Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis InternationalĀ® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Event Details


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Symposium #69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
What Works to Reduce Bullying from Applied Behavior Analytic Perspective
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 205A
Area: EDC/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jeridith Ann Lord (Endicott College)
Discussant: Robert F. Putnam (May Institute)
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis principles have been used to improve numerous behavior problems in schools. For example, there are many programs available to schools that purport to reduce bullying. Unfortunately, few published programs purport to use and incorporate applied behavior analytic principles as the core of their interventions. This session will analyze these programs as reviewed in the literature from an applied behavior analysis perspective. The first paper will review the literature regarding reducing bullying from the unit of analysis of the whole school and its impact on students, parents, and teachers. A PRISMA model literature review will be presented on the existing literature. Finally, data will be shown on the extent to which these studies included competency assessment, generalization assessment, and social validity measures. The second paper will further analyze five of the most popular bullying programs. These programs were chosen because they were evaluated more than two times across different programs and different evaluators. It was found that staff training and parent involvement, hotspots monitoring, and treatment fidelity were associated with higher success. Data on these and other elements will be summarized, and implications for practice and training will be highlighted.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Intermediate - knowledge of school-based applied behavior analytical interventions
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) recite the components of effective anti-bullying programs (2) analyze anti-bullying programs for these effective components (3) list the the most effective components of anti-bullying programs
 

A Systematic Literature Review of Anti-Bullying Interventions

JACQUELINE J. WEBER (Endicott College), Brian Keith Mason (Endicott College)
Abstract:

1. Bullying in schools is a severe problem with implications for safety, mental health, and education. Schools around the world are implementing anti-bullying programs to address bullying. There are many different types of interventions available and in use, and it isn't easy to know which programs are most effective. Some programs are more efficacious than others, but what constitutes success is that the intervention must address the needs of the whole school, including students, teachers, and parents. Additionally, such programs must be implemented continuously and with fidelity. This paper will review the literature on anti-bullying programs to offer insight into what programs and program components are most effective in reducing bullying and victimization among students. A PRISMA model literature review will be presented on the existing literature. Initial searches yielded 351 articles; with additional requirements, the final analysis included 39 papers. Data will be shown on the extent to which these studies included competency assessment, generalization assessment, and social validity measures.

 
A Systematic Analysis of the Components of Effective Bullying Programs
BRIAN KEITH MASON (Endicott College), Jacqueline J. Weber (Endicott College)
Abstract: As an extension of the PRISMA model analysis of the existing literature, an additional analysis was done on five anti-bullying programs. As districts often implement a particular approach, this level of analysis seemed important. The programs selected were: Olweus, KiVA, Steps to Respect, Restorative Practices, and NoTrap! These programs were chosen because they were evaluated more than two times across different programs and different evaluators, lending some credibility to them. In addition, core elements of anti-bullying programs were assessed as to whether they were included in these models. Examples of these elements included: whole-school approach; parent involvement; teacher training; inclusion of classroom rules; curricular integration; working with peers, bullies, and victims; and hotspot supervision. A core component of bullying prevention programs is a whole school approach (Limber et al., 2011; Gaffney et al., 2019). Additionally, staff training and parent involvement were associated with higher success. An effective component that contributed additional value included the monitoring of hotspots. Not surprisingly, treatment fidelity was also associated with a higher impact from the intervention. Data on these and other elements will be summarized, and implications for practice and training will be highlighted.
 

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