Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Second Annual Autism Conference; Atlanta, GA; 2008

Program by Continuing Education Events: Saturday, February 9, 2008


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Invited Paper Session #4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Teaching the Social Dance: Using Script-Fading Procedures to Promote Conversation

Saturday, February 9, 2008
9:15 AM–10:15 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Patricia J. Krantz, Ph.D.
PATRICIA J. KRANTZ (Princeton Child Development Institute)
Patricia J. Krantz, Ph.D., is Executive Director Emeritus of the Princeton Child Development Institute. In 1999, the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis chose the Princeton Child Development Institute as the recipient of the Award for Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis. Dr. Krantz holds academic appointments at the University of Kansas and Queens College of the City University of New York. Her current research focuses on stimulus control procedures that increase spontaneous generative language. She has made many international contributions to autism intervention, including lectures at the British Institute of Mental Handicap; the Congress of the European Association of Behavior Therapy; the Dean’s Leading Edge Lecture at Deakin University, Victoria, Australia; at the Norwegian Association for Behavior Analysis; and keynote addresses at the first conferences on autism in the Soviet Union and in Poland. In 2000, she presented a paper at Congrès Européen pour l’Analyse Expérimentale du Comportement at Amiens, France. Dr. Krantz and her colleague, Lynn E. McClannahan, have published many research articles on activity schedules and script fading and have authored two books, Activity schedules for children with autism: Teaching independent behavior and Teaching conversation to children with autism: Scripts and script fading.
Abstract:

This presentation describes teaching procedures that help children with autism learn to engage in the give and take of ordinary, daily conversation with parents, teachers, and peers. Our research on these intervention strategies began in 1993, and continues today. Scripts and script fading are not procedures for teaching children to speak, but procedures for teaching them to interact. These strategies help young people with autism learn the nonverbal components of conversation (approaching and visually attending to another person), as well as the verbal components (initiating conversation, waiting quietly while others talk, and then responding to what they say). We will discuss some of the factors that interfere with the acquisition of social-interaction skills and will show videotapes that illustrate scripts and script-fading procedures. The goal of these intervention strategies is to teach children to engage in real conversation with us.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysis

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

A Clear Picture: The Use and Benefits of PECS

Saturday, February 9, 2008
10:45 AM–11:45 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Andy Bondy, Ph.D., has over 35 years of experience working with children and adults with autism and related developmental disabilities. He served as the Director of the Statewide Delaware Autistic Program for more than a dozen years. He and his wife, Lori Frost, pioneered the development of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). This system is utilized around the world with remarkable success, as suggested by over 35 data-based publications and 11 descriptive publications regarding PECS and its impact. He has designed the Pyramid Approach to Education (with Beth Sulzer-Azaroff) as a comprehensive combination of broad-spectrum behavior analysis and effective communication strategies. The Pyramid Approach focuses on the development of functional activities and communication skills with an emphasis upon the systematic use of powerful reinforcement strategies. This approach has been cited as a model program for preschool and school-aged children within public and private school settings. He is the co-founder of Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc., an internationally based team of specialists (with offices in 7 countries) from diverse fields providing guidance and services throughout the world. He has taught numerous college-level courses, has published extensively and has presented frequently at national and international conferences.
Abstract:

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) was developed over 20 years ago by Andy Bondy and Lori Frost. PECS was founded on the principles of applied behavior analysis, especially the analysis provided by BF Skinners work on Verbal Behavior. Early descriptive reports indicated that PECS was highly effective with young children with autism and related disabilities in rapidly establishing functional communication. Ongoing work with PECS has demonstrated its effectiveness with children and adults with a wide array of communication deficits. Research from around the world continues to document the success of this program in terms of the speed of acquisition, and its positive impact upon behavior management issues, social skills, and the development and expansion of speech. Reports from recent reviews and international conference presentations indicate that PECS is extremely popular and has very high social validity ratings from parents and professionals. This talk will outline the key elements of the PECS protocol, how it can best be implemented at school, home and in the community, and common mistakes that may undermine the utility of the system.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Effective School-Based Programs for Children with Autism

Saturday, February 9, 2008
11:45 AM–12:45 PM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Ilene S. Schwartz, Ph.D.
ILENE S. SCHWARTZ (University of Washington)
Dr. Ilene S. Schwartz is a Professor and Chair of the Area of Special Education in the College of Education at the University of Washington. She earned her Ph.D. in child and developmental psychology at the University of Kansas. Dr. Schwartz has an extensive background working with young children with special needs, specifically with young children with autism and other severe disabilities. Currently, Dr. Schwartz is the faculty advisor of the integrated preschool and kindergarten programs at the Experimental Education Unit at UW. Dr. Schwartz maintains an active line of research and personnel preparation activities. She is the Principal Investigator of a model demonstration project to develop school-based services for young children with autism, a research project to assess the differential effectiveness of preschool programs for young children with autism, and of a personnel preparation to prepare early childhood teachers who work with children with severe disabilities in inclusive settings. Dr. Schwartz has published numerous chapters and articles about early childhood special education and social validity. She is on the Editorial Review Boards of the Journal of Early Intervention and Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. Dr. Schwartz is very involved early intervention issues at the local, state, and national level.
Abstract:

Public education is the one great entitlement that is designed to help every citizen in the United States achieve their potential. For students with disabilities, including students with ASD, the right to a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) is further guaranteed by federal law. There remains, however, much debate over what constitutes FAPE for students with ASD and even if these services can be provided in the context of public schools. The purpose of this presentation is to review the research on what constitutes a high quality preschool and elementary school program for students with ASD and describe how educators/teachers and parents can work together to ensure that all students with ASD receive the high quality education to which they are entitled.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

From DT to DI: Using Direct Instruction to Teach Students with ASD

Saturday, February 9, 2008
2:30 PM–3:30 PM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Cathy L. Watkins, Ph.D.
CATHY L. WATKINS (California State University)
Dr. Cathy L. Watkins received a doctorate from the University of Florida in 1987. She is a Professor of Special Education at California State University, Stanislaus and Co-Director of the Center for Direct Instruction. Dr. Watkins is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and past president of the California Association for Behavior Analysis. Dr. Watkins serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Direct Instruction and Education and Treatment of Children. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and the Board of Directors of the Association for Direct Instruction. She is co-author of The Components of Direct Instruction in Introduction to Direct Instruction and consulting author of SRA’s Ravenscourt Books. Dr. Watkins has experience working with both general and special education students. She trains and supervises teachers at the university and in public schools. She has consulted with schools and other agencies including the National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI) and the Effective Schools Model of Project Follow Through. Dr. Watkins was honored with the Association for Direct Instruction's Excellence in Education Award for College Teaching and Staff Development. Her primary interest is in helping children and their teachers to be successful.
Abstract:

The number of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) has increased substantially and many students with ASD are general education classrooms. The transition to a less restrictive educational placement presents special challenges for students with ASD whose early learning experiences have consisted primarily of structured 1:1 teaching. Teachers need effective instruction that can be integrated into typical classroom routines and activities. In addition, landmark legislation (IDEA and NCLB) requires the use of instructional methods that are based on scientific research. Direct Instruction can provide a practical and effective option. Direct Instruction programs are scientifically-based but, more importantly, they are empirically-validated. More than 30 years of research has shown Direct Instruction to be effective in addressing the needs of students ranging from those with severe disabilities to those identified as gifted, suggesting that the principles underlying effective instruction are more important in the process of learning than the special characteristics of any particular student population. Direct Instruction programs are based on two overarching beliefs: All children can be taught and all teachers can be successful when given effective materials and presentation techniques. In this session, Dr. Watkins will discuss how Direct Instruction programs can address the unique needs of learners with ASD while supporting the acquisition of academic skills. The presentation will provide an overview of Direct Instruction, present video examples of instructional programs, and describe features of instructional design and delivery methods of DI programs that make them effective and efficient tools to teach children with autism spectrum disorders.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Using ABA to Improve the Lives of Adults with Autism in Work, Community, and Residential Settings

Saturday, February 9, 2008
3:30 PM–4:30 PM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Gregory S. MacDuff, Ph.D.
GREGORY S. MACDUFF (Princeton Child Development Institute)
Gregory S. MacDuff, Ph.D., is the Director of Adult and Community-Living Programs at the Princeton Child Development Institute and Adjunct Professor at the University of Kansas and The College of New Jersey. He has authored articles and book chapters on incidental teaching, photographic activity schedules, staff training strategies, prompt- and prompt-fading procedures, behavioral intervention for adults with autism, and intervention models in residential settings. He has lectured nationally and internationally, and has provided consultation and training to a variety of public and private programs.
Abstract:

This presentation describes behavioral intervention programs that help adults with autism complete tasks in work, community, and residential settings. The presentation suggests that preparation for adulthood should begin in childhood, asserts that the curriculum should be as comprehensive and evaluation criteria as rigorous in programs for adults as in programs for children, and stresses the value of low client-teacher ratios. Our data suggest a number of skills that are key to adults successful transitions from education programs to supported employment and other community settings. These skills include remaining engaged without direct supervision, using delayed reward systems, completing assignments at criterion, following activity schedules, and exhibiting low levels of disruptive behavior. Discussion of keys skills will be supplemented by videotapes.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 
 
Invited Paper Session #9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

"Evidence-Based Practice: Improvement or Illusion?

Saturday, February 9, 2008
5:00 PM–6:00 PM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Gina Green, Ph.D.
GINA GREEN (San Diego State University)
Dr. Gina Green received a Ph.D. in Psychology (Analysis of Behavior) from Utah State University in 1986, following undergraduate and master’s degree studies at Michigan State University. She has been a faculty member in Behavior Analysis and Therapy at Southern Illinois University; Director of Research at the New England Center for Children in Southborough, Massachusetts; Associate Scientist at the E.K. Shriver Center for Mental Retardation in Waltham, Massachusetts; and Research Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Green is currently in private practice in San Diego as a consultant and is on the faculty at San Diego State University and the University of North Texas. She has authored numerous publications on the treatment of individuals with developmental disabilities and brain injuries, as well as the experimental analysis of behavior. Dr. Green co-edited the books Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Autism and Making a Difference: Behavioral Intervention for Autism. She serves or has served on the editorial boards of several professional journals in developmental disabilities and behavior analysis. Dr. Green also serves on the Board of Trustees and the Autism Advisory Group of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, the Board of Directors of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board, and the advisory boards of several autism programs and organizations. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, former president of the Association for Behavior Analysis and the California Association for Behavior Analysis, and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Council for Scientific Medicine and Mental Health. Psychology Today named her “Mental Health Professional of the Year” in 2000. In 2005 she received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland for her work in autism. Dr. Green lectures and consults widely on autism and related disorders, behavioral research, and effective interventions for people with disabilities.
Abstract:

Evidence-based practice has become a popular buzz-phrase recently. Several groups have developed autism practice guidelines that are described as evidence-based, and that phrase is being used to market many interventions. Some laws and policies even mandate that practices be evidence-based. This would seem to be a good thing for behavior analysts and consumers of ABA services. But is it? Although evidence-based practice originally referred to practices that have proved effective in scientific studies, developers of some autism practice guidelines have defined evidence to include information that is not scientific at all. A number of others have defined science in a way that excluded most behavior analytic research. And some interventions that are being promoted as evidence-based have not been tested directly in anything resembling scientific studies. In light of these multiple, confusing usages, how are parents and practitioners to know whether they can have confidence in recommendations that are said to be evidence-based? Which of the many autism practice guidelines are grounded in real science? Why has the science of behavior analysis been ignored by so many guidelines developers, and what can be done about that? What is the best available scientific evidence about various interventions for autism? This presentation offers some answers to these questions, and some suggestions for using genuine scientific evidence to improve the practice of behavior analysis.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and/or Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: N/a
 

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