Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

40th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2014

Program by Day for Friday, May 23, 2014


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: A Comprehensive Merging of Applied Behavior Analysis, Technology, and Visual Supports
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jennifer Dantzler, M.Ed.
HOWARD SHANE (Boston Children's Hospital), STACY CIANCIOLO (Private Practice), JENNIFER DANTZLER (Including Kids, Inc.)
Description: Arguably the ultimate treatment model for persons with complex communication impairments associated with an autism disorder would include evidence-based instruction interwoven with sound technology and effective visual supports. The purpose of this 3-hour workshop is to describe an instructional approach that takes core tenets of applied behavior analysis and blends them with the fundamental principles of the Visual Immersion Program, an evidence-based communication approach created and researched in the Autism Language Program at Boston Children's Hospital. This comprehensive communication approach focuses on seven communication functions that are applied using the latest mobile devices. Because of contemporary technological breakthroughs, communication can now be afforded through traditional grid-type displays as well as visual scene displays. The presentation will describe the distinctive features of each display type, including criteria for determining the optimum display design for a given individual's personal profile. In addition, this workshop will include ways in which principles of applied behavior analysis can be used to improve performance in each of the seven communication operations. Finally, case examples will be presented to demonstrate improved outcomes.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) successfully implement components of the Visual Immersion Program; (2) effectively apply visual supports highlighted in the Visual Immersion Program using the visual immersion approach to assist individuals with autism; (3) effectively select which technology and applications are most effective for individuals with autism; (4) successfully apply principles of applied behavior analysis in order to improve performance in each of the seven communicative functions within the Visual Immersion Program; and (5) describe the distinctive features of communication display types including criteria for determining the optimum display design for a given individual's personal profile.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation including case examples, small group activities, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstration of case examples to demonstrate improved outcomes. Supplemental materials for identifying communication and language barriers within traditional approaches will be provided to support participant learning.
Audience: Do you currently teach communication and language using symbol-based approaches? Are you finding your learner is successful with manding but is unable to comprehend more complex symbol representations and language? The intended audience includes licensed psychologists and Board Certified Behavior Analysts currently providing behavior analytic services in home, school, and/or community settings; speech and language pathologists; and other professionals implementing communication and language programs on low-tech and high-tech devices who find themselves having difficulties with teaching comprehension of language using traditional approaches.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Communication Device, Language Comprehension, Technology, Visual Scenes
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Ethical and Effective Behavior Plans Through Formal Case Formulation
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Isaac Bermudez, M.S.
ISAAC BERMUDEZ (Love 2 Learn Consulting LLC), JOSE D. RIOS (Private Practice), DOUGLAS P. BEATTY (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), KRISTINE DICKSON (Inclusive Education & Community Partnership)
Description: Despite growth in functional assessment and behavior intervention programming, too often there are errors made that lead to ineffective treatment plans. A recommended process to identify potential errors is a formal case formulation. Clinical case formulation involves the summarization and integration of assessment data and related client information for the purpose of selecting interventions. The information gathered during the functional assessment process is used to build effective intervention strategies, strategies that are logically related to the purported function of the behaviors being targeted. In this workshop, we will discuss case formulation, from the beginning stages of assessment, to data reconciliation, through treatment selection. In addition, we will provide participants with a structure for conducting case formulation meetings. Participants will also get an opportunity to critique behavior plans as they would during a formal case formulation meeting. Finally, this workshop will culminate in a discussion of other factors that will affect and impede treatment implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the important role of functional assessment in selecting logically related treatment plans; (2) discuss considerations when stating the function of behavior; (3) explain how to reconcile the assessment information learned from indirect assessment, direct assessment, and functional analysis; (4) describe research-based behavioral interventions that are logically related to the function of the problem behavior; and (5) analyze the role of the mediator in the implementation of behavior intervention plans.
Activities: This workshop will offer didactic instruction, slide presentation, and an exercise. In addition, this workshop will provide participants with handouts to further their education in the topic.
Audience: BCBAs, supervising practitioners, licensed psychologists and related professionals, graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABCs of Behavior Analysis: The Basics, Their Interactions, and Their Implications
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EAB/TBA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), MARNIE NICOLE SHAPIRO (The Ohio State University), JOSHUA GARNER (The Ohio State University)
Description: In this workshop we will review selection of behavior by its consequences, contingencies of reinforcement and aversive control, stimulus control and attention, and sources of novel behavior. We will examine the rationales behind important behavioral language practices, such as specifying what is reinforced by what in arranging and/or interpreting reinforcement contingencies, describing behavior in the context of three-term or higher-order contingencies, distinguishing between positive and negative reinforcement, emphasizing the behavior of attending in analyzing stimulus control, and treating complex behavior in terms of multiple causation. We will identify and address misrepresentations of behavior analytic concepts and practices, as when ignoring is suggested as the most effective treatment for reducing unwelcome behavior, or when reinforcement is falsely equated with bribery, or when it is argued that reinforcement has hidden costs. Along the way we will consider benefits and pitfalls of translations between technical and colloquial vocabularies, as well as practices that tempt us to attribute behavior to weakly defined or unmeasurable entities such as feelings or emotions. We will also consider extensions of basic concepts and terminology to applications, particularly as reflected in the content of certification exams.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) discuss how behavior changes in terms of the selection of behavior by its consequences (as in shaping); (2) provide a behavioral criterion for distinguishing between positive and negative reinforcement; (3) discuss how attention enters into the acquisition of stimulus control; (4) distinguish between different arrangements for producing novel behavior; (5) analyze examples of complex behavior in terms of multiple causation and the interaction of basic processes; and (6) defend against critiques of behavior analysis that are based on misunderstandings of the basic processes.
Activities: The workshop will include presentations supplemented by visual materials and discussions, videos of some basic phenomena as they have been displayed in classroom demonstrations, and computer simulations of shaping and of reinforcement schedules. The basics of behavior analysis will be reviewed in the context of an organization developed for the new fifth edition of the presenter's book Learning (which may be useful to some participants but which is not required for this workshop).
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists as well as (1) students of behavior analysis, especially those completing degrees or preparing for certification examinations; (2) those seeking a refresher overview of basic phenomena; and (3) those teaching or assisting in courses covering the basics of behavior analysis. Those seeking an introductory treatment may also find this workshop appropriate, on the assumption that anyone attending these meetings will already have at least some familiarity with these topics from undergraduate coursework or independent reading.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): attention/discrimination, novel behavior, reinforcement contingencies, shaping
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Work Smarter, Not Harder! "Self & Match": An Interactive Workshop to Develop a Comprehensive Self-Monitoring and Motivational System
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W181a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jamie Siden Salter, Ed.S.
JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education), KATHARINE M. CROCE ("Self & Match")
Description: This interactive and hands-on workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on "Self & Match," a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a "Self & Match" manual with substantial training materials. Additionally, participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The "Self & Match" system has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional or behavior disorders, autism, and learning disabilities, as well as unidentified students in general education. "Self & Match" can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS, and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings, including (but not limited to) public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) identify the basic components of the "Self & Match" system; (3) effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (4) identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (5) identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (6) create a "Self & Match" self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace; and (7) systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, and the "Self & Match" system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own "Self & Match" system.
Audience: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge of systematic self-monitoring and motivational systems as behavior interventions. Workshop attendees will gain a tool/guide to develop their own "Self & Match" systems to utilize in school, home, or clinic settings. This workshop is designed for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from K to 21.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Intervention, PBS, Self-Monitoring
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Successive Approximations: Useful Shaping Strategies and Tactics to Improve Your Teaching
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W176b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (Pappy's Pet Lodge), KATHLEEN DIGNAN (University of North Texas), ERICA FOSS (University of North Texas)
Description: Shaping is a powerful tool for teaching new complex behaviors and producing engaged and confident students, but poor shaping can easily lead to learning plateaus and frustrated learners and teachers. Shaping is often described as an art and as a difficult skill to learn; however, shaping is an orderly and predictable process with rules. This workshop will teach several tactics and strategies for successful shaping and show different ways to engineer behavior (e.g., shaping, micro-shaping, and adduction). Participants will leave with a newly developed understanding of how to look at the shaping process beyond the general concept of successive approximations. Students will learn the rules regarding the mechanics of shaping, the requirements of a conditioned reinforcer, what to reinforce, how to reinforce, how to shape movements and actions, how to arrange the environment to facilitate shaping, how to use resurgence to accelerate shaping, and how to shape the stimulus control based on characteristics of the stimuli (e.g., touching red objects) or characteristics of the response (e.g., stacking objects).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) deliver cues, conditioned reinforcers, and primary reinforcers efficiently; (2) deliver reinforcers in a way that facilitates shaping; (3) isolate movements through environmental arrangements; (4) establish stimulus control of behavior; (5) evaluate students' behavior to decide where to begin shaping; and (6) teach complex behaviors and concepts from simple behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use video examples to illustrate key concepts about shaping. Participants will implement these concepts in interactive games designed to practice and master the strategies and tactics discussed. During the games participants will play the roles of both teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the games as teacher and student.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as anyone interested in the processes of shaping and learning or anyone interested in improving their teaching techniques. The concepts of the workshop can be applied to any population in any learning setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): learning, shaping, teaching, therapy
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Socially Savvy: Assessing and Teaching Social Skills to Young Children With Autism
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W184bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James Ellis, Ph.D.
JAMES T. ELLIS (Step By Step Behavioral Solutions), CHRISTINE DANIELLE ALMEIDA (Newton Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will provide step-by-step guidance in assessing and teaching social skills to young children, primarily children ages three to five. Attendees will be introduced to the Socially Savvy Checklist, which is designed to help identify social strengths and weaknesses in young children. The attendees will then learn how to craft IEP objectives based on areas of weakness and determine and develop teaching and data collection procedures. Teaching strategies covered include systematic use of prompting and reinforcement strategies, development and use of detailed teaching plans, and the use of visual supports and social stories. A major focus of intervention will be on how to embed social-skills intervention in the context of a variety of typical, age-appropriate, and fun activities. Attendees will also learn how to create their own social-skills groups, allowing them to meet the varying social needs of different children within the same social context.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) use the Socially Savvy Social-Skills Checklist to determine social-skills strengths and weaknesses in young children, (2) develop IEP objectives based on information gathered through use of the checklist, (3) identify and develop teaching plans to address targeted social skills, (4) develop practical data collection systems, (5) identify age-appropriate and fun activities within which to teach social skills, and (6) design social-skills groups to simultaneously meet the varying social needs of multiple children.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, discussion, video observation, guided practice, and small group break-out.
Audience: Target audience includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, preschool and early elementary special educators, behavior analysts, speech-language pathologists, and other professionals working with young children with autism or other social impairments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Preschool, Social Pragmatics, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Promoting the Generalization and Maintenance of Skills in Learners With Autism and Related Disorders
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W175a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Association for Science in Autism Treatment)
Description: Educators and other services providers of learners with autism and related disorders are often faced with situations in which skills do not generalize or maintain over time. Many providers fail to recognize the steps they should be taking to promote generalization and maintenance or teach in ways that actually inhibit generalization; nonetheless, the field of applied behavior analysis offers both a framework and a number of methods that can be implemented to circumvent these challenges. During this workshop, the various forms of generalization (stimulus, response, and temporal generalization) will be described along with specific methods that may increase the likelihood that generalization and maintenance can be observed. Efforts to address generalization and maintenance need to be individualized for each learner, tailored to the target skill, and planned for in a systematic manner. More specifically, methods will be presented that can be incorporated at three broad phases in the teaching process, during treatment planning and prior to the initial teaching of a target skill, during the process of teaching the particular target skill, and after the target skill is mastered. A framework for determining how best to maintain target skills after they are mastered will also be offered.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) differentiate the various types of generalization, (2) identify common obstacles and teaching approaches that impede generalization and maintenance, (3) design and implement a variety of strategies to promote generalization, (4) design and implement a variety of strategies to promote maintenance, (5) identify learner and task characteristics that will inform when such strategies could be implemented, and (6) evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to promote generalization and maintenance.
Activities: Although the workshop is primarily didactic, participants will be given many opportunities to engage in discussion and will participate in tasks that will concretize and synthesize the didactic information and increase the likelihood of later implementation. Videotaped vignettes of a variety of teaching interactions will be provided to illustrate an array of generalization and maintenance strategies. Data collection tools and tracking forms relevant to generalization and maintenance will also be shared along with a bibliography of articles related to generalization. Examples will be provided throughout the presentation and adapted to the interests and needs of the participants.
Audience: This workshop will benefit professionals from a variety of disciplines—including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists—as well as parents who are significantly involved in the educational programming of learners with autism and related disorders. Participants should already be familiar with behavior analytic teaching procedures, such as discrete trial instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Autism: Evidence-based Strategies to Enhance Communication and Remediate Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W183b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.S.
OLIVER WENDT (Purdue University), MIRIAM C. BOESCH (University of North Texas), WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), RAVI NIGAM (Governors State University), KASEY PHILPOTT (Little Star Center)
Description: This workshop will provide an introduction to interventions in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One of the core ASD symptoms includes a delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language. Approximately 25–50% of children with ASD are functionally non-verbal and will not develop sufficient natural speech or writing without ongoing and systematic AAC intervention. AAC augments or replaces spoken language through alternative means of communication. The first part of this workshop will review evidence-based AAC strategies to facilitate functional communication skills, enhance natural speech production, and increase social-communicative behaviors. Strategies include unaided approaches such as manual signs and gestures, and aided approaches such as graphic symbols, exchanged-based communication, electronic communication aides, and tablet devices. The second part will focus on how to use AAC for remediating challenging behaviors such as aggression or self-injury. Particular emphasis will be on the application of iPads and AAC apps. The workshop will identify features of evidence-based apps that are most suitable for autism intervention and showcase how to infuse these into behavioral instruction. Data and video cases from recent single-subject experiments will illustrate successful AAC interventions and their implementation into daily activities in an autism center.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) summarize and critically appraise research related to ASD and AAC approaches such as manual signs and gestures, communication boards with graphic symbols, tangible symbols, Picture Exchange Communication System, speech-generating devices (SGDs), tablets and AAC apps, and functional communication training; (2) outline the pros and cons of using tablet devices for AAC intervention, distinguish well-designed from poorly designed AAC apps, and identify app features that are important to facilitate sensory processing and prevent cognitive overload; (3) define the potential benefits of AAC intervention on development of natural speech in children with ASD, as well as the roles of behavioral versus naturalistic AAC intervention approaches; and (4) explain how single-subject research is used to evaluate the effectiveness of AAC interventions, how practitioners can easily estimate the amount of treatment effectiveness, and how to identify quality criteria for sound treatment research in AAC.
Activities: Lecturing will provide an initial overview on the various AAC interventions and their effectiveness for individuals with ASD. Participants will learn the role of single-subject experimental designs for evaluating AAC efficacy and how to apply quality indicators to determine if standards for high quality research and evidence-based practice are met. Videotaped case studies will illustrate differences between AAC approaches and provide a better understanding of different intervention components. Video cases will also demonstrate how to use AAC for facilitating natural speech development, and how to implement AAC intervention into programming in an applied behavior analysis (ABA) setting. Group discussion will revolve around the presentation of different types of AAC apps and evaluation of app features; these will be examined in terms of sensory friendliness, ability to reduce cognitive load, ease of access and programming, suitability for ABA instruction, symbol iconicity, cost-efficiency, and ability to track progress. Finally, resources will be discussed that are available to practitioners seeking best available AAC treatment evidence. Attendees will be provided with digital handouts of all the information covered in the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is intended for professionals working in the autism field who have an interest in AAC interventions for individuals presenting with little or no functional speech. Specifically, practitioners with motivation to implement evidence-based practices in AAC and particular interest in learning about iDevices and tablets for autism intervention will find this workshop very suitable for their needs. These can include BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, applied researchers, behavior analysts, special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, graduate students in any of these disciplines, and other practitioners serving individuals with autism. A basic understanding of single-subject research methodology is advantageous to fully benefit from this workshop, but not strictly necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): assistive technology, autism, communication intervention, tablet devices
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Fun and Effective Programs to Teach and Promote Non-Verbal Communication
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W179b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rebecca Thompson, Ph.D.
REBECCA THOMPSON (Wisconsin Early Autism Project, Inc.), MARY HOPTON-SMITH (Wisconsin Early Autism Project, Inc.)
Description: The ability to interpret and use non-verbal communication is a widely acknowledged deficit in individuals affected by autism. This workshop provides participants with a comprehensive understanding of the significant role that non-verbal communication plays in human interactions. Participants will learn the difference between non-verbal and verbal communication, and how these forms of communication are used during our everyday discourse. Within a behavior analytic framework, participants will learn how non-verbal communication develops during infancy through the three key stages of sharing, following, and directing joint attention. Participants are provided with written programs designed to teach children increasingly complex non-verbal communication skills following a developmental sequence. Each program includes sample target items, prompting strategies, and data collection documents. Programs start from simple interactive games that promote sharing attention and progress to complex activities that teach children to understand how intonation and volume can influence the meaning of information that is vital to navigating social situations successfully. Video examples of the teaching activities are provided, and participants will have the opportunity to role-play and collect data on the activities. This workshop provides participants with a comprehensive curriculum for teaching non-verbal communication to children of all skill levels in both home and school-based settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define the difference between non-verbal communication and verbal communication, (2) identify how non-verbal communication develops in neuro-typical children and how autism might impact the development of non-verbal communication skills, and (3) implement a series of programs to teach a child non-verbal communication skills within structured learning sessions.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, video presentation, and participant practice of activities.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, ABA clinicians, teachers, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, communication, home-programs, intervention
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Developmental Perspective on the First Three Months of Behavioral Intervention for Youngsters With Autism: Working With Children and Their Parents
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W176a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monika M. Suchowierska, Ph.D.
MONIKA M. SUCHOWIERSKA (University of Social Sciences and Humanities), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center), PAUL W. STEPHANY (Stanislaus County Office of Education)
Description: The first three months of early intensive behavioral intervention are a crucial period for a young learner with autism. It has been recommended that the behavioral intervention take into account a developmental perspective, especially as it relates to behavioral cusps leading to autistic development. We will examine several related skills that may be present or absent in young children with autism: stimulus overselectivity, facial recognition, mutually responsive orientation, joint attention, and social referencing. Based on this information, we will propose major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention, together with teaching strategies to accomplish those goals. Moreover, since the first three months of therapy are also important from the perspective of working with the parents, we will present a training program for parents of young children with autism. Teaching Skills for Success is a structured instructional package where behavior analysts work directly with the parents to develop an effective behavior management plan for the child. The program consists of seven units that include the basic principles of ABA, environmental supports, and strategies for shaping a successful behavioral repertoire and for using powerful contingencies. Teaching Skills for Success is accompanied by a workbook that provides a series of exercises for the parents, on which a behavior management plan is developed. The workshop will conclude with suggestions for combining working with the child and working with the parent, as both of those "pieces of the puzzle" fit within the developmental systems approach to treating autism.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to (1) list developmental concepts that relate to early behavioral intervention, (2) characterize skills that are present or absent in young children with autism and that are behavioral cusps for autistic development, (3) list major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention as they relate to the precursors of autism, (4) describe teaching strategies to accomplish the major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention, (5) characterize the elements of the Teaching Skills for Success program, (6) complete the exercises within the training workbook, and (7) design an educational plan for a young child with autism based on responses to the exercises in the training workbook.
Activities: During the course of the workshop, participants will have an opportunity to analyze videos of typically developing children and autistic children to search for the behavioral cusps discussed in the workshop as well as to plan—based on videos of autistic children—goals for the beginning of their therapy. Small group activities relating to the Teaching Skills for Success program will be conducted.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and behavior analysts who work with families of young children with autism and are responsible for programming therapeutic goals for their pupils, as well as for training parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, developmental perspective, EIBI, parent training
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Speech Program Development
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W183c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will present background information on speech assessment, speech target selection, and program development for speech skill acquisition. In addition, it will offer participants an opportunity for individualized case consultation and troubleshooting speech programming for one of their students. For participants not presenting a case, it's an opportunity to observe the problem solving process related to speech development programs. As a group, we will review information from each selected case. This will include results from the Early Echoic Speech Assessment (EESA; Esch, 2008), video clips, current program data, and other relevant information. For each case, Dr. Esch will discuss how to use this information to select appropriate speech teaching targets, how to best sequence these targets, and how to troubleshoot current problems in the program. Specific strategies and techniques may be recommended for individual cases when appropriate. General dos and don'ts when teaching speech and articulation will be included. Participants who pre-register for the workshop will be offered the opportunity to submit their learner's case for the group consultation. Prior to the workshop, participants presenting cases will need to submit a video permission form, signed by parent or guardian, to allow video review by the workshop audience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe several ways to assess current speech function and suggest next steps, (2) identify appropriate sequential and non-sequential speech targets, (3) explain the purpose and use of the Speech Acquisition Sequence Checklist, and (4) write several English vowels using International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcription.
Activities: Didactic instruction (lecture, videos), practice reading and writing IPA symbols, and consultation by Dr. Esch on individual speech cases submitted by participants.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, and anyone who has responsibility for speech development and speech training programs for individuals who haven't yet learned to speak fluently. Participants will have an opportunity to submit individual cases for consultation-model review during the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): articulation, speech, vocal training
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Programming for Pragmatics: Bringing Assessment to Practice for High Functioning Learners on the Autism Spectrum
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W175b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alexia Stack, M.Ed.
ALEXIA STACK (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting), MAGDALENA A. MARKIEWICZ (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting)
Description: It is well known that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience qualitative impairments in social skills development (DSM-V, 2013), including impairments in pragmatic language skills. Moreover, the long term consequences of pragmatic language deficits place individuals with ASD at risk for relational bullying, limit their ability to develop and maintain friendships and romantic relationships, and increase their likelihood of suffering from anxiety and depression. Support for the assessment and development of pragmatic language skills is crucial for individuals with high functioning autism. There is an increase in evidence based practice within the fields of applied behavior analysis, speech and language pathology, and developmental psychology for pragmatic language assessment and programming. Therefore, early intervention addressing pragmatic language skills is necessary for individuals with ASD. Learning to use assessment tools to select goals for intervention, designing programs based on assessment results, and doing ongoing data analysis to monitor learning are all skills required by behavior analysts in delivering services to high functioning learners on the autism spectrum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define pragmatic language skills, (2) discuss higher order pragmatic language skills that are known to be challenging for learners on the Autism Spectrum, (3) the assessment tools that can be used to guide program development, (4) use assessment tools to identify missing component skills needed for higher order pragmatics, (5) design programs based on assessment results, (6) clearly define target behaviors and effective measurement procedures, and (7) identify common error patterns that emerge, and how to problem solve.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, group discussion, data analysis, video analysis, analysis of sample assessment data, small group practice, program development coaching, and application of data-based decision making. Participants will receive supplemental materials to follow lecture material and for note taking purposes. Example assessment data will be made available for small group practice. Sample worksheets and sample data will be included for small group learning objectives.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, and service delivery staff.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Pragmatic language
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Solving Behavior Problems With Precision Teaching
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W184a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard M. Kubina Jr., Ph.D.
RICHARD M. KUBINA JR. (Penn State), KIRSTEN K. YURICH (The Vista School)
Description: The stakes for producing behavioral change have never been higher. General education, special education, early childhood, and even higher education have increasingly become the focal point for effective behavior change technologies. Precision teaching (PT) provides one important part of the solution for addressing behavior problems: an applied scientific measurement system offering the most powerful methods for selecting and identifying behavior; recording behavior; visually displaying data; facilitating timely, learner centered changes; and providing recursive problem solving. Solving behavior problems by adopting the PT framework of the Is-Does Problem Solving System is important for all behavior analysts. The system was developed to uncover orderly relations between behavior and the environment. The Is-Does System includes (1) precise, action-based descriptions of behavior within the context of environmental events; (2) sensitive measurements of behavior with frequency/rate; (3) data monitoring and analysis on standard celeration charts; and (4) decision making. Equipped with this information, behavior analysts precisely engineer effective learning environments, implement intensive data monitoring procedures, and employ ongoing decision making. The workshop provides explicit instruction on the components of the Is-Does Problem Solving System. Applicable materials are provided to participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) categorize environmental variables across programs, program events, pinpoints and movement cycles, and arrangements and arranged events; (2) state the steps involved in systematically analyzing environments when developing and modifying behavior change programs using the Is-Does Problem Solving System; and (3) complete the Is-Does Planning Sheet using presenter and participant generated examples.
Activities: The six-hour workshop activities will instruct participants to use the Is-Does Problem Solving System to systematically evaluate environmental variables to solve behavioral challenges. The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises focused on the components of the Is-Does Problem Solving System. Participants will further evaluate behavioral data on standard celeration charts. Participants will label behavior change pictures, celeration, and bounce significance.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, teachers, precision teachers, behavior analysts, supervisors, or anyone with responsibility for systematically evaluating individual performances and learning environments in order to produce maximum behavior change. The material presented will be appropriate for participants with a moderate understanding of behavior analysis and/or a minimal knowledge of precision teaching, as well as those well versed in traditional practices. The workshop is specifically designed for individuals who routinely review learner behavior and have the responsibility to modify programming in order to produce positive learning outcomes and improve behavior challenges.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavior problems, Decision making, Precision Teaching, Problem solving
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Skinner's Verbal Behavior and Far Beyond Using the PEAK Relational Training System
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W185d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Seth W. Whiting, M.S.
SETH W. WHITING (Southern Illinois University), MARK R. DIXON (Southern Illinois University)
Description: The PEAK Relational Training System developed by Dr. Mark R. Dixon is a program designed to promote verbal behavior and related skills for children with autism. It has already been field tested by practitioners with more than 100 children with autism. Stemming from recent advances in basic and applied research in behavior analysis, PEAK starts the learner at the earliest stages with programs that directly train a beginning repertoire including prerequisite skills and Skinner's verbal operants, yet advances the learner much further by including skills such as extended tacts, autoclitics, metaphor, and perspective taking. PEAK also expands beyond Skinner's approach to language by building the repertoire through stimulus equivalence and relational frames. Instructors utilizing the Peak Relational Training System proceed through the program book while collecting data during each session that demonstrate the learner's progress and allow for ongoing adjustment. Attendees will be trained on how to assess language deficits, identify goals and objectives for students, and implement the most efficient prompting and training techniques to produce evidence-based results. This workshop will walk attendees through the PEAK system, the behavioral concepts underlying its development, and roleplay data collection and program implementation, and provide outlines of PEAK for immediate implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe how Skinner's Verbal Behavior has been incorporated into the Peak Relational Training System; (2) describe how the system utilizes stimulus equivalence and relational frames to promote language; (3) conduct sessions with a participant in each component of the system, including direct training, generalization, stimulus equivalence, and relational responding; (4) collect data on learner responding during sessions; and (5) describe the layout of the Peak Relational Training System and how the programs proceed.
Activities: Participants will view videos of a BCBA conducting sessions using the Peak Relational Training System, collect data from vignettes, fill out and design sample programs, and conduct brief roleplays with others.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, applied behavior analysts who wish to train verbal behavior skills to their clients, administrators who are seeking a verbal behavior program to implement, or verbal behavior researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): PEAK, relational frame, stimulus equivalence, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Motivating Learner Participation Without Blocking Escape, Forced Physical Prompts, or Nagging
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W185bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Schramm, M.A.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA)
Description: The goal of the workshop will be to teach participants an approach to earning instructional control with unmotivated or otherwise challenging learners that does not employ traditional escape extinction procedures such as forced physical prompting, physically holding the learner in the teaching setting, or nagging procedures. Through the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control, participants will be given an easy-to-teach and therefore reproducible path to earning learner motivation while avoiding some of the potentially behavior escalating procedures common in behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the importance of learner assent in home, clinic, and education settings; (2) creative and practical methods for controlling access to reinforcement in all environments; (3) describe the value and process of being meticulously contingent with words and actions; the value and process of pairing oneself with reinforcement; (5) describe the differences between positive and negative reinforcement and why one is valuable in earning instructional control with an unwilling learner; (6) effectively use and increase a variable ratio of reinforcement; (7) prioritize learning objectives and use differential reinforcement effectively; (8) describe how best to use extinction and negative punishment procedures; (9) name three different types of discrete trial teaching; (10) use important motivating operations when teaching intensively; and (11) describe the concept of a teaching arc and how one can prolong the value of teaching over several different reinforcing teaching settings for the length of teaching interactions.
Activities: Discussion, video demonstration, lecture on the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control, and creation ofa teaching arc.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as other professionals who are working directly with children with autism or other challenging disabilities find themselves having trouble developing motivated learning settings regularly or are responsible to teach others how to earn instructional control in home, clinic, or school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W187c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa L. Famiglietti, M.S.
ALYSSA L. FAMIGLIETTI (Advances Learning Center), GINA FUGAZZOTTO (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE FRANCES COREY (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language; conversation; independent, pretend, and cooperative play; social conventions; and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues; (2) facilitate activities that teach body language; conversation; independent, pretend, and cooperative play; social conventions; and perspective-taking; (3) group students into effective learning clusters; (4) use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency; (5) collect data on multiple students; (6) individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; and (7) take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and roleplays.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts who train staff to run social skills groups; licensed psychologists; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): social skills
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Introduction to Behavior Analysis and Dementia
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W181b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DEV/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Maranda Trahan, Ph.D.
MARANDA TRAHAN (Trahan Behavioral Services), CLAUDIA DROSSEL (University of Michigan), JONATHAN C. BAKER (Southern Illinois University)
Description: Behavioral gerontology is the study of how environmental events (antecedents, consequences) interact with the aging organism to produce behavior, and spans basic, clinical, and organizational behavioral research. Older adults account for 12% of the population today, but will make up 20% in 20–40 years. Currently, very few behavior analytic programs offer courses in behavioral gerontology, and thus few behavioral practitioners have knowledge or understanding of the health care issues related to older adults. As behavior analysts begin to extend their services to aging adult populations, knowledge of health care issues and how such issues can impact behavior programming is essential. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an introduction in behavioral gerontology to behavior analytic practitioners. In this workshop we will cover general information on older adults, describe neurodegenerative changes in function, and explain the role of ABA in dementia care. We will review common behavior changes (both excesses and deficits) exhibited by this population and discuss the behavioral assessments and treatments commonly used. In addition, we will briefly discuss the issues for working with older adults with intellectual disabilities. Instructors will provide case examples and arrange lectures, discussions, and small group breakout sessions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the general characteristics of our older adult population, as well as the features of neurodegenerative changes of those with and without intellectual disabilities, (2)identify common behavioral assessments and interventions that can be used with older adults with dementia, and (3) describe how to navigate health care systems in order to coordinate care and find reimbursement opportunities.
Activities: Instructional strategies lecture, discussion, small group breakout, case scenarios, and case presentations.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including practitioners or caregivers who work with older adults with developmental disabilities or older adults with dementia. Students and scientists who are interested in breaking into this new field are also welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervisor Training that Meets the BACB Training Requirements for Supervisors, Part I
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W182 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Parts I and II of this workshop will provide 9 CEs of supervisor training that meets the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s requirements to provide supervision, as specified in their Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline document (available at BACB.com). “After December 31, 2014, only individuals who complete a training experience based on this curriculum outline will be permitted to supervise individuals pursuing the BCBA or BCaBA credentials or practicing BCaBAs.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to:
  1. The supervisor should be able to describe the 6 reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision.
  2. The supervisor should be able to describe the 5 potential outcomes of ineffective supervision.
  3. The supervisor should be able to describe or demonstrate the 12 components of effective, evidence-based supervision.
  4. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the 8 components of behavioral skills training of the supervisee.
  5. The supervisor should be able to describe the 4 formats for providing behavioral skills training with individuals and groups of supervisees.
  6. The supervisor should be able to apply behavioral skills training across relevant skill areas including, but not limited to those outlined in the task list.
  7. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the three components of performance feedback.
  8. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 ways of providing feedback.
  9. The supervisor should be able to describe the 3 methods to evaluate supervisory effectiveness.
  10. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 methods for his/her ongoing professional development as a supervisor.
  11. The supervisor should be able to describe the 7 methods for the ongoing professional development of the supervisee.
Activities: The workshop will provide a variety of learning activities and tests necessary to teach participants the supervisors skills specified in the BACB’s objectives.
Audience: This two-part workshop is for supervisors “of those who deliver behavior-analytic services and those who are pursuing BACB certification” and will satisfy the BACB training requirement for BCBA supervisors. Attend this workshop to meet the BACB’s new training requirement for BCBA supervisors and earn 9 CEs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Analysis, Data-Based Process, Learning Efficiency, Supervision
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Comprehensive Training Program for Functional Analyses and Treatment Development
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W181c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James Chok, Ph.D.
JAMES CHOK (Melmark Pennsylvania)
Description: A functional analysis (FA) is a systematic experimental methodology used in the assessment process to determine a behavior's maintaining variables prior to treatment selection. Research has shown that selecting interventions based upon the results of an FA greatly improves treatment outcomes for problem behavior (e.g., Pelios, Morren, Tesch, & Axelrod, 1999; Hastings & Noone, 2005). Moreover, inaccurate interpretation of FA data can lead to the selection of ineffective interventions, and possibly interventions that inadvertently exacerbate problem behavior (e.g., Iwata, Pace, Cowdery, & Miltenberger, 1994). Thus, utilizing FAs to guide treatment selection is important for behavior analysts working within applied settings. Although designing and conducting functional analyses, and using the results to guide treatment selection, are important skill sets for behavior analysts to possess, the research literature does not yet offer any published examples of how to effectively train the myriad skills that make up this process. The current workshop is designed to teach practitioners how to train these skills in applied settings.
Learning Objectives: The goal of the workshop is to teach individuals in a training role how to teach comprehensive functional analysis and treatment development skills. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to train supervisees to do the following activities: (1) consider ethical dilemmas when conducting functional analyses; (2) conduct standard functional analysis sessions; (3) interview staff members/caregivers and develop idiosyncratic functional analysis conditions; (4) select an appropriate measurement system, functional analysis methodology, and experimental design for functional analyses; (5) interpret functional analysis data; and (6) select treatments that are informed by functional analysis results.
Activities: This workshop will include multiple activities: lecture, modeling of skills, small group practice of skills, and practice taking data and evaluating performance.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including individuals who are responsible for training others to conduct functional analyses and develop treatments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional analyis, staff training, treatment development
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
BACB-Compliant Supervisor Training, Mixed Media Workshop
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W186 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: The mixed media BACB-compliant supervision training workshop is back, bigger and better than ever! Incorporating feedback from our Minneapolis annual convention workshop and the many workshops presented in the past year, this session prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional two and a half hours online through TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost nine hours of content while using only six hours of convention time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and video, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Additionally, participant trios will engage in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, with an additional three CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. We had record-breaking turnout last year, so sign up early! This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the potential outcomes of ineffective supervision, (2) describe the BACB-accepted supervision formats, (3) roleplay behavior skills training, (4) demonstrate how to execute a supervision contract, (5) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback, and (6) identify the levels of supervision and the requirements for each.
Activities: Lecture, identifying skills and deficits in video scenarios, engaging in small group practice with peer feedback and instructor feedback, question and answer time for understanding the rather complex new rules of supervision.
Audience: Participants should be practicing BCBAs with clinical experience who are already providing supervision or who are in the process of determining if they want to become supervisors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): BACB-Compliant, Ethics, Supervisor, Videos
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: BACB
Strategies in Developing and Operating a Successful Applied Behavior Analysis Business for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W187ab (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rany Thommen, M.Ed.
REBECCA RYAN (Sandbox ABA), GIA VAZQUEZ ORTEGA (Blossom Center for Children), RANY THOMMEN (ABA Today), Jennifer Crawford (Crawford Strategies)
Description: This workshop will identify major areas needed to develop and run a successful ABA practice, including multiple business models such as solo practices, home-based services, clinics, and consultations. Specific topics will review development of a business model and plan, legal issues involved, client development and retention, and therapist onboarding.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify areas required for drafting a needs assessment, including market analysis and cost analysis; (2) identify essential components in the development of a business plan; (3) identify ethical rules related to running a business; (4) identify legal rules and regulations related to a business, including differentiating various legal regimes and how they affect business planning; (5) identify strategies to market your business for the purpose of recruiting your clients; (6) identify intake procedures that allow for clarity of services and diminished client stress; (7) identify strategies to promote client satisfaction with an eye on retention; (8) identify strategies to promote staff onboarding and staff training; and (9) identify strategies for promoting staff retention over time.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, small group break-out.
Audience: BACB certificants, practicing behavior analysts, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts, administrators of ABA practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism services, business development, client development, therapist training
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervision: Understanding Features and Purposes and Demonstrating Skills in Behavioral Training, Performance Feedback, and Evaluations
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W176c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC), DEIRDRE LEE FITZGERALD (University of Saint Joseph)
Description: Thissession will identify the ethical guidelines related to the supervisory role of the BCBA. Participants will become familiar with the purpose of supervision, recognize and demonstrate the important features of evidence-based supervision, practice performance feedback and evaluation skills, describe the components of ineffective supervision, discuss steps for ongoing professional development, and engage in roleplay scenarios related to effective supervision. This session will also prepare participants to meet the supervision training requirement as established by the BACB. However, it is being offered independent of the BACB. Participants will be expected to participate and demonstrate competency in roleplay activities.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe the new supervision requirements; (2) describe the reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision; (3) describe the potential outcomes of ineffective supervision; (4) describe and demonstrate components of effective, evidence-based supervision; (5) identify potential ethics violations for front-line therapists, other non-certified implementers, and other supervisees; (6) discuss three methods for providing training or re-training; (7) describe methods for ongoing professional development as a supervisor as well as the importance for the supervisee; (8) describe and demonstrate components of behavioral skills training of the supervisee; (9) describe and demonstrate the different types of performance feedback that can be used with supervisees; and (10) actively engage in roleplay scenarios demonstrating competencies related to effective supervision.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, case study, question and answer, skill demonstration.
Audience: BCBAs and BCBA-Ds only.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): evaluating supervision, Performance feedback, Skills Training, supervision training
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Functional Behavior Assessments in School/Residential Settings: Balancing Rigor With Practicality
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Aaron Barnes, Ph.D.
AARON BARNES (Michigan's Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative), AMY CAMPBELL (Grand Valley State University)
Description: The scope of what constitutes a functional behavior assessment (FBA) in many educational and home settings is broad and varied. Practice may range from informal interviews and anecdotal narrative observation summaries to analog functional analysis, and everything in between. Both policy and resources play a role in determining what the FBA process entails for a particular case in a particular setting, but in many cases steps can be taken to increase both the efficiency and effectiveness of our efforts. This workshop will address practices to increase both the scientific rigor and treatment utility of FBA in natural settings. The presented practices will include selecting indirect and direct assessment methods, conducting assessments with focused efficiency to yield more useful data in less time, utilizing data from indirect assessments to help guide direct assessment procedures, linking data collection from baseline to intervention progress monitoring, and troubleshooting common problems encountered in the assessment and intervention stages of service delivery. The presentation will incorporate technology to enhance data collection procedures. A focus of the workshop will be to share how increased precision during the assessment phase of FBA enhances the development and efficacy of behavior support plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participants will be able to (1) describe the rationale for selecting particular indirect and direct assessment tools in natural (e.g., school, home, community) settings; (2) increase the efficiency of FBA interviews by gathering information that contributes to a functional hypothesis and to the efficiency of conducting direct observations; (3) utilize technology to enhance data collection; (4) conduct targeted direct observation procedures with minimal disruption to naturally occurring contingencies; (5) collect data with high treatment utility in less time; and (6) link the data to behavior support strategies.
Activities: This workshop will alternate between lecture and hands-on activities, including reviewing assessment methods, evaluating initial assessment data to inform subsequent assessment and support plans, demonstrating different ways technology can be utilized to enhance assessment, and reviewing videotaped exercises to practice newly acquired skills.
Audience: The workshop requires participants to have foundational knowledge of applied behavior analysis methods and terminology. The presentation is intended for professionals who design, implement, fund, support, and evaluate functional behavior assessment and subsequent interventions in natural settings including schools, homes, day programs, and residential facilities. This target audience may include BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, educators, therapists, social workers, clinic- or school-based psychologists, graduate-level students, and behavior specialists or analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Efficient Assessment, Functional Assessment, Provider Collaboration
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
B. F. Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W183a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D.
MARK L. SUNDBERG (Sundberg and Associates)
Description: This workshop will provide an introduction to the basic elements of Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior. Participants will be taken through the main points of the first five chapters of Skinner's book. That content will teach the participant how to define, classify, and exemplify Skinner's elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual). Additional topics briefly covered will include motivating operations, multiple control, private events, verbal extensions, automatic contingencies, and autoclitics.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) provide the technical definition of Skinner's elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual); (2) classify examples of verbal behavior as mands, tacts, intraverbals, etc.; (3) provide examples of each verbal operant; (4) define and exemplify the motivating operation (MO); (5) define and exemplify Skinner's analysis of multiple control; and (6) define and exemplify autoclitic verbal relations.
Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and exercises in the classification of verbal behavior. Handouts will be provided to each attendee that will provide information on each topic, as well as exercises related to those topics.
Audience: Participants, including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, should have formal training in behavior analysis, and interest in learning or reviewing the basic aspects of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Verbal Behavior Development Protocols: The Foundations of Language Development From Imitation to Naming
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
W175c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Derek Jacob Shanman, Ph.D.
DEREK JACOB SHANMAN (Teachers College, Columbia University), SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Teachers College, Columbia University), TIMOTHY MICHAEL YEAGER (Teachers College, Columbia University), LAURA E. LYONS (Columbia University), CRYSTAL LO (Teachers College, Columbia University), AMANDA C. PHILP (Teachers College, Columbia University), HALEY PELLEGREN (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Description: Often children with disabilities are missing prerequisite repertoires necessary to acquire language. Recent research has led to the identification of crucial pre-verbal or verbal developmental cusps. Further, successful establishment of these missing cusps has led to an acceleration in learning and further language development. Certain cusps are considered major developmental milestones that allow children to advance through various stages of verbal behavior development. These prerequisites include induction of generalized imitation, the acquisition of a fluent listener repertoire, the induction of hear/say correspondence, the joining of listener and speaker repertoires, and reinforcement for learning new operants through observation of peers. This workshop will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to identify which of these verbal developmental cusps are present in a child's repertoire, and which are missing. Participants will also acquire mastery of protocols necessary to establish or enhance missing foundational cusps necessary for development of subsequent verbal behavior. Protocols to be covered in this workshop include generalized imitation, the listener emersion protocol to induce listener literacy, the auditory matching protocol to induce hear/say correspondence, multiple exemplar instruction across listener and speaker behaviors to induce naming, and the yoked contingency game board to induce observational learning of new operants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define generalized imitation, listener literacy, hear/say correspondence, naming, and observational learning; (2) analyze pre- and post-intervention probe data and identify when there is, or is not, a need to implement the protocols to induce generalized imitation, listener literacy, hear/say correspondence, naming, and observational learning; and (3) implement, take data on, and tact criterion level responding for the mirror protocol to induce generalized imitation, the listener emersion protocol to induce listener literacy, the auditory matching protocol to induce hear/say correspondence, the multiple exemplar instruction across listener and speaker behaviors protocol to induce naming, and the yoked contingency game board protocol to induce observational learning.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balance of lecture, video demonstration, and small group guided practice. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations, with mastery being attained through guided practice and measured through intraverbal and written responses.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, speech therapists, supervisors, or paraprofessionals who are working with children with and without disabilities. Participants should be well-versed in the vocabulary of the science of behavior and have some understanding of verbal behavior, including basic verbal operants. Graduate students are encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Generalize Imitation, Naming, Observational Learning, Verbal Capabilities
 
Special Event #1
Health, Sports, and Fitness Special Interest Group Fun Run
Friday, May 23, 2014
8:00 AM–10:00 AM
W190b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Chair: Annabelle Winters (Garden Center Services, Inc.)

Please join us for our annual fun run! This year's run will be just over 4 miles and loop around Northerly Island. Please meet us in the meeting room, dressed in your running gear. Please be prompt as we'll depart as a group from there. Please stick around for post-run photo ops! No pre-registration is required.

Keyword(s): fitness, health, run, sport
 
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Inner Behavior: How to Change Thoughts, Feelings, and Urges
Friday, May 23, 2014
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
W178a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center)
Description: Thoughts, feelings, and urges are inner behaviors that a person can observe, count, and change as needed. Eleven research studies in the United States and Europe across the past 42 years include more than 1,000 charts and show that behavioral observation and methods can change a person's inner behavior. Therapists, teachers, and researchers have used this radical behavior approach in residential, public school, university, geriatric, and therapeutic settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) state the theoretical and research background for observing and changing inner behavior; (2) define a thought, a feeling, and an urge, and name specific examples of each; (3) practice writing pleasant thoughts, feelings, and behaviorally stated responses to urges at 30 to 35 per minute, and say them at 50 to 75 per minute; and (4) develop, write, and discuss a plan to change inner behaviors of self or a client.
Activities: The workshop reviews the history of the field with an emphasis on various charts and techniques to change people's pleasant and unpleasant inner behaviors. Some of the charts and information include data on people with PTSD and children on the autism spectrum. The workshop also includes and teaches details on how to use the standard celeration chart to record, predict, analyze, and change inner behaviors. Participants will count and record some specific inner behaviors for the duration of the workshop, which can be continued or revised later. Participants may also bring charts to share if they have done any prior counting and charting of inner behavior.
Audience: This workshop is for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, clinicians, people teaching behavior analysis, graduate students in behavior analysis and psychology, special education teachers who work with students with behavior disorders and those on the autism spectrum, and others interested in changing inner behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Bedtime Problems, Sibling Rivalry, Toileting Training, and More: Family Advice Packages for the BCBA Clinician
Friday, May 23, 2014
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ennio C. Cipani, Ph.D.
ENNIO C. CIPANI (National University)
Description: Many BCBAs work with families and their children with developmental disabilities. While the main focus of intervention can be direct services to the child, problems related to family life and management of problem areas often arise. Types of problems that families often ask assistance for can be one or more of the following: bedtime problems (waking up, going to bed); eating problems (either too much or selective eating); sibling problems (including arguments and verbal and physical aggression); toilet training (and related problems); car trips (and other outings); and a host of other types of setting concerns. The focus of the workshop will be on developing a repertoire for dealing with common family problem areas. In addition to the lecture, workshop, and training, one- to two-page parent protocols/handouts for each problem area are available for download for course registrants. Permission (for the BCBA course registrant only, not other BCBAs) to copy any form for client use is granted. The access to this alone makes the course a valuable commodity for BCBAs. The lecture will also include suggestions for group training in the form of topic workshops, with use of handouts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) generate a number of procedures in a package for treating child bedtime problems via parent implementation of such procedures and (2) generate a number of procedures in a package for treating sibling rivalry/conflict problems (arguing, fighting, etc.) via parent implementation of such procedures.
Activities: Write a sample protocol for a family who has a child with bedtime problems and identify within one's own caseload which families need help with one (or more) of the family advice packages.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists who are involved with providing services (directly to the child or consultation) to families with children with developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): BCBA clinician, child problems, parent training
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABCs of Verbal Behavior: The Basics, Their Interactions, Their Implications
Friday, May 23, 2014
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), ANITA LI (Florida Institute of Technology), ZIWEI XU (The Ohio State University)
Description: We will review the basic verbal classes (e.g., echoic behavior, manding, tacting, intraverbals, autoclitics) as they were introduced by Skinner, especially in his book Verbal Behavior and as they have since evolved. We will see how these classes are related to such basic behavioral phenomena as reinforcement and stimulus control. This background will allow us to examine current research on verbal processes that enter into varied human settings and that are fundamental to varied applications. The topics we will consider include the distinction between physical and verbal units, naming, and other higher order classes; abstraction; the role of verbal behavior in judging one's own behavior; multiple causation in verbal behavior; the shaping of verbal behavior; correspondences between saying and doing; verbal governance; and the implications of these areas for treatment and for educational and other settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) interpret instances of verbal behavior by identifying the different verbal classes that have come together to produce them; (2) recognize higher-order verbal classes and their nesting (as when individual tacts are members of a higher-order class called naming) and identify problems that may arise when different contingencies operate on classes at different hierarchical levels; (3) distinguish accounts of verbal behavior that emphasize function (e.g., the stimulus control of verbal behavior, and the contingencies that shape and maintain it) from more common everyday accounts in terms of form (e.g., topographies, grammatical and linguistic categories); and (4) identify functional verbal processes (including verbal shaping and verbal governance) as they occur in natural settings and as they may be incorporated into behavior analytic applications.
Activities: The workshop will consist of brief lectures outlining the classes and functions of verbal behavior interspersed with presentations of research data, demonstrations, visual aids, a computer simulation of verbal shaping, and discussions and other audience-participation activities.
Audience: This workshop may be useful to BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as to (1) those who have read Skinner's book Verbal Behavior and who would like a contemporary update of the issues treated there, and/or (2) those familiar with the concepts of verbal behavior mainly as used in applied settings who would like a more systematic overview, and/or (3) those with a general background in behavior analysis who would like to extend such basic concepts as reinforcement and stimulus control to important aspects of human behavior, and/or (4) those involved in the teaching of verbal behavior, especially at the undergraduate level. A reading of Skinner's book is recommended to participants but is not required. For those who would also like a review of the basic phenomena upon which the analysis of verbal behavior is built, a workshop on the ABCs of behavior analysis may be of interest, but it is not a prerequisite for this verbal behavior workshop.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): higher-order classes, tacts/mands/autoclitics, verbal governance, verbal shaping
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preparing for Adulthood: Skill Assessment and Life Skills Programming for Young Adults With Autism
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W175a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Martineau, Ed.S.
ELIZABETH MARTINEAU (Nashoba Learning Group), STEPHANIE DANIELS (Nashoba Learning Group), JESSICA TILLEY (Nashoba Learning Group), KELLEY WARD (Nashoba Learning Group)
Description: Individuals with moderate to severe autism who have received quality ABA programming generally develop a strong repertoire of skills. As those students age, it is critical that programming be geared toward building those skills into routines that will allow them to be as successful as possible as adults. Although there is a substantial body of research to assist in teaching early learners, there is significantly less documented work to assist practitioners in designing functional programming for older students who still require individualized ABA instruction. At Nashoba Learning Group (NLG), we have developed a curriculum for teaching vocation and life skills that has allowed our students to significantly increase their functional skills and independence. Our curriculum utilizes well researched ABA techniques, such as task analyzed instruction, incidental teaching, discrete trial teaching, and stimulus fading to build repertoires of skills essential to success in adulthood. This workshop will review NLG's Life Skills Inventory assessment and curriculum and describe how we use the assessment to identify skills to target. We will compare patterns of student scoring on the assessment by age category and compare performance when students are 22 with ability to participate in adult program activities. We will look in depth at two skill areas in part 2: food preparation skills (for employment and as life skills) and community job placement skills. We will present task analyses and demonstrate how to modify teaching procedures based on students' varying skill levels, including multiple case studies of students performing at different levels as well as task selection for two students with different profiles at a community job placement.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) design integrated vocation and life skills programming for teenagers with autism, (2) assess current student performance in a variety of skill areas, (3) create learning objectives for students for vocation and life skills, (4) teach food preparation skills using task analyzed instruction, (5) match community job placement tasks to individuals in a food service establishment, (6) adapt teaching procedures to students' varying skill levels and supervision needs, and (7) complete a portion of NLG's vocation and life skills assessment for a presented student.
Activities: Participants will engage in a variety of activities throughout the workshop. We will begin with an overview of NLG's vocation and life skills curriculum and assessment tool. Participants will watch a video of a student completing vocational skills and will complete the corresponding portion of NLG's task analysis and then translate that into an item on the vocation and life skills assessment. We will review relative scores on the assessment instrument for NLG students and adult program members by age level and for adults based on relative emphasis of their school programming and the skill area of grocery shopping; participants will discuss how to adapt the procedures for students of varying skill levels. Participants will receive a copy of the assessment tool and instructions for completing the instrument.
Audience: This workshop is designed for licensed psychologists, BCBA level teachers and clinical directors, as well as program coordinators. Presenters will assume that participants are familiar with a variety of ABA techniques and with individualized curriculum design for students up through young adulthood. Participants should have a strong interest in developing individualized programs for children, teenagers, and young adults with autism that result in the students achieving independence on core life skills and work readiness.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Lifeskills Inventory, Lifeskills Training, Vocational Training, Young Adults
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Group Social Skills Instruction for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Design to Implementation
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W181b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Emily Huber Callahan, Ph.D.
JULIE PATTERSON (Virginia Institute of Autism), PEGGY W. HALLIDAY (Virginia Institute of Autism), EMILY HUBER CALLAHAN (Virginia Institute of Autism)
Description: Social interaction deficits are considered to be the core deficits exhibited by individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (Travis & Sigman, 1998; Kanner, 1943). Among others, delays and deficits in the development of social interaction skills impede an individual's ability to develop meaningful social relationships and have been associated with peer rejection and anxiety (Bellini, Peter, Benner, & Hopf, 2007). As such, instruction to remediate these deficits is critical. Social skills groups are often conducted to teach individuals skills (e.g., entering or exiting a conversation, filtering your thoughts, handling a disagreement) used daily to interact and communicate with one another. Though these groups can be fun, running an effective group can be challenging. This workshop will help practitioners design an effective social skills group by first learning how to form a group based on age and compatibility. Then, different ways to develop a curriculum that meets the needs of the participants and allows them to grow within the program will be discussed. Additionally, the incorporation of interactive group activities such as theater games, role-plays, and gaming to teach and practice social skills will be presented. Finally, this workshop will share ideas for implementing group contingencies and self-monitoring procedures.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) form groups based on recruitment, size, and fit; (2) use a variety of activities to provide students with opportunities to practice social skills; (3) facilitate activities that target body language, thinking on your feet, entering a conversation, staying on topic, electronic communication, filtering your thoughts, handling disagreements, and cooperation; (4) describe how to incorporate group contingencies and self-monitoring strategies into social skills group instruction; and (5) design a social skills plan to meet the needs of children and teenagers.
Activities: The objectives for this workshop will be taught through a balanced presentation of lectures, video observations, group discussions, group activities, and role-plays.
Audience: The intended audience for this workshop includes licensed psychologists, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, special education teachers, general education teachers, speech/language pathologists, behavioral technicians, and other individuals who currently are or who are intending to implement social skills instruction in a group setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, group instruction, social skills
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Strategies to Ensure Caregivers of Children and Adults With a Diagnosis of Autism Implement Effective Teaching Interventions During Daily Activities
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W184d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed for consultants and program administrators who wish to further their skills in developing and implementing comprehensive intervention programs. In order to facilitate the rapid acquisition of critical language, social, and functional skills, it is important that both the selection of specific learning objectives and the teaching activities be prioritized. It is also critical that those skills be maintained by naturally occurring reinforcement contingencies that associate with the use of those skills in common daily activities. However, many instructional programs for individuals with a diagnosis of autism fail to devote sufficient instructional time to the development of those skills that will result in the greatest overall rate of skill acquisition. Therefore, it is important that parents, educators, and other caregivers be able to identify teaching opportunities available in home, community, and school settings, and that they be able to successfully implement effective teaching and reinforcement strategies. In spite of receiving consultative services, many caregivers report finding it difficult to implement recommended teaching strategies. Techniques will be presented that facilitate caregivers' successful implementation of evidence-based teaching strategies with individuals at various levels of development in home and community settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify strategies for helping parents and educators prioritize the learning outcomes for both language skills and functional living skills based upon a learner's current set of skills; (2) analyze programs for a nonverbal individual and select learning objectives that will help identify the skills necessary to develop instructional control and establish an initial verbal repertoire; (3) analyze an instructional programs for an individual who has acquired a set of basic mand, tact, and intraverbal skills and select learning objectives that will teach more advanced skills in these repertoires and incorporate the use of these skills into a variety of everyday social interactions; (4) compare the existing skill levels of a young child with an autism spectrum disorder with the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children; and (5) identify methods to ensure caregivers come in contact with reinforcement for implementing intervention strategies designed to develop important functional life skills while participating in everyday household, community, and classroom activities.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and discussion at the end of the presentation. Core content will be taught through lecture, and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: Licensed psychologists, BCBAs, and BCaBAs who are currently supervising or implementing behavioral teaching interventions with individuals with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, natural environment, parent intervention, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB
Technology Now: Useful Communication and Behavior Recording Apps for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W185bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jose D. Rios, M.S.
JOSE D. RIOS (Private practice), ISAAC BERMUDEZ (Love 2 Learn Consulting LLC), E. CHERYL FLETCHER (Integrated Therapy Services)
Description: Apps for smartphones, computers, and tablets have revolutionized the tech industry. There is an expanding body of apps for teachers, parents, therapists, and behavior analysts, as well as for other professionals. Apps are convenient, usually reasonably priced, and may be useful tools for those who work with children, adolescents, and adults with developmental disabilities. Apps and software exist for an array of skill acquisition areas including language training, fine and gross motor skill development, social skills training, reading, toilet training, and developing table manners. Apps and software also exist for data collection, functional analyses, preference assessments, discrete trial training, self-management, and goal setting. In this workshop we will review apps in two categories: apps for communication development and instruction and apps for behavior observation and data collection. We will draw from the extensive list of apps in these two categories, and we will provide workshop participants with comments, criticisms, and recommendations on the selected apps.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) point out differences and choose between communication apps that are literate vs non-literate (e.g., iconic driven); (2) differentiate between types of AAC (augmentative and alternative communication) apps ranging from simple picture communication systems to complex voice output devices; (3) apply AAC to common behavioral techniques such as mand training, time-delay procedures, milieu training, incidental learning, interrupting the behavior chain, modeling, prompting, and reinforcement; (4) use AAC for the management of maladaptive behaviors including the introduction of a functional communication system; (5) point out the methodology and ethical considerations of AAC selections; (6) choose behavior recording apps that best fit the client population and service needs; (7) point out differences between various behavior recording apps; and (8) describe benefits and disadvantages of the various behavior recording apps that are presented.
Activities: This workshop will include didactic instruction, a slide presentation outlining apps that will be reviewed, and demonstrations on the use of these apps. Handouts also will be provided to participants with app information as well as other helpful technology resources.
Audience: This workshop is geared toward BACB certificants, including new professionals as well as seasoned veteran professionals who are new to app technology or who want to learn more about the technological advances in the fields of communication instruction and behavior recording.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Systematic Program Evaluation of Educational Services for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W179b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica R. Everett, Ph.D.
JESSICA R. EVERETT (Melmark New England), BARBARA O'MALLEY CANNON (Melmark New England), JAMES T. ELLIS (Step By Step Behavioral Solutions)
Description: The number of students with autism spectrum disorders currently being serviced within the educational system has increased tremendously in the past several years. These students function at varying levels and have varying educational needs. As a result, a variety of programming options have been developed to meet the needs of these students. Systematic evaluation of these programs is necessary to ensure effective progress and efficient delivery of services. Additionally, behavior analysts may be asked to evaluate the effectiveness of individual student programming. The current workshop will review evidence-based practice for educating students with autism spectrum disorders, effective programmatic evaluation strategies, and effective collaboration to best help educational teams and families meet the complicated needs of these students. Programmatic evaluation tools will be reviewed, and discussion will center around tying evaluation results to effective educational recommendations. Collaboration strategies will be reviewed in terms of sharing evaluation results with team members in ways that increase the likelihood of the results being implemented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the various components involved in individual and programmatic evaluation of student progress in learners with ASD, (2) select evaluation tools to be used in programmatic and individual evaluation of student progress, (3) develop recommendations for students with ASD that reflect best practice, and (4) present evaluation results in a collaborative way that increases the likelihood that recommendations will be implemented.
Activities: Open discussion, lecture, question and answer, video examples, small group work, and completion of observational record tools.
Audience: The target audience is BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including behavior analysts working with students with autism spectrum disorders who may be asked to complete programmatic evaluation reviews. Behavior analysts who are asked to complete programmatic reviews of effective services related to individual students will also benefit from this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism Spectrum, Evidence-Based Practice, Interdisciplinary Collaboration, Program Evaluation
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Teaching Parents How to Deal Effectively With Their Children's Behavioral Difficulties
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W185d (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amos E. Rolider, Ph.D.
AMOS E. ROLIDER (The Academic College of Kinneret, Israel)
Description: In this workshop, a consultation model that emphasizes teaching parents to rearrange significant context variables and to discover the antecedents and functions of their children's most burdensome behaviors will be presented. Parents subsequently learn to identify the function of their own responses to their children's inappropriate behaviors and are trained to select and apply simple and effective interventions based on the discovery of antecedents and maintaining consequences.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify behaviors and typical parental responses associated with the termination of a preferred activity or reinforcer, refusal or inability to provide a preferred activity or reinforcer, demand situations, transition from preferred activity to non-preferred activity, and elicited emotional outbursts; (2) describe the importance of preparing an established weekly schedule and set of expectations; (3) prepare children for antecedents in the form of difficult situations; (4) select an appropriate response based on the function of the inappropriate behavior; (5) select an appropriate motivational program based on DRO/DRA; and (6) practice using the model to deal with children's most common inappropriate behaviors, including bickering and refusal, tantrums and aggression, over-dependence, school-related problems, and other issues.
Activities: Forthcoming.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practitioners, including BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, who work with or are interested in working with parents of children who exhibit a variety of behavioral issues; parents; and educators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performance
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W185a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic levels for many populations, including populations served by behavior analysts, it is vital that behavior analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles as effectively as possible. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness, and healthy living are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively assess and optimally improve their own or their clients' physical fitness, health, and, if desired, athletic performance. Emphasis will be on behavior analytic "gradual change techniques"; optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and how the use of behavior analytic experimental designs, such as multiple baselines across situations and bounded changing criterion designs, may be used not just to measure change, but actually to facilitate effective behavioral change. New for this year will be an emphasis on functional assessment of dysfunctional health behaviors. Finally, participants will learn how improved health and physical fitness allow individuals to live a valued life and aid in the pursuit of chosen life directions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) state many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy lifestyle; (2) perform functional assessments of current health and fitness related behaviors; (3) perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors, safe and effective exercise, and skilled athletic performance; (4) identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness, and athleticism; (5) use goal setting, task analysis, and pinpointing, and identify skill gaps, set realistically achievable goals, and effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance; (6)use behavior analytic experimental designs not only to measure and assess behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness, and athletic behavioral changes; (7) use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program; and (8) use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors.
Activities: PowerPoint slides, worksheets, and lecture handouts will provide participants with the information necessary to learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; to develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; and to use behavior analytic experimental designs to assess and facilitate desired behavioral change.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to change unhealthy behaviors; promote and develop healthy lifestyles, fitness, and weight loss and maintenance; or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Ethics for Behavior Analysts: Fluency Style
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W175c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: W. Larry Williams, Ph.D.
MELISSA NOSIK (University of Nevada, Reno), MARK MALADY (Brohavior/HSI/WARC), W. LARRY WILLIAMS (University of Nevada, Reno), STUART M. LAW (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to review practice ethics, recent changes in behavior analyst certification standards, supervision guidelines, and disciplinary standards identified by the BACB in a fluency fashion training environment. The workshop is very interactive and will have participants practice SAFMEDS in 1-minute timings with a partner between instructional components throughout the workshop. Participants will also be taught to chart their progress throughout the workshop. Learning channelswill include free say, free write, hear/say, and see/say. Additionally, an example of an ethics rating scale for quantification of a behavior analyst's own ethical behavior will be introduced.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) demonstrate improved fluency in verbal identification of ethical conduct areas and disciplinary standards discussed within the workshop and as measured on the standard celeration chart; (2) self-rate ethical behavior; and (3) chart using a daily per-minute standard celeration chart of 1-minute timings of SAFMED practices.
Activities: 15 min—introduction to SAFMED assessment and learning techniques, introduction to charting; 20 min—baseline probes: SAFMED fluency on ethical areas of conduct and disciplinary standards, pre-tests: free-say and free-write activities on ethical areas of conduct; 20 min—review of ethical conduct guidelines, disciplinary standards; 20 min—SAFMED practice; 20 min—changes in standards and brief focus on behavior analysts as supervisors; 15 min—break; 20 min—SAFMED practice; 15 min—maintaining ethical behavior; 15 min—SAFMED practice with partner; 15 min—introduction to ethical self-rating scale; 15 min—post-tests and workshop survey
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and graduate level students of behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Fluency, Training, SAFMEDS
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Creativity in Play Skills: Why and How Behavior Analysis Can Do This Well
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W181a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/TPC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The workshop will focus on teaching participants procedures for establishing simple play repertoires and procedures for reinforcing the use of these basic play skills in novel settings, with novel materials and in novel combinations. The instructors will describe creativity and generativity in play skills from a behavior analytic perspective. All procedures will be described in terms of basic principles and demonstrated live or via video. Participants will be trained in the use of research-supported strategies to teach play skills and then to support their generalized and expanded use. These strategies will include (but will not be limited to) matrix training (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989), video modeling (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz, & Ahearn, 2009), activity schedules (MacDuff, Krantz, & McClannahan, 1993), and the use of visual/text supports for motor and vocal actions in the context of play scenarios. Creativity will be defined behaviorally with an emphasis on how to support stimulus generalization, response generalization, and recombinative generalization of play skills. Participants will receive materials to support a range of basic play repertoires for children ages 2–5 years, along with opportunities to practice using these materials.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) describe creativity from a behavior analytic perspective; (2) describe the deficits in children with ASD that result in the need for formally teaching creativity; (3) describe specific procedures to support stimulus, response, and recombinative generalization; (4) identify different types of play skills to be established and a hierarchy for doing so; (5) describe matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity; (6) describe video modeling and one scenario in which to implement it; and (7) establish a basic play activity schedule.
Activities: Outline—Teaching Creative Play Workshop Proposed Schedule: .45, overview of creativity in play behavior—What it is? Why do we need to directly teach it for learners with ASD? review of current research on play skills; .5, ASD and instruction visual learning strengths, response to language instruction, instructional support, "critical keys" stimulus, response and recombinative generalization; .25, break; .75, review matrix training/video modeling demonstrations and practice; .75, review text/visual checklists and picture activity schedules demonstrations and practice
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, including persons providing home- and school-based EIBI services to individuals on the autism spectrum.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Creativity, Play Skills
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ethical and Professional Practice With Individuals With Autism and Their Families
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W186 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: CSE/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (The University of Kansas)
Description: Are you ethical? Of course! Are Kim Kardashian, Ryan Braun, and Conan O'Brien ethical? Now that's a bit trickier! Are ethics important? Of course! Then why are they not clear-cut? Luckily, in the field of behavior analysis we have ethical guidelines to guide our practice (BACB, 2010). Addressing the "real world" ethical dilemmas during implementation of applied behavior analysis with families of individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). What do we do when our ethical guidelines conflict with other professionals' behavior in the field? This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding "real world" examples of ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, at centers, and within schools and other organizations. Utilizing video examples and actual scenarios of BCBAs and students working on the BCBA credential, the instructors will guide the participants through identifying the appropriate ethical guideline, lead discussion regarding appropriate actions, and provide guidance on how to manage their ethical compass.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define "ethics" and describe why ethical guidelines are important, (2) identify the 10 Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts, (3) compare the ethical guidelines of behavior analysts to other published guidelines, (4) navigate the BACB ethics app, (5) accurately identify ethical dilemmas presented in video examples, (6) accurately identify which guideline is addressed in a given example, and (7) accurately identify appropriate responses to "real world" dilemmas.
Activities: Review the 10 Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts. Compare these guidelines to other published guidelines. Discuss Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on each of the ethical guidelines. Watch video examples of the guidelines. Discuss how to respond to "real world" dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (as well as those seeking these credentials), licensed psychologists, and others looking for additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals with autism and their families.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, ethical practice, home/community
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Rediscover Your Roots: Using Discrepancy Analysis to Increase Learner Performance
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W176a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, M.S.
MEGAN MILLER (Navigation Behavioral Consulting), STEVEN J. WARD (Whole Child Consulting LLC)
Description: Many behavior analysts are trained on curricula instead of receiving training on how to use behavior analytic research to analyze learner behavior. This is a skill set that one must possess to be an effective behavior analyst. While no one checklist, training, or curriculum can teach this skill in its entirety, the purpose of this workshop is to provide behavior analysts training on how to conduct a discrepancy analysis (determination of why a learner is performing poorly). The presenters will teach the participants how to conduct a discrepancy analysis, to practice analyzing learning behavior, and to solve learning problems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify poor learner performance, (2) conduct a discrepancy analysis, (3) use a discrepancy analysis to improve learner performance, (4) teach learners to overcome common skill deficits that interfere with learner performance, and (5) address common challenging behaviors that interfere with learner performance
Activities: Participants will actively participate using guided notes, templates, role-playing, and vignettes.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn how to conduct a more in-depth problem-solving analysis when their learners are not making progress. Attendees may have an in-depth understanding of behavior analysis and/or be relatively new to the field but have a lack of training or experience with using behavior analysis to determine why their clients are not making progress when using standard behavior analytic techniques such as reinforcement, prompting, shaping, differential reinforcement, and functionally analyzing challenging behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): barriers, learner performance, troubleshooting
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Integrating Functional Behavioral Assessment and Positive Behavioral Interventions in a School System
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W183c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: This workshop will describe how to integrate functional behavioral assessments and positive behavioral interventions in a school-wide system. There are many challenges involved in this process, and participants will learn strategies for overcoming those challenges. Components of the process include gaining administrative support, establishing a culture of consistency, developing school-wide expectations and procedures, gathering functional assessment and progress monitoring data, creating a positive environment with social and tangible reinforcement, classroom management strategies based on function, teacher buy-in and training, behavioral consultation for children with challenging behaviors, and empowering the school to be more independent while fading ourselves. This workshop will help teachers and behavior analysts to work together with the common goal of enabling students to perform better and exhibit more pro-social and emotionally mature behaviors. Teacher-friendly forms that focus on gathering information to conduct effective functional behavioral assessments will be provided. There will also be checklists provided that will make the process of data collection easier and more teacher-friendly. Methods for making behavioral consultation more effective and easily received will be provided as well.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to describe how to (1) gain administrative support for developing a school-wide system, (2) develop school-wide expectations and procedures, (3) gather functional assessment and progress monitoring data, (4) create classroom management strategies based on function, and (5) provide behavioral consultation for children with challenging behaviors.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life cases in schools, take notes, ask questions, view a PowerPoint presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include Board Certified Behavior Analysts, behavioral consultants, licensed psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers, and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who are typically developing who have behavioral and/or emotional difficulties in schools.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral consultation, educational settings
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Engineer Learning: Fundamentals of Iterative Design and Development
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W181c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: EDC/TPC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Janet S. Twyman, Ph.D.
JANET S. TWYMAN (University of Massachusetts Medical School/Center on Innovations in Learning), MARTA LEON (Headsprout), MELINDA SOTA (University of Oregon)
Description: We know any skill that can be described can also be taught, and that there are effective ways to teach specific skills. What still remain elusive are the art and science of planning a complete instructional program, from learning objectives through validation by learners. In this workshop, participants will learn a non-linear approach to designing instruction. The outcome of this non-linear approach is not only an effective instructional program, but also a significant gain for instructional designers in terms of knowledge about the subject matter they are teaching and about how their learners learn it. Participants will be able to apply this approach immediately to program an instructional sequence of their own and will meet the workshop objectives listed below. Rather than answering the question "How do I teach skill x?" (where the answer is a specific technique), this workshop will answer the question "How do I design instruction for skill x so that I am confident that I am teaching skill x effectively and systematically?"
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to apply the non-linear programming process to specific instructional examples provided by the instructors and transfer that process to novel examples. Specifically, participants will (1) perform a basic content analysis, state instructional objectives, and create/evaluate relevant criterion tests; (2) determine necessary entry behavior; (3) design a meaningful instruction sequence; (4) analyze performance data and use them to adjust instruction; and (5) suggest ways to maintain learner behavior throughout the instructional sequence. Participants should be able to utilize formative evaluation within an iterative development process to create effective programs.
Activities: The workshop includes short presentations by instructors followed by hands-on activities in which participants will analyze and design components of an instructional program and receive feedback from the instructors. The workshop will also include small-group discussion in which participants will analyze performance data and recommend instructional changes and compare and contrast different potential solutions to a problem in programming instruction.
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, teachers, trainers, educators, and others interested in or involved in the design of instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): formative evaluation, instructional design, program development
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervisor Training that Meets the BACB Training Requirements for Supervisors, Part II
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W182 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Parts I and II of this workshop will provide 9 CEs of supervisor training that meets the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s requirements to provide supervision, as specified in their Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline document (available at BACB.com). “After December 31, 2014, only individuals who complete a training experience based on this curriculum outline will be permitted to supervise individuals pursuing the BCBA or BCaBA credentials or practicing BCaBAs.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to:
  1. The supervisor should be able to describe the 6 reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision.
  2. The supervisor should be able to describe the 5 potential outcomes of ineffective supervision.
  3. The supervisor should be able to describe or demonstrate the 12 components of effective, evidence-based supervision.
  4. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the 8 components of behavioral skills training of the supervisee.
  5. The supervisor should be able to describe the 4 formats for providing behavioral skills training with individuals and groups of supervisees.
  6. The supervisor should be able to apply behavioral skills training across relevant skill areas including, but not limited to those outlined in the task list.
  7. The supervisor should be able to describe and demonstrate the three components of performance feedback.
  8. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 ways of providing feedback.
  9. The supervisor should be able to describe the 3 methods to evaluate supervisory effectiveness.
  10. The supervisor should be able to describe the 8 methods for his/her ongoing professional development as a supervisor.
  11. The supervisor should be able to describe the 7 methods for the ongoing professional development of the supervisee.
Activities: The workshop will provide a variety of learning activities and tests necessary to teach participants the supervisors skills specified in the BACB’s objectives.
Audience: This two-part workshop is for supervisors “of those who deliver behavior-analytic services and those who are pursuing BACB certification” and will satisfy the BACB training requirement for BCBA supervisors. Attend this workshop to meet the BACB’s new training requirement for BCBA supervisors and earn 9 CEs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Analysis, Data-Based Process, Learning Efficiency, Supervision
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Procedural Integrity of Clinical Programming in Applied Settings
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W176c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Helena L. Maguire, M.S.
HELENA L. MAGUIRE (Melmark New England), AMANDA KENNEDY (Melmark New England), SILVA ORCHANIAN (Regular Affiliate Member), PATRICIA A. FINNEY (Melmark New England)
Description: The clinical effectiveness of a behavior support plan relies not only on the technological sophistication of the written plan, but also on the ability of direct service staff to accurately and consistently implement the behavior support plan. This workshop will present the staff training, supervisory training, and performance monitoring systems for clinical programming that have evolved over the past 15 years at Melmark New England, a private, not-for-profit, community-based organization serving children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, acquired brain injury, neurological diseases and disorders, dual diagnoses, and severe challenging behaviors. Following a review of the OBM literature on effective systems development, workshop participants will review sample training schedules, training protocols, performance monitoring tools, and procedures for training supervisors to implement these systems. The goal of this workshop will be to provide participants with systems to ensure competent and accurate implementation of clinical programs from a direct service staff person's first day on the job.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the components of an effective staff training program, (2) develop training schedules and select training protocols for sample clients, (3) accurately score sample performance monitoring tools after viewing video samples of work performance, and (4) identify the components of training systems necessary for supervisory staff.
Activities: Short lecture, case studies, guided practice with feedback.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, as well as new supervisors or individuals with the responsibility of training or overseeing the training of direct service staff and development of supervisory training programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Generalization: Don't Put It on the Back Burner
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W184a (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lauren Kryzak, M.A.
LAUREN KRYZAK (Above and Beyond Learning Group), CHRISTEN RUSSELL (Above and Beyond Learning Group), JENNIFER CAROLAN (Above and Beyond Learning Group)
Description: This workshop focuses on teaching practitioners how to promote generalization when teaching individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Stokes and Baer (1977) issued a call to action for behavior analysts to view generalization as an active process. Despite empirically supported methods to promote generalization, such as multiple exemplar training or self-management, many applied settings still struggle to program and/or test for generalization. Five domains where researchers have used evidence-based strategies to promote generalization will be discussed; these are social skills, language acquisition, behavior reduction, community behavior, and joint attention. Five systems in which change can be made to promote generalization will be reviewed; these are parent training, programming common stimuli, staff training, peer behavior, and treatment integrity checks. Attendees will then be guided to collectively develop 10 practical applications to promote generalization across applied settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) identify the different types of generalization, to promote fluency in speaking about generalization to others (because to get it done, you're going to have to talk about it—a lot); (2)identify empirically based examples of generalization; (3) discuss some system-wide changes that can help achieve the mission of promoting generalization; and (4)identify some pragmatic ideas for getting it done.
Activities: A bound workbook for note-taking, brainstorming, and completion of the exercises. Development of skill acquisition and/or behavior reduction procedures that promote generalization with templates provided to attendees on an individual flash drive.
Audience: BCBAs, licensed psychologists, home- and school-based ABA providers, graduate students, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, generalization
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
From Stabilization to Generalization: The Role and Importance of Behavior Analysis in All Phases of Post-Acute Interdisciplinary Treatment Planning With Survivors of Traumatic Brain Injury
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W184bc (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Chris M. Schaub, M.Ed.
CHRISTINA M. PETERS (University of Nevada, Reno), CHRIS M. SCHAUB (ReMed), KEVIN ERDNER (ReMed), JIM CONWAY (ReMed)
Description: The workshop will include an overview of behavior analytic philosophy, principles, and procedures toward developing effective interventions for specific target behaviors as well as more broadly developing and implementing comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment programs for individuals with intensive neurobehavioral needs, including aggression, elopement, resistance, dual diagnosis, etc. The primary focus is to present information that will help clinicians and others identify and prioritize treatment plan elements that are essential to integrated, comprehensive neurobehavioral rehabilitation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) demonstrate beginning knowledge of the complex medical, behavioral, and cognitive sequelae associated with survivors of TBI with co-occurring issues; (2) describe the phases of post-acute TBI programming, from stabilization, evaluation, and treatment to discharge planning, preparation, and transition; (3) identify the ways in which the role of the behavior analyst can impact interdisciplinary treatment at all phases of planning and implementation; (4) describe how key behavior analytic concepts and principles can be incorporated into each phase of neurobehavioral programming; and (5) demonstrate a beginning knowledge of the behavior analytic model established by the presenters to guide interdisciplinary team efforts to integrate, prioritize, and program for this challenging population.
Activities: The presenters will provide an overview of ReMed's neurobehavioral population and services, followed by an in-depth discussion of the philosophy and programming that have been developed for this population. Attendees will participate in a hands-on activity designed to review relevant behavior analytic concepts, principles, and procedures and learn how and when each is used within the model to guide the interdisciplinary treatment. Participants will practice implementing the model presented via analysis and discussion of specific case examples to demonstrate application of basic concepts, principles, and tools.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BACB certificants and licensed psychologists,as well asbehavior analysts and/or interdisciplinary treatment team members currently working or interested in working with survivors of traumatic brain injury with complex neurobehavioral sequelae.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Brain Injury, Interdisciplinary team,, Neurobehavioral, Rehabilitation
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB
Incorporating iOS (Apple) Apps Into Effective Behavioral Programming in Applied Settings
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W187c (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Wenig, M.S.
JESSICA WENIG (Advances Learning Center), WENDY GREENHALGH (Advances Learning Center)
Description: "There's an app for that." In September 2012, Apple announced that it had 700,000 approved applications available in the App Store, with 250,000 specifically for the iPad. The Apple App Store itself is currently the largest digital application distribution platform. With the number of approved apps increasing exponentially, the spillover of this new resource into the field of ABA is a tremendous opportunity to further realize Skinner's dream of a "teaching machine." The four capacities reviewed in this workshop include instructor tools, teaching, communication, and fun. Instructor tools apps include apps designed to facilitate data collection, graphing, and assessment. Apps for teaching include apps that are either designed specifically or used incidentally to promote skill acquisition. Apps for communication include those created to facilitate augmentative alternative communication (AAC), and apps for fun highlight how these tools may function as reinforcers. This workshop will outline multiple apps from each of these capacities, incorporate learning activities to demonstrate use of these applications in behavior analytic programming, discuss ethical considerations in using apps for applied programming, and review tricks of the trade and helpful resources to find apps for programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to identify evidence-based apps appropriate for programming and practice using apps from the following capacities: a. instructor tools apps—data collection, discrete trial implementation, graphing, preference assessments, assessment of target behavior, self-monitoring, social stories, video modeling, and data conversion(based on cost, description, pre-requisite exemplars, and reputable sources); b. apps for teaching—activity schedules, apps to promote independence in vocational settings and fine motor skills, and discrete trial apps to teach expressive and receptive language and pre-academic and academic skills across multiple subject areas; c. apps for fun—preference assessment apps to determine potential reinforcers, new hot games on the market, and lesser-known activities and apps designed to teach functional skills hidden in "kid friendly" activities; and d. apps for communication—based on AAC features including cost, age range, compatibility, text to speech output, accessibility (i.e., switch output, eye gaze, sequential, row/column, auditory scanning, etc.), sentence/phrase mode, shared library, computer based interface, support site, and fun additional features. The participant will also be able to (1) utilize assistive technology terminology to select appropriate AAC applications based on learner need and pre-requisite skills; (2) implement creative strategies, using applications, to replace stigmatizing methods commonly used to monitor behavior in community settings; (3) reference ethical considerations in selecting applications including determining reputable sources, evidence based apps, pre-requisites, informed consent, privacy, treatment efficacy, and sections of the BACB guidelines; and (4) use the same resources as professionals in the assistive technology field to find even more applications and find deals on more costly applications.
Activities: Alternating among lecture and hands-on activities and demonstrations, participants will work in groups to use apps from each capacity, review case studies, and participate in creating sample videos for video modeling.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts currently providing behavior analytic services in the home, school, and/or community setting; teachers; speech and language pathologists; physical therapists; behavioral instructors or therapists who facilitate behavior analytic services; school staff intending to utilize apps to access portions of the curriculum, or who work with students who have an assistive technology written into their individualized education plans; and anyone currently using applications in the field or wishing to use them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA, Autism, iOS(Apple) Apps, Technology
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Measuring Fidelity: How Fidelity Measures Have Evolved in ABA Research and Current Applications for Direct Observation Measures to Ensure Implementation Fidelity of EBPs for Toddler Behavior Issues
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W180 (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: TBA/CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Shelley Clarke, M.A.
MICHELLE A. DUDA (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), SHELLEY CLARKE (University of South Florida)
Description: This workshop will provide an overview of the rationale for more precise and accurate measurement and implementation of the independent variable. This includes ensuring proper documentation and accountability by linking assessment to intervention. The content of the workshop will reflect the current interest in implementation science within applied research that also relates to recent legislative requirements concerning treatment integrity. Presenters will introduce the body of literature within applied behavior analysis that has promoted the need for measurement beyond change in the independent variable. Treatment integrity will be described both from the conceptual and practical viewpoint. Case studies demonstrating implementation measures and direct instruction in how to develop fidelity tools for researchers, teachers, and parents for early childhood studies will be shared.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define and describe the elements of treatment integrity and procedural fidelity, (2) describe the importance of including treatment integrity measures within applied studies, and (3) identify practical approaches to developing treatment integrity measures supplemented with actual case studies.
Activities: The workshop will include an overview of implementation literature in the field of applied research, as well as sharing case studies from the field of intervention research that include measures of treatment integrity via videotape. Participants will be instructed in how to measure treatment integrity and practice with video in small group format, as well as how to develop treatment integrity measures for their own use in the field. Participants will be provided with structured group discussion about individual measures developed. Question and answer discussion with presenters will also be provided.
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, researchers, behavioral consultants, program developers, and purveyors who may be involved in conducting applied intervention research.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Skinner's Verbal Behavior, Chomsky's Review, and the Naming Account
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W175b (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Marleen T. Adema, Ph.D.
MARLEEN T. ADEMA (Independent Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D))
Description: This workshop gives an introduction to Skinner's view on verbal behavior and its acquisition. His functional approach will be described, including the verbal operants he distinguished. These verbal operants (e.g., mand, tact, intraverbal) now have an important role within applied work with children with developmental delays. Skinner's (1957) book Verbal Behavior was heavily criticized by Chomsky (1959) in a lengthy review. Chomsky's critical comments will be discussed, as well as responses by behavior analysts. Chomsky's review was and is seen by some as having defeated Skinner and having terminated all work in the area of verbal behavior. But Skinner's book continues to influence both applied and experimental work. One example of this is experimental work on naming. Horne and Lowe's (1996) naming account will be described, and an overview will be given of research that tested this account. Implications of the naming account and naming research with typically developing children for verbal interventions in populations with learning disabilities will also be noted.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define verbal behavior; (2) distinguish Skinner's functional account from the linguists' structural approach to language; (3) distinguish between the verbal operants; (4) identify implications of Skinner's account of verbal behavior for applied behavior analysis; (5) describe the main points of Chomsky's review; (6) describe the main points of behavior analytic responses to Chomsky; (7) define the name relation and specify the characteristics of the naming account; (8) judge whether the naming account has provided any testable predictions; (9) identify whether the naming account has generated any research and, if so, evaluate whether results are in line with the naming account; and (10) identify possible implications of the naming account for applied behavior analysis.
Activities: Participants will listen to presentations on the topics outlined above, including research data, and take part in discussions of and exercises in the analysis of verbal behavior. Examples of verbal behavior will be provided through video. Precision teaching methods will be used to measure learning.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, and anyone else seeking an introduction (or refresher) to Skinner's book Verbal Behavior, Chomsky's review, and naming.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Chomsky's Review, Naming Account, VB Applications, Verbal Behavior
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Improving Acquisition of Intraverbal Language Skills: The Role of Verbal Conditional Discriminations
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
W187ab (McCormick Place Convention Center)
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, Inc.)
Description: In order to engage in effective conversational interactions (i.e., non-rote intraverbal responses), individuals must acquire verbal conditional discriminations (VBCDs). But often the prerequisite skills for such discriminations are missing, making it difficult to learn complex language responses. Furthermore, certain instructional formats and sequences may inadvertently impede the acquisition of these critical discriminations. In this workshop, Dr. Esch will discuss and give examples of VBCDs and their prerequisite component skills. In addition, she will provide many examples of instructional worksheets, templates, and data sheets to show how instructional sequences can be arranged to aid VBCD skill acquisition.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to (1) define verbal conditional discriminations (VBCDs), (2) list prerequisite skills for acquiring complex intraverbal responses, and (3) describe several examples of instructional formats to promote acquisition of VBCDs.
Activities: Didactic instruction (lecture, videos).
Audience: BACB certificants, licensed psychologists, speech pathologists, behavior analysts, teachers, clinical directors, program managers, or others responsible for creating and managing language acquisition programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): conditional discriminations, improving language, intraverbal skills, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W75
CE Offered: BACB
CPT Code Training for Affiliated Chapter Leadership
Friday, May 23, 2014
4:00 PM–6:00 PM
Regency Ballroom E (Hyatt Regency McCormick Place)
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Travis Thompson, Ph.D.
TRAVIS THOMPSON (University of Minnesota), WAYNE W. FISHER (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Description: ABAI will provide training for ABAI Chapter representatives on the new CPT codes for applied behavior analysis (ABA) and treatments called the Adaptive Behavior Assessment and Treatment Codes.
Learning Objectives: Workshop attendees will exit the training session with an understanding of the purpose and use of new AMA CPT codes for applied behavior analysis.
Activities: Lecture and discussion.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): CPT Codes

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