Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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33rd Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2007

Event Details


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Symposium #331
CE Offered: BACB
Improving Staff Performance in Residential Schools: The Use of Innovative Training Models
Monday, May 28, 2007
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Emma C
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Helena L. Maguire (Melmark New England)
CE Instructor: Daniel Almeida, M.A.
Abstract:

This symposium will present 4 studies demonstrating innovative models to improve staff performance in a residential setting. The first paper will discuss the effectiveness of a training program incorporating a video model of correct skill performance, but no feedback provided on performance. The second paper assessed the level of protocol compliance in new staff following a training package comprised of didactic training and structured performance-based training with a competency component. In addition, ongoing system-wide data of performance and competency-based staff training using feedback tools will be presented. The third paper assesses and compares the accuracy of the descriptive data collected by direct-care staff under the two conditions: on-shift with students or independent observer. The fourth paper employs the same procedures as Parsons and Reid (1995) to train 5 supervisors in a residential facility and 5 supervisors in a school facility to provide effective feedback to direct service staff in both the group home and school setting.

 
Video-Modeling to Teach Staff to Conduct Discrete Trial Instruction: Maintenance and Generalization of Performance.
CYNTHIA N. CATANIA (Melmark New England), Daniel Almeida (Melmark New England)
Abstract: Developing effective and efficient training methods to teach human service and educational staff to conduct discrete trial instruction is of critical importance to the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. In this study, 5 direct service staff, with varying levels of experience and training in Applied Behavior Analysis, participated in a training program incorporating a video model of correct skill performance, but no feedback provided on performance. Staff’s percentage of accuracy of discrete trial competencies was assessed during baseline and training conditions using a multiple probe across participants design. Results showed an immediate and substantial increase in accuracy to 95-100% following training. For 3 of the 4 staff remaining in the study, maintenance data collected 4 months after the initial training showed continued levels of high accuracy. Generalization data will be collected on staff performance across different, non-training instructional curricula and students. How the findings relate to the efficiency and effectiveness of staff training will be discussed.
 
Comparing the Effectiveness of Performance-Based Training to Didactic Training on Staff Teaching Skills.
LAUREN M. FREDERICK (Melmark)
Abstract: Behavior analysts must learn to be effective change agents with students as well as those who will carry out the interventions. Ensuring protocol compliance across direct care staff in a large residential educational facility is a challenge. While didactic training is enticing due to time efficiency, empirical research does not offer strong support of effectiveness in changing staff behavior (Dyer, Schwartz, & Luce, 1984; Sterling-Turner, et al., 2001). Effective staff training should be performance and competency based (Reid & Parsons, 2002). Data will be presented depicting the level of protocol compliance exhibited by recently hired staff following a training package comprised of didactic training and unstructured performance based training without a competency component. Data show low levels of compliance. Specifically, scores on a teaching skills feedback instrument ranged from 29.4% to 77.8% correct implementation (inter-observer agreement averaged 85%). These data will be compared to the level of protocol compliance in new staff following a training package comprised of didactic training and structured performance-based training with a competency component (data to be collected). In addition, ongoing system-wide data of performance and competency-based staff training using feedback tools will be presented. The impact of improved staff training on student outcomes will also be discussed.
 
Utilizing Video as a Self-Monitoring Tool to Increase Staff Interaction Skills.
TIFFANEY M. ESPOSITO (Melmark New England/Northeastern University)
Abstract: The effects of a self-directed monitoring and feedback system on the interaction skills of direct-care staff in a residential group home setting were investigated. Four direct-care staff working with students with developmental delays were exposed to a training system which utilized video as a self-monitoring tool to improve desired interaction skills in the absence of supervisory feedback. The effects of the training system were assessed utilizing a multiple-baseline design across subjects. The performance across all four participants improved and was generalized over time. The need for the development of more efficient staff training and management systems that ensure the quality of care to individuals who reside in human service settings is discussed.
 
Training Supervisors to Provide Feedback for Maintaining Staff Teaching Skills.
HELENA L. MAGUIRE (Melmark New England), Patricia A. Finney (Melmark New England)
Abstract: Training supervisors to provide effective feedback that both enhances and maintains staff’s skills when teaching consumers is an integral component to an effective organization. Consumers benefit from staff members who utilize effective teaching skills and are consistent with the delivery of effective teaching strategies. Previous research conducted by Parsons and Reid (1995) found that maintenance of teaching skills was far greater for direct service staff whose supervisors had received training in providing feedback relative to staff whose supervisors had not received such training. In this study, the same procedures as Parsons and Reid (1995) were employed to train 5 supervisors in a residential facility and 5 supervisors in a school facility to provide effective feedback to direct service staff in both the group home and school setting. The training package included classroom based instruction, on the job observation, and on the job feedback. After supervisors demonstrated mastery in providing direct services to consumers, these same supervisors were then trained to deliver effective feedback. Following this training in providing feedback, all supervisors were observed in their provision of feedback to their staff. Supervisors were observed and data was collected on the correct or incorrect presentation of the eight feedback components. Data to be collected.
 

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