Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Program by : Saturday, May 29, 2021


 

Symposium #17
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission On Antiracist Actions in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Cody Morris (Salve Regina University )
CE Instructor: Cody Morris, Ph.D.
Abstract: Not engaging in racist behaviors is often erroneously thought of as the opposite of engaging in racist behaviors. However, merely avoiding overtly racist behaviors does not counteract racism because existing racist policies continue to perpetuate inequalities if they do not encounter active resistance. As a result, inaction on the part of society only continues to promote and sustain oppressive systems. Therefore, to move towards abolishing racist systems, all members of a society must engage in anti-racist behaviors. Engaging in anti-racist behaviors involves taking actions toward dismantling racist systems and policies to create more equitable systems. The purpose of this symposium is to review and discuss specific anti-racist behaviors that behavior analysts can engage in to contribute to combating racism in our field and our communities. The first presentation will focus on evaluating risk factors related to client mistreatment in applied settings; the second presentation will focus on creating solidarity of non-black people of color in creating racial equity; and the third talk will focus on behavior analyst’s role in combatting microaggressions.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): antiracist, diversity, equity, systemic racism
Target Audience: This talk will be appropriate for BCBAs. There is no prior knowledge needed to benefit from his talk.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to (1) identify risk-factors of client-mistreatment; (2) describe important antiracist actions necessary for creating racial equity in the field and beyond; (3) define microaggressions behaviorally.
 
Diversity submission On the Uncanny Similarities Between Police Brutality and Client Mistreatment
NICOLE HOLLINS (Western Michigan University), Cody Morris (Salve Regina University )
Abstract: Direct-care staff are responsible for carrying out behavior-analytic services in a culture that perpetuates systemic racism and other problematic systems that can lead to the mistreatment of clients. Limited data exists on factors that influence the mistreatment of clients, so behavior analysts must look to better-studied comparison contexts as a way to identify risk-factors. Police brutality is one context where problematic systems are apparent. Therefore, examining variables known to affect police brutality offers one way to identify aspects of direct-care staff implementation of behavior-analytic treatment that may harbor similar systems. The purpose of this presentation is to examine variables associated with police brutality as risk-factors for the mistreatment of clients in direct-care settings. The primary risk-factors discussed include racial-bias, warrior mentality, lack of transparency and accountability, and ineffective intervention. This paper concludes that the field of behavior analysis needs sensitive data collection methods and systematic evaluation of risk-factors to better protect clients from mistreatment.
 
Diversity submission Solidarity: The Role of Non-Black People of Color in Promoting Racial Equity
ANITA LI (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Multicultural behavior analysts must stand together to address the issues of systemic racism collectively, show solidarity, and support Black lives. This paper discusses the role of culturally and linguistically diverse behavior analysts, mechanisms underlying barriers and incompatible behaviors in showing solidarity, and mechanisms required for cultural evolution to promote a compassionate and nurturing approach to racial equity. It is critical that non-Black people of color actively participate in antiracist advocacy to show solidarity to the Black Lives Matter movement. Both allyship and contributors to systemic racism, especially in the context of injustice and mistreatment of Black people, are not limited to white individuals. The purpose of this paper is to invoke introspection and promote solidarity-aligned behaviors for non-Black ethnic and racial people of color within the field of applied behavior analysis, discuss the individual and metacontingencies involved, and facilitate a cultural evolution to reduce racism and prejudice towards Black individuals.
 
Diversity submission Understanding Microaggressions: Implications for Using a Science of Behavior to Promote and Support Anti-Racist Teaching
DENICE RIOS MOJICA (Georgia Southern University), Marlesha Bell (University of South Florida), Lorraine A Becerra (University of Missouri), Andrew Bulla (Georgia Southern University - Armstrong )
Abstract: Microaggressions are defined as daily verbal and non-verbal assaults directed toward people from historically marginalized and stigmatized groups. When compared with overt acts of racism, microaggressions can cause just as much, if not more, psychological damage. Over the last 10 years, social psychologists have done a lot of work to research the effects of microaggressions and have evaluated ways to address them in many different contexts. Often diversity and inclusion trainings use this body of literature to educate and bring awareness to the concept. However, research on these types of trainings show mixed results in terms of their effectiveness. Behavior analysts often stay away from subjective definitions and focus on function and environmental effects. Additionally, behavior analysts have a large body of literature in instructional design and concept teaching that is often used to successfully teach difficult concepts. As such, behavior analysts might be in a good position to redesign instruction and trainings around microaggressions to bring more objectivity to the definition, reduce subjective interpretations, and ensure successful learning of the concept. In this presentation, we will outline examples on how we can use the research in concept teaching and learning to successfully teach the concept of microaggressions.
 
 
Panel #27
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission An International Cultural Perspective on Interprofessional Collaboration
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lina Slim-Topdjian, Ph.D.
Chair: Tracie L. Lindblad (First Bridge Centre, London, UK; Tracie Lindblad Consulting)
LINA SLIM-TOPDJIAN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology – ABA Online Program; ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC)
MICHELLE P. KELLY (Emirates College for Advanced Education (ECAE))
KAROLA DILLENBURGER (Centre for Behaviour Analysis, Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland)
Abstract:

One effective component that leads to better health and educational outcomes is Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice (IPEC) (WHO, 2016) and another is developing culturally aware practices. This panel facilitates discussions regarding the initial establishment of interprofessional collaborations, ways to bridge cultures and create partnerships, challenges to collaboration from an international perspective, and the roles of cultural competencies and cultural humility in fostering effective collaborative and therapeutic relationships. Case examples will be presented from the United Arab Emirates, Europe, Canada and the United States, reflecting challenges and successes in fostering positive collaborative relationships with various stakeholders, including government. Panelists will also discuss suggestions for how to effectively resolve conflicts to improve health and education outcomes for all clients and raise a call to action for the field of behavior analysis to develop education and training systems/programs that foster building culturally aware practices and cultural humility, and promote the dissemination of the science of behavior analysis across international borders.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and professionals from other disciplines that have more than 1 year practical working experience with individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Students enrolled in an ABA master's program. University Professors of ABA programs. Clinical supervisor of ABA services. Parents who are members of ABA advocacy groups.

Learning Objectives: 1. Identify core interprofessional education and collaborative competencies 2. Describe cultural considerations for effective training and treatment delivery 3. Identify components of culturally aware practices and dissemination
 
 
Invited Paper Session #28
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission ABA in the Kingdom: Shaping the Field
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
CE Instructor: Lamis Baowaidan, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LAMIS BAOWAIDAN (Dar Al-Hekma University)
Abstract:

Over the past 10 years, as the prevalence rate of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) increased, applied behavior analysis (ABA) has become the topic of interest in Saudi Arabia. It has drawn the attention of medical professionals, teachers, clinicians, stakeholders, and legislators alike. ABA is increasingly being recognized as the leading evidence-based intervention for individuals with ASD, and with this rising recognition, there is a growing demand for accountability and provision of state-of-the-art services. To respond to this demand, we have established the first verified course sequences in the Middle East on both undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as provided collaborations with schools and clinics. In this presentation, I describe the dissemination efforts made through training behavior analysts, implementation of positive behavior support in schools, and advocating for services and the establishment of a local legislative body. Furthermore, the significant growth in the number of certificants, clinics using ABA, ABA training programs, as well as the current challenges and the future of ABA in Saudi Arabia are discussed.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the status of the field of ABA in Saudi Arabia; (2) describe the actions taken to advocate for the establishment of a local legislative body in the country; (3) identify challenges and potential solutions in disseminating the science of ABA and regulating its practice.
 
LAMIS BAOWAIDAN (Dar Al-Hekma University)

Dr. Baowaidan is the department chair of the Master of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis and assistant professor of special education at Dar Al-Hekma University, Saudi Arabia. She launched the first graduate program in ABA in the Middle East.  In 2016, she became the first Saudi to hold a Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst with doctoral designation (BCBA-Dâ). She earned her MA and Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from Columbia University under the direction of professor R. Douglas Greer. She has extensive teaching experience with children with and without special needs under the CABAS® model of schooling at the Fred S Keller School, where she also acted as a program supervisor and served as a clinical professor to many graduate students.

 
 
Symposium #55
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Exploring Barriers to Treatment With Stakeholder Driven Research: Giving BCBAs a Seat at the Table
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Krista M. Clancy (Wayne State University)
CE Instructor: Krista M. Clancy, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior analysts know that getting children with ASD enrolled into ABA treatment at the earliest possible age is important to achieving the best outcome. To resolve barriers that both parents and providers encounter and reduce delays to ABA service, Behavior Analysts need to collaborate with other providers in this service system. Parents typically start by talking to their pediatrician, then their insurance provider, a diagnostician, then get referred to ABA and other therapeutic/educational services. This complex process is difficult to navigate for all stakeholders, resulting in delays to service. Because other stakeholders within the system of care have earlier contacts with families, it is important for Behavior Analysts to collaborate with these stakeholders to develop ways to reduce delays in starting ABA. This presentation provides a review of barriers identified, including targeting marginalized populations, and proposed solutions created by a community-based research team made up of parents, providers at each access point, payors, community group leaders, and governmental leaders, who are currently targeting this issue. Barriers identified and discussed will include parent engagement, the referral process, coordination of care, provider and family education, equitability of services, and simplification of workflow for providers distributing resources and educational materials to families.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): care coordination, equity, service access, Treatment barriers
Target Audience:

Intermediate - Audience members should have a basic understanding of ABA principles and procedures related to the care of individuals with ASD and their family. Audience members should also have the ability to complete a basic cost benefit analysis assessing variables associate with successful outcomes and the ability to evaluate individual client and family barriers that might impact treatment outcome.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1). identify ways to connect and collaboration with stakeholders in the community to improve the dissemination of accurate information about ABA and how to improve access for clients and their families. (2). identify barriers for families to gain access to treatment and provide permanent product solutions to improving access to behavioral services. (3). recognize differences between the beliefs and values of different cultures related to diagnosis and treatment of ASD and use that information to develop educational materials and treatment for clients and their families.
 
Diversity submission Identifying Gaps and Barriers and Inviting the Right Stakeholders to the Table
KRISTA M. CLANCY (Wayne State University), Tasha Kelly-Stiles (Michigan Public Health Institute), Julia Heany (Michigan Public Health Institute), Mat Edick (Michigan Public Health Institute)
Abstract: Systems of care for individuals with ASD and their families is very complicated. It can be difficulty to navigate and there are many professionals that are involved between the time that the parents have their initial concerns regarding their child’s development and getting their child enrolled in ABA services. As behavioral analysts, we know that children need to get access to ABA services by the time that they are 2-3 years of age in order to have the best outcomes in treatment. However, one of our biggest barriers to improving access is that we do not have contact with families until they have been screened and evaluated for ASD. There are many other professionals with differing opinions and knowledge gaps in what is needed to obtain ABA services that families encounter before behavior analysts have the opportunity to discuss services with families. The Michigan Innovations in Care Coordination project brought together all the stakeholders involved in this complicated system of care including parents; pediatric, diagnostic and ABA providers; payors; researchers; and community leaders to evaluate the gaps and barriers in access to develop an improved system of care that considers barriers that each stakeholder encounters along the way. Survey data collected and discussions amongst the stakeholders allowed this team to pilot changes targeting systemic improvement in Wayne County Michigan focused on parent engagement, parent and provider education, and coordination of care using technology supports to better communicate between providers and patients and to improve the referral process. This presentation will review the process of bringing this group together, keeping the stakeholders engaged in the project, and what barriers were identified by the team.
 
Diversity submission 

Identifying Accessibility Barriers to Behavioral Services

ADRIENNE BRADLEY (Behavioral Frontiers), Michelle Madison (Starfish Family Services), Fatima Othman (Behavior Frontiers), Jill Idicula (University Pediatricians Autism Center), Krista M. Clancy (Wayne State University), Mat Edick (Michigan Public Health Institute)
Abstract:

In order to enable more equitable access to care for underserved families, providers must work to identify barriers to access behavioral services. A team of stakeholders participated in the development of products and strategies targeting access, using a collaborative community-based approach to evaluate experiences of providers and families within the Wayne County Michigan Medicaid state funded system. Both parents and providers expressed concerns about the complex processes to gain access to ABA treatment. Additional concerns were identified by the group related to ensuring equity in access for underserved families. Barriers identified included limited resources for families and providers designed to understand the system of care, knowledge on the steps to gain access to behavioral services, and what choices amongst service providers are available for families. Permanent product solutions were developed to address equitability and inclusion barriers for families and providers. A variety of surveys, media, and documents were developed through this process for use by service providers, both within and outside of the ABA community, to achieve equitable access to behavioral services. This presentation will also review recommendations about ways to facilitate collaborative work within a local healthcare system to increase awareness of barriers and urge more intervention research to explore the means for removing them.

 
Diversity submission 

Incorporating Cultural Competency Within Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis, Assessment and Treatment: What Do We Need to Consider?

JILL IDICULA (University Pedestrians Autism Center), Fatima Othman (Behavior Frontiers), Adrienne Bradley (Behavioral Frontiers), Krista M. Clancy (Wayne State University), Mat Edick (Michigan Public Health Institute)
Abstract:

Individuality of treatment has always been a primary focus in the field of ASD and ABA. Factors such as trauma, age, and family barriers have guided Behavior Analyst’s individualization of portions of treatment including teaching procedures, reinforcers, goals, and behavior intervention plans. However, in order to ensure true individuality of care for all clients, all stakeholders involved should be culturally competent. Cultural competence involves learning and understanding the views and practices of different cultures. Our cultural beliefs and traditions influence our thoughts and actions, and therefore, should be considered as early as screening and diagnosis. Parents have interactions with a variety of stakeholders including pediatricians, diagnosticians, schools, ABA and other therapeutic services. Starting at screening and ending at treatment implementation, each client’s cultural beliefs should be a consideration in the way stakeholders communicate with families regarding diagnosis, what assessment is chosen, what goals are chosen, what materials are used in programming, and much more. This presentation will include discussions and recommendations for how to modify treatment when encountering language barriers, stigma involving diagnosis, lack of support and understanding from support communities, and differing beliefs on the roles for men and women coming from different back grounds.

 
 
Invited Symposium #59
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Cultural Biases in Assessment, Treatment, and Access to ABA Services
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
Discussant: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University)
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Though the principles of behavior are universal, the specific behaviors, stimuli, and social contingencies impacting our clients are rooted in the cultures in which they live. As behavior analysis grows around the world, the inherent biases and assumptions of our technology becomes more apparent. Assessment instruments need translation, revision, and validation; interventions need to be adapted to ensure social validity and relevance; and the ways in which behavior analysts provide services need to expand to ensure that they are accessible to all clients in need. This symposium will present strategies for behavior analysts to identify biases in their professional practices, minimize such biases when they arise, and learn to practice cultural humility.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Practitioners and researchers. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe applicability of diversity, equity, and inclusion and analyze their own self-bias as related to cultural differences; (2) engage in ethical problem-solving frameworks as related to culturally humble and responsive behaviors; (3) identify the topography of culturally humble behaviors in our research and practice; (4) describe ways to engage in institutional accountability and systems change towards increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion through the engagement of culturally humble behaviors; (5) describe values procedures for increasing their own behaviors oriented toward social justice; (6) identify specific behaviors they could do more of in their own lives that may strengthen their work as accomplices for social justice; (7) describe how to use self-monitoring plans to increase their own behaviors oriented toward social justice; (8) discuss the role that culture plays in behavior analytic interactions; (9) list barriers for international dissemination of behavior analysis; (10) desribe two existing models for the documentation of cultural adaptations made to interventions. 
 
Diversity submission 

The Role of Culture for the Global Dissemination of Behavior Analysis

MAITHRI SIVARAMAN (Ghent University, Belgium; Tendrils Centre for Autism, India), Tara A. Fahmie (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

The cultural and linguistic diversity that characterizes the world remains a seminal barrier for the global uptake of applied behavior analysis (ABA). Although North America accounts for only 4.7% of the world’s population, more than 95% of BCBAs live in the United States and Canada. While behavioral principles may be universally applicable, this talk will argue for why understanding cultural diversity and avoiding prejudice is important. We will discuss specific challenges for the global dissemination of ABA, with India as an example, and suggest potential training strategies with which to overcome such barriers. Our training protocol may serve as an initial framework for practitioners and researchers to achieve buy-in and positive outcomes internationally. In addition, we will highlight existing frameworks to define and describe cultural adaptations and list previously used adaptations in ABA-based treatments for individuals outside of North America. Finally, we will advocate for a behavior analytic perspective for organizing and reporting potentially relevant variables for the global success of ABA services.

Maithri Sivaraman is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst with a Masters in Psychology from the University of Madras and holds a Graduate Certificate in ABA from the University of North Texas. She is currently enrolled as a doctoral student in Psychology at Ghent University in Belgium. In 2016, Sivaraman established the Tendrils Centre for Autism Research and Intervention in Chennai, India to make behavior analytic services more accessible to families with children with developmental disabilities. With Dr. Tara Fahmie, she is the co-recipient of a dissemination grant from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board’s (BACB) Committee of Philanthropy to train caregivers in function-based assessments and interventions for problem behavior in India. Her research focusses on social and verbal behavior interventions for children with disabilities, and cultural considerations in the dissemination of behavior analysis. She has served as Guest Reviewer for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis since 2018, and is the International Dissemination Coordinator of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment (ASAT).
 
Diversity submission 

Lessons Learned From Behavior Analysts of Color on How to Become Stronger Accomplices

JONATHAN TARBOX (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids), Brandon Whitfield (Autism Therapies), Jacqueline Ramirez (University of Southern California ; Positive Behavioral Supports Corporation)
Abstract:

Since the rise of the #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter movements, and especially since the murder of George Floyd, the field of behavior analysis is experiencing tremendous growth in action toward social justice. This growth of action and activism within our field is exciting but many have concerns over how much of this change is actually structural, versus performative, and therefore whether or not it will persist over time. From the perspective of a white man in a position of substantial privilege and power within the field of behavior analysis, I will stand next to and amplify the voices of behavior analysts of color who have offered powerful and practical resources to all of us to create and sustain our roles as accomplices in furthering social justice. This presentation will amplify recent publications by behavior analysts of color on practical strategies for enacting social justice within our own personal lives, within the service provision agencies where we work, and within our graduate programs, among others. In particular, practical strategies from behavioral approaches to self-management, including acceptance and commitment training, will be shared.

Dr. Jonathan Tarbox is the Program Director of the Master of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis program at the University of Southern California, as well as Director of Research at FirstSteps for Kids. Dr. Tarbox is the past Editor-in-Chief of the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice, a Board Member of the ABA Task Force to Eradicate Social Injustice, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Women in Behavior Analysis (WIBA) conference. He has published five books on applied behavior analysis and autism treatment, is the Series Editor of the Elsevier book series Critical Specialties in Treating Autism and Other Behavioral Challenges, and an author of over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles and chapters in scientific texts.  His research focuses on behavioral interventions for teaching complex skills to individuals with autism, Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), and applications of applied behavior analysis to issues of diversity and social justice. 

 
Diversity submission 

DEI, Bias, and Cultural Humility: Putting It All Together for Social Justice Change

NASIAH CIRINCIONE-ULEZI (ULEZI, LLC; Pivot 2 Inclusion; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Capella University), NOOR YOUNUS SYED (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

The pressing need to engage in compassionate, culturally humble behavior as a field became apparent following the needless deaths of those such as Mr. George Floyd; the world at large recognized the importance of social justice and, as behavior analysts, we are uniquely poised to engage in systems change and create levels of institutional accountability throughout all aspects of our work. This dialogue will discuss culture as a dynamic metacontingency and will focus on understanding diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) as related to all cultures. We will analyze our own self-bias and will describe ethical problem-solving frameworks designed to increase DEI through the engagement of culturally humble behaviors as practitioners and researchers. Finally, we will review ways to implement measures of institutional accountability to assess whether we are meeting our goals of DEI. We will end by inviting questions from the audience to promote thoughtful considerations intended to further our understanding of the topography of culturally humble behaviors and how we can begin immediately to engage in social justice change.

Nasiah is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, with a Doctorate degree in Education from Loyola University of Chicago. She holds a Master’s degree in Special Education from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and a Master's degree in Educational Leadership from the American College of Education. She is a graduate of the Infant Studies Specialist program at Erikson Institute of Chicago. In addition to her BCBA credential, she is an Illinois licensed special education teacher and an Illinois Early Intervention provider and State evaluator. Professionally, she has served as a special educator, clinician, educational administrator, and professor of special education. Her clinical experience spans infancy through adulthood. Currently, she is the CEO & Founder of ULEZI, LLC, Co-Founder of Pivot 2 Inclusion and serves as a court appointed special advocate, for children in the Illinois foster care system. She is also an Advisory Board member for Black Applied Behavior Analysts and a Board member for the Illinois Association for Behavior Analysis. She has assisted school districts in the State of Illinois in developing meaningful educational programs to meet the needs of students with autism. Her research interests include supervision, mentoring, leadership, and culturally humble practice within the field of ABA. She is a champion for diversity, equity and inclusion and is deeply committed to using her skills and experiences, paired with the science of applied behavior analysis, to empower the lives of the people she supports and serves, in positive and meaningful ways.

Noor Syed, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA/LBS, (she/her) is an Assistant Professor of Applied Behavior Analysis, Clinical Coordinator, and founding Director of the Center for Autism Inclusivity (Research, Education, and Services) with SUNY Empire State College. She is also a Senior International Program Director with Anderson Center International, an Adjunct Professor Advisor in ABA with Endicott College, and Research Coordinator for the Global Autism Project.  She is a certified general and special education teacher in New York, U.S., birth through grade six. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Syed has worked with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and developmental disabilities from early intervention through adulthood in school and center-based settings as a teacher, therapist, consultant, and administrator. Dr. Syed has consulted for autism clinics around the world, including in Uganda, Antigua and Barbuda, and the Czech Republic, and currently serves as the international and school-based expert on ABAEthicsHotline.com with Dr. Jon Bailey. She assisted in building Lehigh University Autism Services and its corresponding practicum, which is an insurance and university-based program offering services in the home, community, and clinic. Dr. Syed’s interests lie in compassionate care, cultural humility, ethical practices, supervision, the practice of school-based BCBAs, and diversity. She received her undergraduate degree in ABA under Dr. Raymond G. Romanczyk in the Institute of Child Development at Binghamton University and completed her PhD in ABA with Dr. R. Douglas Greer at Teachers College, Columbia University.

 
 
Symposium #64
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Culture, Race, and Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Translational
Chair: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Discussant: Shahla Susan Ala'i (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Shahla Susan Ala'i, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium will address three questions through four presentations related to race, culture, and behavior analysis. The first presentation will address the question of how preferences for behavior-analytic treatment strategies align across caregivers and providers of different races, and then address the implications misalignments across racial groups might have for best practice. The second and third presentations will conceptually address the question of how behavior analysts can assess for and build multicultural and antiracist education, practice, and research. Examples of an assessment tool for research and recommendations for graduate training programs in behavior analysis will be provided. The final presentation will conceptually address the question of how behavior analysis can be applied to larger cultural and race-based issues by reviewing police use-of-force reform. A discussion of these presentations will follow and focus on how behavior analysts can contribute to improvements in cultural humility and competence.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Culture, Education, Policing, Race
Target Audience:

The target audience for this workshop includes college students, early-career researchers, BACB certificants in-training (e.g., RBTs), behavior analysts (BCaBAs, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds), and behavioral health aides or direct care workers with a working knowledge of the principles of behavior and basic behavior analytic procedures (e.g., antecedent strategies, differential reinforcement, etc.).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to (1) identify at least one implication misalignments across racial groups might have for best practice; (2) describe one possible tool for assessing cultural sensitivity in behavior analytic research; (3) identify at least one recommendation to promote antiracist and multicultural graduate training programs in behavior analysis; and (4) identify at least one way behavior analysts might improve the assessment and efficacy of police use-of-force reform.
 
Diversity submission Assessing Correspondence Between Caregiver and Provider Treatment Preference in Alaska
(Applied Research)
KRISTIN RIALL (University of Alaska Anchorage), Katelynn Marie Mobley (University of Alaska Anchorage), Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract: Research shows that social validity is a key component of effective behavior analytic treatment and that treatment fidelity is crucial to success. This study expands upon Kawari et al.’s 2017 research on caregiver preferences by conducting a between-groups analysis to determine preferences for behavioral treatments, and how these preferences aligned between BCBAs and Alaska Native and non-indigenous caregivers in Alaska. Participants completed a web-based questionnaire including four scenarios describing problem behavior and selected how they would prefer to respond. Responses were compared across groups to identify potential differences. Results showed discrepancies in treatment preference across groups. These differences could have implications for treatment fidelity in the absence of additional strategies by providers working with Alaska Native caregivers. This research lays the groundwork for community-based research and improved theory centering on the needs of indigenous caregivers in Alaska who support an individual with Autism.
 
Diversity submission 

A Look at Using Culturally Responsive Research Practices in the Field of Behavior Analysis

(Theory)
SHERI KINGSDORF (Masaryk University ), Karel Pancocha (Masaryk University)
Abstract:

Culturally competent practices are materializing in the clinical work of behavior analysts. This growth may be the result of added components to coursework, continuing education training, and client-focused curricular materials. However, applied behavior analysis (ABA) research has been slower to see these changes. With ABA research guiding the work of new and seasoned practitioners, it is imperative that it strongly reinforces components of cultural responsiveness. Researchers outside the field of ABA, Dr. Bal and Dr. Trainor, have recognized the importance of research demonstrating cultural competence. Resultantly, they developed the Culturally Responsive Research Rubric for evaluating studies. The 15-item rubric is built upon existing tools for assessing research quality, but is not aimed at commonly accepted indicators (e.g., experimental design). Rather, the focus is on a set of culturally responsive criteria (e.g., how culture guided design). To bridge gaps in ABA research and cultural competence, two behavior analysts aim to introduce the rubric, discuss its applicability to the field of ABA, give examples of rubric components that align with the work of behavior analysts, and present a review of the behavioral research on pyramidal parent training through the lens of the rubric.

 
Diversity submission 

Towards the Development of Antiracist and Multicultural Graduate Training Programs in Behavior Analysis

(Theory)
Adel Najdowski (Pepperdine University), LUSINEH GHARAPETIAN (Pepperdine University), Victorya Jewett (Pepperdine University)
Abstract:

Racist policies and inequity are prevalent in society; this includes higher education institutions. Many behavior analytic training programs have been complicit in omitting cultural humility and antiracist ideas in their curricula and institutional practices. As societal demands for allyship and transformational change increase, programs must rise to the challenge and act as agents of change in our clinical, professional, and personal communities. The current paper offers a multitude of strategies for institutions to develop an antiracist and multicultural approach. These recommendations encompass policies that may be promoted on the following levels: (a) organizational infrastructure and leadership, (b) curriculum and pedagogy, (c) research, and (d) with faculty, students, and staff.

 
Diversity submission 

A Behavioral Analysis of Two Strategies to Eliminate Racial Bias in Police Use-of-Force

(Theory)
ASHLEY MARIE LUGO (Florida Institute of Technology), Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract:

Structural racism is rooted in American social systems that were supposedly designed to promote our right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Social systems like policing, for example, are built on a foundation of discriminatory practices designed to disenfranchise Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC). One of the most recent visible examples of racially-biased policing is the excessive use-of-force by officers toward BIPOC. In response, advocates, policy makers, and researchers have sought solutions. Police use-of-force reforms such as Body-Worn Cameras (BWCs) and Implicit Bias Training (IBT) have become popular and are currently being applied in many police departments across the country. However, evidence supporting the effectiveness of these reform strategies to reduce use-of-force is mixed, and further evaluations are needed to understand why these strategies are purported to be an effective solution. The purpose of the current review is to ignite future empirical evaluations of use-of-force reform. Following a summary of the research conducted to date on BWCs and IBT, we will conclude with a brief discussion of how behavior analysts might improve and foster strategies that are efficacious.

 
 
Paper Session #70
Diversity submission Keep that House! How a Culturo-Behavioral Science Analysis May Improve Housing Stability for Families Who Have Experienced Homelessness
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:30 AM–11:55 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS
Chair: Richard F. Rakos (Cleveland State University)
 
Diversity submission 

Keep that House! How a Culturo-Behavioral Science Analysis May Improve Housing Stability for Families Who Have Experienced Homelessness

Domain: Theory
Kennee Switzer Rakos (Family Promise of Greater Cleveland), RICHARD F. RAKOS (Cleveland State University)
 
Abstract:

The 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing (HEARTH) Act directs federal funding to agencies and services that have adopted a “Housing First” or “Rapid Rehousing” approach. This approach requires that those experiencing homelessness be housed as quickly as possible and that services then be provided to keep them housed (HUD Exchange, 2020). Little controlled research has been undertaken 1) to determine the effectiveness of this approach in maintaining long-term housing stability and 2) to identify the services most important for averting a return to homelessness (Urban Institute, 2018). We suggest that behavior analytic tools, such as the functional analysis (Kanfer & Saslow, 1969), metacontingency analysis (Glenn, 2004), and contextual functional analysis (Hayes, Barnes-Holme, & Wilson, 2012), can be employed to clarify the competencies and skill deficits, supports and resources, and systems level variables that impact long-term housing stability for homeless families. We discuss the need for research that examines whether a culturo-behavior science analysis leads to improved long-term housing stability of families who have experienced homelessness. We present a brief case example to demonstrate the potential utility of this approach and discuss several research strategies to acquire empirical data related to long-term housing stability.

 
 
 
Symposium #77
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission The Road Less Traveled: Revolutionizing Applied Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 29, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Samantha Fuesy (Adapt & Transform Behavior, LLC (ATBx))
CE Instructor: Samantha Fuesy, M.A.
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has historically been implemented and carried out most commonly in clinical settings with adults and children diagnosed with autism and developmental disabilities. Within recent years, the field of ABA has been disseminating its implementation of services and interventions to other settings and populations. Behavior analysts at Adapt & Transform Behavior, LLC have been providing ABA services within juvenile detention and residential facilities in multiple states within the past 4 years. The company has been one of the firsts within the country to have detention staff be credentialed as registered behavior technicians and implement ABA services facility-wide. The presentations included in this symposium will provide a closer look at the effectiveness of the application of ABA with youth involved in juvenile/criminal justice systems. Additionally, the presenters will discuss barriers to youth accessing treatment, current misconceptions and need for additional research to assist in correcting systemic issues with commonly used treatments that are leading to potentially dangerous outcomes for this vulnerable population.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Criminal Justice, Facility-Wide PBIS, Juvenile Justice, Youth
Target Audience: Prerequisite skills include; basic understanding of behavior analysis, Behavior Analysts, Students, Crime and Delinquency, PBIS, trauma
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Implement a pyramidal staff training protocol; (2) evaluate most effective ways to implement facility wide interventions; (3) pinpoint specific needs for future research in this area.
 
Diversity submission 

Diversifying ABA to New Places Using Behavior Skills Training and Feedback to Increase Proficiency Within Detention Staff

SARA HORDGES (Adapt & Transform Behavior, LLC)
Abstract:

The application of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) in the juvenile justice settings is a fairly new area of research for ABA. Recently Adapt & Transform Behavior, LLC behavior analysts have trained detention center administrators, supervisors and staff to become credentialed as registered behavior technicians (RBTs). The introduction of RBTs to this setting was hypothesized to increase the effectiveness of facility wide interventions put in place by the Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and aid in the fidelity of staff compliance with mandated facility operating procedures. The purpose of the case studies to be presented were to evaluate the effects of evidence-based interventions in the implementation and proficiency of daily detention roles and responsibilities. Pyramidal training (BCBA ? RBT? Detention staff) was used to train detention officers using behavior skills training on conducting effective and proficient searches on youth. Secondarily, a multicomponent intervention was implemented by RBTs to increase level card proficiencies.

 
Diversity submission 

Using High Density ABA to Increase Effectiveness and Efficiency of Facility-Wide Interventions in the Juvenile Residential Facility

EMILY KIEFFER (Adapt & Transform Behavior LLC)
Abstract:

As research shows, high intensity Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) for individualized interventions is a successful approach. However, in many cases the density of services is minimized by institutions in the name of cost savings. This presentation will review a case study demonstrating the ability of highly effective FW-PBIS systems to be put in place at a quicker pace with high fidelity when high intensity Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) interventions are implemented by Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs). Prior to the introduction of high doses of ABA, the facility was experiencing high rates of self injury, property destruction, fighting and noncompliance that resulted in multiple escapes, arrests and hospitalizations of youth alongside high rates of staff turnover and terminations. These issues resulted in financial consequences (in the form of fines, hospitalizations, freezes and on boarding) for the program that outweighed the cost of attempting to bypass the use of BCBAs. The results of this case study show that both facility wide and individualized interventions were effectively put in place within three months and services were systematically faded and maintained at a lower level over the next year.

 
Diversity submission When Helping Hurts
SAMANTHA FUESY (Adapt & Transform Behavior)
Abstract: Interventions used in treatment facilities/programs for youth involved juvenile justice systems typically include a range of mental health interventions from psychotherapy, CBT, group therapy, psychotropic medications, etc. combined with religious interventions, mentors and punitive consequences. The introduction of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has begun but at a much slower pace due to many roadblocks and systemic issues within the current service delivery models. Because of a lack of research and behavior analytic presence at the policy level many youth are denied access to ABA services who need them. As a result unproven and, in many cases, potentially harmful treatments are being implemented with these vulnerable populations instead. Our data will show this is especially true in cases involving youth who engage in self injurious behaviors and/or severe aggression. One intervention in particular, the “Baker Act”, when used incorrectly has resulted in shaping up more severe and dangerous behaviors, a phenomenon that has been observed across multiple states.
 
 
Symposium #79
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Toward an Inclusive and Diverse Behavior Analysis: Advantages and Barriers to International Collaboration
Saturday, May 29, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Elana Keissa Sickman (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Tom G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Zhihui Yi, M.S.
Abstract:

Behavior analysis is expanding and diversifying to include analysts from multiple and diverse backgrounds, from Western and non-Western countries, and who speak many different languages. Fostering internationalization and diversity in our field is not only necessary to achieve optimal growth as a field but represents a strategy of turning science inward to improve the way that we operate behavior analysis as a unified and diverse field. The first talk will explore potential advantages that bilingual behavior analysts may have in areas of derived relational responding and psychological flexibility that can translate to work with clients. The second talk will discuss several barriers that international students face when completing graduate training and work within the United States. Addressing these barriers may ultimately confer several advantages not only to practitioners, but this work can also serve to improve the overall quality and scope of our evolving field.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Bilingual, Diversity, International students, Relational Frames
Target Audience:

BCBAs

Learning Objectives: (1) Identify strengths in derived relational responding that are related to biligualism; (2) Identify the relationship between diversity and psychological flexibility; (3) Identify barriers for international students in US behavior analysis programs
 
Diversity submission The Effect of Bilingual Experience on Derived Relational Responding and Psychological Flexibility
ZHIHUI YI (Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract: The behavior of translation is conceptualized by Skinner as a special case of intraverbal behavior where the stimuli are in one language, and the response is in another. However, as Skinner pointed out, it is somewhat difficult to account for the interchangeability in responses among bilingual speakers where they may produce two different languages or use them in the same sentence when presented with the same stimuli. Stimulus equivalence, and subsequently, Relational Frame Theory (RFT), seems to account for this phenomenon where two different languages can be viewed as two relational networks connected by the same stimuli or constructs they are related to. By repeatedly engaging in relational framing and the derivation of equivalent and non-equivalent relationships between two different verbal operants, bilingual speakers are able to produce novel verbal behavior in a new language. To test this hypothesis, the current study compared the differences in derived relational responding between bilingual and English-only speakers. Forty participants participated in the study. Preliminary evidence suggests that bilingual speakers were able to engage in derived relational responding more fluently than English-only speakers. We also examined the differences in psychological flexibility after controlling for anxiety and depressive symptoms.
 
Diversity submission 

Barriers and Considerations for International Students in Behavior Analytic Graduate Programs

Sidhant Sehgal (The Chicago School), Rocco G Catrone (SIU-Carbondale), Manish K. Goyal (Southern Illinois University), Sebastian Garcia-Zambrano (Southern Illinois University), Danielle Wilhelmina Kennedy (The Chicago School), SOMCHART SAKULKOO (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

There are over 38 thousand BCBAs worldwide with roughly 2 thousand residing outside of North America (BACB, n.d.). With behavior analytic work being highly sought after and needed (Carr and Nosik, 2017), the 103 institutions outside of north America that have a verified course sequences (VCS; ABAI, n.d.) serve as the educational hubs abroad before the BACB decisions to pull back certification to only USA and Canadian certificants. Many students, however, come from around the world to the USA in order to complete these courses sequences in hopes of becoming a BCBA. There is a surprising lack of data regarding international students engaged in this coursework in addition to outcomes of individuals who have graduated from USA-based institutions. International students also experience more barriers and hurdles to overcome during their time than local students (Mallinckrodt, et al. 1992; Sawir, 2005; Lian & Wallace, 2020) making the education/learning experience received, as well as future job prospects, inequitable. Given this lack of data and concerns regarding access to resources, this manuscript will be addressing the various barriers that inhibit the training experience and overall comfort of these students while completing their graduate education in behavior analytic programs. These barriers will be broken down into administrative, structural, and cultural barriers being behaviorally defined, identification of what is included within that barrier, and author lived experiences with each. Suggestions for policy change as well as future research will be suggested in order to create a more equitable model of support for international students.

 
 
Symposium #80
Diversity submission Recent Advances and Applications of Telehealth in Applied Behavior Analysis During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Saturday, May 29, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Hedda Meadan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Abstract:

Numerous professionals, including board-certified behavior analysts (BCBAs), have had to pivot to delivering ABA therapy via telehealth due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The lessons learned from these experiences can provide insights to researchers and practitioners about the state of telehealth practice in the community. This symposium includes a series of presentations to inform the field and support the application of telehealth services during times of crisis. The first presentation will describe results from a convergent mixed-methods survey study of the experiences of 657 BCBAs, three months after stay at home orders went into effect. The second will describe the results of a single-case, multiple probe design study across three BCBAs who were provided professional development via telehealth on strategies for building better rapport with caregivers and coaching them to bring about maximum clinical efficacy. The third will describe results of a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a series of online parent training modules on caregiver’s use of behavioral principles with their young child with challenging behaviors.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): service delivery, telehealth, telepractice
 
Diversity submission ABA Professionals Expedited Delivery of Therapeutic Services via Telehealth During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Lessons Learned
ANA DUENAS GARCIA (Lehigh University ), Sophia R D'Agostino (Hope College)
Abstract: Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is recognized as a medically necessary treatment for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Association of Professional Behavior Analysts, [APBA] 2020). The use of telehealth to deliver ABA services has been on the rise over the past decade, but at the time of the COVID-19 stay home orders, there continues to be limited literature on telehealth implementation guidelines for providers. Most of the existing literature outlines the barriers to implementation but few studies offer solutions. The purpose of this survey study is to inform researchers and practitioners regarding the use of telehealth to deliver ABA therapy during unprecedented times. A convergent mixed methods research design was utilized to examine the experiences of ABA professionals as they deliver ABA techniques via telehealth to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Findings include ABA service providers’ decision-making process for determining the modality of service, therapeutic structure via telehealth, usability and troubleshooting of telehealth, and professional development related to telehealth. Results will be discussed along with recommendations for research and practice.
 
Diversity submission 

Supporting Professionals to Coach Caregivers Who Have Children With Autism During Pandemic: A Single-Case Study

MOON YOUNG CHUNG (University of illinois at Urbana-Champaign), James Lee (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Hedda Meadan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Michelle Sands (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Ben Sleiman (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Abstract:

The importance of family engagement in their children's education and treatment is emphasized by researchers, professional organizations, and legislations. Providing services with caregivers via telepractice has gained more support and is becoming especially timely due to the current pandemic and social distancing requirements. Professionals, such as board-certified behavior analysts (BCBAs), who work with caregivers with children with disabilities may benefit from receiving professional development on strategies for building better rapport with caregivers and coaching them to bring about maximum clinical efficacy. The current study replicated an earlier study by Meadan et al. (2020) to examine the effects of the Coaching Caregiver Professional Development (CoCarePD) program, in which (a) BCBAs received training and coaching from researchers via telepractice on their caregivers coaching practices, (b) BCBAs coached caregivers of children with autism. A single-case, multiple-probe design study across three BCBAs was conducted. Findings support a functional relation between the CoCarePD and BCBAs' use of coaching practices. Participating BCBAs were also satisfied with the goals, procedures, and outcomes of the program. The detailed method, findings, limitations, and implications will be discussed.

 
Diversity submission 

Effects of Online Modules on Challenging Behaviors for Korean Families: A Randomized Controlled Trial

JAMES LEE (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Hedda Meadan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Abstract:

Consistent challenging behaviors of young children are known to have significant impact on the child’s optimal development, such as social-emotional development or communication skills (Dunlap et al., 2006). Furthermore, some parents who live in Korea have exacerbated hardships due to limited opportunities for treatment for their children with autism. Intervention delivery using telepractice is supported with more research in these cases. To strengthen the capacity of parents in Korea, we developed and examined the effectiveness of a series of online parent training modules on behavioral principles using a randomized controlled trial with a waitlist control group (N = 88). We found significant interaction effects of Group X Time for (a) parental knowledge of behavioral principles, (b) positive parenting practices, and (c) parental stress, with no preexisting differences between the two groups. Furthermore, qualitative social validity data indicated that parents were highly satisfied with the goals, procedures, and outcomes, and that the modules affected their parenting styles, increased knowledge leading to better child outcomes, and recommendations for future research.

 
 
Poster Session #89
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Online
25.

Adapting a Function-Based Intervention to Promote Autonomy and Safety for a Student With Emotional Disturbance

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
MARNEY SQUIRES POLLACK (Vanderbilt University), Blair Lloyd (Vanderbilt University), Jessica Torelli (Western Kentucky University), Katie Copeland (Vanderbilt University)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

The latency-based functional analysis (FA) is a hypothesis testing strategy used to inform effective function-based interventions for students who engage in challenging behavior (Lambert et al., 2017). Despite the promise of interventions informed by this experimental analysis, some students—especially those with emotional/behavioral disorders—respond in unexpected ways. For example, the establishing operations presented during functional communication training may elicit challenging behaviors as part of a stress response or evoke them in the form of countercontrol. These unanticipated responses may signal intervention procedures are aversive to the student, indicating a need to adapt procedures to prioritize student autonomy and safety. One such modification is the Enhanced Choice Model (ECM; Rajaraman et al., 2018), where concurrently available alternatives to participating in intervention sessions are programmed. We implemented a latency-based FA and subsequent function-based intervention with an elementary student who received special education services under an emotional disturbance label. When initial functional communication training with isolated contingencies failed to reduce rates of challenging behavior, we implemented skill-based treatment (Hanley et al., 2014) within an ECM. Outcomes suggest, with a moderate degree of confidence, that the adapted intervention successfully increased the student’s tolerance for stressful classroom conditions.

 
26.

The Effects a Fluency Building Intervention on Math Facts Performance for Students Receiving Intensive Academic Support

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JAMES STOCKER (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Emily Crumpler (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

A growing body of evidence indicates systematic practice with math fact families efficiently and effectively improves fluency. The present investigation tested the effects of a fluency building intervention on math facts performance with four elementary school students participating in multi-tiered systems of support. The researchers employed a multiple baseline design across three sets of fact families. Intervention components consisted of modeling the fact family followed by three, one-minute practice trials with immediate feedback delivered between each timing. The students received up to a ten-day window of intervention on one set of fact families before moving to the next set. Results suggest a significant increase in digits correct per minute and a decrease in digits incorrect per minute. Study outcomes also suggest that fluency instruction focusing on the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction operations can plausibly serve as a viable alternative to instruction with isolated and unrelated math facts. Discussion points on stimulus equivalence as well as implications for practitioners and recommendations for future research will be shared.

 
28.

Effects of Point of View Video Modeling for Students With Autism: A Literature Review

Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
JARED R MORRIS (Brigham Young University), Ryan Kellems (Brigham Young University), Cade T. Charlton (Brigham Young University), Emmy Davis (Brigham Young University), Jamie McKay (Brigham Young University), Sarah McFadyen (Brigham Young University)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

This literature review was conducted to synthesize the research studies that evaluated point of view video modeling and analyze the behavioral, academic, and social outcomes it had on students with autism. Video modeling has been established through research as a robust intervention with positive effects across disabilities to teach behavioral, academic, functional, social, and life skills. Methods: A literature search was conducted using the online databases ERIC and APA PsychInfo. The Boolean search string: video technology AND modeling AND point of view AND autism was used. The titles and abstracts of the articles were reviewed to identify relevance and, in order to be included in the review, studies had to meet the following criteria: (a) independent variable is POV video modeling, (b) study participants are individuals with autism, and (c) study was conducted using a single-subject research design. Results: Twenty studies met the criteria for this review. Analysis of these studies indicate a functional relation between POV video modeling and the skills and behaviors the researchers were targeting. Implications: This systematic review provides evidence that point-of-view video modeling has positive effects when used to teach play, social skills, vocational tasks, letter writing, mathematics, and transition related tasks.

 
29.

Efficiency Analysis of a CABAS®-Based Low Intensity Educational Package for Teenagers and Young Adults

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CLAUDIA PUCHETTI (VitaLab Educational Center), Fabiola Casarini (Scuola delle Stelle), Gianluca Amato (VitaLab Educational Centre), Elena Vaccari (VitaLab Educational Centre)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

We tested the effects of implementing a CABAS® based educational model for 12 adolescents and young adults, aged 13 to 21, all enrolled in a learning and research centre in Italy. We collected monthly data on the total number of Learn Units, on the learning objectives achieved and on the number of Learn Units to Criterion by each participant. Data were discussed based on graphical analysis and suggested that CABAS® can be an effective tactic for the individualized education of our Participants. Also, the model appeared to successfully adapt to the Italian welfare system, and could provide Public Services leaders with easy-to-read data on the efficiency of evidence-based treatments for adolescents and young adults. Further research should compare different treatment intensity packages and add norm-based data. This pilot project was aimed to measure treatment effectiveness and efficiency using Learn Units, with the purpose of sharing the results with the Italian Health Department and stakeholders.

 
30.

The Convergence of Mastery Criteria and Instructional Format: A Systematic Review

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
MARLA HERNANDEZ (University of Missouri- Columbia), Lorraine A Becerra (University of Missouri), Samantha Kraus (University of Missouri)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a widely accepted science in which treatment for problem behavior reduction and skill acquisition interventions has been developed for learners diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Discrete Trial Training (DTT) is an effective teaching method within ABA that presents teaching targets in a rapid instructional format until a mastery criterion is met (Smith, 2001). Clinicians and researchers select instructional format and mastery criterion when designing the DTT protocol for their clients with ASD. Modifications in the instructional format present ratios of mastered teaching targets relative to targets in acquisition. Furthermore, the specified mastery criterion demonstrates when a skill is learned to sufficiency. The interaction of teaching format and mastery criteria options may impact the efficient acquisition and maintenance of the novel skills. The purpose of this review was to systematically categorize and evaluate instructional format and mastery criteria within a discrete trial teaching procedure for learners with developmental disabilities. The review included 15 studies organized into the following categories: Mass trial, interspersed trial, and distributed trial, as well as mastery criteria. Task interspersal (75% of those that compared instructional format) and an 80% mastery criterion correct across 3 days or sessions (80% of those that compared mastery criteria) were the most commonly identified. However, there was extreme variability across studies and future research is needed to allow clinicians to form a rationale for their treatment modification selections. Clinical implications and future directions for research are discussed.

 
Diversity submission 31.

Computer Literacy in College Students and Unemployed Adults With Heroin Addiction

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
MOLLY PRIMERO DEMAYO (California State University, Stanislaus), Shrinidhi Subramaniam (California State University, Stanislaus)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

Today, gaining competitive employment often requires searching for jobs and completing applications online, which may be a barrier for older, chronically unemployed adults with heroin addiction. In contrast, college students in the job market are presumed to be skilled with computers. To compare these populations, we measured digital literacy using interactive, online assessments (https://digitalliteracyassessment.org). Participants were 31 adults with chronic unemployment and heroin addiction (Treatment) and 115 college students enrolled in introductory computer science courses as part of their general education program (Control). Treatment participants had low median scores in assessments of Microsoft Word (52% vs. Control=83%), Microsoft PowerPoint (37% vs. Control=73%), and information literacy (49% vs. Control=67%). Although Control participants had higher median scores than Treatment participants in all domains, scores were within 10 percentage points in Social Media (difference=2.8%), Computer Basics (difference=7%), and E-mail (difference=9.2%). Employment support in addiction treatment should target computer skills to address this potential barrier to employment.

 
32.

A Review of Literature: Implications and Effectiveness of Using Self-Monitoring Interventions in the Inclusive General Education Classroom

Area: EDC; Domain: Basic Research
JESSICA HUBBARD (University of Memphis), James Nicholson Meindl (The University of Memphis)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract:

Educational policies over the past two decades have prioritized integrating students with disabilities into the general education setting. With this shift, the demographics of the general education setting have become more diverse, requiring teachers to implement a variety of behavioral and academic interventions to support the varying needs of individual students. To support teachers and students, interventions that are effective, while still socially valid, must be identified. Self-monitoring interventions have widely been used to address behavioral and academic concerns across a variety of educational and clinical settings and across a variety of disabilities. However, limited studies have examined the use of self-monitoring in the inclusive setting. Previous research would suggest that general education classroom teachers would benefit from implementing self-monitoring based intervention packages. Additionally, interventions capable of intervening on a group of students at one time, thereby reducing effort and oversight on the part of the teacher, are more favorable and socially valid. The combined use of a student-directed intervention (such as self-monitoring) and a group-based intervention (such as a group contingency) could have a significant impact on the performance of target and non-target students within a general education classroom. This study analyzes previous use of self-monitoring interventions, the possible implications of these interventions on the general education classroom setting, and makes suggestions for future research.

 
33. The Effects of Increased Opportunities to Respond and Goal Setting on Student Engagement in the Classroom
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SYDNEY MARIE HARMON (Western Michigan University), Nicole Hollins (Western Michigan University), Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Opportunities to respond (OTRs) and active student responding (ASR) are two variables that increase effective learning outcomes and appropriate behaviors for students in the classroom setting (Kestner et al., 2019). Goal setting and in-vivo coaching have demonstrated improvement in the number of praise statements delivered by teachers, while also improving implementation of classroom management interventions (Kleinert et al., 2017). In this study, consultants used evidence-based interventions to train one teacher on direct instruction teaching methodologies during large group instructional time. Specifically, consultants modeled the implementation of high rates of OTRs, then coached one teacher to implement these interventions. After coaching, an attainable goal was developed for student engagement and OTRs (i.e., the goal for OTRs was 4 per minute and the goal for student engagement was 70% or higher), supplemented with a graphic display of feedback before and after each session. Using an A-B design to systemically evaluate treatment effects, the results of this study indicate that the intervention was effective for increasing active student engagement (A=41% to B= 70%), rates of OTRs (A=3.22 to B=4.30), and behavior specific praise (A=5% to B=31%). Concluding consultative services, the teacher reported these procedures as being appropriate and sustainable for long term implementation.
 
34.

The Effects of Brief Values and Committed Actions Exercises Upon BCBA Candidate Study Behaviors During an Online BCBA Examination Preparatory Course

Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
BRIAN KATZ (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract:

Brief Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) exercises focusing on values clarification and committed action were delivered to post-master’s participants qualified to sit for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst exam in a virtual setting during a 6-week test preparation class by RogueABA. The current study was an extension of Palilunas et al. (2018) who conducted a randomized controlled trial and delivered the same exercises to master’s levels students in a university setting. The current study differed in that a single-subject experimental design was utilized, along with differing dependent variables. Following exposure to ACT exercises, there was an increase in psychological flexibility as indicated by results by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire 2 (AAQ-2); however, there was no clear evidence of a functional relation between these ACT exercises and several overt dependent variables. It was noteworthy that Group One, who gained more psychological flexibility as measured in an AAQ-2 self-report, completed an increased percentage of asynchronous online modules immediately following exposure ACT exercises. This was evident in a withdrawal design. However, this effect was not replicated for Groups Two and Three. Furthermore, the current study serves as a proof of concept in which automated data collection methods can be utilized to measure socially significant public behaviors in addition to self-reports that are commonly used in contextual behavior science research.

 
35.

Special Education Teachers as Coach for Paraprofessionals’ Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices: A Systematic and Quality Review

Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
AMANDA M AUSTIN (Purdue University), Hannah Crosley (Purdue University), Charissa Donn Voorhis (Purdue University), Rose A. Mason (Purdue University), Alexandra Newson (University of Oregon)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract:

Special education programming in public schools relies heavily on the use of paraprofessionals to support instructional, behavioral, and social learning for students with disabilities (SWDs), however, paraprofessionals often lack formal training in the use of evidence-based practices (EBP). Traditional lecture-style methods of professional development for school-based staff are neither cost or time-efficient, nor effective at producing long-term changes in instructional behaviors employed by staff in the classroom. Research has demonstrated that paraprofessional-level practitioners can learn to use high levels of implementation fidelity of EBPs with SWDs when provided experiential training such as coaching. We conducted a systematic and quality review of literature on the use of coaching to train paraprofessionals to implement interventions for SWDs. We reviewed 174 full-text articles for inclusion and evaluated the methodological rigor of the research. Contextual variables, including trainer and participant characteristics, target skills, and implementation fidelity were synthesized to provide a summary of strengths and gaps in the evidence. Recommendations for practice and future research will be discussed.

 
Sustainability submission 36. Improvement of reading and comprehending skills of children using ABA procedures.
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
MEERA RAMANI (ABA India), Rajashree Balasubramanian (ABA India )
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Two approaches were used to teach reading to children under the Autism Spectrum Disorder A traditional method was applied to teach reading and comprehension versus reading was taught using an ABA method. Three students with a previous diagnosis of autism and enrolled in a Centre participated in this study. The 3 children under the study were taught reading .The multi-sample matching procedure for teaching the relations between pictures and printed words was employed. In this procedure, each student’s attempt was composed of 3 sample stimuli and three comparison stimuli. In the test, it was assessed the emergence of relations between printed words and pictures, and naming printed words and pictures. The results indicated that the treatments that included ABA techniques were more effective than treatments that did not include ABA for teaching reading.
 
37. Overcoming Challenges Imposed by Virtual Learning for High School Freshmen Year: Infrastructure, Habits, Behavioral Momentum and Principles
Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
EMILY COOK (Bishop McDevitt High School, Harrisburg, PA), Matthew Gross (Shippensburg University), Richard Cook (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Freshman year of high school Is historically fraught with challenges commensurate with the opportunities. These challenges mount in the setting in which the student is new to a school system, let alone in the midst of the overwhelming societal disruption of the Covid 19 pandemic, especially for the student using virtual online options in hybrid school settings. A student, however, can utilize principles and practices of Applied Behavior Analysis to mitigate some of the undesirable effects, and thereby ameliorate aspects of the situation. Some of the useful behavioral concepts which can be used by counselors and therapists, teachers, parents, and even the students themselves include developing behavioral momentum, the related use of successive approximations, token economies, the Premack principle, reinforcer and punisher determination, and the use of motivation establishing operations, among others. Domains of the life of the freshman new to the school system using "virtual learning" include the academics (homework, study habits, paying attention in class especially given the presence of household distractions, keeping track of assignments, taking tests, communicating via internet with teachers and classmates); social contacts within the school and making new friends; mastering technological challenges unique to online learning especially in a "hybrid" situation where most classmates are attending in person; and dealing with school system bureaucratic issues including teachers unfamiliarity and difficulties with the virtual technologies and administrators simply not familiar with or sensitive to the challenges faced by online students. In addition there are challenges historically common to all high school students including extra curricular activities in and out of school, social media, household and family dynamics, and the rest of life out of school. This presentation highlights - from the perspective of one such freshman- application of the behavioral concepts to those domains, including ways in which improvements made for the pandemic can be maintained and generalized afterwards.
 
38. Evaluating Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Training and Academic Wellbeing
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JESSICA M VENEGONI (Missouri State University ), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University), Camilla Molica (Missouri State University), Jessica Summers (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: College students all across America went from socializing on campus to social distancing in their dorms. As the number of COVID-19 cases rise, so can the number of mental health challenges that college students experience. The present studies examined the effectiveness of the implementation of a semester long self-compassion training program, which is embedded within undergraduate coursework and compared to students in a control group who receive and complete weekly study tips, and also correlations between academic performance and academic wellbeing using scales such as the AAQ-II, CompACT, and Self-Compassion Scale in undergraduate students. The three dimensions of self-compassion and mindfulness activities utilized in the study include mindfulness, common humanity and self-kindness. A Quasi-experimental study of self-compassion and mindfulness training in college classrooms is measured using a cross over design. Results support a relationship between self-compassion, flexibility, and academic wellbeing, and that a brief intervention can affect these processes in a college classroom.
 
 
 
Poster Session #90
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Online
39.

A Framework for Expanding Scope of Competence

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
DANIEL ALMEIDA (Beacon ABA Services; Cambridge College), Julie Marshall (BEACON Services of Connecticut)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

The increased need for Applied Behavior Analysis services, especially in autism treatment, has resulted in behavior analysts working with client populations, in settings, and addressing behaviors of concern that they were not explicitly trained to address. It is essential that our field provide guidance for how behavior analysts can become competent in new practice areas. However, the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s Professional and Ethical Compliance Code provides limited guidance in this area. Brodhead et al. (2018) has made recommendations for how behavior analysts can self-evaluate and expand their own scope of competence. This poster will expand on the work of Brodhead et al. (2018) to suggest a framework of specific practices to expand one’s scope of competence. This framework will include both technical skills as well as other important repertoires including clinical decision-making, problem solving, rapport building, and culturally responsive practice. Implications for graduate training and professional development will be discussed.

 
Diversity submission 40. Disseminating ABA in Serbia: A Pilot Study
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
MARIJA COLIC (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract: Serbia lacks systematic support for families of children with developmental disabilities (DD) that American counterparts receive as basic rights including ABA services (there is only one active BACB certificant in the whole country). This study aimed to explore potential benefits of ABA service in Serbia and whether a free online ABA webinar is a potential way to provide ABA knowledge for the families of children with DD and professionals. The author provided six free online ABA webinars regarding basic ABA principles and procedures in the Serbian language. The webinars were hosted from May to August 2020 and each webinar lasted 1.5 hours. Number of participants per webinar ranged from 20 to 45. After each webinar, the author sent the questionnaire that consisted of eight closed-ended questions Likert type and three open-ended questions, except the questionnaire that explored overall satisfaction which consisted of four closed-ended questions. The responses of participants who gave informed consent were included in analysis. Results showed that participants were highly satisfied with each webinar as well as with the online training program as a whole. Also, they reported that they would recommend this training to others if it happens in the future and they would like to continue with training. Thus, a free online webinar is a valuable means to disseminate ABA in Serbia to help both families of children with DD and professionals.
 
Diversity submission 41.

Caregiver Involvement in Communication Intervention for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families With Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Across Cultures

Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
CHING-YI LIAO (University of Central Florida), J.B. GANZ (Texas A&M University), Kimberly Vannest (University of Vermont), Sanikan Wattanawongwan (Texas A&M University), Lauren Pierson (Texas A&M University), Valeria Yllades (Texas A&M University), Yi-Fan Li (Texas A&M University)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

This presentation will report a review of single-case studies across cultures to summarize the characteristics of caregiver involvement in communication interventions for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual/developmental disability (IDD) for recommendations on culturally responsive practices. Caregiver involvement can improve communication skills in CLD individuals with ASD and IDD; however, there is a need to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate support to CLD caregivers during caregiver involvement. Limitations and implications for future research and practice will be addressed.

 
42.

Identifying Attitudes of Psychologists and Behavior Analysts TowardTelehealth in Applied Behavior Analysis in Saudi Arabia

Area: TBA; Domain: Basic Research
REEM JAMIL ABDULRAZZAK (Dar Al-Hekma University), Lamis Baowaidan (Dar Al-Hekma University)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

The importance of the distant provision of psychological and behavioral interventions is crucial during COVID-19 pandemic. This study explores psychologists’ and behavior analysts’ attitudes toward using telehealth-based ABA services to support individuals with disabilities in Saudi Arabia. The research addresses a two-fold problem? inadequate corroborated empirical evidence concerning the effectiveness of using telehealth models to provide individuals with disabilities with ABA services and a lack of research on practitioners’ attitudes toward employing telehealth-based ABA services. A quantitative survey method informed the study. The researcher used 20 survey questions to collect quantitative data from 104 participants about their general perceptions toward using telehealth-based ABA services to support individuals with disabilities. The researcher used descriptive, correlational, and statistical analyses to analyze the data. The results showed that most of the surveyed people (53%) stated that they were aware of the concept of telehealth in the field of applied behavioral analysis. Moreover, the majority of respondents expressed positive attitudes toward telehealth-based ABA services in terms of utility, willingness to provide the facilities, and potential benefits during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results also indicated that most of the respondents (88%) are willing to provide telehealth services if an adequate training is provided. On the other hand, (43%) of the participants disagree with the statement that telehealth provides the same benefits as the direct healthcare services. Keywords: Telehealth, applied behavior analysis, behavior analytic interventions, individuals with disabilities, COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth-based ABA services

 
43.

Using Novel Costume Pieces in Asynchronous Lectures to Increase Test Scores

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
ROBIN ARNALL (The Sage Colleges, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

This study wanted to determine if the addition of novel stimuli in the form of costume pieces (primarily novelty hats) would increase student engagement in pre-recorded lectures for an asynchronous masters level course. When comparing the results between a control and an experimental group, the first experimental test results showed better outcomes including a decreased range of scores between the lowest score and highest score across group participants and an increased low score on the exam. Following the first experimental test, however, scores leveled out to scores similar to baseline and the control groups, suggesting either satiation (i.e., wearing off of the effect) or anticipation of the procedure, resulting in no effect. Limitations and future research considerations are also discussed.

 
44.

Production and Validation of a Video to Teach Implementation of Paired-Stimulus Preference Assessment

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Fernanda Mota (Universidade Federal de Alagoas), DANIELA MENDONÇA MENDONÇA RIBEIRO (Universidade Federal de Alagoas; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia sobre Comportamento, Cognição e Ensino)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

A series of studies has demonstrated that video modeling is effective to train staff to conduct stimulus preference assessments. However, only a few studies have conducted the evaluation of content validity of the video presented to participants. The purpose of this study was to produce a video to teach the implementation of paired-stimulus preference assessment, and evaluate its content validy. Initially, a task analysis was carried out to identify the necessary steps to a correct implementation of a paired-stimulus preference assessment. Then, we produced a video containing a written description of each one of steps identified through the task analysis, followed by a depiction of a full assessment. Finally, six professionals with different areas of expertise viewed the video and answered a questionnaire evaluating its content. They indicated that the video had all the steps necessary to conduct the assessment, and suggested a few modifications which were made to improve the comprehensibility of the information presented in the video. Considering that the report of the professionals is not enough to prove the effectiveness of the video, it is necessary to evaluate its effects on the implementation of a paired-stimulus preference assessment.

 
Diversity submission 45. Challenging Racism in Functional Behavior Assessments and Positive Behavior Support Plans
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
OLIVIA GRACE ENDERS (University of Pittsburgh), Kristen Buonomo (University of Pittsburgh), Rachel E. Robertson (University of Pittsburgh)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract: Despite decades of research and calls for reform, exclusionary discipline remains disproportionately used with minoritized students and students with disabilities (SWD). The present study considers how the FBA (FBA) and Positive Behavior Support Plan (PBSP) procedures can be leveraged to achieve equitable outcomes for minoritized SWD. Specifically, researchers created and implemented modules for pre-service teachers. Modules focused on interrogating potential bias and racism within the FBA and PBSP processes. We detail the development, delivery, and student perceptions of modules, directly and explicitly challenged color-evasive FBA practices, and considered how PBSPs can be culturally-responsive. We also present results of social validity surveys and the School Record Analysis (SRA), a tool used to measure pre-service teacher’s implicit racial bias as it relates to student behavior and discipline to provide preliminary insight into the modules’ effectiveness. We conclude the modules provide a promising and necessary step for using behavior analysis for social good.
 
Diversity submission 46. Project Prevent and Address Bullying Behavior at all Tiers (PPABB)
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
JESSE (WOODY) W. JOHNSON (Northern Illinois University), Michelle Demaray (Northern Illinois University), Julia Ogg (Northern Illinois University), Christine Malecki (Northern Illinois University)
Discussant: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract: Bullying is a public health issue and is one of the most serious concerns facing schools across the United States (Cook et al., 2010; Dinkes et al., 2009; Nickerson, 2019). Northern Illinois University’s Project Prevent and Address Bullying Behavior at All Tiers (PPABB) is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. The project is a collaboration between the Specialist in School Psychology Program and the Special Education M.S.Ed. Specialization in Behavior Analysis Program at NIU. The project provides specialized cross-disciplinary training to prevent and address bullying behavior in schools. Scholars from both school psychology and special education receive specialized training to prevent and address bullying behavior in schools including the coursework and experiences to be eligible to sit for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) exam. Over a 5-year period, 12 school psychology and 12 special education scholars will a) complete 9 shared courses, b) complete 8 shared clinical assignments, c) participate in bi-weekly PPABB supervision meetings and d) complete an interdisciplinary coordinated field experience. Graduates of the project will be licensed school psychologists and special educators with expertise in applied behavior analysis and specialized interdisciplinary training in addressing bullying across all tiers of support.
 
 
 
Poster Session #91
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Online
47.

Let’s Save the World With Applied Behaviour Analysis: A Closer Look at the Climate Crisis and What We Can Do About It

Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
MEAGHEN SHAVER (Centre for Behavioural Studies, St. Lawrence College), Pamela Shea (Centre for Behavioural Studies, St. Lawrence College), Jori Bird (Centre for Behavioural Studies, St. Lawrence College)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

Scientific evidence clearly supports the existence of climate change, attributes this change largely to human behaviour, and warns that these changes will produce rapid and potentially catastrophic changes (Houmanfar, & Mattaini, 2015, Lehman & Geller, 2004; Luke, Roose, Rakos, & Mattaini, 2017; Thompson, 2010). Research has provided insight into changing individual’s pro-environmental choices using both consequence and antecedent strategies (Bacon & Krpan, 2018; Wansink & Love, 2014; Kongsbac et al., 2015; Baca-Motes, Brown, Gneezy, Keenan, & Nelson, 2012; Arieley, Bracha, & Meier, 2009). One area of research involves nudges, which are a collection of tools which make purposeful changes in the choice architecture and influence the behaviour of individuals (Lehner, Mont, & Heiskanen, 2015). In reviewing the literature, there are at least eight strategies that can be employed to increase the probability that people will engage in pro-environmental behaviours. These strategies can be implemented at the individual, community and governmental levels to move societies towards a sustainable and livable future.

 
Diversity submission 48. Student Views on Racial Diversity in Behavior Analysis Graduate Programs: Resources and Atmosphere
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
CASEY IRWIN HELVEY (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Richelle Elizabeth Hurtado (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Sydney Batchelder (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Ryan Charles Blejewski (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: The Association for Behavior Analysis International’s recent development of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) board highlights the field’s growing commitment to such topics, with special funding and training opportunities available. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board also recently released updated information about the demographic distribution of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), with the large majority being White and only small percentages across all minority groups represented (BACB, 2020). Accordingly, it seems important to assess the current racial composition of students and faculty in behavior-analytic and related graduate programs, as well as the extent to which topics of DEI are included in behavior-analytic curricula and other program activities. The current poster will present data from a survey on racial diversity within and across behavior analysis graduate programs in the United States. Questions were asked about the availability of resources for supporting and promoting racial diversity on campus and the overall atmosphere of the program in general. While data collection is ongoing, results to date indicate a lack of information about existing resources, a range of opinions on comfort levels relative to DEI issues within the program, and an endorsement of a need for more resources to support students of color.
 
Diversity submission 49. Student Views on Racial Diversity in Behavior Analysis Graduate Programs: Curriculum, Composition, and Application Process
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
RYAN CHARLES BLEJEWSKI (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Sydney Batchelder (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Richelle Elizabeth Hurtado (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Casey Irwin Helvey (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: The Association for Behavior Analysis International’s recent development of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) board highlights the field’s growing commitment to such topics, with special funding and training opportunities available. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board also recently released updated information about the demographic distribution of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), with the large majority being White and only small percentages across all minority groups represented (BACB, 2020). Accordingly, it seems important to assess the current racial composition of students and faculty in behavior-analytic and related graduate programs, as well as the extent to which topics of DEI are included in behavior-analytic curricula and other program activities. The current poster will present data from a survey on racial diversity within and across behavior analysis graduate programs in the United States. Questions were asked about the racial diversity within the behavior analysis program population, curriculum, application, and interview process. While data collection is ongoing, results to date indicate a lack of diversity in program composition, a lack of attention to such issues during the application and interview process, and a strong endorsement of more DEI instruction.
 
Diversity submission 50. What Would Skinner Say? A Critique of Colonization and Modern Aid in Africa
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
NICOLE RENEE SMILAK (Encompass International; Endicott College)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: In Skinner’s chapter titled The Ethics of Helping People, he states, “By giving too much help, we postpone the acquisition of effective behavior and perpetuate the need for help.” Through years living cross-culturally in various African countries, I have seen this demonstrated not only in organizations, but also as part of the very fabric of society. The detrimental effects of helping as described by Skinner are especially evident in African countries that were recently colonized by western, developed countries. Not only do strong reinforcement contingencies surround the helper, but also the helped, which creates and maintains a reciprocal dominating/dependent relationship that has stifled growth in the past and continues to do so in the present. Since the field of behavior analysis was born in the developed world, any dissemination efforts to developing countries will naturally perpetuate the power dynamic that was born out of colonial ‘helping’ practices. In this paper, I outline suggestions for behavior analysts interested in international dissemination; specifically looking at the role participatory community development can play in alleviating colonial relations between developed and developing countries.
 
Sustainability submission 51. Reducing Electricity Consumption in College Classrooms Using Low-Tech Visual Prompts
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
RACHEL LEE (University of Detroit Mercy), Linda Slowik (University of Detroit Mercy), Erin Watts (University of Detroit Mercy)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Sustainability and energy consumption have become important topics, and the field of behavior analysis can make significant contributions in helping society reach its goals in these areas. For organizations such as universities and colleges seeking to reduce energy consumption, it is important that they have a wide variety of strategies and techniques at their disposal, particularly interventions that require little initial investment but yield significant energy savings. The current study was designed to extend prior studies examining the effects of low-tech visual prompts on electricity consumption at a small, urban, Midwestern university. A multiple baseline design was used to determine whether visual prompts placed in immediate proximity to light switches resulted in fewer college classrooms remaining lit by overhead lights while unoccupied. Preliminary results of this study are promising and indicate significant improvement when compared to baseline. Final results and analysis will be presented in conjunction with limitations, implications, recommendations, and additional resources.
 
Diversity submission 52. Meaningful Applications of Culturo-Behavior Systems Science to Social and Global Issues
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
JOSE ARDILA (University of Nevada, Reno), Traci M. Cihon (University of North Texas), Holly Seniuk (Behavior Analyst Certification Board), Sarah M. Richling (Auburn University), Richard F. Rakos (Cleveland State University), Kendra Combs (Sparks Behavioral Services), Mark A. Mattaini (Jane Addams College of Social Work-University of Illinois at Chicago)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Meaningful applications of behavioral systems science to social and global issues have been limited, largely due to lack of preparation and access to critical systems and limited conceptual guidance. In the Matrix Project, Behaviorists for Social Responsibility has worked for six years to address these limitations, emphasizing the potential for behavioral systems analysis to advance the underlying science. The Project currently includes active work groups in two general areas: (a) subcommittees that focus on particular issues and (b) working groups that create resources for specific sectors.These groups have developed a training directory; syllabi and course units in the areas of sustainability, resilience, diversity, and of social importance; (b) and developed state (and national, in the case of Brazil) BFSR chapters, with strong emphasis on student involvement, and supporting individual student engagement in socially significant efforts; (c) examining options for increasing integration of behavior analytic data into state and federal policy; and (d) encouraging and disseminating information related to behaviorists’ involvement in activism and advocacy. The role of volunteers is increasingly emphasized for the advancement of the Project and training procedures for measuring volunteerism are being developed. These projects offer exemplars of the conceptual framework underlying and structuring all of these projects—a systemic integration of Goldiamond’s constructional approach and Lutzker’s ecobehavioral work, relying primarily on shifting interlocking and recursive patterns of antecedents (particularly SDs and motivative operations), reducing response effort, and accessing already established reinforcers.
 
Diversity submission 53.

Performance of Human Rights in the School Environment

Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
AGUSTIN DANIEL GOMEZ FUENTES (Universidad Veracruzana), Paola Alejandra Reyes (Universidad Veracruzana), Minerva Perez Juarez (University of Veracruz, Mexico), Alejandro Francisco Reyes (Universidad Veracruzana)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

The education of values as competencies for life is one of the current challenges of the school. The values can be analyzed as a psychological phenomenon, based on the behavior of an individual in relation to the functional changes of the individual or object before whom he behaves. The conditional relationships are analyzed based on the taxonomy proposed by Ribes (2018). An experimental design with Baseline, Intervention Phase and Follow-up Phase was used. Twelve preschoolers from a Kindergarten in the city of Xalapa, Veracruz participated. The study suggests that the performance of children's rights during the intervention phase was high on average in the three behaviors under study in the five functional levels: higher in promoting the “common good” and “tolerance” and a little lower in “equality between people”. However, in the follow-up phase, under natural conditions, the level of functional aptitude was identified more frequently in the first levels of functional aptitude; higher in “tolerance”, then in "equality between people" and lower in promotion of “the common good”. The results suggest that children's rights are learned and performing as life practices and that they can be studied from the Analysis of Behavior Theory.

 
Diversity submission 54. Truancy Prevention and Diversion Program: An Analysis of Student Absences Before and During COVID-19
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
Kelsey Dachman (University of Kansas), MADISON GRAHAM (University of Kansas), Alicia Morgan (University of Kansas)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: School absenteeism is correlated with academic failure, school dropout, delinquency, and problems in adulthood (e.g., unemployment and incarceration). The US Department of Education declared school absenteeism a national crisis in 2017-18 after reporting over 8 million students missed 10% or more of school. Although we are awaiting the official 2020-21 report, state-wide data suggest lower attendance rates during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to before the pandemic (2019-20). Our country needs programs dedicated to combating school absenteeism now more than ever. The Truancy Prevention and Diversion Program (TPDP) is a comprehensive model that operates under a behavioral framework and includes environmental engineering, attendance monitoring, mentoring, and behavioral contracting to decrease unexcused absences in truant youth and divert them from the formal court system. Analyses of the TPDP’s effects across 10 yr (August 2008-May 2018) demonstrated that 75% of the total 450 students reduced their unexcused absences to zero during participation in the program. However, we adapted several TPDP procedures to abide by health guidelines in light of COVID-19. This study will analyze the effects of these adaptations on unexcused absences and compare the outcomes to those immediately before the pandemic. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be conducted.
 
55.

Evaluating Behavioral Skills Training to Teach College Students to Pour a Standard Serving of Alcohol

Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
EMILY WORMAN (University of the Pacific), Alondra Del Real (University of the Pacific), Samantha Crooks (University of the Pacific), Margaret Brock (University of the Pacific), Mark Matz (University of the Pacific), Angel Zhong (University of the Pacific), Carolynn S. Kohn (University of the Pacific)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

Binge drinking is prevalent among college students. Students who count drinks and set limits are less likely to binge drink; however, these tactics require knowledge of standard servings. Unfortunately, most students are unable to identify or pour standard servings of alcohol. Although Behavioral Skills Training (BST) has been used to teach this skill, researchers have not evaluated the generality of this skill across different types of cups and across time. We used a nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design to examine whether students (N=6) can acquire the skill and whether this skill generalized across untrained cups and a 5 -10 day follow-up. After receiving BST, most participants poured accurately into the trained cup and into one of the untrained cups. At follow-up, three participants poured accurately into all cups without needing additional BST. Two participants poured accurately into all cups after an additional round of BST for one cup. One participant continued to pour inaccurately. Because most participants poured accurately into at least one untrained cup after receiving BST, this suggests that some skill generalization and maintenance occurred. The time investment of BST may be worthwhile, and college administrators may want to incorporate BST into college alcohol education courses.

 
56. The Ubiquity of Social Reinforcement: A Nudging Exploratory Study to Reduce the Overuse of Smartphones in Social Contexts
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
Massimo Cesareo (IESCUM (Istituto Europeo per lo Studio del Comportamento Umano)), MARCO TAGLIABUE (OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University), Annalisa Oppo (Sigmund Freud University IESCUM (Istituto Europeo per lo Studio del Comportamento Umano)), Paolo Moderato (IULM - University of Languages and Communication IESCUM (Istituto Europeo per lo Studio del Comportamento Umano))
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: In this study, we analyze the interaction between smartphones and their users as contingencies of reinforcement underpinning social behavior. We posit the intro-duction of a nudge: an environmental intervention meant to guide behavior that can be easily avoided in a social context. Our experiment takes us to an Italian pub with the hypothesis that a simple environmental factor (a basket featuring a social cue) will contribute to a reduction in digital social interactions in favor of physical social interactions. Data were collected employing a momentary time sampling where we recorded an increase of estimated time with no smartphone interactions and a decrease of estimated time with all the customers seated at one table using their smartphones in the experimental condition. These results were significant and suggest that the nudge was effective at reducing smartphone use among the pa-trons. Moreover, the estimates of these digital interactions were shorter for the statistical unit when compared to the control. Together, the results of study demonstrate that a nudge can reduce smartphone use in contexts of social interac-tion. However, it may be difficult to sustain alternative behavior without provid-ing consequences that reinforce its future occurrences.
 
57. Implicit Bias and Systemic Racism: A Model-Dependent Review of the Literature
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
ELANA KEISSA SICKMAN (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University), Lindsey Audrey Marie Dennis (Missouri State University), Ashley Payne (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Tanya Hough (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Racism and anti-racism are an increasing topic of social and research interest in the United States corresponding to recent instances of police brutality and systemic discrimination. Belisle, Payne, and Paliliunas (under review) proposed a nested model of racial bias against the black community that combines advances in our understanding of Relational Frame Theory, Critical Race Theory, and Meta-contingencies. We evaluated peer-reviewed experimental research related to implicit bias and meta-contingencies and relate the research to the nested model. Research is also evaluated in terms of theory-to-impact levels (Dixon, Belisle, Rehfeldt, & Root, 2018). Results suggest that considerable basic and translational research has been conducted on implicit bias against people of color along with some applied work to reduce implicit bias. Minimal research has evaluated the impact of these interventions as applied at a social level. Minimal research has approached systemic racism by evaluating potential meta-contingencies that operate within racist systems, necessitating more research in this area. Avenues for future research are discussed with an emphasis on implementation and impact research to develop affect technologies to combat individualistic, systemic, and systematic racism.
 
 
 
Poster Session #93
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Online
58.

Contingency Analysis to Reduce Behaviors Valued as a Problem in the School Environment

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Lisbeth Vázquez (Universidad Veracruzana), EMANUEL MERAZ-MEZA MEZA (Universidad Veracruzana), Esperanza Ferrant-Jimenez (Universidad Veracruzana), Cecilia Magdalena Molina Lopez (Universidad Veracruzana)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

This research involves a critique of the concept of childhood “pathologization” that has been given greater importance, mainly due to the increase in children diagnosed with disorders that did not exist before, which has given rise to a catalog of treatments that include behavioral management therapies on occasions accompanied by drugs, losing sight of the individuality of the minor and only attending to a clinical diagnosis. In the present study, the effect of a behavioral change program was designed, applied, and evaluated through Contingency Analysis to observe human behavior, whether it is valued as problematic or not. This research was carried out using an experimental ABC design in two primary school children, referred for presenting behaviors valued as "problem behaviors". The interventions were carried out in three phases: Analysis, application, and follow-up. The analysis shows that morphologically similar behaviors, defined by the teacher, should be addressed differently in each one, given their circumstances, and that approach does not depend on a diagnosis. The application phase consisted of the use of behavior modification techniques adjusted to each context. The results show a decrease of problems behaviors on intervention and follow-up phases. The discussion is based on Behavior Analysis Theory.

 
59. Video Game Dependence: Relation Between Genre and Impulsive Behavior
Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
Alexandre Cintra (Universidade Estadual Paulista), FABIO LEYSER GONCALVES (Universidade Estadual Paulista)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract: Video game dependence has become a matter of public health concern. Even so, it is still a subject in need of a consensual definition, etiology and prevalence. This study investigated the relation between video game genres/modality, and symptoms of dependence (especially impulsive behavior). We gathered data using an online survey taken by 100 individuals, mostly males. We also tested video game dependence level using the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF). Participants named their most played games and performed two delay discounting tasks, one in a monetary setting and the other in a gaming setting. Results suggest players who prefer Shooter [F(1,93) = 3.92; p<0.05] or RPG (Role-playing game) [F(5, 94) = 7.614; p<0.05] games presented more signs of dependence compared with other players. Those who prefer Adventure [F(1,93) = 4.04; p<0.05] games, on the other hand, showed fewer symptoms. Concerning modality, preference for single-player games was associated with more symptoms. Monetary delay discounting was not significantly associated with dependence symptoms. But gaming delay discounting was associated with dependence symptoms [F(5, 94) = 7.614; p<0.001]. This research points to variables related to video game dependence and contributes to the assessment and understanding of its etiology.
 
60.

Behavior Analytic Research in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Brief Review

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
JESSICA M HINMAN (University of Illinois at Chicago ), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago), Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago), Rene J Niessner (University of Illinois at Chicago )
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

Although Acceptance and Commitment therapy or Training (ACT) derives from behavior analytic principles, ACT has only recently become popular amongst behavior analysts. Although an incredibly large body of research already exist, supporting its utility to produce meaningful behavior change, most of the studies are conducted outside behavior analytic settings. The current project examines the state of ACT research conducted within the field of behavior analysis. Preliminary results suggest that the majority of empirical research conducted on ACT within behavior analytic journals (N = 36) has not been conducted by behavior analysts (n = 9). The current study also examines participant demographics, types experimental designs used, dependent variables, and the types of interventions implemented. Our brief review suggests that more empirical research is needed to examine the direct effect of ACT among diverse clinical populations typically served by behavior analysts.

 
61.

Integrating Principles of Behavior Change and Public Health to Change Habits and Combat the Challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
RICHARD COOK (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates, Hershey, PA East Shore Psychiatric Associates, Harrisburg, PA), Matthew Gross (Shippensburg University), Joseph Martin (Shippensburg, PA)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

Moreso than in most medical problems and health crisis situations, leaders of many and diverse disciplines repeatedly cite “changes in behavior” as the mainstay of addressing the challenges of the Covid 19 pandemic. Given the lack of preventative, protective, and treatment modalities, the importance of behavior and habit change by individuals and society becomes the most prominent “tool in the box,” and allows for empowerment of individuals, familys, organizations, and societies. This presentation highlights ways in which behavioral principles and techniques, especially when integrated with relevant principles of medicine and public health, can, and need to, be applied by clinicians and non clinicians to promote desired behaviors/habits including mask/PPE use (and techniques) and practicing social distancing,as well as remembering to NOT do many things we habitually do like shaking hands and holiday family gatherings. It applies as well to "private" behaviors of attitudes, opinions, knowledge (reality of the illness, safety of vaccines). The current pandemic serves as yet another opportunity for those most skilled in the principles and techniques of the management of behavior and development of habits to showcase the power of the discipline in making substantive desirable impacts on many phases of the Covid 19 pandemic, and the people affected by it.

 
62.

Online Acceptance and Commitment Training Matrix for Japanese-Speaking Parents With Distress

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
YUKIE KURUMIYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Yors A. Garcia (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

Parental distress and coercive parent-child interactions are of major issues in our society. Cultural biases, stigma, and language barriers keep Asian-American parents and children away from mental and behavioral services. Behavior parent training as part of applied behavior analysis services is usually available to parents and children if their child has a diagnosis, but not for parents of children without diagnoses. Research in the area of parent-child interactions suggests a combination of behavior parent training and acceptance and commitment training as an effective preventative intervention alleviates parental distress and fosters positive parent-child interactions. However, limited research is available that examined the effectiveness of preventative acceptance and commitment training-based interventions for this population. Thus, the current study evaluated the effects of the individual acceptance and commitment training Matrix online training for Japanese-speaking distressed parents in the United States, using a single-subject design. Specific dependent variables measured were value-driven behaviors, parental engagement in treatment, parental distress, and psychological flexibility. The results revealed that the acceptance and commitment training Matrix training was effective in improving all four dependent variables. Parents reported that the training was culturally sensitive, effective, and appropriate in the social validity questionnaire.

 
63.

Increasing Home-Cooking Behaviors With a Social-Media-Based Interdependent Group Contingency

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MARIAH FAITH JENSEN (California State University, Fresno), Sharlet D. Rafacz (California State University, Fresno), Dolly Mizner (California State University, Fresno ), Alexis Barajas (California State University, Fresno)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

Healthy eating is essential in combating diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Unfortunately, healthy eating has decreased with the decline of home-cooking and increased consumption of convenience foods. Research shows some indication that cooking interventions that contain social contingencies are more likely to have results that maintain and generalize to the home versus those that do not. The current study targeted meal preparation in the homes of college students utilizing an interdependent group contingency. 18 participants were divided into three groups, added to a social media group page, and required to post about their home cooking. The group contingency included a goal where all members of the group had to increase their number of weekly meals prepared in the home in order for all members of the group to receive monetary reinforcement. Results indicated that while the intervention initially increased meal preparation, these increases quickly declined. This is most likely due to group members failing to meet goal and not contacting reinforcement. However, further research is needed to determine if other group contingencies or goal levels may be more successful and utilizing social media groups may still have utility as it allows remote delivery of social consequences.

 
64. Effect of Social Media Stimuli on Reports of Self-Compassion, Mindfulness, Psychological Flexibility, and Affect: Basic and Translational Investigations
Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
BREANNA LEE (Missouri State University), Baylor Miles (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract: Social media use has been increasing for years; researchers have explored the negative effects of social media usage on individuals’ psychological well-being, however the potential positive effects have received less empirical attention (Pantic, 2014). The purpose of the two studies was to examine the effect of Instagram stimuli related to self-compassion, psychological flexibility, and mindfulness on college student reports of psychological flexibility, affect, self-compassion, and mindfulness. The first examination, in a laboratory setting, compared participant responses on self-report measures prior to and following viewing a series of Instagram stimuli for a brief time; a control group viewed neutral stimuli and an experimental group viewed compassion/mindfulness stimuli. The second examination, in a natural setting, compared participant responses on the same self-report measures over a one-week period. Participants included individuals who had a personal Instagram account used at least ten minutes per day. The experimental group used their account to follow three “tags” (self-compassion, acceptance and commitment therapy, and mindfulness) for one week. The control group continued social media use as usual. Results are interpreted in terms of stimulus control and motivative augmental stimuli. Implications for the development of interventions utilizing social media platforms to support psychological and behavioral well-being are discussed.
 
65.

Examining the Impact of FitbitWith and Without Competitions on Physical Activity Among Children

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
JULIA LOCKYER (Pepperdine University), Adel C. Najdowski (Pepperdine University), Matthew P. Normand (University of the Pacific), Christina Master (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine), Shelly Harrell (Pepperdine University)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

Physical inactivity continues to be a national health concern contributing to increased risk for mental and physical health problems in childhood (Reiner et al., 2013; Väistö et al., 2014). Environmental factors such as decreased activity and increased sedentary routine (i.e., video gaming and television watching) as well as social influence regarding physical activity among children are thought to contribute to and maintain the problematic unhealthy lifestyle trends (McKenzie et al., 1997; Väistö et al., 2014). Introduction to physical activity habits at a young age can help to promote beneficial lifelong health behaviors. Obesity prevention and physical activity intervention programs are often costly and require extensive resources to run (Chen & Wilkosz, 2014; Rivera et al., 2016). Recent advances in mobile technology, such as the Fitbit,® can potentially offer a cost-effective solution to increasing physical activity levels among children. Few research studies have been published on the effectiveness of Fitbit® use among young children. Even fewer studies have examined the impact that social influence, such as gamification or challenge features, have on the user’s level of physical activity. The current study was aimed at determining: the effectiveness of the Fitbit® with children and the impact of social influences on physical activity. Overall, it was found that the Fitbit® alone and when using its 24-hr challenge feature were ineffective at increasing step counts to recommended levels. Similarly, adding the goal, for two out of the three dyads, was ineffective at increasing step counts, and the one dyad who did respond to this component was found to have confounded data due to learning about the upcoming rewards phase. The addition of tangible rewards was only found to increase steps for two of the four participants who received them.

 
66.

A Socially Validated Comparison of Tummy Time With and Without Preferred Items

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MINJUNG PARK (CUNY Queens College), Rika Ortega (CUNY graduate center), Joshua Jessel (Queens College, City University of New York)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

Tummy time is an activity for infants to practice their early motor skills. Although most pediatricians recommend tummy time, parents may avoid the procedures due to infant discomfort during this period. The present study investigated whether a preferred item increased head elevation and decrease negative vocalizations during tummy time with two typically developing infants. We compared more-preferred items identified using preference assessments to that of maternal attention. In addition, we evaluated social acceptability of the two procedures with the mothers in two ways. First, the mothers were given the direct opportunity to select which tummy time treatment they would like to implement in a concurrent chains design. Second, the mothers completed social validity questionnaires regarding their personal experiences. We found that more-preferred items and mother’s attention were effective at increasing head elevation and decreasing negative vocalizations during tummy time for both infants; however, the caregivers preferred the treatment including the more-preferred items.

 
67. A Behavioral Economic Demand Analysis of Mothers’ Decision to Exclusively Breastfeed in the Workplace
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
YUSUKE HAYASHI (Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton), Nicole Fisher (Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton), Donald A. Hantula (Temple University), Lydia Furman (Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital), Yukiko Washio (RTI International)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract: The present study determined whether behavioral economic demand analysis could characterize mothers’ decision to exclusively breastfeed in the workplace. Females, aged between 18 and 50 who have given birth in three years, were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk. In a novel demand task with hypothetical scenarios, in which they returned to work with a 2-month-old baby, participants rated their likelihood of breastfeeding their baby at a workplace lactation room versus formula-feeding their baby at their desk. The distance to the lactation room ranged from 10 sec to 60 min. This assessment was conducted with and without hypothetical financial incentives for 6-month exclusive breastfeeding. The two demand indices, intensity and elasticity, which could conceptually represent initiation and continuation of breastfeeding, respectively, were analyzed in relation to the participants’ experience of exclusive breastfeeding. The demand for breastfeeding in the workplace was more intense and less elastic among mothers with an experience of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding and under the condition with hypothetical financial incentives. The novel demand task can potentially provide a useful behavioral marker for quantifying mothers’ decision to initiate and continue exclusive breastfeeding, identifying risk of early exclusive breastfeeding cessation, and developing an intervention to assist mothers to exclusively breastfeed.
 
68. Impact of Social Interactions on Group Contingency in Promoting Walking Behavior
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MINWOO JO (Yonsei University)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract: Group contingency (GC) is a behavior management strategy where a consequence is contingent upon performance of a group. Effectiveness of GC has been well-established. However, social interaction among group members has not been well examined, even though intensive social interaction is expected to occur. Thus, we investigated whether social interactions affect effectiveness and cost-efficiency of group contingency. 78 undergraduate students were grouped in teams of three based on their step counts and were randomly assigned to 4 conditions: 2(random dependent condition, interdependent condition) x 2(social interactions possible, social interactions impossible). Step counts and activity time were gathered through an application ‘Beactive’ and participants eared points each time their team met the goal for 66 days. Data for 42 participants were analyzed after eliminating those who dropped out or had more than 10 missing data. 2x2 ANOVA analysis shows that there is no significant effectiveness of group contingency or social interactions on step counts and activity time. However, the increase of activity time was higher in social interactions possible condition when the same amount of points was provided. The result suggests that social interactions may not affect effectiveness of group contingency, but cost-efficiency.
 
Diversity submission 69.

Social Discounting and Health Perceptions

Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
ANNA GADE (Gonzaga University ), Paul Romanowich (Gonzaga University)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of different diabetes diagnoses on sharing practices. Diabetes is a family of diagnoses that involves a dysfunction of the pancreas and impacted insulin levels. Different forms of diabetes include type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and prediabetes. Diabetes is a health condition that may incur certain stigma and bias, and this may impact social interaction. Through this study, data collection was performed in order to surmise if there is a difference in sharing practices concerning diabetes diagnoses. It was hypothesized that sharing practices would be impacted by the types of diabetes diagnosis, versus control, in a negative manner. Using a between subject model, social discounting was tested at different social distances within each different group. The participants, university students, were divided into four different groups correlating to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, and control. Data was collected and analyzed. Through the use of different statistical analyses including non-parametric statistics, it was seen that there may be a difference between sharing for diabetes and non-diabetic individuals with participants trending towards being more willing to share with individuals diagnosed with diabetes.

 
70.

Children's Behavior Function and Subjective Reinforcement Value: Pilot Study

Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
SILVIA MORALES CHAINE (National Autonomous University of Mexico)
Discussant: Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

Before the COVID19 pandemic, 20% of the children population was already at risk of showing problem behaviors associated with parents´ raising behaviors. Furthermore, we can study behavioral mechanisms through understanding behavioral learning principles underlying children´s choice of behaving. This paper describes the relationship between children´s behavior function and discounting of reinforcement in specific contexts as a pilot study. Thirteen scholar children, between 6 and 8 years old (M= 7; 69% were girls) took part in this preliminary study. The parents´ mean age was 34 years old (SD=6.01), 92% were women, and 100% were in confinement because of the COVID-19. We used the Children´s behavior inventory, the Alabama Questionnaire, the Probability of Compliance Occurrence Questionnaire, a Caregivers-children´s Observational System, and the Rabbat software version 2.0 (Escobar et al., 2020). We used a within-subject design to get the baseline thorough functional analysis situations (e.g., Waiting to receive reinforcement) and to assess the subjective value of reinforcement through delay, probability, and effort discounting tasks. We used Zoom®, Meet®, Visual Basic 10 Express®, and Google Forms® platforms, and accomplishing APA (2013) ethical guidelines. Mainly, results from the 104 behavioral patterns from the behavior´s functional analysis and the 780 trials of discounting task (260 temporal, 260 probability, and 260 effort discounting task) suggested children´s waiting to receive reinforcement negatively associated with opposition defiant, and hyperactivity behavior; both associated to effort and probability discounting (respectively). Furthermore, data indicated a generality of the children´s context choice effect over reinforcement devaluation when used the virtual rewards in computational environments and how different mechanisms of choice behavior resulted from the cost associated with the delivery of prizes. We have initiated to study the relationship between these subjective values of reinforcement, functional analysis of behavior, and choice procedures explaining children´s behaviors.

 
 
 
Poster Session #96
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Online
85.

The Effects of the Good Behavior Game on Students With Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Classrooms

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
LYNDSEY AIONO CONRADI (University of Hawai'i), John Matt Jameson (University of Utah), Aaron J. Fischer (University of Utah), Robert E. O'Neill (University of Utah), John J. McDonnell (University of Utah), Leanne Hawken (University of Utah)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a Tier 1 classroom intervention used to encourage teachers to implement effective classroom management strategies to increase academically engaged behaviors (AEB) and decrease disruptive behaviors (DB) in the classroom. The GBG literature demonstrates positive effects across various settings and participants. However, only two studies explore the effects of the GBG on students with severe disabilities. To expand the GBG literature, this study used a single-case multiple probe baseline design to investigate the impact of the GBG intervention on students with severe disabilities and general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Findings indicate students were able to understand classroom-wide expectations and participate in the GBG, as demonstrated by an overall increase in AEB and an overall decrease in DB across all participants. Findings also suggest that the GBG had positive effects on general educator behaviors illustrated by an increase in praise statements and the implementation of positive classroom management strategies. This study demonstrates how the GBG can be used to provide positive behavioral supports to all students, including those with severe disabilities in inclusive settings. Findings also indicate several implications for practitioners as well as future researchers in the field of special education.

 
86.

Acquisition of Joint Attention Skills in Children With Cortical Visual Impairment

Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
AVERY KEITH (Brock University), Nicole Luke (Brock University)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The emergence of joint attention is a critical point in children’s social and language development. Research shows the efficacy of various behavioural teaching strategies in increasing responses and initiations of bids for joint attention among children with autism spectrum disorder. The use of gaze-based behaviours has been the predominate method of evaluating the attainment of joint attention, as a marker of social engagement and awareness of others’ attention. Although children with visual impairment have difficulty perceiving how others’ attention is directed towards stimuli, they are assumed to acquire joint attention through alternative sensory modalities and positive social experiences. The purpose of the current study is to examine the effectiveness of a parent-implemented behavioural teaching strategy via telehealth to teach children with cortical visual impairment to engage in more bids for joint attention. Three to five children under 6-years and their caregivers will participate in a behaviour skills training procedure using a single-case, multiple baseline design. This study will report on the findings from pre to follow-up changes in children’s engagement in joint attention. The results of the study are expected to provide valuable information about effective caregiver-implemented behavioural teaching strategies to increase joint attention skills of children with visual impairment.

 
87. Validation process of French Versions of the Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
MARIE-JOËLLE BRACONNIER (Universite du Quebec à Trois-Rivieres), Carmen Dionne (Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres), Annie Paquet (Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract: A need for assessments linked to early intensive behavioral intervention curriculum programs, and useful for intervention purposes, is identified by literature (Gould et al., 2011). Besides, a portrait of the child’s needs is required to make the best decisions for intervention (Bagnato et al., 2010). Many childcare providers report their dissatisfaction of conventional assessment tools (Bagnato et al., 2014). The Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children (AEPS®), 2nd edition (Bricker, 2002), an authentic assessment and intervention tool, is a promising option. The 3rd version is currently submitted to a translation process. This study aims to contribute to the validation process of both French editions of the AEPS® assessment. A quantitative survey with two online questionnaires is proposed. Participants were Quebec childcare providers from five public early intervention services centers (n = 26). From those, experienced users completed the second questionnaire about the 3rd edition (n = 11). Results show many positive effects on professional evaluation practices. Furthermore, the tool’s items and procedures reflect the characteristics of an authentic assessment based on the eight evaluation-specific quality indicators (Bagnato et al., 2010). The AEPS® presents a high level of social acceptability, and facilitates teamwork and parents-professionals collaboration.
 
88.

A Systematic Literature Review of Behavior Skills Training to Teach Vocational Skills to Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
KALEIYA P. IMLAY (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Chrystal Jansz Rieken (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

According to the Center of Disease Control, approximately 40 million adults in the workforce have a disability; the numbers are increasing ((Disability and Health Data System [DHDS], 2020). There is growing support for inclusive workplaces for adults with disabilities alongside legislation and State endorsed vocational training however eligibility criteria, costs, and limited availability to training programs often make them inaccessible. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate other training options. Behavior Skills Training (BST; Fetherson & Sturmey, 2014) is considered an evidence-based training model used to teach novel skills to a variety of populations including adults with disabilities. A systematic literature review from 2000 to 2020 was completed to determine what is known about using Behavior Skills Training to teach vocational skills to adults. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Results supported that while Behavior Skills Training was effective in teaching vocational skills to adults, there were inconsistencies across components of Behavior Skills Training used, limited technological and measurement information reported, and outcomes indicting that the procedure was not efficient. Recommendations for future research are provided.

 
89.

Evaluation of Staff Training Programs to Address Challenging Behaviour in Adults With?Developmental Disabilities: Meta-Analysis

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
VICTORIA SCOTT (Brock University), Laura E. Mullins (Brock University)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Many adults with developmental disabilities supported in residential services engage in challenging behaviour, interfering with their quality of life. Training direct care staff is essential to address these behaviours and improve relationships between service providers (SP) and service users (SU). However, little research directly assesses the effectiveness of training based on direct measures of behaviours or the long-term effects of these changes. This meta-analysis of 13 single-subject experimental designs evaluated staff training's effect on outcomes for SP and SU. The purpose of this research was to examine the types of training and factors responsible for improvements in SP and SU behaviours directly following training and during maintenance. Training in positive behavioural support was the most effective training for changing SP and SU's behaviour, followed by active supports. In-situ training and incorporating multiple components of behavioural skills training (particularly models and feedback) appeared to lead to greater changes. Follow-up was conducted for six out of 14 studies, and four maintained their results. The only factor found to account for these results was the use of a group format. This research demonstrates that the type of training and how training is delivered influence the effectiveness and maintenance of outcomes.

 
90. Effects of Prosocial Process on Group Functioning of Two Developmental Support Agency Management Teams
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
EMMA CHAIKOWSKY (Brock University), Sabrina Nifo (Brock University), Laura E. Mullins (Brock University), Priscilla Burnham Riosa (Brock University)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract: The Coronavirus pandemic has presented agencies supporting adults with developmental disabilities with additional challenges in safely providing quality support to the clients they serve, leading to increases in stress experienced by management teams. Prosocial is a process-based group intervention that uses Acceptance and Commitment Training to promote effective group functioning and psychological flexibility. Using a quasi-experimental (waitlist-control) design, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a four-session virtually delivered Prosocial intervention on the group functioning of two management teams (n1=12, n2=7). Direct observations of goals and engagement were conducted during biweekly management meetings. Survey data on well-being and group functioning were collected before, during, and after Prosocial. Social validity data on participants’ experiences with Prosocial and data on service provision (i.e., chemical restraints, medication errors, incident reports) were also collected. Preliminary results indicated progress toward the goals achieved. Content analysis of open-ended survey questions indicated improvements in group functioning and collaboration. However, the team’s group functioning ratings showed no significant improvements. Service provision data indicated slight reductions following Prosocial. Study results will be used to inform the implementation of Prosocial throughout both agencies and its utility within the developmental service sector.
 
91.

Variations of the Diverted-Attention Condition to Identify Attention-Maintained Problem Behavior

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
MCKENNA ELIZABETH KOPESKY (Marquette University Student), Jeffrey H. Tiger (Marquette University), Lauren Casper (Marquette University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

After an initial, multielement functional analysis resulted in low and undifferentiated levels of aggressive behavior across conditions, experimenters evaluated a diverted-attention condition in which a target therapist engaged in conversation with a secondary therapist and delivered mild reprimands following instances of aggression. The sensitivity of aggression to attention during this condition was demonstrated in a reversal design. Next experimenters evaluated multiple permutations of this condition including one in which a single therapist was present but engaged in a conversation on the phone. This condition required fewer staff members but also occasioned elevated levels of aggression as when both therapists were present. Aggression under this condition was then reduced using functional communication training.

 
92.

An Evaluation of Functional Communication Training to Treat Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior: A Systematic Review of the Literature

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
ANDREA RAMIREZ-CRISTOFORO (The University of Texas at Austin ), Terry S. Falcomata (The University of Texas at Austin), Fabiola Vargas Londono (The University of Texas at Austin)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

Functional Communication Training (FCT) is a well-known and often recommended intervention to treat problem behavior among individuals with developmental disabilities. FCT consists of teaching a functional, alternative communicative response to replace problem behavior in the individual’s repertoire to allow them to obtain functional reinforcers that previously maintained problem behavior. Despite a number of literature reviews on FCT, to date, no literature review has examined studies that have evaluated FCT as a treatment for negatively reinforced problem behavior. It may be beneficial to explore treatment-related factors to inform practitioners and researchers on how to increase the social validity and generalization of FCT outcomes for negatively reinforced problem behavior(s). The primary purpose of this literature review was to evaluate factors that impact the effectiveness of FCT alone and/or in conjunction with other interventions to treat negatively reinforced problem behaviors. Results across 47 empirical studies supported and extended prior literature review findings. Some novel identified findings on factors that can affect FCT efficiency and generalizability were quality of reinforcement, variability of mands, and the exposure of problem behavior to establishing operations. Recommendations for clinicians and potential avenues for future research will be discussed. Keywords: functional communication training, negatively reinforced behavior, escape-maintained problem behavior

 
Diversity submission 93.

Using ACT to Assess Stigmas and Biases Within South Asian Families to Promote Treatment Support

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
KRITI CADAMBI (University of Southern California )
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

Cultural biases are prevalent in our society, and many instances have the power to influence individuals in different degrees. Within the South Asian community, there are numerous social stigmas and negative perspectives on seeking mental health services. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the social stigmas and cultural biases within the community experienced by parents who are raising children with developmental disorders. As a result, furthering their readiness to seek services for their child. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is beneficial in identifying values and choosing committed actions to aid parents in overcoming the barriers they face to better support their child. The specific ACT tools such as, identifying personal values, paying attention to the present moment, and choosing committed actions that are meaningful to them can help shift how this specific group approaches treatment for their child. Once caregivers identify what specific changes need to occur in their behaviors, whether that is influenced by South Asian stigma and biases experienced, this can influence the ability to access services for their child as early as possible. ACT is a powerful tool to overcome the prejudice caregivers encounter and promote fulfilling lives for their children.

 
Diversity submission 94.

A Systematic Review of Trial-Based Functional Analysis of Challenging Behavior: An Update and Synthesis

Area: DDA; Domain: Theory
VICTORIA ANDRUS (University of Hawaii at Manoa ), Jennifer Ninci (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

The effectiveness of interventions based on functional analysis is well established in the empirical literature. A variation of the functional analysis is the trial-based functional analysis. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of studies that utilize the trial-based functional analysis as a means of assessing challenging behavior, synthesized with the Rispoli et al. (2014) study. The method is based on the method described in Rispoli et al. (2014), with some minor changes including the addition of an examination of interobserver agreement and procedural integrity, and a look at the number of studies published on trial-based functional analysis through the years. The results of the current study add to the growing literature on the effectiveness of the trial-based functional analysis as a means of identifying the function of challenging behavior. This systematic review adds to and synthesizes with the Rispoli et al. (2014) literature review by examining participants and trial-based functional analysis characteristics in studies ranging in date from 2013 to October 2020. We compare the results of each review and discuss directions for future research, implications for practitioners, and limitations of this study.

 
95.

Analysis of the LIFE Curriculum to Establish Domestic and Vocational Skills Remotely

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
LINDSEY AUDREY MARIE DENNIS (Missouri State University), Raymond burke (APEX Regional Program ), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

The present research study sought to elaborate and adapt necessary vocational skills training procedures to a remote climate. Adapting Constant Time Delay procedures (CDT) to online instruction allows researchers to examine the effects of teaching domestic and vocational skills, identified by the LIFE curriculum (Dixon, in press), to two individuals with various developmental and/or intellectual diagnosis. Throughout this study, researchers utilized a matrix training approach to assist in developing the selected domestic skills (i.e. washing a table, washing a fridge door, washing a window) to increase autonomous living and potential future employment opportunities. A multiple probe design across targeted skills was replicated across the participants within their homes with prompting provided over virtual conferencing due to COVID-19. Results demonstrated an increase of task completion independent of prompting for both participants and when presented with the Treatment Inventory - Short Form (TEI-SF) participants indicated the intervention was helpful, positive, and adaptable to their current circumstances.

 
Sustainability submission 96.

Teaching Leisure Activities Using Video Modeling for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Review of Literature

Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CHAIDAMOYO GOODSON DZENGA (Tennessee Technological University), Krystal Kennedy (Tennessee Technological University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

Individuals with developmental disabilities have limited access to participate in leisure activities compared to typically developing peers. Despite an abundance of free time, this population has limited access to leisure activity participation due to maladaptive behaviors and deficits in communication and social interaction. Leisure activities provides an opportunity for them to build relationships and gain skills that are essential for successful integration into the general public. Video modeling provides several advantages, such as, it can be edited to show the desired behavior, and the video can be repeated for better understanding. This systematic literature review analyzed 16 single-subject studies published from 2000 to 2020 that used video modeling to teach individuals with developmental disabilities to complete leisure activities. The dependent variable was the percentage of completion of the leisure activities. The studies were analyzed using the guidelines of the What Works Clearing House (2020). Participants in the study were aged between 3-35 years and were diagnosed with a varying diagnosis that fell under the generic term of developmental disabilities. Initial results analyzed through visual analysis indicate that video modeling is effective. The study’s limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

 
97.

Comparing the Performances of Youth With Intellectual Disability on a Visuospatial Working Memory Task With a Distributed and an Accumulated Reinforcement Schedule

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
KYONG-MEE CHUNG (Yonsei University), Chansol Park (Yonsei University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

The relative effectiveness of accumulated reinforcement over distributed reinforcement among persons with developmental disabilities (DD) has been well established especially on easy tasks. However, inconsistent findings have been found for studies using diverse task difficulties. In this study, effectiveness of distributed and accumulated schedule of reinforcement was investigated using a visuospatial working memory task with moderate level of task difficulty. 33 children with intellectual disability (ID) ages from 7 to 11 years old were recruited. This study used a within-subject design in which visuospatial working memory task was administered under a distributed and an accumulated schedule of reinforcement. Dependent variables were accuracy rate, response rate per minute and correct response per minute. The results showed that accuracy rate and correct response rate per minute in the accumulated schedule of reinforcement were significantly greater than the distributed schedule of reinforcement. There was no significant difference between the groups in response per minute. Implications and limitations of current research and suggestions for future research were discussed.

 
 
 
Poster Session #97
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Online
98. Using Relational Frame Theory to Teach Perspective-Taking Skills
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
BRITTANY DOLAN (St. Cloud State University; Centre for Behavioural Studies, St. Lawrence College), Meaghen Shaver (Centre for Behavioural Studies, St. Lawrence College), Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

Perspective taking is a common skillset of interest when considering individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Emerging trends suggest a relational frame theory (RFT) lens can be effective in establishing deictic responding as a generalized operant of behaviour, which is arguably synonymous with improving perspective taking skills, and thought to underlie diverse social skills. The current project seeks to explore the extent to which relational training can improve deictic relational responding, as well as the effect of such training on performance on common Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. This case study examines the learning trajectory of an 8-year-old boy with ASD via PEAK Equivalence and PEAK Transformation modules. Results suggest an RFT approach is effective for the participant, yielding program mastery and demonstrating relational responding. Despite evidence suggesting relational training may not transfer to performance on common ToM tasks in individuals with ASD, the results discussed in this paper may indicate otherwise. Implications and next steps are discussed.

 
100.

Evaluating an eHealth Case Management System in an Intensive Behavioural Intervention Program

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
AMY PANKEWICH (University of Manitoba; St.Amant), Toby L. Martin (University of Manitoba; St.Amant Research Centre), Kerri L. Walters (St. Amant; University of Manitoba), Charmayne Dube (New Directions; University of Manitoba)
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

Early intensive behavioural internvention (EIBI) is a treatment program designed to increase adaptive behaviour and decrease maladaptive behaviours for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The current standard of data collection used by EIBI programs in Manitoba is paper-and-pencil. Participants were three Autism Consultants and one Autism Senior Tutor currently employed in a large, community-based EIBI program. Differences between accuracy of collecting Discrete Trial Teaching and challenging behaviour data using paper-and-pencil and an eHealth tool (TNAC®) were examined. Questions regarding the social validity of both methods of data collection were also examined. There were no substantial differences in accuracy between collecting DTT and challenging behaviour data using paper-and-pencil or TNAC®. Respondents indicated in the social validity questionnaires that paper-and-pencil was the preferred method to collect data across all categories. These findings suggest that using an eHealth tool for data collection could provide benefits to an EIBI program if the social validity components are addressed.

 
Diversity submission 104.

A Synthesis of Interventions for Children With Autism in East Asia: A Scoping Review

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
JAMES LEE (Department of Special Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ), Hannah Etchison (Georgia State University )
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

Children with autism require specific course of psychosocial and educational interventions to reach their full potentials. Often, these interventions are based on the principles of applied behavior analysis, which are reported to be effective regardless of cultural or geographical boundaries. However, relatively little is known about what practices are prevalent in efforts to treat children with autism in many countries and regions outside the United States, particularly in Asian countries, which accounts for a large portion of the world’s population. Therefore, we conducted a scoping review of all single-case research conducted with children with ASD in all of East Asia, and examined what practices are currently being promoted using single-case design, and the overall situation for autism treatment in these countries. Furthermore, we collected data specifically on social validity in order to examine perceptions of participants in these interventions. Through a systematic search of the literature, we identified a total of 27 single-case studies, and we systematically coded, synthesized and analyzed the data from all studies. Implications and recommendation for future research will also be discussed to address the treatment gap of evidence-based practices in these regions.

 
105.

Reduction in Stereotypic Behavior of a 17-Year-Old Student With Autism Through a Self-Management Treatment Package in a School Setting

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
NICOLA CEFALO (Aliter Cooperativa Sociale)
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

For individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a wide variety of treatment techniques have been proposed to decrease stereotypic behaviors. A majority of studies used consequence-based approaches exclusively. I used a self-management treatment package to reduce stereotypic behavior of a 17-Years-Old Student with ASD, in the school setting. The treatment package includes: teaching to emit the target behavior when the therapist says so, teaching to tact the target behavior when the therapist does it, check on a card if the target behavior was emitted using a momentary time sampling measurement procedure; gradually increase of the interval of measurement. I use a withdrawal with a parametric design to show internal validity. Data shows an increase from a mean of 54% of intervals without stereotypic behaviors in baseline, to 100% of intervals without stereotypic behaviors with the treatment package starting from a 1 minute interval until a 3 minutes interval.

 
106.

Teaching Imitation to Young Learners With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Discrete Trial Teaching With Contingent Imitation

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
ALICE BRAVO (Haring Center for Inclusive Education; University of Washington)
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

Research has demonstrated imitation to be a pivotal skill in early childhood, serving learning and social interaction functions for young children. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) frequently experience delays in this skillset, demonstrating challenges in the ability and/or propensity to imitate the actions of others. Current intervention programs frequently use Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT) or Reciprocal Imitation Training (RIT) to teach imitation to young children with ASD. This study combined one component of RIT – contingent imitation – with DTT to enhance learning outcomes related to both the ability and propensity to imitate. A multiple probe design across three preschool children with ASD was conducted within participants’ early learning classrooms. Participants were between 4-years and 4-years, 8-months at study onset. One participant was White, one participant was Black, and one participant was of mixed racial background, Black and White. Response to intervention varied across participants, with participants whose teachers reported observing some appropriate object engagement at onset of intervention experiencing greater outcomes than the participant whose teacher reported observing limited appropriate object engagement. Further research is needed to improve the teaching of imitation to young children with ASD who exhibit low object engagement and an inability to imitate actions with objects.

 
Diversity submission 107.

Behavioral Changes in Individuals With Autism in Latin America During COVID-19

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
ANA RAMIREZ (The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley), Andy U Torres (The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley), Daniel Valdez (Universidad de Buenos Aires), Analia Rosoli (Organización Estados Iberoamericanos para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura ), Gabriela Garrido (Universidad de la República), Sebastian Cukier (PANAACEA), Georgina Perez-Liz (A.J. Drexel Autism Institute), Team REAL - (Red Espectro Autista Latinoamérica )
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, all affected countries have been forced to implement safeguards to protect their population, such as social distancing, mandatory quarantine, and contact restrictions. These safeguards impose drastic changes in people’s everyday life that may have an effect on their behavioral and mental health. Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are especially vulnerable to these changes, and little is known about the effects of the pandemic on their functioning. This study aimed to explore caregivers’ perceived impact of COVID-19 on individuals with ASD in 15 Latin American (LATAM) countries. 1826 caregivers from the 15 different countries completed an online survey. Participants were asked about behavioral changes in the individual with ASD that occurred after the implementation of COVID-19 safety guidelines. Results indicated that caregivers perceived more irritability (64.9%), anxiety (59.1%), and wandering (46.6%). Changes in aggression, eating and sleeping habits were not as frequently endorsed but still significant. COVID-19 has resulted in increased challenges for individuals with ASD worldwide. Knowledge about the impact of COVID-19 on behavioral and socioemotional functioning among those with ASD is needed to better understand and support their needs during these uncertain times.

 
108.

Special Educator Self-Efficacy for Teaching Students With Autism

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
JULIA M HRABAL (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), Stephanie Gerow (Baylor University), Tracey Sulak (Baylor University ), MacKenzie Raye Wicker (Baylor University ), Kathleen Hine (Baylor University ), Providence Lively (Baylor University)
Discussant: Daniel E Conine (Georgia State University)
Abstract:

Self-efficacy refers to an individual’s perceived ability to accomplish specific expectations. Research indicates that individuals with higher self-efficacy are more likely to demonstrate persistent behaviors associated with meeting expectations. Special educators are required by law to implement evidence-based practices for students with autism, most of which are rooted in the concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis. Special educators with high self-efficacy are likely to believe that they have the ability implement evidence-based practices for students with autism and behave in a manner that ensures such practices are implemented with fidelity. Therefore, it is pertinent that special educators have high self-efficacy related to the ability to effectively teach students with autism. The Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) is a reliable and valid measure of special educator’s self-efficacy for educating students with autism. We administered the ASSET to 100 special educators who work with students with autism in public schools. Results indicated variability in responding across and within participants. We evaluated potential moderating variables such as grade level taught, instructional setting, and years of experience. Practical implications and recommendations for future research will be discussed.

 
109. Development of a Measurement System for Teaching Social Inferencing
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
ELIZA DELPIZZO-CHENG (Endicott College), Gabriela Peinado (Universidad Autonoma De Baja California), Michelle Jones (Bexley City School District), Sara Aganowitz Jones (Speech and Language Development Center and School), Marissa Caccavale (Speech and Language Development Center and School), Carrie Wada (Speech and Language Development Center and School), Louanne Boyd (Chapman University)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: One of the hallmarks of autism are the social deficits that affect the everyday lives of these children. Children with autism have minimal intrinsic interest in ongoing everyday relationships. It is agreed upon in the literature that teaching for social understanding, initiation, and responsiveness is a required part of programming. One of the challenges of conducting research and obtaining empirical verification on social competencies for children with autism is the issue of measurement. How do we measure multifaceted skills so we can get a sense of whether or not we are teaching children to see the big picture? Measurement helps therapists to determine whether or not we are providing them with abilities to make socially functional moves in everyday social relationships (Weiss & Harris, 2001). The aim of the present study is to investigate a measurement approach embedded within a teaching methodology to promote social inferencing for two-dimensional images that depict everyday social scenes. Four students with autism gave verbal responses to the prompt “what is the picture about?” A table depicts our initial results. Reliability for scored verbal responses was 83%. This poster will present the details of the measurement approach and results in a multiple baseline design.
 
110. A Review of Response Interruption and Redirection as a Treatment for Stereotypy and Facilitator of Collateral Behavior
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
JOSEPH WILLIAM RYAN (University of Massachusetts Lowell), Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell), Emily Rowe (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: A review of recently published articles on response interruption and intervention (RIRD) is presented in the present poster. The review extends previous reviews by including the following: 1) only papers that used the term ‘RIRD’; 2) all behaviorally oriented journals with publications on the topic; and 3) articles that evaluated RIRD for both vocal and motor stereotypy; and 4) an evaluation of measures of treatment integrity, social validity, and generality. Suggestions for future research and use of RIRD in clinical practice are discussed.
 
111.

Using the Behavior Flexibility Rating Scale-Revisedto Inform Functional Analysis and Treatment of Severe Problem Behavior

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Katherine Sorensen (May Institute), ALI SCHROEDER (May Institute), Clare Liddon (May Institute)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract:

One of the core features of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is restrictive and repetitive behavior. It is also common for individuals with ASD to engage in problem behavior. The Behavioral Flexibility Rating Scale - Revised (BFRS-R), is structured rating scale that may be used to identify the severity of problem behavior that occurs when restrictive and repetitive behavior is somehow disrupted (i.e., demonstrating a lack of flexibility). Previous research suggests the BFRS-R may be used to inform the functional behavioral assessment process (Liddon et al., 2016). The present series of clinical data evaluates the use of the BFRS-R to inform a trial-based functional analysis and systematic treatment evaluation for severe aggression in a young man with ASD. Preliminary results demonstrate that that BFRS-R can be used to identify specific functional analysis conditions, yielding conclusive results (i.e., problem behavior occurrence during near 0% of control segments and 80-100% of test segments) and subsequent, function-based treatment evaluation conditions. That is, the BFRS-R may be informative in the assessment and treatment process of severe aggression with idiosyncratic functions of problem behavior related to behavioral inflexibility.

 
112.

Clinical Evaluation of an Intensive Toilet Training Package With a Young Child With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
AREZU ALAMI (Brock University), Kimberley L. M. Zonneveld (Brock University), Madeline Marie Asaro (Brock University)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract:

Children with developmental disabilities often achieve urinary continence later than their typically developing counterparts, or not at all. Incontinence can negatively impact an individual’s independence, hygiene, and physical comfort and can lead to stigmatism and reduced participation in social and community events. In this case study, we used an AB design to evaluate the effects of an intensive toilet training package on the continence of a young boy with autism spectrum disorder. The clinical team implemented a 1-day intensive toilet training package in the child’s home. For all subsequent days of toilet training, the caregivers implemented the packaged intervention. Following the first intensive day of toilet training, the percentage of appropriate urinations steadily increased and reached the mastery criterion of three consecutive days with 100% appropriate urinations and no accidents. We subsequently introduced a phase of enhanced reinforcement for self-initiations and observed a stable number of self-initiations until the treatment concluded. Results will be discussed within the context of practical implications, limitations associated with the weak experimental design used, and suggestions for future clinical applications.

 
113. Treatment of Food Refusal in a Young Child: A Clinical Case
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
SAMANTHA PAIGE KUNO (Brock University ), Kimberley L. M. Zonneveld (Brock University), Arezu Alami (Brock University), Madeline Marie Asaro (Brock University)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: Feeding disorders range in severity from mild selectivity (e.g., picky eating) to complete refusal and can result in serious health ramifications, including weight loss, growth delays, and developmental delays (Flygare et. al., 2018; Freedman et al., 1999; Levy et al., 2019). To date, treatments based on applied behavior analysis have the most empirical support for increasing consumption in children with feeding problems (Peterson et al., 2016; Sharp et al., 2010). In this clinical case, we used a reversal design to evaluate the effects of differential reinforcement of alternative behavior and nonremoval of the spoon on the consumption of nonpreferred foods in a young child with autism spectrum disorder, in his home setting. We subsequently implemented demand fading to resemble a typical meal arrangement in which the child received reinforcement after he consumed all bites of the “meal” and trained the caregivers to implement this treatment. Results will be discussed within the context of practical implications, limitations, and suggestions for future work.
 
114. Delivery of the RUBI Parent Training via Telehealth: Caregiver Training During COVID-19
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
LAUREN ASHLEY NORDBERG (Auburn University), Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University), Hope Dabney (Auburn University), Jordan DeVries (Auburn University), Lydia Lindsey (Auburn University ), Carolyn Syzonenko (Auburn University)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: Caregiver training is an integral component of behavioral interventions for children with autism. The barriers to conducting caregiver training, such as limited availability of services and conflicting schedules, were exacerbated during the closures resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, which required many service providers to rapidly pivot to telehealth service delivery. During this time, we delivered the RUBI Parent Training for Disruptive Behaviors via telehealth to caregivers of children with autism, decreasing the barrier posed by lockdown restrictions to ensure families in need could access services. We delivered the training according to the RUBI handbook with modifications, including delivery via telehealth and in a group format with individual weekly consultations. A total of 13 caregivers completed the nine-week training. At the end of training, caregivers demonstrated an increase in their knowledge of ABA and reported a decrease in the severity of their child’s challenging behaviors at home, as measured by the Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder.
 
116.

Predicting the Relative Efficiency of Interventions: A Systematic Review of Within-Subject Replicability in Single-Subject Comparisons

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CHENGAN YUAN (Arizona State University), Lanqi Wang (The University of Iowa), Katherine Nguyen (Arizona State University), Shahad Alsharif (Dar Al-Hekma University), Qing Zhang (Arizona State University)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract:

Researchers and clinicians rely on single-subject comparison designs (e.g., alternating-treatment, parallel-treatment designs) to identify efficient intervention procedures that can improve learner outcomes. However, the extant literature has repeatedly noted the poor generality of the outcomes from such comparisons (e.g., Ledford et al., 2019; Johnston, 1988). That is, the efficiency of an intervention procedure is often idiosyncratic among the learners. Despite between-participant inconsistencies, some studies have demonstrated relatively consistent within-participant outcomes when multiple comparisons were conducted (e.g., Carroll et al., 2018; McGhan & Lerman, 2013; Yuan & Zhu, 2020). We will systematically review the studies that included multiple comparisons of the interventions to examine whether and the extent to which within-subject replication was demonstrated. If replication can be reliably achieved, clinicians may be able to utilize an initial comparison of the interventions to predict the relative efficiency of the intervention and can, therefore, inform the treatment-selection decisions.

 
117.

Using Pairing to Teach Response to Name to Children With Autism

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
AMBER R. PADEN (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract:

Response to name (RTN) is often a deficit of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is a common treatment goal for children receiving early intervention services. Previous research has evaluated different prompting strategies to increase RTN without using physical guidance, which can be overly intrusive (Connie et al., 2019). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the use of pairing to teach RTN to preschool-aged children diagnosed with ASD. During pairing sessions, the child engaged with moderately preferred items and the experimenter said the child’s name three times while placing a preferred edible item in the child’s mouth. Following the completion of ten trials, the experimenter began a post-pairing session. During post-pairing, the experimenter stated the child’s name five times. A correct RTN (i.e., looking at experimenter’s eye region for any duration within 5 s) resulted in a brief social interaction (e.g., greeting, comment). Following every three post-pairing sessions, we conducted generalization and control sessions. During control sessions, the experiment stated a name other than the child’s five times. Preliminary results show pairing is effective at increasing RTN with two children with autism. We continue to implement this protocol with additional participants to provide more evidence supporting the effectiveness of this procedure.

 
118.

Functional Communication Training for Toddlers at Risk for Autism

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
SIERRA STEGEMANN (University of Texas at San Antonio), Leslie Neely (The University of Texas at San Antonio), Katherine Cantrell (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Discussant: Hannah Lynn MacNaul (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract:

Functional communication training (FCT) typically consists of determining the function(s) of challenging behaviors and teaching the child an appropriate communicative response that can serve the same function as the challenging behavior once did. In this study, FCT was used to teach infants/toddlers at risk for autism to appropriately request for their caregiver instead of engaging in challenging behaviors when the caregiver left the room. This study expands upon the current literature because of its participant age (under three years old) and “at-risk for autism” criteria (discussed in participant section). Five children were taught a functional communicative response (FCR) for their caregiver and then introduced to a time delay of reinforcement. Problem behavior decreased in all participants while the use of the FCR increased. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, data collection was cut short for 2 participants.

 
119.

Parents Sense of Competency After Receiving Caregiver-Mediated Behavioral Intervention for Toddlers At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
TREY XIMENEZ (University of Texas at San Antonio), Leslie Neely (The University of Texas at San Antonio), Katherine Cantrell (University of Texas At San Antonio)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Early childhood interventions (e.g. Early Start Denver Model, Naturalist Development Behavioral Intervention), specifically parent or caregiver training for children at -risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are prevalent and there is an increasing concern for the caregivers sense of competency. Parent-Led Autism Treatment for At-Risk Young Infants and Toddlers (PLAAY) is a grant funded research initiative which identifies toddlers who are at high-risk for ASD and provides parent-assisted treatment for their children who experience challenging behavior and intervene through Functional Communication Training (FCT). This poster specifically evaluates the pre/post information to measure the change in responses from the Parent Sense of Competency (PSOC) scale. The PSOC will be used as a measure of social validity through a self-reporting questionnaire using a 6-point Likert scale to measure the parent’s competence through efficacy and satisfaction. The aim of this evaluation is to measure the caregivers change in overall competence after the PLAAY 10-week program. The results indicate a significant increase in parent’s competency after receiving caregiver-assisted treatment. This provides more information on the acceptability of early childhood interventions, specifically parent training with toddlers at-risk who display challenging behavior.

 
120.

Self-Managed Sibling-Mediated Intervention for Children With Autism

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chengan Yuan (Arizona State University), Lanqi Wang (The University of Iowa), NATALIJA MILUTINOVIC (Children's Autism Center; Arizona State University), Qing Zhang (Arizona State University), Qiuyu Min (Shanghai Clover Center for Children)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Involving typically developing siblings during interventions can be cost-effective and may lead to long-lasting and generalized behavioral outcomes for children with autism. Among the few studies that investigated the effects of sibling-mediated intervention, researchers have found that typically developing siblings were able to learn various procedures to improve learning outcomes of children with autism (Shivers & Plavnick, 2015). However, it may be difficult for typically developing siblings to learn and implement multiple interventions with varying protocols at a high level of integrity when teaching different skills to children with autism. Using a multiple baseline across behavior design, we investigated if 1) self-management could be used to maintain a high level of integrity when the typically developing sibling implemented a model-lead-test strategy and 2) the sibling-mediated model-lead-test strategy could effectively improve skills across multiple domains for children with autism. Our results showed that the self-management tactic effectively led to the correct implementation of the model-lead-test strategy and, in turn, resulted in improvement of the target skills across domains.

 
121.

Evaluating Comparative Research on Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
BRENNA R GRIFFEN (University of Arkansas), Cody Lindbloom (University of Arkansas), Elizabeth R. Lorah (University of Arkansas), Christine Holyfield (University of Arkansas), Jessica Miller (Early Autism Services)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Because 30% of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience difficulties with vocal communication, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems provide a means for those persons to communicate with others. When making a recommendation for a suitable AAC for an individual with communication impairments, practitioners must have access to the most current data. This systematic review screened various academic and professional data bases which yielded nine (n=9) alternating treatment design single case studies. These studies were compared to evaluate the efficacy of various AAC modalities using the TauU method of data non-overlap. This study also compared operants, evidence-based best practices, quality indicators, and modality preferences of participants. Visual and statistical analyses indicate most of the participants both preferred and performed better using a speech generating device (SGD) compared to picture exchange systems and manual sign. The findings of this study suggest that practitioners should consider using SGD systems to facilitate verbal behavior in children who experience ASD with limited or no vocal communication and that there is a need for SGD research beyond the utilization of mand training and participants 13 or younger.

 
122.

Reducing Vocal Stereotypy Using Response Interruption and Redirection With Mindfulness

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
COREY OLVERA (The Center for Discovery), Johanna F Lantz (The Center for Discovery)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Vocal stereotypy often interferes with an individual’s ability to acquire adaptive skills and can be socially stigmatizing (Gibbs et al., 2018). Vocal stereotypy is often maintained through automatic reinforcement. Response Interruption and Redirection (RIRD) is often used to address automatically maintained behavior. However, vocal stereotypy can be difficult to physically redirect. This study investigated the impact of RIRD on reducing vocal stereotypy on a student with ASD, whose stereotypies often pertained to past and future events. The intervention included a mindfulness component that required the student to engage in three verbal responses answering questions regarding the immediate environment or engaging the five senses. The study utilized a multiple baseline across settings design. The settings were a) sensory room where student is alone with preferred items, b) group lesson in which the student engaged in an activity with peers, and c) during workstations/independent work in which direct 1:1 instruction is given. The results showed decreased rates of vocal stereotypy in all settings. A withdrawal design demonstrated a return to increased rates of vocal stereotypy. The intervention appears to keep the student engaged with their immediate environment, reducing the likelihood of engagement in vocal stereotypy.

 
123.

Neurological Contextual Difference in Children With Autism: Executive Functioning and Derived Relational Responding

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
TAYLOR MARIE LAUER (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Carly Yadon (Missouri State University)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Autism is a neurological disorder that presents marked differences in behaviors in individuals. The external context which surrounds both the neurotypical population and individuals with autism is similar, yet there are consistent differences between these two groups. We have proposed a model which allows a functional contextualistic account of behavior that emphasizes the interaction between a neurological context, the external context, and behavior, to allow behavior analysts in conjunction with neuroscientists an equivalent approach for behavior. We reviewed the existing literature comparing neurological differences between individuals with autism and matched typically developing peers during executive functioning tasks that may require verbal relational responding. Neurological activity within the neurotypical population involves activation in the frontoparietal regions, which appears to overlap with regions of deficits within the autism population. These results support a potential complex interaction between neurological contextual differences and external contextual similarities that predicts performance difference in individuals with autism.

 
124. Comparing Traditional and Automated PEAK Programming: TelePEAK
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
MEREDITH MATTHEWS (Missouri State University ), Lindsey Nicole Holtsman (Emergent Learning STL Center ), Taylor Marie Lauer (Missouri State University ), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract: Discrete trial training is a long-supported method of teaching various skills by breaking those skills down into small, chain-like increments while reinforcing those steps with preferred items (Elder, 2018). While this approach is widely used and accepted, using physical stimuli can reduce the efficiency during trial blocks, can become redundant or repetitive and often consumes far more time and resources when compared to similar gamified programs. In the present study, we utilized a multi-element design across three sets to determine if a computerized, or gamified, version of PEAK achieves the same or better outcomes when compared to the traditional discrete trial training delivery mode, versus a control set. The stimuli utilized for all three sets were arbitrary symbols to guarantee that no previous relationships had been established, and each set contained unique symbols to ensure that no symbols received reinforcement from the other trials. Both methods exceeded the control, suggesting that the automated programming will produce similar outcomes than those achieved through the traditional “tabletop” programming. Additional benefits conferred treatment implementation fidelity because it’s all programmed as well as reducing the need to develop physical stimulus materials.
 
125.

An Evaluation of Systematic Prompting in Augmentative and Alternative CommunicationResearch for Individuals With Autism

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
ASHLEY MCCOY (Bowling Green State University)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Prompting is classified as an evidence-based practice for individuals with autism (National Autism Center, 2015). Within the last ten years there have been several reviews on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for individuals with autism that commonly report prompting. However, there exists a need for further research to focus exclusively on prompting in AAC intervention research that provides details on the systematic prompting procedures and procedural parameters. This project reviewed six literature reviews published since 2011 on AAC and autism. From these six reviews, there were 125 included studies; 71 after duplicates were removed. These original 71 studies were reanalyzed to extract prompting elements from the intervention procedures. Thirty-three studies provided sufficient detail to be included in this analysis. Results suggest that the most commonly reported prompting procedure was system of least prompts (n=14) followed by constant time delay (n=8). Additional procedural parameters evaluated include: prompt levels, the types and arrangement of prompts, as well as time components. Results are also reported for the types of AAC systems and the targeted communication skill. The identification of these elements can aid practitioners in making informed decisions when utilizing prompting, as well as highlighting additional areas of need for future research.

 
Diversity submission 126. Virtual Behaviour Skills Training: Teaching Parents to Conduct a Functional Analysis
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
AMALIA COZZARIN (ErinoakKids Centre for Treatment and Development), Nathan Vieira (ErinoakKids Centre for Treatment and Development)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract: Emerging literature surrounding telehealth services indicates a potential alternative for individuals receiving behavioural analytic services and supports. With the surfacing of the COVID-19 pandemic, many practitioners were forced to use a telehealth model to provide ABA services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using telehealth video conferencing to support skill acquisition and competency for two individuals to implement functional analysis (FA) for their family member diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The participants resided in Saudi Arabia and were unable to return to Canada to receive services. Coaching involved using behaviour skills training (BST) and fidelity checklists to support the acquisition of skills necessary to conduct a functional analysis across five conditions (tangible, escape, alone, play, attention). Results indicate that the two participants mastered the skill across all five conditions and demonstrated treatment fidelity during implementation of FA across conditions. Discussion includes implications of rapidly improving quality of telehealth services and potential for additional opportunities.
 
127.

Decreasing Hand Flapping Stereotypy Using Behavior Intervention Package

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
TRACY YIP (N/A), Ying Hu (N/A)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Self-stimulatory behaviors in the form of hand flapping is a common form of stereotypy found in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The participant in the study engaged in this form of stereotypy so often that it was directly impeding with his learning and affecting his ability to form social relationships with others. Data collection and analysis indicated that the behavior may be primarily functioning as self-stimulation. Using a behavioral intervention package involving DRI, response interruption, and DRO strategies, the behavior was significantly reduced. The participant was able to engage in classroom activities and independent activity schedules with minimal engagement of hand flapping. His on task behavior and rate of skill acquisition has increased and maintained as the plan was systematically faded out.

 
128.

Relations of Learning Abilities, Task Characteristics, and Acquisition of Skills in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
MARIA PONGOSKI (Manitoba Association for Behaviour Analysis, University of Manitoba), Geneviève N. Roy-Wsiaki (Université de Saint Boniface), C.T. Yu (University of Manitoba)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

The current study sought to establish whether rate of task acquisition may be affected by the interaction between learning ability and task difficulty for children with autism spectrum disorder enrolled in an early intensive behavioural intervention (EIBI) program. To do so, specific teaching tasks selected from the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills-Revised (ABLLS-R) that were previously categorized into learning ability levels were taught to two children recruited from an EIBI program. Each participant, P05 and P07, was assigned three teaching tasks that were programmed as a match, a mismatch above, and a mismatch below their current learning ability level. Teaching tasks were taught using discrete trial teaching methods for a maximum of 64 trials per task. A single teaching task, mismatched below P05’s learning ability, was mastered after 25 trials. No other teaching task was mastered within 64 trials for either participant. As this was only the first study to assess the rate of task acquisition for ABLLS-R tasks categorized into learning ability levels through direct observation, future researchers should continue to explore the effects of task difficulty on rates of task acquisition.

 
129.

Using Reinforcement to Increase Independence While Eating

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CAITLIN BELTRAN (Millstone Township School District), Emily Lurie (Millstone Township School District)
Discussant: David W. Sidener
Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by challenges in social skills, repetitive behaviors, and communication. Feeding problems are highly prevalent in children with autism spectrum disorders. Feeding problems can include food selectivity, prompt dependence, and refusal during meals.These behaviors are socially stigmatizing and can negatively impact an individual’s nutritional status. Research has demonstrated that strategies based on applied behavior analysis are effective for increasing appropriate behavior and decreasing inappropriate behavior in children with autism; however, there is little research on treatment of feeding problems in children with autism. The current study examined the effects of using reinforcement and systematic prompting to increase independence while eating. A reversal design (ABAB) was utilized in which treatment consisted of the therapist presenting a token board containing 3 tokens and a picture of chosen reinforcer, along with the verbal cue, “Time to Eat, 3 tokens for ___.” A vibrating timer was set for 10 seconds. If ten seconds elapsed with no independent bite, a gesture prompt (in the form of therapist pointing to fork) was provided. No verbal prompts were provided. The present study demonstrated that using systematic reinforcement was effective in increasing independence in eating. Additional sessions should be run to systematically fade the number of responses required for reinforcement, and to demonstrate maintenance.

 
130.

Establishing Auditory Discrimination and Echoic Stimulus Control With an Auditory Matching Procedure

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Clare Marie Christe (Western Michigan University), Richard W. Malott (Western Michigan University), MOLLY MATTES (Western Michigan Universtiy )
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

The present study used a variation of the go/no-go procedure (Serna, Dube, & McIlvane, 1997) to teach auditory matching to four preschool-aged children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. Two sounds were presented in a continuous, alternating fashion at the start of each trial. If the sounds were the same, students indicated a match by touching a button; if they were different, students would refrain from touching that button for the duration of the trial. Phases of the intervention began with sound discriminations that became successively more complex, until they involved word discriminations. We used a nonconcurrent multiple-probe design to assess each participant’s performance on a list of echoics before, during, and after the intervention. Two students acquired a generalized echoic repertoire, one improved his articulation, and one acquired some vocal imitation skills; all four students could receptively identify matching sounds and words by the end of the intervention.

 
131.

Engaging Young Children with Autism in Caregiver-implemented Shared Reading: A Review and Call for Research

Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
XIAONING SUN (Ohio State University), LING YI (NingBo College of Health Sciences)
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, children with ASD have limited access to therapy sessions which would lead to worse behavioral and cognitive outcomes (Zwaigenbaum et al., 2015). Therefore, it is important to train parents on delivering evidence-based practices. As a regular practice in early education as well as home settings (Mucchetti, 2013), shared reading offer adults opportunities to read aloud to children while using strategies asking questions, commenting about the story, or expanding on the child’s utterance to promote interaction between the adult and child, as well as support the child’s language and literacy development (NELP, 2008). This systematic review provides evidence that actors as reading quality, duration as well as book types may impact children’s performance. In addition, prompt, repeated reading, praise, expand, evaluate as well as question prompts will contribute to language acquisition as well as communication. Also, behavior skill training which includes instruction, modeling, role-play, feedback is still the main and effective parent training method. However, the limited studies included in this review also indicate that more research needs to be conducted to explore effective interventions on supporting engagement and verbal behavior of children with ASD in home setting.

 
132.

The Use of Immersive Virtual Environments to Encourage Social Interaction Between Children With Autism and Their Siblings During Game Time

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
EMILY SCARBOROUGH (Tennessee Tech University), Krystal Kennedy (Tennessee Technological University)
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

This poster presents a service delivery model for using Immersive Virtual Environments (IVEs) to teach children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) social interaction opportunities with their typically developing siblings. The relationships between children with ASD and their typically developing siblings are often strained due to the lack of social skills and other problem behaviors (Hastings, 2003, O’Brien, Cuskelly, & Slaughter, 2019; Ward, Tanner, Mandleco, Dyches, & Freeborn, 2016). Immersive Virtual Environments consisting of putting children with ASD into different social scenarios is a method that can be used to teach them appropriate social skills. This session will guide the audience through procedures used to teach children with ASD different skills used during play and social interaction through Immersive Virtual Environments. Specific procedures include children with ASD reviewing virtual scenarios prior to play opportunities then demonstrating observed skills with their siblings. Preliminary results indicate virtual reality is an effective way to teach children with ASD different social skills. Data will be shared if available by conference date.

 
134.

Experience of Parents Receiving In-Home Behavioral Treatment for Their Child With Autism

Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
GERALD LAVARIAS (MAPSS)
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

In-home applied behavior analysis (ABA) treatment has well-documented results and is widely recommended for children with autism. Since 1987, parents have sought and implemented ABA treatment in their homes for their children with autism. However, research on parents’ lived experiences with in-home ABA treatment is limited. As such, there is a need to study the impact and influence of ABA treatment on parents’ quality of life (e.g., challenges, scheduling, parenting). This qualitative study explored parents’ lived experiences while their children with autism received in-home ABA treatment using a phenomenological approach. Five parents participated in a 60-minute interview about in-home ABA treatment for their child with autism. Data was processed and analyzed using structural and descriptive textures. Results revealed 5 themes: perceptions of the child’s ABA clinicians, knowledge of in-home ABA services, satisfaction with child’s progress, facing challenges, and commitment to child’s in-home ABA treatment. These results may help ABA professionals improve their understanding of parents’ lived experiences involving their children’s in-home ABA treatment. Additionally, the study may help parents understand the empirical implications of seeking and receiving in-home ABA treatment and help extend knowledge, support, and treatment integrity for positive change in the effectiveness of in-home ABA treatment.

 
135.

Values-Oriented Parent Training Improves Outcomes for Children With Autism and Their Families

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
BLAKE HANSEN (Brigham Young University)
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

Parent training has a strong research-base in behavior analysis and is a viable solution for problems associated with raising a child with a disability. The present study is a single-case parent training study conducted in a university-based clinic. The participants were a mother of three boys, one of whom was diagnosed with autism. The parent training involved assessing the parent’s values and aligning the training to the parent’s values. Over ten weeks, the parent was trained on implementing a naturalistic teaching program. Each training and feedback session included an assessment of values, progress, and committed action. Measures included the child’s communication and problem behaviors. The parent’s implementation fidelity was measured each session along with levels of acceptance and fusion. The study utilized an ABCB reversal design. The B condition involved parent training with the child’s two siblings present, while the C condition was conducted without the siblings present. The study demonstrated that increases in implementation fidelity were related to improvements in psychological flexibility and committed action. Concurrent changes in the child’s communication and reduction in problem behaviors were likewise observed. These findings are discussed in light of current research on integrating components of acceptance and commitment therapy in parent training programs.

 
136.

Playing Games with "No": Teaching Delayed and Denied Access

Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
AMBER N. VARELA (Firefly Autism), Elyse Murrin (Firefly Autism)
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

The current study used a multiple-probe design to examine the effects of a treatment package, including systematic desensitization, demand fading, and behavioral momentum, on increasing tolerance to delayed and denied access. The intervention was presented to a child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder receiving center-based one-on-one applied behavior analysis therapy who engaged in high rates of screaming, property destruction, physical aggression, and self-injurious behavior when presented with demands to wait or denied access to items or activities. The participant was given demands to wait or denied access to items or activities by being told “no” in a game format using items of varying preference in a classroom setting. Maladaptive behaviors were defined according to the participant’s individualized behavior intervention plan. Results indicated that the treatment package increased the participant’s tolerance to delayed and denied access and decreased rates of behavior targeted for reduction. The study was extended to a generalization phase where the game format was faded and being told to “wait” and/or “no” were applied to naturally occurring opportunities. Data from this study suggests that the treatment package was effective in reducing problem behavior, increasing tolerance for “wait” and “no,” and generalizable to natural settings.

 
138. The Effectiveness of A Therapist-Robot Interactive(TRI) Model to Teach Autistic Children
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
YINGYING SHE (Xiamen University), Hang Wu (Together Education Institute)
Discussant: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract: Abstract: This experiment investigated the effectiveness of Therapist-Robot Interactive(TRI) Model training program teaching three autistic children under One-on-One condition to improve receptive and expressive language,social skill, and concept form learning. TRI Model training program was introduced to three autistic children at staggered times to form a multiple baseline design. The first finding was TRI Model was effective in DTT setting to improve matching, labeling, instruction following and manding via calculating the correct percentage of correct response. The second finding was TRI Model was effective in generalization. Social validity was evaluated by the therapists, the social robot could serve as a natural and friendly companionship with autistic children and assist the therapist easily. Results suggest that TRI Model produced an increase learning by the three autistic children. Furthermore, continued use of TRI Model under naturalistic condition, high social validity ratings,and extended TRI Model use under One-on-More condition suggest that use of TRI model may be sustainable.
 
 
 
Panel #102
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Incorporating Multiculturalism and Antiracism in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Fong, Ph.D.
Chair: Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University)
ELIZABETH FONG (Pepperdine University)
SHAWN CAPELL (Covenant 15:16 LLC)
LAUREN BEAULIEU (Newton Public Schools)
Abstract:

The profound effects of social injustice have been become undeniable and the systemic challenges affect the work of behavior analysts. For many, including culture in behavior analytic work may feel completely incompatible with our science. For those seeking to learn more, it can be overwhelming to dive into this area and it may clash with a lifetime of personal learning history. Behavior analysts unsure how to incorporate multiculturalism, diversity, and antiracism into their behavior analytic work, how to reconcile this with our science, and where to begin to learn about this topic are invited to this panel discussion. In this event, panelists with varying perspectives and levels of expertise will discuss existing resources within and outside the field of behavior analysis, how we can understand antiracism from a behavioral perspective, how to utilize behavioral tools to support culturally competent practice and supervision, and make recommendations for the training of culturally competent behavior analysts.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Target audience include graduate students, practitioners, and faculty.

Learning Objectives: (1) Attendees will be able to define cultural competency, (2) Attendees will be able to identify the importance of cultural competency in behavior analysis, and (3) Attendees will be able identify how cultural competency can be embedded in their current training or practice of behavior analysis.
Keyword(s): antiracism, diversity, ethics, multiculturalism
 
 
Panel #103
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Freedom or Exploitation: The Integration of Behavior Analysis in a Capitalistic System
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Joshua Garner, Ph.D.
Chair: Adam Peal (The Behavioral Education Research Initiative )
DON TOGADE (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; George Brown College, Toronto, Canada)
JENNIFER KLAPATCH TOTSCH (Envision Unlimited)
JOSHUA GARNER (Behavioral Education Research Initiative)
Abstract:

The concept of freedom is analyzed in reference to the negative consequences of a capitalist system. Specifically, the contingencies that interfere with clinical and educational quality will be addressed. These contingencies include the exploitation of the labor force by private equity firms and universities, as well as the restrictions of for-profit health insurance. Each contingency highlighted may seem like a system in which we are free to behave as clinicians or educators. However, we hope to point out the restrictive and arguably unethical contingencies that capitalism produces, as these contingencies interfere with our ability to provide high-quality services. Furthermore, we provide solutions to these issues as well as the challenges we will likely encounter in pursuit of changing the system.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

This content is intermediate to advanced. The prerequisite skills should include knowing the BCBA codes of ethics as well as an understanding of meta-contingencies.

Learning Objectives: Objective 1: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to define capitalism and exploitation. Objective 2: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to apply various forms of exploitation to the labor of professors, BCBAs, and RBTs. Objective 3: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to define freedom based on Skinner, Goldiamond, Baum, and Marx. Objective 4: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to engage in philosophical doubt regarding the nature of capitalism and their own work place, particularly the contingencies that interfere with their ability to provide high quality services. Objective 5: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to define solutions to these issues.
Keyword(s): ABA, Capitalism, Freedom, Theory
 
 
Invited Panel #121
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Exploring Publication Bias in Behavior Analysis Research
Saturday, May 29, 2021
4:00 PM–4:50 PM EDT
Online
Domain: Theory
Chair: Matthew Tincani (Temple University)
CE Instructor: Matthew Tincani, Ph.D.
Panelists: MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington), JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia), JASON TRAVERS (Temple University)
Abstract:

Publication bias is the disproportionate representation of studies with certain characteristics, such as strong experimental effect, in the published research literature. Publication bias skews the body of scientific knowledge by overrepresenting studies with specific methodologies, analytic techniques, and data, which distorts the scientific literature and, ultimately, foments public distrust in science. Scholars in psychology and education have documented the presence of publication bias within these broad bodies of research. However, to date, behavior analysts have focused little attention on the possibility of publication bias in basic and applied behavior analysis research. Participants in this panel will reflect on their experiences as researchers, journal editors, and manuscript reviewers regarding issues of publication bias in behavior analysis. Their discussion will explore whether publication bias is a problem in behavior analysis research; how publication bias might manifest uniquely in our work; the potential impact of publication bias on the corpus of scientific knowledge in basic behavior analysis, applied behavior analysis, and on consumers of behavior analytic interventions; and potential strategies for reducing publication bias.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state the definition of publication bias and describe examples of publication bias within scientific research; (2) describe how publication bias could manifest in basic and applied behavior analytic research; (3) discuss possible ways of reducing publication bias in basic and applied behavior analysis research.
MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington)

Dr. Galizio received his BA from Kent State University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee where he worked with Dr. Alan Baron.  In 1976, he joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he is currently Professor of Psychology. His research interests include behavioral pharmacology,  stimulus control/concept learning, aversive control, and human operant behavior.  He has published two books, more than 100 articles and his research has been supported by NIDA, NSF and NICHD. He is a Fellow of ABAI and four APA divisions and is a past-president of APA Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis and served as an At-Large member of the ABAI Executive Council. He has served on numerous NIH study sections and chaired two of them. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia)
Joel Ringdahl is an associate professor in the department of communication sciences and special education at the University of Georgia. His research interests include functional analysis and treatment of severe behavior problems, stimulus preference assessments, functional communication training and translational research in the areas of behavioral momentum theory and behavioral economics. He is the editor of Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice.
JASON TRAVERS (Temple University)
Jason Travers, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is an associate professor in the college of education and human development at Temple University. He serves on the editorial board of several journals, including Journal of Special Education Technology, TEACHING Exceptional Children, and Journal of Disability Policy Studies
 
 
Symposium #127
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
Diversity submission Can Behavioral and Developmental Science Live Happily Ever After? An Overview of Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Intervention
Saturday, May 29, 2021
4:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Melanie Pellecchia (University of Pennsylvania)
Discussant: Sophia R D'Agostino (Hope College)
CE Instructor: Melanie Pellecchia, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Early intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorder is historically rooted within two distinct theoretical foundations: behavioral and developmental sciences. Proponents of each discipline have traditionally held opposing views toward treatment, with little collaboration. A recent shift in autism intervention has led to the emergence of a group of interventions that incorporate elements from both developmental and behavioral science. These naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions (NDBI) have been used effectively in a variety of settings. This symposium includes a series of presentations describing the application of NDBI across a range of settings, with a focus on describing the integration of developmental and behavioral science. The first presentation will provide a broad overview of NDBI, including a description of its core components. The second will describe the implementation of NDBI in a hospital-based clinic setting, including data related to the characteristics of children enrolled in the program. The third will describe outcomes from a group-based delivery of NDBI for preschool-aged children. The final presentation will shed light on the actual use of NDBI strategies by describing the self-reported utilization of developmental and behavioral strategies from a large sample of applied behavior analysis providers.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): early intervention, NDBI
Target Audience:

basic

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) Describe the differences between developmental and behavioral approaches to autism intervention. 2) Describe core strategies used within naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions. 3) Discuss how naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions are used in a variety of practice settings.
 
Diversity submission 

Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Intervention: The Next Frontier for Early Autism Treatment

(Service Delivery)
MELANIE PELLECCHIA (University of Pennsylvania)
Abstract:

A recent trend in early intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorder is the development of interventions that bridge both developmental and behavioral sciences. This new breed of interventions, Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions (NDBI), merge best practices in these two previously opposing approaches to intervention. NDBI integrate behavioral learning theory and developmentally-focused strategies within natural environments. Several efficacious NDBI treatment models have been successfully implemented across a variety of settings with improved child and family outcomes. Yet, this approach has yet to be disseminated widely among behavior analysts. This presentation will provide an in-depth overview of Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions, with an emphasis on how this approach can be incorporated into existing applied behavior analysis programs for young children with autism spectrum disorders. The presentation will include: a description of the theoretical background underlying the approach, the core components of NDBI, and examples illustrating its application. A summary of the evidence supporting the effectiveness of NDBI and recommendations for incorporating NDBI strategies into existing programs will be provided.

 
Diversity submission 

The Application of Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions in a Hospital-Based Autism Center

(Service Delivery)
Ashley Dubin (Nemours/AI duPont Hospital for Children), EMILY BERNABE (Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children), Meena Khowaja (Nemours/ Alfred I. Dupont Hospital for Children ), Erin Machemer (Nemours/ Alfred I. Dupont Hospital for Children )
Abstract:

This presentation describes the clinical implementation of Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions (NDBIs; Schreibman et al., 2015) in a hospital-based autism center. Parents of young children recently diagnosed with autism are coached on strategies to promote social communication. Different service delivery models (e.g., telehealth) and the strategies comprising the parent-mediated NDBIs will be discussed. Data will be presented about characteristics of the parents and children referred for, enrolled in, and who have completed one of the center’s NDBI programs. As enrollment in NDBIs is ongoing, we anticipate including additional data related to child social communication and other behaviors over time, and other factors potentially related to enrollment and completion of NDBI programs. Important considerations for implementation of parent-mediated NDBIs in a hospital-based clinic setting will be discussed, including advantages, possible barriers, need for modifications, and future directions for research and practice.

 
Diversity submission 

Follow the Children: A Group-Based Application of Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Intervention for Preschool Children With Autism

(Service Delivery)
MEGHAN KANE (University of Pennsylvania), Julia Waldman (University of Pennsylvania), David Mandell (University of Pennsylvania)
Abstract:

Group-learning models for young children with autism provide environments rich with opportunities for teaching social communication and interaction skills. Comprehensive preschool programs that incorporate naturalistic developmental behavioral intervention (NDBI) strategies have produced improvements in children’s social communication skills, social engagement, and core ASD symptoms (Stahmer & Ingersoll, 2004; Strain & Bovey, 2011). This presentation will provide an overview of an NDBI treatment model delivered within a group program for preschool-aged children with autism. A description of the treatment model and subsequent changes in children’s social communication skills for 20 preschool-aged children enrolled in the program will be discussed. Staff fidelity was measured using a direct observation fidelity tool designed to measure the core components of a group-based NDBI model. Fidelity was high and averaged over 87% accuracy across all NDBI components. Changes in children’s social communication were measured at baseline and following six months of intervention using the Social Communication Checklist, a curriculum-based measure of social communication. Improvements were observed across all domains, with significant improvements in the group’s overall social communication score (p < .05), social engagement (p <.01), and play skills (p <.05). Implications for research and practice incorporating NDBI into group-based treatment programs will be discussed.

 
Diversity submission 

Self-Reported Utilization of Developmental and Behavioral Intervention Techniques by Applied Behavior Analysis Providers

(Service Delivery)
KYLE M FROST (Michigan State University), Brooke Ingersoll (Michigan State University )
Abstract:

Naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions (NDBIs; Schreibman et al., 2015) are a class of early interventions for autism spectrum disorder with growing empirical support, however, their similarity to Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) as delivered in the community is unknown. This online survey-based study characterized the self-reported utilization of developmental and behavioral intervention techniques in a large sample of ABA providers (n=368) and explored what aspects of provider background predict utilization. Respondents rated the extent to which they used each of a number of intervention techniques in a recent session with a specific child. ABA providers self-reported less use of developmental techniques than behavioral techniques, t(356)=-26.35, p<0.001. Providers with greater self-reported competency in NDBIs reported more frequent use of developmental techniques (Table 1); NDBI competency was not related to use of behavioral techniques, which were reported at high levels across providers. Point-biserial correlations indicated some trending relationships with training background such that providers with a background in psychology reported greater use of developmental techniques and those with backgrounds in ABA and special education reported less use (Table 1). Results suggest that further research on the similarities and differences between NDBIs and ABA delivered in the community is warranted.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #137
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diversity submission Beyond Translation: Ethnic Disparities on Early Identification and Access to Services of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 29, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
CE Instructor: Regina A. Carroll, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CECILIA MONTIEL-NAVA (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)
Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong disorder that affects children and families in several ways. A growing body of research has documented the ways in which racial disparities affect the rate of identification, access and use of services, and relationship with professionals making the diagnoses. In general, Latino children are diagnosed with ASD later in life; usually with more severe symptoms, lower IQs, and more health conditions, compared with non-Latino children. Furthermore, cultural factors can shape how the signs of ASD are conceptualized and how families accept a positive diagnosis, especially how they are affected by stigma. Diminished access to diagnostic services as well as having a caregiver with a non-English primary language can act as barriers to identifying children with ASD, in particular Latino children. This lecture will review current research in health disparities in both early identification and access to services of Latino children with ASD. Research with this underserved population contributes to enhancing diagnosis and identification methods for Latino children with ASD and assessing the unidentified risk factors and barriers to accessing services, hence improving their outcomes.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

researchers, allied health professionals, educators

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss health disparities in children with ASD with race, ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status, environment, and geography; (2) discuss under-identification of ASD in Hispanic children can result in families not receiving the services they need to improve health outcomes; (3) explain the importance of developing a culturally sensitive model as a way to increase the identification, diagnosis and referral to available services of ASD in Hispanic children.
 
CECILIA MONTIEL-NAVA (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)
Dr. Cecilia Montiel-Nava, a bilingual child clinical psychologist, holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV), an M.S. in Clinical Psychology from Loyola University Maryland, and a B.A. in Psychology from the Universidad Rafael Urdaneta (Venezuela). Dr. Montiel-Nava’s research focuses on three topics: 1) Understanding ethnic disparities among children with autism spectrum and neurodevelopmental disorders, 2) Evidence-based interventions that can be carried out by parents of children with developmental delays in underserved populations, and 3) Validity and acculturation of diagnostic instruments. Since 2015, she has been involved with Red Espectro Autista Latinoamerica (Latin American Autism Spectrum Network [REAL]), that aims to foster international collaboration for research in Latin American countries. She is also a member of the WHO/AS team for the implementation and evaluation of WHO Caregivers Skills Training (CST) pilot projects in various countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, India, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay). Her longer-term goals include developing a package for early identification and early intervention that could be broadly and freely administered in underserved populations in the valley. As a clinician, researcher, and human being, she wants parents to feel that their socio-economic status, ethnicity, or location are not another hurdle to overcome in the road to gain a better outcome for their child. She is an author of two books and more than 45 research reports, articles, and book chapters.
 
 
Symposium #140
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
Diversity submission Building a Coalition to Amplify the Impact of Behavioral Science
Saturday, May 29, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/OBM; Domain: Translational
Chair: Tiffany Dubuc (Public Heath Agency of Canada; Blossom Behavioural Services)
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Converging evidence pinpoints the basic conditions that people need to thrive—minimal amounts of coercion or threat, high levels of positive reinforcement for prosocial behavior, psychological flexibility, and environments that have minimal influences or opportunities for problem behavior. There is, however, a substantial gap between what we know about human thriving and the quality of social environments for millions of people. This symposium describes the creation of the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations, which ABAI helped to create. It is designed to foster the translation of behavioral science knowledge into widespread implementation of programs and policies that. By working in cooperation with other behavioral science organizations we can increase our influence on public policies advance the use of our knowledge. This symposium will describe the rationale and development for the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations and will then describe the progress that the coalition is made in promoting a long-term effort to improve individual and family well-being in neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Climate Change,, Coalitions, Concentrated Disadvantage, Dissemination,
Target Audience:

The attendees should have training in any area of behavior science, including not just behavior analysis, but also behavioral medicine, education, and prevention.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) Describe the history, organization and aims of the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations (2) Describe the nature of neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage and the factors that contribute to continuing disadvantage. (3) Describe programs and policies that have the potential to reduce disadvantage.
 
Diversity submission Rationale and History of the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations
(Service Delivery)
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Abstract: The Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations is made up of six organizations: Association for Behavior Analysis International, Association for Contextual Behavior Science, Association for Positive Behavior Support, the Evolution Institute, the National Prevention Science Coalition, and the Society of Behavioral Medicine. It was created to pursue the common interest of these organizations in promoting the use of behavioral science knowledge and methods. It is believed that by combining our expertise both with respect to the science of human behavior and with respect to the ways in which public policies that promote the use of our knowledge can be achieved, we can have a significant impact on the implementation of evidence-based programs and policies and ultimately on the prevalence of well-being in the population.
 
Diversity submission Rebuilding Opportunity in America
(Service Delivery)
ANDREW C BONNER (University of Florida )
Abstract: Over the past fifty years, the health and well-being of a significant portion of Americans have declined, and the prospect of systematically oppressed children escaping from poverty has nearly disappeared. No progress has been made in reducing structural racism -- a major cause of concentrated disadvantage. Concentrated disadvantage refers to neighborhoods with high percentages of residents of low socioeconomic status. These neighborhoods are the focus of our long-term nation-wide effort because they are where the well-being of families, including child development, is most compromised. We cannot reduce the impact or prevalence of neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage without both community-driven and policy-level approaches. We propose to develop community partnerships to identify neighborhood-level needs and collaboratively set action plans to organize and advocate for local and national policies. This paper will describe a policy agenda for reducing structural racism and the progress the CBSO Families and Wellbeing Task Force has made in garnering endorsements of this agenda, drafting the policies that are needed and creating inroads to get these policies in the hands of policy makers, and collaborating with organizations working in neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage. Future aspirations of the Rebuilding Opportunity in America initiative will also be discussed.
 
 
Invited Panel #149A
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Applying Our Science to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: A Conversation With the ABAI DEI Board
Saturday, May 29, 2021
5:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: DEI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
Panelists: SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas), JOVONNIE ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno), ELIZABETH FONG (Pepperdine University), RICHARD FUQUA (Western Michigan University), RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno), JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This panel represents the second annual DEI Board discussion in a series designed to provide the ABAI membership with: 1) updates on Board activities, 2) opportunities for considering specific topics of relevance to advancing DEI efforts within ABAI and more broadly, and 3) a mechanism for input and ideas from the audience. This year’s panel will focus on the potential contributions of behavior analysis theory and scientific research to improving diversity, equity, and inclusion in ABAI and, more generally, in society. After a brief review of the Board’s actions over the past year by Carol Pilgrim, Chair of the ABAI DEI Task Force, DEI Board members will share perspectives on how the science of behavior analysis can be brought to bear in designing DEI initiatives and evaluating their effectiveness. Time for questions and comments from the audience will be included to allow for sharing relevant experiences and lessons learned.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify actions taken by ABAI’s DEI Board over the past year; (2) discuss the application of behavior-analytic theory and research in the design of DEI initiatives; (3) discuss the application of behavior-analytic research in evaluating the effectiveness of DEI actions.
SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Shahla Alai received her B.S. from Southern Illinois University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at the University of North Texas. Shahla and her students collaborate with community partners to serve people who are under resourced and marginalized within current societal structures. Shahla is a member of an interdisciplinary lab that includes faculty and students from Woman’s and Gender Studies, Applied Anthropology and Behavior Analysis. Shahla teaches courses on technology transfer, ethics, autism intervention, parent training, behavioral systems, applied research methods, behavior change techniques, and assessment. Shahla has served on several boards and disciplinary committees, most notably the ABAI Practice Board and the ABAI Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Board. She has published and presented research on social justice, ethics in early intervention, play and social skills, family harmony, change agent training, supervision and the relationship between love and science in the treatment of autism. Shahla has over four decades of experience working with families and has trained hundreds of behavior analysts. She was awarded an Onassis Foundation Fellowship for her work with families, was the recipient of UNT’s prestigious “’Fessor Graham” teaching award, received the 2019 Texas Association for Behavior Analysis Career Contributions award, and the UNT 2020 Community Engagement award.
JOVONNIE ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno)

Jovonnie Esquierdo-Leal is the Program Development Specialist for the Diversity and Inclusion Office at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She received her M.A. from California State University, Fresno and is currently a doctoral candidate at UNR. Jovonnie’s scholarly interests include diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI); social justice; Behavioral Systems Analysis (BSA); verbal behavior; and leadership.

ELIZABETH FONG (Pepperdine University)
Dr. Hughes Fong has over two decades of experience in the fields of behavioral health, education and management. Her educational background is in clinical and counseling psychology and applied behavior analysis. She holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a concentration in Forensic Psychology. She is currently the Associate Director of the MSABA online program and Visiting Clinical Professor at Pepperdine University.

In 2011, Dr. Hughes Fong founded Multicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts (MultiABA) which was a special interest group of the Association of Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). The SIG has since rebranded as the Culture and Diversity SIG and she continues to be a board member of that group. As a doctoral student, she was a "Distinguished Scholar" with the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.  In addition, she was the founder of “Diversity in Behavior Analysis” a section in Behavior Analysis Research and Practice, and served as an Associate Editor for the journal. She has been a reviewer for Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and the National Multicultural Conference and Summit.

Currently, Dr. Hughes Fong serves on the Executive Committee for the American Psychological Association's (APA) Division 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women), and Division 35 Section 5 Psychology of Asian American and Pacific Women).  Dr. Hughes Fong is also a member Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board.

In addition to Dr. Hughes Fong activities, she is a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst and licensed as a Behavior Specialist in Pennsylvania, a trainer in the Pennsylvania Bureau of Autism’s Functional Behavior Analysis training, and has received training certificates in the area of Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy Childhood Traumatic Grief. She received her level one certification in Pivotal Response Training and Gottman Couples Therapy. Her primary areas of interest are in the application of ABA to diverse populations, telehealth, social validity, health and behavior analysis, and examining child custody and parental competency when a child has developmental disabilities.
RICHARD FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Wayne Fuqua (Ph.D., BCBA-D) is a Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University where he served as the Chair of that Department for 14 years. Dr. Fuqua’s research and scholarly interests span a range of topics including autism, health psychology, gerontology, dissemination of evidence-based practice, ethics, and behavioral approaches to sustainability and climate change. His contributions have been recognized with several appointments and awards including: election as a Fellow for the Association of Behavior Analysis; a Distinguished Service Award at WMU; the Jacobson Award from New York State ABA; and a term on the Michigan Autism Council. He has also produced a series of training videos that feature interviews and demonstrations with leaders in behavior analysis (wmich.edu/autism/resources).
RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Dr. Ramona A. Houmanfar is Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She currently serves as the trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Chair of the Organizational Behavior Management Section of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, and editorial board members of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and Behavior & Social Issues. Dr. Houmanfar has served as the editor of Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, senior co-chair of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, Director of the Organizational Behavior Management Network and President of the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis.

Dr. Houmanfar has published over seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters, delivered more than 100 presentations at regional, national, and international conferences in the areas of behavioral systems analysis, cultural behavior analysis, leadership in organizations, rule governance, communication networks, instructional design, and bilingual repertoire analysis and learning. Her expertise in behavioral systems analysis and cultural behavior analysis have also guided her research associated with implicit bias, cooperation, situational awareness, decision making, and value based governance.  Dr. Houmanfar has published three co-edited books titled “Organizational Change” (Context Press), "Understanding Complexity in Organizations", and “Leadership & Cultural Change (Taylor & Francis Group).
JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)

Dr. Jomella Watson-Thompson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, and the Director of the Center for Service Learning at the University of Kansas. She is also affiliated with the Center for Community Health and Development. She attained a Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology and a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Kansas. She applies behavioral science methods and interventions to improve how communities address issues related to community health and development. Her research has focused on behavioral-community approaches to neighborhood development, substance abuse prevention, and youth and community violence prevention. Dr. Thompson supports community-engaged scholarship using participatory approaches to address social determinants or factors that may contribute to disparities, particularly for marginalized groups and communities. She has researched the effects of community-based processes and behavioral-community interventions to promote mobilization and change in communities. Dr. Thompson has received numerous funding awards and co-authored articles on community capacity-building, youth and neighborhood development, and adolescent substance abuse and youth and community violence prevention.  She is as an Associate Editor with Behavior and Social Issues and serves on the ABAI Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board.

 
 
Symposium #155
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Beyond Direct Assessment and Treatment: Addressing the Safety of Individuals Who Engage in Problem Behavior When First Responders Must be Called
Saturday, May 29, 2021
6:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sarah Slocum (Marcus Autism Center and Emory School of Medicine)
CE Instructor: Sarah Slocum, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior analysts have a history of demonstrating large-scale reductions in severe behavior disorders among the individuals we serve. While this may lead to a quality-of-life improvement, problem behavior is not likely to be eliminated entirely. As such, there are still times in which problem behavior could produce significant danger to an individual, including when unaware or untrained first-responders answer a crisis. The current symposium will first include a presentation on survey results related to the physical and emotional impact of problem behavior on caregivers as well as modifications caregivers have made to their homes to prevent damage caused by problem behavior. These impacts may be critical when training first-responders or other professionals who may be called upon to mitigate the impact of problem behavior. Second, we will present caregiver reports of the use of first-responder services based on their child’s demographics (e.g., race, ethnicity, age, and type of challenging behavior exhibited). Finally, we will show an effective procedure to teach law enforcement officers strategies to promote compliance when responding to a crisis. Overall, these presentations will go beyond the direct reduction of problem behavior to begin to address the safety of individuals with severe behavior disorders during emergency circumstances.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): first responders, law enforcement, problem behavior
Target Audience:

N/A - Basic level

Learning Objectives: 1. identify critical physical and emotional barriers facing families of individuals who engage in problem behavior. 2. understand the impact demographic presentations have on families' uses of first-responders. 3. implement behavioral skills training on critical strategies for first-responders to obtain compliance among individuals with problem behavior.
 
Diversity submission Caregiver Report on the Social and Environmental Impact of Challenging Behavior
AMANDA KAZEE (Marcus Autism Center and Emory School of Medicine), Kortney Rist (30329), Grace Binion (Marcus Autism Center), Mindy Christine Scheithauer (Marcus Autism Center)
Abstract: Most researchers measure challenging behavior with direct observations or parent-report of the frequency/duration. While important, this information often does not address the severity of the behavior as it relates to the impact that the behavior has on the child, the family, or others in the community. The purpose of this study is to describe outcomes from a structured interview conducted with a large sample (N > 400) of parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities referred to a behavioral treatment program for the primary concern of challenging behavior. Domains assessed included: environmental changes to the home; avoiding certain activities or tasks; damage to property; physical harm to self or others; and contacting emergency or crisis services. Caregivers reported a large degree of negative impact from challenging behavior. Over 80% reported physical injury, over 70% damage to items or the home, and over 40% made structural modifications to their home. It is important to consider these impacts when working with families of children who engage in challenging behavior, both when considering necessary resources and when training first-responders or other professionals who may be called upon to mitigate the impact of challenging behavior.
 
Diversity submission 

Prevalence of Interactions With First Responders: Report From Caregivers of Children Who Exhibit Challenging Behaviors

Nadratu Nuhu (Marcus Autism Center and Emory School of Medicine), Summer Bottini (Marcus Autism Center and Emory School of Medicine), MADELINE AUGE (Marcus Autism Center and Emory School of Medicine), Mindy Christine Scheithauer (Marcus Autism Center), Alexis Constantin Pavlov (Marcus Autism Center), Sarah Slocum (Marcus Autism Center and Emory School of Medicine), Nathan Call (Marcus Autism Center), Colin S. Muething (Marcus Autism Center)
Abstract:

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder who engage in challenging behaviors are at increased likelihood of coming into contact with first responders during crisis situations. Currently the demographic risk factors associated with contacting first responders is unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine whether caregivers report differential use of first responder services based on their child’s demographics, including race, ethnicity, age, and type of challenging behavior exhibited. Experimenters evaluated 579 participant case files for information regarding caregivers’ use of first responders during crisis situations. Findings from the study suggested no significant differences in contacting emergency services based on race. In regards to ethnicity, findings indicated individuals who identify as Hispanic are less likely to contact emergency services in response to their child engaging in challenging behaviors than those that identify as non-Hispanic. We discuss the clinical implications of outcomes and present areas of future research.

 
Diversity submission 

Preparing Law Enforcement Officers to Engage Successfully With Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Evaluation of a Performance-Based Approach

KARLIE AMELIA HINKLE (UHCL), Dorothea C. Lerman (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Abstract:

Law enforcement officers (LEOs) may use physical force unnecessarily or escalate problem behavior when attempting to gain the compliance of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Copenhaver & Tewksbury, 2019). Although specialized training may remedy this problem, the relatively small literature on such training programs indicates the need for further research (Railey et al., 2020). This study evaluated the outcomes of performance-based instruction on strategies to promote compliance when LEOs respond to calls involving individuals with ASD. Results for three LEOs and 24 police cadets demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) for teaching LEOs how to interact more effectively with individuals with ASD. Results also suggested that hands-on training should supplement commonly used forms of didactic instruction.

 
 
Panel #157
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission Bridging the Gap: The Establishment of Behavior Analysis Professional Associations Across Latin America
Saturday, May 29, 2021
6:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Estefania Carla Alarcon Moya, M.A.
Chair: Amanda Bueno dos Santos (CEDIN)
ESTEFANIA CARLA ALARCON MOYA (Florida Institute of Technology; CeABA Chile)
CAROLA SCOLARI (Casita ABA)
GRICEL PEZZOTTI (ABA DOMINICANA)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is an emergent field in Latin America (LATAM). The popularity of ABA evidence-based practices led to rapid growth in demand, rising faster than services could be supplied. The quality of services available is a concern. Furthermore, the absence of local regulations (both legal and ethical) to practice ABA is a common detriment that all countries in LATAM share. Until recently, most efforts to create support systems for the education of new qualified ABA practitioners were mostly linked to the BACB certification. Nevertheless, the discontinuation of the international scope of the credential posed a challenge for the region, opening the opportunity for several countries to discuss and reflect on how to bridge the gap. In the present discussion, panelists will share their experiences on how they have been actively collaborating in the creation of local task forces. They will also discuss the process by which they have established a consensus on the competencies and ethical standards representing their communities. Additionally, panelists will discuss the diversity of challenges across the region and outline potential solutions to support other countries with fewer resources to advance in the development of local ABA practice standards.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Basic
Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the challenges to regulate practice in Latin American Countries 2) Outline solutions to overcome the main challenges Latin American Countries face in the development of their own regulatory bodies. 3) List actions to create collaborative forces in the design of standards representative of Latin American countries
Keyword(s): Dissemination, Latin America, Practice Standards, Professional Associations
 
 
Panel #161
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Compassionate Online Education in a Post-COVID-19 World
Saturday, May 29, 2021
6:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dipti Mudgal, Ph.D.
Chair: Laura L. Dudley (Northeastern University)
DIPTI MUDGAL (Ball State University)
VERONICA J. HOWARD (University of Alaska Anchorage)
ROBYN M. CATAGNUS (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

Compassion is showing concern for others who are experiencing suffering. In recent years, an emphasis has been placed on “compassionate care” within healthcare, and some studies have suggested that an empathetic approach to patient care may lead to improved outcomes as well as increased social validity. ABAI’s recent Presidential Address highlighted compassionate behavior analysis as a guiding core principle. Over the past year, we have faced numerous challenges, including a deadly virus, racism, violence, natural disasters, fiscal worries, political unrest, and rising mental health issues. Given these challenges, a compassionate approach within healthcare and education seems more necessary now than ever. With the necessary migration of graduate education to online formats, the absence of human connection emphasizes the need for compassionate education and support. How can we, as behavior analysts, incorporate compassionate practices into how we mentor, teach and train graduate students in an online format? In this panel, we will discuss various methods for weaving compassion into our teaching, mentoring, and advising of students. This discussion will focus on curriculum, communication, administration, and organizational systems. Panelists will describe their experiences and recommendations to support students in this ever-changing world.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students and faculty of online ABA programs.

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to understand what compassionate education should include. 2. Participants will be able to tailor online education to meet the needs of students. 3. Participants will be able to list ways programs and administration can provide compassionate online education.
Keyword(s): COVID-19, Diversity, Online education
 
 
Business Meeting #169
Diversity submission Culture and Diversity SIG Meeting
Saturday, May 29, 2021
7:00 PM–7:50 PM EDT
Online
Chair: Robyn M. Catagnus (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Presenting Authors:
The business meeting for the first non profit multicultural alliance for behavior analysts, established to support research, growth, and networking about culture and diversity issues in behavior analysis. Our mission is to increase inclusive practices in behavior analysis research, education, policy, training, and clinical practice - and in our wider communities. The SIG welcomes everyone and seeks a variety of backgrounds, perspectives, and skills. This meeting will include introductions of a new Board, as well.
Keyword(s): culture, diversity, multicultural, racism
 
 
Business Meeting #176
Diversity submission Behavior Gerontology Special Interest Group
Saturday, May 29, 2021
7:00 PM–7:50 PM EDT
Online
Chair: Claudia Drossel (Eastern Michigan University; Center for the Advancement of Neurobehavioral Health)
Presenting Authors:
The Behavioral Gerontology SIG provides an open forum for students, practitioners, and researchers who have an interest in applying the science, practice, and philosophy of behavior analysis to wellbeing in later life, typically referring to ages 65 and older. The goal is to promote the development, implementation, and evaluation of behavior analytic approaches to a wide variety of topics with high public health significance in this population, such as self-management for health promotion and disease prevention, and functional assessments of and interventions for behavioral changes commonly associated with neurocognitive disorders (e.g., due to Alzheimer's disease). The meeting will explore attendees’ interests and needs and foster collaborations and the sharing of information, to encourage education, training, practice, and research. Outreach and organizational issues are central to the meeting agenda.
Keyword(s): Alzheimer, behavioral health, gerontology, older adults
 

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