelaez has published more than 100 articles in refereed journals (including the American PsychologistChild Development, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and Perspectives on Behavior Science), dozens of chapters and monographs, and an influential textbook on Child Development (with Novak, 2004, 2022).  Professor Pelaez is the founding editor of the Behavior Development Bulletin (1990-2017) and has been a member of nine editorial boards of refereed journals, including the European Journal of Behavior Analysis and Perspectives on Behavior Science. She has received Fellowship status from the American Psychological Association (APA) and from the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). Dr. Pelaez is the 2023 recipient of the Nathan H. Azrin Award granted by the American Psychological Association (APA) for her distinguish contributions to applied research with infants. She is a trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and serves as an At-Large Representative on the Executive Council Board of Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and past member of the Science Board.

 
 
Special Event #167
Presidential Address: Designing Effective Instruction to Teach Micro-credentials . . . Or Any Instructional Objective
Saturday, May 25, 2024
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center, Ballroom B
📺   Streaming Status: waiting for the session to begin
Instruction Level: Basic
Chair: M. Christopher Newland (Auburn University)
 

Presidential Address: Designing Effective Instruction to Teach Micro-credentials . . . Or Any Instructional Objective

Abstract:

A new approach to documenting the skills and repertoires of professionals is emerging in several fields of study, including education, medicine, and information technology. The technology is called micro-credentialing. According to the Mozilla Foundation, micro-credentialing refers to “digital certification of assessed knowledge, skills and competencies which is additional, alternate or complementary to, or a component of, formal qualifications.” A micro-credential is an award, based on a short, verifiable presentation that demonstratesthat a scientist-practitioner has mastered a specific skill in a content area. An individual with a micro-credential can demonstrate competent, mastery-level performance of its corresponding skill—on demand. Here are some examples of micro-credentials relevant to behavior analysts:

• conduct a reinforcement preference assessment

• shape behavior in an operant chamber

• conduct an organizational needs assessment

• design a Precision Teaching program for a specific skill

• analyze delay-discounting data

Notice that micro-credentials are much narrower in scope than typical recognitions of study endeavors like M.S. or Ph.D. degrees, Continuing Education Units, and licenses or certifications like a BCBA. As important as these traditional recognitions are, they do not concretely indicate an ability to engage in ANY specific skill or expertise.Further, the latter recognitions emphasize only clinical skills rather than the broad array of skills that characterize diverse behavior-analytic jobs (e.g., laboratory skills, instructional design). Establishing skill-based credentials across the field of behavior analysis would provide additional reassurances about the skills of potential employees or supervisors and may provide a data-based way for individuals to demonstrate specific expertise in an area.

In my address today, I’ll describe a behavior analytic view of the concept, micro-credential, focusing upon micro-credentials for intellectual skills and repertoires—those related to “doing” vs. recitation or “saying” repertoires, as in the examples I listed above. Intellectual skills require teaching for generative responses. The learner must go beyond what has been taught and demonstrate mastery of responding in new situations, those never seen before. Then I’ll use the context of intellectual skill development to describe some “best practices” in instructional design that one could incorporate in a micro-credential learning program. I will focus upon micro-credentials relevant to three kinds of intellectual skills—concepts, principles, and strategies, highlighting evidence-based protocols for teaching each kind. Then I will describe and illustrate explicit generalized imitation training procedures to teach component intellectual skills, and procedures for practicing component skills to fluency. Finally, I will relate my discussion of intellectual skills to a new analysis of generalization, breaking it into two kinds of active processes—simple and complex generative responding.

Whether or not you agree with me about the benefit of establishing a micro-credential program in behavior analysis, no matter our everyday responsibilities and functions, every behavior analyst is a teacher who desires to engage in effective instruction and help their learners master everything they teach. So, I hope that my description of some best practices in instructional design will guide improvements to any instruction you provide in your work as a behavior analyst.

 
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy)
 

Kent Johnson, Founder and Executive Director of Morningside Academy and Co-Founder of Headsprout, received his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1977. Morningside Academy operates a scientifically driven “catch-up” program for children and youth with learning and attention problems and a “get-ahead” program for average and above-average middle school youth, as well as provides a laboratory for developing instructional methods and materials. Morningside’s exemplary science-based approach has had global impact and serves as a beacon of hope for many, transforming lives and demonstrating what high-quality behavior analytic education can offer. Dr. Johnson’s commitment to and success in developing and disseminating innovative and highly effective behaviorally based educational practices have been recognized by his receiving the Award for Public Service in Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, the Edward L. Anderson Award in Recognition for Exemplary Contributions to Behavioral Education from the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, the Ogden R. Lindsley Lifetime Achievement Award in Precision Teaching from the Standard Celeration Society, and the Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education Award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association.

 
 

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