Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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31st Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2005

CE by Type: BACB


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Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Organizational Behavior Management Approaches in Human Services Settings
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Williford A (3rd floor)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Southbury Training School), JOSEPH D. CAUTILLI (Children Crisis Treatment Center)
Description: This workshop will provide a theoretical framework for utilizing behavior analysis principles of organizational behavior management, combining it with methods from Quality Management and statistical process control as applied to human services provider organizations (Hantula, 1995; Babcock, Fleming & Oliver, 1999). Organizational management and human resources (HR) applications are a growing area for behavior analysts, who have the unique skills and experience to utilize principles of behavior analysis to improve processes and functions in human services organizations. One particular area of interest for behavioral practitioners will be organizational behavior management (OBM). OBM conceptualizes and empirically solves organizational problems. This workshop will provide participants with the concepts and knowledge to increase their potential for professional behavioral consultation to human services organizations. Operation issues plague most mental health and service industry professions. It is our experience that organizational behavior management has much to offer traditional operations in job design, analysis, and HR management. In addition, OBM readily lends itself to improve the quality of treatment services in human service organizations that provide services to people with mental retardation, developmental disabilities, autism, and emotional/behavioral disorders. This presentation will focuses on applying the basics of OBM to the development of successful service operations, and provide data from a demonstration research project conducted in a residential treatment facility serving these populations. Management involves the acquisition and use of resources. OBM redefines management from control of the person to control of the context/environment in which the person works. It has developed powerful techniques for a range of management areas, and can be used to improve the integrity and quality of treatment approaches being used in a human service organization. (Cautilli & Clarke, BAT, 2000, Weinberg et. al., BAT, 2001).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: -Develop management by team objective programs. - Analyze performance problems from a traditional operations perspective. - Identify ways that OBM can enhance this approach. - Understand operations and HR approaches to enhance employee performance, and to achieve a company's strategic goals. - Use OBM in operations to enhance treatment integrity. - Use statistical process control to determine when to intervene. (P Chart) - Set up functionally based programs with the supervision of all staff as the cornerstone. - Set up benchmarks and define outcomes for successful interventions. - Understand the essential skills of an effective manager. - Understand key skills to devise performance objectives linked to evaluation, mission of the organization, and performance-contingent salary increases.
Activities: Participants will work in breakout groups to devise performance objectives for professionals and staff linked to the organization�s mission; participants will practice use of various organizational assessment instruments in evaluating their own or hypothetical human services agencies.
Audience: Behavior analysts, human resources professionals, program directors or administrators of human services organizations, OBM professionals, and students in OBM track programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Enhancing Understanding of the Behavioral Approach to the Treatment of Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Private Dining Room 4 (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Timothy R. Moore, M.S.
TIMOTHY R. MOORE (Minnesota Autism Center), JULIE A. WALDOCH (Minnesota Autism Center)
Description: Autism, a condition more prevalent than ever before, is a developmental disorder whose most valid treatment options (those that are behaviorally-based) are not as widely used or understood as we might hope. Workshop participants will learn about cardinal and secondary characteristics of autism, and behavioral approaches to treatment. Specifically, well discuss theory and practice in several areas: what Applied Behavior Analysis is and is not, approaches to functional assessment, the use of reinforcement and punishment, family and support staff involvement in treatment, prompting, and the management of dangerous behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe the three cardinal characteristics of autism. - Outline essential components of the behavioral approach to the treatment of autism. - Conduct a functional assessment (indirect component). - Conduct a direct functional assessment (direct component). - Develop a reinforcement and behavior management program. - Use prompt hierarchies to teach a simple skill. - Make decisions based on safety during a crisis.
Activities: Case studies with video samples: Small groups will identify cardinal characteristics of autism; Case studies with written descriptions: Small groups will conduct a brief functional assessment interview with a participant role playing the parent; Case studies with video samples: Small groups will identify important setting events, antecedents, and consequences to behavioral scenarios; Based on the functional assessments with case studies, small groups will discuss and plan treatment, complete with antecedent and consequence programming; Small groups will develop a teaching plan, complete with prompt hierarchy, for a skill to replace a negative behavior; Case studies with written descriptions: Small groups will make decisions on interventions during crisis scenarios.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for clinical staff and educators at teaching or supervisory levels, as the discussion of theory, and practice of application, may be novel or an expansion on a skill set. Parents will also benefit as they wish to enhance their understanding about the behavioral approach to the treatment of autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Diverse Strategies to Teach Advanced Social Skills to Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Williford B (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (The Genesis School), CATHERINE E. FALLEO (Personal Touch), RUTH M. DONLIN (Private practice)
Description: Children with autism exhibit many deficits in the area of socialization. It is difficult for children with autism to respond to peers in social situations as well as to initiate to others. There are many other areas of socialization that children with autism have great difficulty with such as ending a conversation, listening to another conversation to obtain information and knowing how to join in a conversation. This workshop will discuss a variety of innovative strategies that have been successful for improving social skills in children with autism. Specific strategies to be discussed will include topics such as: the use of behavioral rehearsal, role playing, using video modeling and video rehearsal, and conducting ABC analyses of social situations. Carol Gray's comic strip conversations and social stories will be also be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will: - Learn a minimum of 3 new methods for increasing social skills in children with autism. - Learn how to operationalize advanced concepts such as friendship when teaching a child with autism. - Learn how to use behavioral rehearsal with children with autism to improve social skills. - Learn how to use self-monitoring for children with autism to help them to monitor their social skills.
Activities: Participants will watch video clips of a variety of strategies that can be used to increase social skills in individuals with autism. Specific activities will include writing a story about a social situation for a student, conducting an ABC analysis on a social situation and operationalizing a variety of advanced social concepts.
Audience: Psychologists, Special educators, social workers, speech pathologists, parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
An Updated Version of the Verbal Behavior Assessment and Curriculum for Children With Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Continental A (1st floor)
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D.
MARK L. SUNDBERG (STARS School)
Description: Skinners analysis of verbal behavior has proven to be a valuable tool for language assessment and intervention for children with autism. This workshop will provide an overview of the basic elements of Skinners analysis of verbal behavior, and will present an updated version of several aspects of the application of the analysis to language assessment and intervention. Specifically, updated versions of the language assessment sequence, the barriers to language acquisition, the verbal behavior curriculum, and the training procedures for each elementary verbal operant will be presented. A strong focus of the workshop will be on the importance of conducting verbal behavior analyses at all levels of a language intervention program.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Define the elementary verbal operants (i.e., echoic, mand, tact, intraverbal, textual, and transcriptive). - Describe several barriers to language acquisition and explain how to remove them. - Provide a brief task analysis of each of the verbal operants. - Describe procedures for teaching each of the verbal operants. - Explain how typical language development can serve as a guide for a language intervention program. - Describe what constitutes a �verbal behavior analysis.� - Conduct �verbal behavior analyses� of various language acquisition problems.
Activities: Attendees will participate in didactic presentations, discussions, and exercises in the analysis of verbal behavior. A 300 plus page handout will be provided to each attendee that will contain extensive information on each topic.
Audience: Participants should have a strong working knowledge of behavior analysis and some interest in its application to language assessment and intervention.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Direct Instruction:Curriculum Overview and Implementation with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4F (4th floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, M.S.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), WENDY KOZMA (Evergreen Center), ANN FILER (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: This workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of two Direct Instruction (DI) curriculum components; Language for Learning and Reading Mastery. The relevance for use with both typical learners and those with developmental disabilities will be demonstrated. Participants will receive curriculum materials and have hands on practice in the implementation of DI teaching practices. Throughout the course of the workshop, strategies to enable both typical children and individuals with disabilities to access traditional curriculum, while operating within the structures of behavioral teaching, will be highlighted and practiced. The methods and structure of DI incorporate behavioral principles into instruction, including prompt fading, use of multiple exemplars and frequent measurement of efficacy. The instructors will provide in depth review of the types of instructional modifications required to implement DI with atypical learners. These modifications will include the use of token systems, visual schedules, additional visual prompts, presenting tasks in isolation and pre-teaching. These modifications although not specified in traditional DI scripts and trainings will be discussed in detail and practiced in this workshop. In addition, participants will review a model to provide program wide implementation training and effective implementation in home based and school based settings.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Demonstrate beginning knowledge of Direct Instruction, as a teaching process with specific techniques and strategies. - Be able to implement at least three or more Direct Instruction instructional practices. - Demonstrate beginning knowledge of Direct Instruction, as a curriculum designed to teach reading decoding, comprehension, and language development skills. - Describe the data supporting successful implementation of Direct Instruction programs with children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. - List at least five modifications effective in the implementation of Direct Instruction programs with children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. - Be able to implement at least three of the modifications of Direct Instruction programs with children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. - Describe the implications of parent training and participation in the implementation of Direct Instruction programs. - Be able to implement the DI structures and procedures in a range of settings and to increase generalized compliance in natural settings.
Activities: Review efficacy data related to Direct Instruction and its curriculum components; Review the Reading Mastery curriculum and practice implementation of lessons and exercises; Review the Language for Learning curriculum and practice implementation of lessons and exercises; Review, observe and practice the modifications of curriculum necessary for effective implementation of DI for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders; View videotapes demonstrating structured DI sessions encompassing modifications for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders; Practice implementation of both curricula with modifications in place; Practice using DI data collection systems and teacher feedback forms.
Audience: Individuals who are working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Activity Schedules: Beyond Independent Activities
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4C (4th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: David M. Corcoran, M.S.
DAVID M. CORCORAN (Beacon ABA Services), JOSEPH M. VEDORA (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The purpose of this introductory workshop is to train participants in the use of various forms of visual activity schedules. Activity schedules will be described and explained, and instruction on how to effectively establish stimulus control using activity schedules. Activity schedules have been employed with individuals with autism to promote independence and increase on-task behavior. In addition to addressing their use with individuals with autism, this workshop will describe their expanded use to a variety of conditions at home and school. The first half of the workshop will include a lecture and training on how to design schedules and teach students to sue this versatile tool using basic close ended activities. The second half will focus on novel uses of activity schedules including the use of activity schedules to increase social and play skills, food acceptance, self-help skills, community behavior, and the use of computerized activity schedules.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Design and implement basic 3-4 task activity schedules. - Identify settings and occasions to use them and learners with which to use them. - Describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals learning styles. - Demonstrate the teaching procedures necessary to implement basic activity schedules. - Troubleshoot challenges in designing and teaching activity schedules. - Describe modifications enhancing usefulness of activity schedules. - List variations on the basic activity schedule and apply them to real world situations.
Activities: Describe and set up basic activity schedules; Identify settings and occasions to use them and learners to use them with; Describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals� learning styles; Implement basic activity schedules; Troubleshoot and describe modifications enhancing usefulness of activity schedules; Expand upon basic activity schedules.
Audience: Individuals who are working with adults and children with disabilities who are interested in effective methods of teaching a wide range of skills and behaviors that are traditionally difficult to teach this population.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assembling Case Presentations Using Goldiamond's Constructional Approach
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Williford C (3rd floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Paul Thomas Andronis, Ph.D.
PAUL THOMAS ANDRONIS (Northern Michigan University)
Description: The functional analysis of behavior has become the generally accepted standard for initial behavioral assessment in the delivery of human services by both public and private agencies, and many other institutions throughout the United States. Goldiamond (1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, & 1984) elaborated a thoroughgoing method for the functional analysis of behavior, called the Constructional Approach, that includes linear and nonlinear contingency relations, and that may be addressed explicitly to both topical and systemic treatment programs. In short, Goldiamons approach affords a comprehensive, coherent, and fundamental basis for the functional analysis of behavior. This workshop will provide a brief overview of Goldiamonds (1974) Constructional Approach to social and personal behavior problems, including a brief review of the Constructional Questionnaire, used like an intake interview to gather initial information to guide the functional analysis. The focus will be on the presentation of material collected in this interview (or other formats), in a way that portrays the individual as a competently functioning person, and the problem behavior as an effective, adaptive operant given the individuals personal history and natural ecology. Examples from clinical and organizational casework, as well as any offered by participants, will illustrate the method. The theoretical model used in this workshop treats human behavior as a rational and adaptive outcome of individuals unique personal histories (including both social and biological endowments). Accordingly, we will discuss ways in which the material gathered in the Constructional Questionnaire, as well as other forms of intake interviews, can be assembled to reveal how troublesome behavior can nonetheless benefit individuals in personal ways, and how framing behavior problems within a Constructional approach can makes sense of behavior that, from other perspectives, is classified as senseless, irrational, maladaptive, dysfunctional, pathological, and so on.
Learning Objectives: At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe a contingency-based view of the rationality of behavior, making sense of examples of troublesome behavior drawn from clinical, educational, and other practical settings. - Describe Goldiamond�s Constructional Approach, and critically distinguish it from other behavioral approaches to analyzing and changing behavior. - Describe the kinds of basic information that are useful for Constructional programming. - Identify important assessment and programming variables gathered by means of the Constructional Questionnaire or other intake interview formats. - Define disturbing behavior patterns in terms of their functions as successful operants. - Identify different kinds of ordinary outcomes that can nonetheless maintain disturbing patterns of behavior. - Identify strengths a client/patient/student may possess at the start of the program. - Write a brief description of a client�s behavior problem using Goldiamond�s Constructional Case Presentation Guide.
Activities: After a presentation of the model, participants will discuss key elements of the Constructional approach, its differences from those procedures that characterize conventional functional analysis, and the importance and utility of distinguishing between linear and nonlinear contingency relations, and between topical and systemic treatment procedures. With materials supplied to them, or information they themselves have contributed, the participants will work in small groups to analyze clinical or other applied vignettes, identify the appropriate contingency matrices, and then present their analyses to the workshop as a whole in Constructional terms (using Goldiamond�s Constructional Case Presentation Guide). If time allows, participants may suggest and discuss outlines for Constructional interventions in those cases.
Audience: Participants for this workshop should have a basic understanding of the consequential governance of behavior. Familiarity with Goldiamonds Constructional Approach, through previous workshops in the area, would greatly enhance the value of this workshop to participants. The subject and activities would probably appeal most to people working in clinical, educational, or other applied settings with various populations, and those looking for a humane, effective, and radically behavioral approach to helping others who engage in challenging or disturbing behavior. Level: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention and Relational Frame Theory
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Continental B (1st floor)
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ian T. Stewart, Ph.D.
JOHN D. MCELWEE (Step By Step Academy), IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway), ERIC J. FOX (Arizona State University)
Description: Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) is an effective behavior analysis based approach to remediation of deficits for Autistic Spectral Disorder (ASD) where communication is the core deficit. Relational Frame Theory (RFT) is a modern behaviour analytic approach to human language and cognition, which extends Skinners analysis of verbal behavior by conceptualizing language as generalized relational responding, thus providing new directions for behavioral research and intervention. The purpose of this workshop is to demonstrate how insights and procedures generated by the RFT approach might be applied in the EIBI domain. The first part of the workshop will involve defining and explaining the core concepts of RFT. It will explain the history that gives rise to the core generalized operant of arbitrary relational responding or relational framing and outline the defining properties of this operant, as well as providing research evidence of the link between arbitrary relational responding and language. It will explain how the analysis of verbal behavior in terms of relational framing can explain the extraordinary generativity characterizing language and will outline findings from RFT-based work that has used laboratory generated relational framing to model a diversity of linguistic and higher cognitive skills, with particular emphasis on those most obviously relevant to EIBI such as derived naming, hierarchical relational responding and perspective taking. Finally, this initial portion of the workshop will examine existing EIBI curricula and show how core training protocols might be reinterpreted and extended using Relational Frame Theory, putting particular emphasis on the importance of the RFT-based concepts of multiple exemplar training, contextual control and derived relational performance outcomes. The second part of the workshop will examine how RFT may be combined with the area of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention to provide a comprehensive framework for teaching relational framing beginning with basic conditional discriminations and progressing through various stages of non-arbitrary and arbitrary relational responding. Starting with simple non-arbitrary auditory and visual identity matching, the framework will progressively target auditory-to-visual matching-to-sample, mutually entailed sound-object/object-sound relations, contextually controlled (SAME versus DIFFERENT) non-arbitrary visual and auditory matching, flexibility of contextual control and combinatorial entailment. This half of the workshop will involve greater participation by the audience than the first. The audience will be divided into groups and guided in key features of the implementation of successive stages of the framework.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Understand how RFT approaches language. - Understand key theoretical concepts of RFT. - Be familiar with several of the areas of the RFT empirical research programs that are relevant to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention. - Understand core principles of RFT as they apply in the arena of early intensive intervention . - Understand and use techniques designed to train relational framing from a basic level. - Be knowledgeable with how existing EIBI curricula and core training protocols might be reinterpreted and extended using Relational Frame Theory. - Implement a short Relational Frame based training protocol in an EIBI context.
Activities: Didactic instruction, small group work, and brief exercises will be utilized.
Audience: Therapists with expertise in the analysis of verbal behavior and the implementation of EIBI programs that are interested in applying principles of Relational Frame Theory in the EIBI domain.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Promoting Participation in Activity Among People with Severe Intellectual Disabilities Through the Active Support Model
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
5G (5th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sandy Toogood, Ph.D.
SANDY TOOGOOD (University of Wales, Bangor), VASO TOTSIKA (University of Wales, Bangor)
Description: Active Support (AS) describes an empirically tested group of procedures for organizing small community homes to maximize opportunities for adults and young persons with severe or profound intellectual impairments to participate fully in everyday, life-defining activity and social interaction. Active Support has integrated procedures for Activity Support Planning, Individual Program Planning, Community Access Logs, Opportunity Planning, Structured Teaching, data based Team Meetings and Interactive Training. Interactive Training is a structured behavioral approach to on-site staff training that is individually tailored to each staff-client combination. Interactive Training typically covers a) activity preparation and presentation, b) providing support and assistance, c) making participation rewarding, and d) managing personal behavior and the social environment. AS exploits the relationship between active participation and effective antecedent assistance from staff. AS also generates rich data for routinely monitoring service effort (inputs) and individual client experience (outcome). AS complements bespoke behavioral intervention (e.g. via establishing operations) and augmented communication systems where they are clinically relevant.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Relate the ethics and theoretical basis of ABA to the philosophical orientation and core values of Active Support. - Describe the components of Active Support functionally and structurally. - Develop Activity Support Plans in his/her own services settings. - Operate a system of Opportunity Planning using behavioral objectives. - Cite applied research into Active Support as it relates to core concepts and methods in ABA. - Relate, compare and contrast Active Support with other applied behavior analytic approaches (e.g. Positive Behavior Support).
Activities: Data based presentation and discussion; Multi-media description and discussion; Rehearsing a selection of training exercises; Discussing and reviewing Active Support and other applied approaches. In addition, participants will have the opportunity to take part in, or observe and critically evaluate, a simulated behavioral observation and on-site training exercise.
Audience: Behavior analysts and other professionals working into small community homes for adults with intellectual disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Fluency-Based Instruction for Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Private Dining Room 2 (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTEN N. SCHIRMER (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KRISTA ZAMBOLIN (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SHANE D. ISLEY (University of North Texas)
Description: This six-hour workshop will introduce participants to Fluency-Based Instruction as applied to learners with Autism. Fluency-Based Instruction, an instructional system derived from the discipline of Behavior Analysis and its subfield Precision Teaching, is a highly effective and efficient system for arranging instructional contingencies. Participants will learn the components of Fluency-Based Instruction, it historical and empirical underpinnings, as well as the support systems needed to effectively implement this model with learners with autism. The workshop uses a combination of slides, multiple video examples, and performance data from children with autism to illustrate key concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - List and describe the components of Fluency-based Instruction for learners with autism. - Describe the historical and empirical underpinning of Fluency-Based Instruction. - Define rate of response and discuss the role it plays in Fluency-Based Instruction. - Describe the clinical and measurement advantages offered by measuring rate of response rather than percent correct. - Describe the levels of data-based decisions that clinicians can make when monitoring Fluency-Based Instruction. - Describe the procedures used to empirically validate skill retention, endurance, application, and stability. - Describe the support systems needed to implement Fluency-Based Instruction in both school and private clinical arrangements
Activities: The presenters will use a combination of lecture, small group discussion, and large group discussion to ensure that participants learn the skills described in the workshop�s objectives. Throughout the workshop, participants will be encouraged to ask questions as the material is presented.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for parents and professionals involved in the design and monitoring of behavior analytic intervention programs for children with autism and related disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: Super-Charging the Therapeutic Relationship
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
5F (5th floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert J. Kohlenberg, Ph.D.
ROBERT J. KOHLENBERG (University of Washington), REO NEWRING (University of Washington), CHRISTEINE M. TERRY (University of Washington), MARY D. PLUMMER (University of Washington), MADELON Y. BOLLING (University of Washington)
Description: Do you want to learn how to develop intense therapeutic relationships with your outpatient psychotherapy clients? This workshop is for behavior analysts who want to apply functional analytic principles to outpatient mental health treatment and it is for practicing clinicians who want to incorporate functional analysis in their work. We will explain how a functional analysis in psychotherapy leads to a focus on the client-therapist relationship, and overview the basic principles of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP). Clinicians that are new to functional analysis or FAP are welcome and we aim to present topics that go beyond the basics. Strategies and techniques for using the client-therapist relationship as a therapeutic tool will be introduced and practiced. Emphasis will be placed on experiential learning, in addition to didactics. Finally, we will address issues in training and supervising therapists. Participants will have time to discuss ways of tailoring FAP to their needs and integrating this approach with other treatments, including ACT. In addition, the presenters will address challenges and concerns about focusing on the client-therapist relationship.
Learning Objectives: This workshop will overview the basic principles of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and introduce strategies and techniques to apply these principles: - To familiarize clinical behavior analysts with the notion of in-vivo work. - To demonstrate how the identification, evocation, and modification (i.e., natural reinforcement) of in-vivo behavior can improve clinical outcomes. - To learn the tools and techniques suggested in FAP. - To practice strategies and discuss how these principles can be applied with participants� clients. - To train clinicians to use a functional analysis to assess and interpret client behavior and develop treatment plans. - To experience the intensity of an in-vivo interaction within the constraints of the workshop. - To introduce considerations for supervision and discuss difficulties in training therapists and applying the suggested strategies. By the end of the workshop, attendees should be able to use a number of FAP strategies, including case conceptualizing, identifying and evoking clinically relevant behaviors, assessing the effects of interventions, and focusing on the therapeutic relationship.
Activities: This workshop is a combination of didactic presentation, videotaped clinical case material, and a variety of exercises and activities. Participants will be encouraged to discuss ways to tailor FAP principles to their own clients. Attendees will have the opportunity to practice with materials frequently used in or adapted for FAP. In addition, materials will be provided to help participants apply the workshop strategies to their own practice. FAP is unique in that the treatment is tailored to the needs, history, and abilities of each client; the workshop presenters will use FAP strategies and techniques to tailor the workshop to the needs, history, and abilities of the attendees.
Audience: The workshop is aimed at several audiences. One is the behavior analyst who is interested in an introduction to therapy techniques and a behavior analytic interpretation of the therapeutic process. Because FAP is built on behavior analytic principles, anyone who understands BA can learn to supercharge their relationships. Another is the therapist who is interested in applying functional analysis in his/her approach to treatment. Any therapist who is interested in increasing the intensity and/or salience of the therapeutic relationship, regardless of the type of interventions used, is invited to attend. Although the focus of the workshop will be on working with adult, mental health outpatients with generally intact cognitive functioning, we welcome discussion of how these methods may apply to other populations. Because clinical material is being presented, the workshop is open only to faculty, graduate students, or professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Language for Learning: A Direct Instruction Language Development Program
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4D (4th floor)
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Cathy L. Watkins, Ph.D.
CATHY L. WATKINS (California State University, Stanislaus)
Description: This workshop is designed to provide training in the Language for Learning program. Language for Learning is a comprehensive oral language development program that teaches the essential concepts and skills all children need in order to be successful. The workshop will provide an overview of Direct Instruction programs, emphasizing language development programs. Training will focus on effective delivery of Language for Learning. Participants will practice teaching formats from the program and receive feedback from the workshop presenter. Issues related to using the program with students who have exceptional learning needs will also be addressed. Teachers Guides for the Language for Learning program will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe the scope and sequence of skills taught in Language for Learning. - Identify critical design features of the program and explain their importance. - Demonstrate effective program delivery techniques. - Demonstrate effective correction procedures. - Specify the necessary preskills for entering Language for Learning. - Make placement and grouping decision based on the Language for Learning placement test. - Describe appropriate adaptation/modifications for students with exceptional learning needs.
Activities: Participants will receive information about the design of the Language for Learning program. Videotapes of lessons will be shown. The presenter will demonstrate how to teach selected formats from the program. Participants will practice delivering formats and receive feedback from the workshop presenter.
Audience: Anyone who is interested in learning how to teach Direct Instruction programs in general and Language for Learning in particular. No previous experience necessary. The workshop is appropriate for teachers, practitioners, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Curriculum for Intensive, Early Intervention Program for Children with Autism: The First Two Phases
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Joliet (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Barbara Metzger, Ph.D.
BARBARA METZGER (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools), ANGELA L. POLETTI (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools)
Description: A curriculum for teaching young children with autism will be presented. The curriculum is presented in a flow chart format that specifies the sequence of teaching programs. The curriculum has a heavy emphasis on teaching early language and play skills. The curriculum also covers imitation, school readiness and self-help skills. Teaching methodologies and strategies for beginning programs and advanced programs will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Read the curriculum flow chart to determine the sequence of skills. - Identify the programs of the first two phases of the curriculum as well as the overall goal and ideal timeline for each phase. - Identify the goal of each program. - Identify potential mistakes of each program. - Identify teaching tips for each program. - Demonstrate the steps of discrimination training. - Demonstrate the left to right visual work system. - Identify the types of generalization. - Identify play activities to incorporate into your teaching.
Activities: Watch video clips of specific programs and specific teaching methods/strategies; Lecture; Question and answer; In vivo practice of teaching methodologies/strategies.
Audience: Parents and professional who want to learn about the curriculum and methodologies to teach a young child with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Sign Language to Hearing Children and Adults with Developmental Disabilities, Including Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Waldorf (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. & Associates), TROY A. FRY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. & Associates)
Description: Many children and adults with developmental disabilities, including autism, do not communicate using spoken words. At the present time, the most popular alternative communication response form includes selecting pictures. This workshop provides participants with a "new" look at the advantages and disadvantages of sign language, demonstrations of learners using signs, and practice teaching learners sign mands, tacts, and intraverbals.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe the importance of the echoic repertoire. - Decide when an alternative communication response form � signing, pictures, or augmentative devices � is necessary. - Describe the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative communication response forms. - Describe and implement effective procedures for teaching sign mands. - Transfer sign mands to tacts and intraverbals. - Collect data while teaching sign mands, tacts, and intraverbals. - Adjust teaching procedures when common problems occur in teaching sign mands, tacts, and intraverbals.
Activities: This workshop will provide written descriptions, videotape and live demonstrations, and practice activities for participants.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes teachers, behavior analysts, and others who work with children and adults with developmental disabilities, including autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Incorporating Generalization and Maintenance into Skill Acquisition Programming for Learners with Autism and Related Disorders
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Boulevard B (2nd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Private practice)
Description: Educators and other providers are often faced with situations in which the skills of learners with autism and related disorders do not generalize or maintain over time. Many providers fail to recognize the steps they should be taking to promote generalization and maintenance; nonetheless, the field of applied behavior analysis possesses a framework and a number of methods that can be implemented to circumvent these challenges. During this workshop, the various forms of generalization (stimulus, response, and temporal generalization) will be described along with specific methods that may increase the likelihood that generalization will be observed. Efforts to address generalization and maintenance need to be individualized for each learner, tailored to the target skill, and planned for in a systematic manner. More specifically, methods will be presented that can be incorporated at three broad phases in the teaching process, during treatment planning and prior to the initial teaching of a target skill, during the process of teaching the particular target skill, and after the target skill is mastered. A model for determining how best to maintain target skills after they are mastered will also be offered.
Learning Objectives: After this workshop, participants will be able to: - Differentiate the various types of generalization. - Recognize common obstacles that impede generalization and maintenance. - Design and implement a variety of strategies to promote generalization. - Design and implement a variety of strategies to promote maintenance. - Recognize learner and task characteristics that will inform when such strategies could be implemented. - Evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to promote generalization and maintenance.
Activities: Although workshop is primarily didactic, participants will be given many opportunities to engage in discussion and will participate in tasks that will concretize and synthesize the didactic information and increase the likelihood of later implementation. Videotape vignettes of teaching interactions will be provided to illustrate an array of generalization and maintenance strategies. Data collection tools and tracking forms relevant to generalization and maintenance will also be shared along with a bibliography of articles related to generalization. Examples will be provided throughout the presentation and adapted to the interests and needs of the participants.
Audience: This workshop will benefit professionals from a variety of disciplines, as well as parents who are significantly involved in the educational programming of learners with autism and related disorders. Participants should be familiar with behavior analytic teaching procedures, such as discrete trial instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
ACT in the Treatment of Chronic Illness: Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Diabetes, Burn-Out
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4K (4th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: JoAnne Dahl, Ph.D.
JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden), TOBIAS LUNDGREN (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Description: This workshop will illustrate, exemplify, roll play and have practical exercises around the ACT treatment model and its applications to chronic illness in general and specifically in the areas of chronic pain, epilepsy, diabetes and burn-out. Participants will go away with a theoretical orientation, insight and practical skills for applying ACT in individual, or group clinical work.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Obtain a theoretical conceptualisation of the ACT model in the treatment of chronic illness - Obtain an ACT conceptualisation of the actual process of getting stuck in a chronic illness. - Practice applications of ACT techniques of Acceptance - Practice applications of ACT techniques of identifying the context of values - Practice applications of ACT techniques of diffusion . - Practice applications of ACT functional analysis of language. - Practice applications of ACT exposure - Practice application of ACT commitment in a group.
Activities: Role play, group exercises for values, diffusion, acceptance and commitment.
Audience: Everyone working in the area of chronic illness
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Radical Behaviorism and the Counseling Process: Constructional Bones, Solution-Focused Flesh
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4L (4th floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jack Keith Williams, Ph.D.
JACK KEITH WILLIAMS (University of Waterloo)
Description: This workshop has been continually revised to reflect the emergence of methods that are consistent with a goal-directed, competency-oriented approach to counseling/psychotherapy. Elements of a radical behavioral viewpoint will be related to practices, strategies, and concepts involved in helping others. The aim is to help provide attendees who are interested in and/or familiar with radical behaviorism with the ability to begin using this perspective when working with clients. It will also be of interest to those with a counseling background who wish to explore how counseling approaches are related to a radical behavioral perspective. The workshop will consist of five components: a review of pertinent features of a radical behavioral viewpoint, the relationship to counseling/psychotherapeutic practices and strategies, a description of the basic components of a constructional approach, illustrations of these components(including video, and exercises to facilitate acquisition of these skills and perspective (with take-home material to facilitate continued practice).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will understand: - Basic aspects of radical behavioral conceptual analysis and their relationship to counselling approaches. - The importance and usefulness of maintaining a radical-behavioral semantic framework and eschewing creeping/tempting mentalistic cognitivism. - The importance of working within a goal-directed framework as opposed to a traditional categorical diagnostic system. - The basic outlook and repertoire of constructional/solution-focused skills. - How these skills reflect a different perspective on client situations than do other approaches. - The skills in use and as they have been used in client situations. - Trial and practice of constructional skills to enable participants to begin developing a constructional repertoire. - Timing and choice of skills in client situations.
Activities: Teaching activities include: presentation of conceptual and practical material, self-testing of the acquisition of this material, illustration of the skills and their application, practice in using basic constructional skills via exercises and role-play, discussion of participants� application questions.
Audience: Practitioners, prospective practitioners, and others who see the world from a radical behavioral perspective and wish to develop counseling practices consistent with this perspective.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: Assessment & Treatment from a Behavioral Perspective
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Boulevard A (2nd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Many children with developmental disabilities and children in the child welfare system develop several of the symptoms of various childhood psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, bipolar disorder and reactive attachment disorder, due to early abuse/neglect, multiple placements and multiple caregivers. Differential diagnosis becomes a critical issue in providing appropriate treatment and services for these children and their families. However, these children are often diagnosed based on behavior exhibited during office visits and personality assessment instruments with questionable reliability and validity. Additionally, the treatment focus follows the medical model with the assumption that behavioral symptoms are the result of underlying psychopathology. Behavior analysts are in a unique position to provide more comprehensive diagnosis that includes observations of behavior in a variety of settings to determine the effect of various stimulus conditions and setting events, functional assessments to determine the causes and maintainers of various behavioral symptoms, and careful analysis of learning histories to determine the efficacy of various reinforcers and punishers. Behavior analysts are also able to provide assessment-driven treatment approaches, to design therapeutic environments that support the learning of appropriate replacement behaviors and to facilitate typical development rather than psychopathology.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Explain the differences between the medical and behavioral approaches to the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of psychopathology in children. - Name some of the symptoms used in the differential diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder & reactive attachment disorder. - Describe the unique learning histories of children with psychiatric disorders and how feelings serve as establishing operations in these children. - Tell why children with this learning history often are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, and conduct disorder in different developmental stages of their lives. - Name some of the antecedents, behaviors and consequences that are unique in children with psychiatric diagnoses. - Describe how to provide assessment-driven treatment and target specific behaviors that are unique in children with psychiatric diagnoses. - Explain why structuring and nurturing are necessary components of effective treatments and give examples of how to provide these components.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories, take notes, ask questions, view a power point presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Improve Work Performance: The Behavior of Individuals, Work Processes, and Organizations
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
5H (5th floor)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John Austin, Ph.D.
JOHN AUSTIN (Western Michigan University), JOSEPH R. SASSON (Florida State University)
Description: This workshop will guide participants through various concepts of performance improvement at all levels of the organization. The strategies presented will assist attendees with the tasks of performance analysis and improvement at the organization, process, and human performance levels. This workshop is appropriate for those who conduct human performance improvement activities in organizational settings, as well owners/operators of small companies or administrators/managers in human services facilities. Participants should come prepared with an actual performance problem from their organization that they would like to work through during the session.
Learning Objectives: By the end of the workshop participants should (be able to): - Identify factors that affect their organization�s performance. - Know a collection of strategies to address organizational problems. - Identify factors that can affect process performance using tools such as process mapping. - Know a collection of strategies that they can use to improve the way work is performed in their organization. - Identify the factors affecting human performance in the workplace. - Know a collection of strategies that they can use to improve human performance. - Understand the systematic processes involved with targeting the actual cause of a performance problem, and matching the actual cause with the appropriate solution. - Understand the relationship between all three of the levels of performance and how factors at each level are interdependent.
Activities: The workshop will involve lecture on OBM content, group exercises, and discussions among participants.
Audience: Managers, supervisors, executives, faculty, in any area, including human services and business and industry.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: BACB
Verbal Foundations for Academic Success in School
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4M (4th floor)
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), ELIZABETH HAUGHTON (Haughton Learning Center), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy)
Description: This workshop will focus upon the visual and auditory skills and the language and knowledge repertoires that learners need in order to learn to read, write, think, reason, and solve academic problems in school. Six research and evidenced based curriculum and methods will be presented, one per hour. The first method, phonological coding, prepares students to make the auditory discriminations necessary to learn phonics and word attack skills. The second method, Rapid Automatic Naming (RAN) builds visual discrimination and rate and prepares students to build reading fluency. Third, students need to learn the typical language that teachers use during early academic instruction. We will present a set of terms and phrases and Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching methods to teach these. Fourth, we will teach you a method for teaching students to retell familiar events from their lives, such as making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, riding a bicycle or tricycle, and other simple directions to follow. The primary goal of the retelling method is to teach verbal description and sequencing skills that do not relie on gestures or other verbal support to communicate. The fifth method is called sentence combining. Through combining short phrases and sentences students can learn all variations of sentence syntax. The method can also be extended to teach the mechanics and other conventions of writing sentences. The sixth area concerns the conventional vocabulary and knowledge that teachers assume students have learned by the time they reach the primary grades. We will introduce the Core Knowledge curriculum for Kindergarten and first grade. We teach you how to use Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching to teach each of the 6 repertoires described above. Workshop participants will receive a minimal amount of materials to allow them to participate in practice exercises. We encourage you to purchase Morningside's Early Learning Essentials three-ring binder available in the ABA Bookstore for $60. It includes all the materials we will present in our slide shows, as well as articles and sample teaching materials which will allow you to implement immediately upon your return home. Your workshop experience will also be enhanced if you purchase this notebook in the ABA Bookstore before you attend the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Practice teaching auditory sensory behavior with phonological coding materials and methods. - Practice teaching visual sensory behavior with Rapid Automatic Naming (RAN) materials and methods. - Practice teaching language of instruction and following directions. - Practice teaching learners to retell what they know. - Practice teaching sentence syntax and conventions with sentence combining materials and methods. - Practice teaching assumed vocabulary and knowledge necessary for school with Core Knowledge materials and methods. - Understand the research and evidence upon which these 6 methodologies were derived.
Activities: One hour will be devoted to each of the 6 research-based methods. During each hour a method will be described and modeled. Prerequisite skills necessary to learn each of the 6 skills will also be discussed. Then workshop participants will break into small groups and practice using each method to teach other members of their group. Morningside consultants will provide coaching during your practice sessions.
Audience: Teachers, behavior therapists, behavior specialists and others who work with clients who need extra support in the primary grades in school, or who working with clients who are being prepared to enter a school setting. Staff development trainers and college professors who teach teachers and behavior therapists to work with clients who show academic promise will also be interested in this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Advanced Level Skills to Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Astoria (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kim D. Lucker Greene, Ph.D.
CHERISH TWIGG (Private practice), HOLLY R. KIBBE (Establishing Operations, Inc.), KIM D. LUCKER GREENE (Behavior Management Consultants, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed for providers of applied behavior analysis services to children with autism. It will focus on teaching advanced skills such as mands for information, answering novel intraverbal questions, initiating and maintaining conversation, as well as peer socialization and independent play skills. Video examples will be used to demonstrate recommended procedures. It is recommended that the participants are familar with and bring a copy of the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (Partington & Sundberg, 1998). An understanding of verbal operants such as mands, tacts, and intraverbals is strongly recommended prior to attending this workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will know: - How to contrive motivation for information in order to teach mands for information. - Steps to teach children with autism to answer novel intraverbal questions of all types (e.g. Why, How, When, etc) - What prerequisite skills are necessary before teaching conversation skills and how to teach conversation when ready. - The importance of and procedures to teach manding for the attention of others. - How to teach advanced tacting skills such as pronouns, prepositions, emotions and composite tacting. - Helpful procedures to teach advanced receptive skills such as following multiple step directions. - Steps to increase peer socialization. - Steps to increase appropriate play skills.
Activities: Workshop activities will include modeling of procedures as well as video examples. Participants will practice developing lesson plans to incorporate procedures discussed during the workshop.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are parents and professionals who deliver behavioral services to children with autism. Knowledge of the verbal operants is recommended prior to attending.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Language Training for Children with Autism & Related Disorders
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
4A (4th floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jonathan J. Tarbox, M.A.
MARLA SALTZMAN (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.), JONATHAN J. TARBOX (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.), RACHEL S. F. TARBOX (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.), DOREEN GRANPEESHEH (Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Inc.)
Description: One of the primary objectives in teaching young children with autism is to establish and maintain verbal repertoires. Discrete trial (DTT) language training has been found effective in teaching a variety of language forms (e.g., object labels, prepositions, size concepts, etc.) of varying levels of complexity but has faced limitations in terms of application of skills learned to a variety of everyday settings. Other instructional procedures such as incidental teaching and natural environment training (NET) overcame some of these shortcomings by contributing a free operant approach to language instruction, yielding higher rates of spontaneous verbal behavior. However, employing both DTT and incidental teaching / NET procedures within the framework of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior provides the advantage of outlining all of the functional relationships involved in training a complete language repertoire. This workshop will present CARD's beginning and intermediate level language curriculum and demonstrate how several verbal operants (e.g., echoic, mand, tact, & intraverbal) can be established using the procedures described above.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Demonstrate basic language intervention skills to train impure and pure echoics - Demonstrate basic language intervention skills to train impure and pure mands - Demonstrate basic language intervention skills to train impure and pure tacts - Demonstrate basic language intervention skills to train tact-intraverbals and pure intraverbals - Discriminate between impure and pure verbal operants and understand the relevance of this distinction in building functional, spontaneous language in children with autism - Identify which of Skinner's verbal operants is being taught in videotaped teaching procedures & the relevance of a functional classification of language - Select appropriate data collection systems when teaching spontaneous language (e.g., pure mands & tacts)
Activities: The instructors will present the training objectives through lecture, videotaped examples, and practice exercise.
Audience: Parents and professionals working with children with autism and related disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: BACB
Instrumentation and Programming for the Operant Laboratory
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Boulevard C (2nd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Steven I. Dworkin, Ph.D.
STEVEN I. DWORKIN (University of North Carolina, Wilmington), KARL ZURN (MED Associates, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide a presentation of the behavioral equipment and research paradigms currently being utilized in operant psychology research. The presentation will be followed by instruction on the design and use of Med associates hardware and software programming tutorials for MED-PC IV.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will (be able to): - Learn about equipment that is available for operant research. - Understand the basics of equipment design. - Understand basics of laboratory design and setup. - Have knowledge of the software that is available for operant research. - Have hands-on experience on experience with equipment. - Write a simple program in MED-PC IV. - Work on specific applications for individual laboratories.
Activities: Power point presentation; Demonstrations; Workbook; Programming; Program Testing.
Audience: Anyone interested in setting up a new operant laboratory or updating an existing Operant laboratory.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Formal Sequential Program for Shaping Personnel Skills in Educational Programs Serving Children with Special Needs
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Private Dining Room 1 (3rd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Beth Sulzer-Azaroff, Ph.D.
BETH SULZER-AZAROFF (Browns Group, Naples), MARTIN J. POLLACK (Private practice)
Description: The pool of personnel skilled in the applied practice of behavior analysis in programs for children with special needs is limited. Even those capable of "talking the talk" of ABA may insufficiently have mastered the capability of "walking the walk." In this workshop, we will present a program that behavior analysts associated with organizations serving children with special needs will be able to used to guide trainees step by step along the path toward competent applied skills. Attendees will receive a sample copy of a printed manual to take to their home sites.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Say why guided and reinforced practice is essential to preparing skilled personnel within applied settings. - Identify instructional objectives of relevance to the personnel they hope to train. - Sketch out a plan for designing and implementing that training. - List a set of methods for assessing the effectiveness of their procedures.
Activities: Overview of objectives; Case examples; Audience contributions of case examples; Step by step sequence of 15 units designed to support trainee progress; Participant plans to introduce at local program; Evaluate learning and satisfaction.
Audience: Behavior analysts concerned with promoting skills of personnel employed within their organizations or those coordinating and/or supervising students in practicum or internship settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB
Teaching a Behavioral Child Development Coure: The Whats and Hows
Friday, May 27, 2005
10:00 AM–1:00 PM
Private Dining Room 3 (3rd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Gary D. Novak, Ph.D.
GARY D. NOVAK (California State University, Stanislaus), MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University)
Description: This workshop will prepare you to teach an undergraduate course in child development from a behavior analytic perspective. Basic concepts of a behavioral systems approach to development based on the authors' textbook will be covered. Methods for proposing, organizing and teaching a course will be included.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Explain the basic principles of a behavioral systems approach to child development. - Write a course proposal/syllabus for a behavioral child development course. - Take a chapter from the book and write learning objectives for a unit of a child development course. - Identify the pedagogical approach that you will take in teaching a course.
Activities: Participants will be given a set of chapter objectives related to the textbook as models. They will be asked to generate their own set of objectives for one chapter. These will be discussed and critiqued. They will create sample quiz questions based on the objectives they create. They will create a syllabus for their own course in child development that can be used as part of a course proposal process. Finally, they will discuss methods that would be relevant to their own teaching situation.
Audience: Graduate students, full-time and part-time faculty interested in teaching a course in child development from a behavioral perspective. Both those who have or have not yet taught a developmental course are welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Generalization Promotion in Education and Human Services
Friday, May 27, 2005
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Private Dining Room 1 (3rd floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Pamela G. Osnes, Ph.D.
PAMELA G. OSNES (The Ohio State University)
Description: This workshop will present the generalization promotion strategies of Stokes and Baer (1977) and Stokes and Osnes (1989). Participants will compare and contrast the strategies described in each paper, and will discuss application to their work in school and human services settings. Each generalization-promotion strategy will be analyzed individually, and will be discussed in the context of the participants' education and intervention planning. Both the presenter and the participants will provide examples of interventions for analysis in terms of their abilities to promote (or inhibit) generalization. Challenges to generalization-promotion will be described, and participants will provide programming alternatives to address obstacles they have encountered in their work.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe, compare, and contrast the generalization-promotion strategies of Stokes and Baer (1977) and Stokes and Osnes (1989). - Analyze intervention examples provided by the presenter and from their own work to determine the generalization-promotion methods in each. - Describe obstacles to generalization-promotion that occur in practice. - Generate generalization-promotion strategies when given intervention examples. - Suggest modifications to intervention plans to enhance their generalization-promotion capabilities.
Activities: Participants will receive copies of the generalization promotion strategies in Stokes and Baer (1977) and Stokes and Osnes (1989). Using these, they will analyze each strategy individually. Given intervention examples by the presenter, they will analyze the interventions and identify the generalization-promotion strategies inherent in each and any obstacles for generalization-promotion that are apparent. Participants will provide intervention examples from their work in schools and human services for analysis and problem solving to determine ways to plan intervention to enhance generalization capabilities.
Audience: Behavior analysts, human services providers, educators, parents, and other individuals who plan and implement behavior intervention plans.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Case Studies in Ethics in Intellectual Disabilities
Friday, May 27, 2005
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Private Dining Room 3 (3rd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: R. M. (Duke) Schell, Ph.D.
R. M. (DUKE) SCHELL (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: Most discussions of ethics in the practice of psychology and/or behavior analysis focus on the misconduct of the professional providing services. Behavior analysis, as a methodological perspective, tends to be distanced from ethical issues because it is a science-based approach, but it is not immune from personal and cultural contingencies that create unethical behavior. This workshop will focus on the everyday ethical behaviors of clinicians that enhance habilitation and life quality of those served through discussions of cases that involve ethical dilemmas.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe how the historical concepts of ethics, values, morals are viewed by behavior analysis. - Determine everyday behaviors of clinicians that can be viewed as ethical or unethical and also those behaviors that are less readily placed at either end of the continuum. - Describe how the dimensions of behavior analysis can be used to reinforce ethical behavior. - Review and analyze their behavior and the culture of their clinical setting to recognize where ethical issues may arise and how to resolve them.
Activities: A brief review of historical information will be followed by casebook-style discussions based on experiences of the presenters as well as composite examples that raise ethical issues. Participants are encouraged to bring their own case histories for discussion with the group.
Audience: People involved in the development and supervision of behavioral teaching and treatment procedures and applied research with people with mental retardation and related disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB
Using Excel for Graphing Behavior and Academic Performance of Individuals in Applied Settings
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Private Dining Room 1 (3rd floor)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bryan J. Davey, M.Ed.
DONALD M. STENHOFF (Utah State University), BRYAN J. DAVEY (Utah State University)
Description: Visual display of data in single-subject research is imperative when communicating quantitative relationships and behavior patterns to consumers and fellow practitioners. Excel is an application that allows practitioners and consumers to create spreadsheets and graphical displays. Excel graphs convey effect across various single-subject designs (e.g., multiple-baseline, alternating treatment, reversal, cumulative record). While Excel can be difficult to navigate and master, this workshop will provide participants with hands on training promoting effective use. Workshop mini lessons include how to setup spreadsheets and input data sets, chart wizard navigation, graph construction of all data or select data sets within a spreadsheet, manipulation of graph components (e.g., axes, data labels, phase change lines), and updating data sets and graphs. Instructors will provide several models, followed by opportunities for participants to practice skills with feedback. Throughout the workshop instructors will explain and demonstrate the subtle nuances of Excel. These tips allow for easier Excel navigation and enhance the graphical presentation. Additionally, workshop instructors will provide an Excel CD tutorial that will continue to guide participants in future Excel projects. Participants are required to bring a laptop with the Excel application and strongly encouraged to bring their own data sets to graph during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Set up measurement specific spreadsheets, input data sets, and manipulate data sets within an Excel spreadsheet. - Create graphs for alternating treatment, reversal, multiple-baseline designs, and cumulative records. - Use the chart wizard, construct graphs of all data or select data sets within a spreadsheet, and update databases and graphs as data collection continues. - Manipulate graph components (e.g., axes, data points, data paths, secondary axis), and use drawing tools to insert additional components (e.g., arrows, data labels, phase change lines, boxes).
Activities: Participants will be provided concise instruction and several models, followed by two case examples completed with instructor support to ensure skill acquisition. Finally, participants will complete a comprehensive case example that provides opportunities for participants to solve challenges inherent in the Excel application. The comprehensive case example will consolidate and increase fluency of the skills taught during the instructional phase of the workshop. Additionally, participants will be encouraged to bring questions in regard to previous Excel experiences.
Audience: Practitioners, students, researchers, educational service providers, and others interested in visual display of data in single-subject research and program progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB
Overview of Standard Celeration Charting
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Williford A (3rd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
CLAY M. STARLIN (University of Oregon), ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Learning Center), MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HENRY S. PENNYPACKER (University of Florida), JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
Description: This workshop will teach participants to read and chart human performance on the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). Participants will learn: important features of the chart, the rationale for monitoring performance frequencies, standard SCC conventions, how to chart performance across varying lengths of counting time, and how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The presenters will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of setting to illustrate key concept taught in the workshop. Examples from the areas of university teaching, intervention with children with autism, educational intervention with students with learning disabilities, general public school education, and the monitoring of private events will be used. All participants will receive a copy of all materials used in the workshop including a CD-ROM containing additional copies of the presentation materials, forms, example videos, and an animation-based tutorial.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Read human performance data charted on all versions of the SCC. - Chart human performance data charted on all versions of the SCC. - Describe data on the SCC in terms of its frequency (level), celeration (trend), and bounce (variability). - Describe performance management systems helpful in maintaining consistent use of the SCC in clinical and educational settings.
Activities: Applying principles derived from behavior analysis of well-designed instruction, our world-class group of workshop presenters will use a range of activities to ensure participants learn the key skills targeted in the objectives. Participants will engage in choral responding and paced practice, timed practice on key concepts and skills, and both small and large group discussion.
Audience: Anyone seeking an introduction (or refresher!) to Standard Celeration Charting, including those persons interested in using the SCC to improve their own teaching or clinical practice, as well as individuals planning to take the BACB examination.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Too Many Children, Not Enough Time: Teaching Others to Provide Intensive Behavior Therapy to Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Williford B (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Colin Peeler, Ph.D.
COLIN PEELER (Florida State University)
Description: In 1987, Lovaas published the results of the UCLA Young Autism Project, in which 47% of the children receiving intensive behavior therapy (IBT) were mainstreamed into regular education classrooms. Since then there has been an ever increasing demand for well trained therapists that has exceeded the supply. Unfortunately, because of this the quality or quantity of services these children receive is typically below the standard and as such their gains are not maximized. However, it is possible through better training and supervision (i.e., better consultation) behavior analysts can teach almost anyone how to provide quality behavioral services and thereby increase the quantity and quality of therapy a child receives. This workshop will focus on three main sets of skills essential to achieving this outcome: basic therapy skills, consultation skills, and training skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe findings from the literature on IBT as a treatment for Autism - Identify critical components of an IBT program that are associated with improved outcomes - Describe funding/training issues and how they impact one�s ability to implement the most effective IBT program - Describe the sequence of training events to maximize the effectiveness of a new therapist working with a child with Autism - Describe the 10 Basic Therapist Skills for working with a child with Autism and correctly score them from videotapes - Learn basic consultation skills each therapist should know that will improve the consistency and efficacy of the therapy across therapists - Describe how to supervise and manage a team of therapists within current funding issues
Activities: In the first hour the presenter will focus on the difference between best practice as defined by the literature and actual practice as it is affected by training and funding issues. In the second hour the presenter will focus on the key skills all therapists should know and how to assess and train them. In the third hour the presenter will focus on how to efficiently supervise an in home program given a limited amount of time to do so. Video examples will be used throughout.
Audience: Behavior analysts, parents looking to set up and manage an in home program, autism program directors or consultants, autism therapists, direct care staff, teachers and school personnel.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evaluating the Efficacy of Autism Programs: Making Evidence Based Decisions
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Private Dining Room 3 (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Suzanne Letso, M.A.
SUZANNE LETSO (Connecticut Center for Child Development), ERICA ROEST (Connecticut Center for Child Development)
Description: Until recently, parents and professionals where faced with the task of single handedly creating a applied behavior analytic program for a child in need of educational services. Today, a host of programs and services are available throughout the country in both public and private settings. The more challenging question now is to determine whether or not any particular program is actually based on the educational principals of applied behavior analysis, or not. Secondarily, parents and professionals need to assess whether the potential behavioral services and learning environments are appropriate to meet the specific needs of a given child. This workshop will provide information and resources to assist parents and professionals making educational placement decisions. Key programmatic components, environmental considerations, and staff competencies will be discussed. Methods of collecting data to support the decision making process will be described, and samples provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will have learned: - A general description of behavior analytic services for children with autism encompassing a wide range of environments will be provided. - Availability of assessment tools to determine a particular student�s readiness for active participation in different learning environments. - Basic program criteria including credentials of staff, staffing ratios, training, supervision, and access to peers and the community. - To create a customized check-list of critical features in relation to a student�s individual educational needs.
Activities: Didactic lecture, group discussion and guided notes will be utilized. Handouts will include identification of additional resources, sample data collection systems, and sample IEP objectives.
Audience: Behavior analysts, school administrators, or other educational service providers working in applied settings with individuals with autism or related disorders. Participants should have knowledge of applied behavior analysis and autism treatment.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
ABA-Based Supported School Inclusion of Young Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Williford C (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joel P. Hundert, Ph.D.
JOEL P. HUNDERT (Behaviour Institute), NICOLE WALTON-ALLEN (Behaviour Institute)
Description: Much of the movement of the inclusion of children with autism in regular educational settings based on laudable principles that address why inclusion should occur. Not as much attention has been focused on developing and evaluating procedures to make inclusion for children with autism effective. Numerous studies have indicated that placement of children with disabilities with typically developing children in a regular educational setting, is insufficient by itself, to produce significant gains in social or academic adjustment. Skills and behaviors associated with success in an inclusive setting need to be purposely taught, using systematic interventions feasible to implement in a regular educational setting. This workshop will present ABA-based interventions associated with gains in children with autism in the following areas associated with survival skills for children with autism in inclusive educational settings: a) the ability to follow school routines independently; b) the ability to communicate independently; c) the ability to initiate and sustain reciprocal peer interaction; d) the ability to learn in group instruction; e) the ability to complete seatwork activities independently; and, f) the display of low levels of problem behaviours that interfere with learning (e.g., stereotypy, disruptive behavior, aggression).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe key points of the outcome literature on supported inclusion with children with autism. - Apply a rating form to hypothetical case examples of children with autism in regular class environments. - Describe alternative strategies associated with having children with autism participate in group instruction and apply those strategies to hypothetical case examples. - Describe alternative strategies associated with teaching children with autism to interact with peers and apply those strategies to hypothetical case examples. - Describe alternative strategies associated with teaching children with autism to follow school routines independently and apply those strategies to hypothetical case examples. - Describe alternative strategies associated with teaching children with autism to communicate and apply those strategies to hypothetical case examples. - Describe alternative strategies associated with teaching children with autism to complete seatwork assignments independently and apply those strategies to hypothetical case examples. - Describe how to set-up a collaborative school-parent team.
Activities: Participants will receive written material and exercises on such interventions as prompting and reinforcement procedures of teacher assistants, priming of group participation, peer-based strategies of teaching social skill in regular schools, curriculum-embedded instruction, adapted incidental language instruction, and school-parent collaborative teams. Concepts and strategies of ABA-based supported inclusion will be presented using didactic instruction. Participants will clarify points raised in the workshop and apply the skills covered to exercises based on videotapes and case study information. Handouts will be provided on the content of the presentation.
Audience: This workshop is intended for individuals who work with children with autism in school settings, including teachers and psychologists. It would be particularly applicable to individual who consultant on children with autism and their inclusion in schools.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB
Data Collection and Analysis Using Computer Technology: Hands-On Discrete and Sequential Applications of the BEST System
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Astoria (3rd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), DANIEL W. BALDERSON (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc)
Description: The workshop will provide hands on application of a sophisticated software package designed to collect and analyze discrete and time-based behavioral data. The program is particularly useful to advanced graduate students and behavioral psychologists interested in analyzing complex configurations of behaviors which are emitted at high rates, oftentimes overlap in time, and which are context dependent. Discussion includes an introduction to (a) recommended procedures when collecting time-based data in the live setting and from videotape records, and (b) computer generated discrete and sequential descriptions, graphic and statistical analyses, and reliability comparisons of discrete and sequential data. Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the complete software package on CD ROM, and a .pdf file summary copy of a compatible research methods text published by Sage Publications as a function of workshop participation. *While some computer hardware will be provided, it is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with software-based data collection and analysis competencies, including the ability to (a) construct and apply systemic observation systems, (b) generate a time-based behavioral record using an inclusive overlapping category system, (c) perform traditional and sequential analyses using multiple measurement methodologies and interpret Z score transformations, (d) create and edit graphic data representations and apply relevant visual and statistical analyses, (e) conduct reliability and treatment fidelity analyses, and (f) apply a variety of data record edit and merge functions when operating with complex multiple event category systems. At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Discuss in conceptual and applied ways the principles and practice of discrete and sequential behavior analysis methods. - Apply a range of computer-based data collection, reliability, and measurement techniques to their particular behavior analysis interests. - Understand and apply a range of computer-based descriptive and statistical data analysis techniques in relation to discrete and sequential measurement sets. - Construct a variety of behavior graphs and apply appropriate analysis techniques to the graph types covered.
Activities: Activities include (a) review of traditional behavior analysis recording methods, (b) introduction to, and hands on application of, a computer-based package designed to enhance behavior analyses of complex interactive settings, and (c) detailed hands-on demonstration of data collection features, discrete and sequential analysis capabilities, within and across data-file graphic representations, and a variety of reliability, treatment fidelity, and data manipulation and editing functions.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in experimental and applied settings who are interested in research and development related to the interactive nature of behavior in situations where study of multiple behaviors and events, multiple participants, and changing setting variables are present. Those working in educational and social science settings and who are challenged with how to describe and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary software particularly appealing to a wide range of research and assessment applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: BACB
Improve Your Oral Presentations
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Lake Ontario (8th floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ned Carter, Ph.D.
NED CARTER (Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions), THOMAS E. BOYCE (Center for Behavioral Safety, LLC), KENNETH NILSSON (Behavior Analysis Group, Sweden)
Description: Oral presentations play an essential role in individual success in both the public and private sectors. The workshop content is based on detailed practical analyses of speaker and audience behavior. Truly effective speakers conduct a dialogue with their audience, preparing themselves to control and to be controlled by their audience. This workshop will assist participants in identifying variables initiating and maintaining audience attention, interest and participation. Emphasis is placed on using the principles of behavior analysis, particularly the analysis of verbal behavior, to improve speaker behavior. The workshop has been offered annually since 1999 and the majority of attendees have rated the workshop as excellent.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify high probability audience behaviors and requests. - Use multiple techniques to initiate and promote audience participation. - Dealing with situations such as stage fright, "losing your place" and aggressive questioning. - Identify and control extraneous stimuli in order to maximize audience attention.
Activities: The workshop is interactive and active participation is encouraged. Techniques for creating better overheads, PowerPoint slides and presentation figures will be described. Participants will take part in a series of exercises and structured role-play sessions. Course content will be adapted to the interests of participants.
Audience: Behavior analysts who desire to improve their presentation skills at meetings, conferences and in teaching. The workshop is appropriate for both novices and experienced public speakers. Participants are encouraged to bring real-life examples for use in role-playing exercises.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Instructional Curricula for Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Private Dining Room 2 (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel Cohen-Almeida, M.A.
DANIEL COHEN-ALMEIDA (Melmark New England), JAMES T. ELLIS (Melmark New England), BRIAN C. LIU-CONSTANT (Melmark New England)
Description: Intensive educational services for children with autism require instructional curricula that are individualized to each learner, adapted to the teaching environment, minimize errors, and incorporate the collection of meaningful objective data to evaluate progress. Workshop participants will review stimulus control and discrimination learning principles, errorless prompting strategies, curriculum components and organization, and data collection systems. Particular emphasis will be placed on adapting curricula to fit the students learning style and the learning environment. Examples will be provided for teaching academic, communication, and social skills in one-to-one, inclusion, and home-based settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Identify basic stimulus control and discrimination learning principles. - Identify the components of systematic instructional curricula - Identify instructional strategies and prompting methods - Write 2 instructional curricula (given case study examples)
Activities: Interactive Lecture, Group Discussion, Video review, Case Studies
Audience: Introductory/Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Verbal and Pictorial Preference Assessments
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Marquette (3rd floor)
Area: PRA/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard B. Graff, M.S.
RICHARD B. GRAFF (New England Center for Children), THERESA M. CLEVENGER (New England Center for Children)
Description: Identifying effective reinforcers is crucial for skill acquisition and reduction of challenging behavior for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. Although many different types of stimulus preference assessments have been developed and refined over the past 15 years, most of these methods involve exposing an individual to tangible stimuli and measuring approach responses to or duration of engagement with stimuli. Unfortunately, this makes it difficult to assess preferences for large stimuli or community-based activities. In this workshop, participants will learn about two methods to assess these types of stimuli, verbal paired stimulus (VPS) and pictorial paired stimulus (PPS) preference assessments. First, participants will be taught how to conduct pretests to assess whether the individuals possess the appropriate prerequisite skills. Participants will then be taught how to conduct VPS and PPS assessments, and will practice these techniques with feedback from instructors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Conduct discrimination pretests for VPS and PPS assessments. - Conduct a VPS assessment. - Conduct a PPS assessment. - Generate preference hierarchies based upon the results of VPS and PPS assessments.
Activities: Participants will be instructed on the use of stimulus preference assessments, with particular emphasis placed on the paired stimulus assessment developed by Fisher et al. (1992). Participants will be taught how to conduct discrimination pretests before conducting VPS and PPS assessments. Next, participants will watch instructors conducting VPS and PPS assessments, and each participant will conduct a VPS and a PPS assessment, with feedback provided by instructors. Participants will be taught how to collect preference assessment data, and how to generate preference hierarchies based upon these assessments. All participants will be provided with hard copies of materials and a compact disk that contains all pretests, VPS and PPS protocols, and blank data sheets, which can be used in any applied setting.
Audience: Parents, special education teachers, and professionals who work with individuals with ASD or other developmental disabilities who use positive reinforcement to teach new skills and/or to decrease challenging behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: BACB
Train-to-Code: Using a Software System to Train Behavioral Coding Skills in Students or Staff
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Boulevard B (2nd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Roger D. Ray, Ph.D.
ROGER D. RAY (Rollins College), JESSICA M. RAY (Rollins College)
Description: This workshop introduces a software application, called Train-To-Code, designed to shape behavioral observation and coding skills. Observing behavior is a fundamental part of psychology and at the essence of Behavior Analysis. Yet skills required to be an effective and efficient observer are often under stressed in the process of training and education. Often there is not an efficient way to train reliable behavioral coders in the small amount of time available for staff or student training. This workshop is designed to give participants new ideas on how to conduct sampled and/or sequential descriptive behavioral coding and analysis in a concise manner. Issues in sampling vs continuous coding, sequential analysis, and inter-observer reliability measurement will be discussed. With the aid of this software system, participants will take an active role in constructing a coding scheme and loading it into the software system; will engage in coding a brief video so the file may be used as an expert reference for automated training feedback; and will learn how to access the detailed statistical analysis of behavioral sequences observed in the session. Further, inter-observer reliability scores, as measured by Cohens Kappa, will be demonstrated.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Use software-based shaping procedures to shape observational skills in someone else. - Apply behavioral principles to teach observational techniques in staff training situations - Build a simple behavioral coding scheme to use within the software system. - Link any external digital video file to the software for customizing the coding environment. - Use the four alternative modes of successive approximation to expert coding of a selected video. - Explain unconditional and conditional behavioral probabilities and their meaning to others. - Code and save a sample training file as well as measure the inter-observer reliability between this file and the expert reference file.
Activities: Activities will include an interactive review of observational foundations including methods of sequential analysis; introduction to and detailed use of new software which uses shaping principles to teach observation and coding skills; hands-on experience in creating coding schemes, actually coding behavior via a video, and analyzing session data.
Audience: Teachers and trainers who have a need for teaching others how to reliably identify and describe behavior in various settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Video Modeling to Teach Play to Young Children with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Boulevard C (2nd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: June M. Sanchez, M.Ed.
JUNE M. SANCHEZ (New England Center for Children), REBECCA P. F. MACDONALD (New England Center for Children), KRISTINE WILTZ (New England Center for Children), SHELLY COTA (New England Center for Children), SALLY N. ROBERTS (New England Center for Children)
Description: Play is an important part of a typical childs development and contributes to the acquisition of language and social interaction skills. Children with autism often do not develop play skills. Video modeling has been demonstrated to be an effective procedure to teach a variety of skills. We will review several studies that we have conducted demonstrating the effectiveness of video modeling teaching procedures to teach independent pretend play to children with autism, as well as to teach cooperative play between children with autism and typically developing peers. In addition, we will present data from our most recent work, teaching children to generate novel play using video modeling. Video modeling is now an integral part of our preschool social skills and play curriculum. In this workshop, we will review how to develop scripts using commercially available play sets, create video modeling tapes, and provide video instruction to children with autism. We will also discuss the advantages of this teaching procedure and the technical issues encountered when implementing the procedures. We will also discuss the implications for this technology as an easy and effective strategy for teachers and parents to use to teach play and other skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Define video modeling as a teaching procedure and describe its advantages. - Describe how to teach simple imitative, toy play, pretend play and reciprocal play with a peer using video modeling procedures. - Describe strategies to generate novel play using video modeling procedures. - Describe how to create new individualized play scripts using a variety of commercially available toys.
Activities: The participants will work in small groups to plan and create video modeling play scripts. The participants will first complete planning forms. The participants will consider certain child characteristics such as age, interests/preferences, language skills, fine motor skills, and potentially interfering behaviors to aid them in planning individualized play scripts. The participants will then generate the play actions and verbal statements that make up the play scripts. Finally, the participants will create and act out a video modeling play script using commercially available toys.
Audience: The workshop is designed for educators and consultants currently implementing programs to teach appropriate play skills to children with autism using behaviorally based teaching technologies. Participants should have some knowledge of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Assess Progress in Public School Settings: Data Collection Systems That Anyone Can Use
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
4A (4th floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Cheryl J. Davis, M.Ed.
CHERYL J. DAVIS (New England Center for Children), NICOLE CIOTTI GARDENIER (New England Center for Children), AMY GECKLER (New England Center for Children), JUNE M. SANCHEZ (New England Center for Children)
Description: Data analysis is a fundamental part of Applied Behavior Analysis. This workshop will provide a review of and practical guidelines for observation and measurement procedures in public school settings. The workshop will briefly review identifying and prioritizing target responses and developing operational definitions. A particular emphasis will be placed on selecting appropriate methods for measuring target responses including baseline, treatment and maintenance data collection techniques. Advantages and disadvantages of various measurement methods will be discussed with particular emphasis on selecting the most accurate measurement methods possible given the other responsibilities one has in the public school.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop the participant will be able to: - Identify the skill to be targeted. - Describe appropriate measurement methods based on video-taped samples of behavior. - Describe advantages and disadvantages of various measurement methods for a variety of target responses. - Summarize, interpret, and evaluate data.
Activities: This workshop will emphasize trainee participation in a series of exercises. For identifying the target skill, trainees will generate skills to be taught from video-taped behavior samples and case studies. For measurement methods, trainees will (a) use a variety of measurement methods to record behaviors of varying frequency, duration, and temporal distribution; and (b) evaluate accuracy using sampling methods with varying procedures to measure the same target response. Participants will also summarize and interpret data samples and then practice writing progress reports according to the data summaries.
Audience: This workshop is for clinicians, therapists, teachers, parents, students, and anyone else who would like to collect useful data, who are novel to data collection techniques, or who would like a review of data collection techniques. This workshop is also beneficial for behavior analysts who are preparing to take the board certification examination. The workshop will focus primarily on Task List Content area #7.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Curriculum for Intensive, Early Intervention Program for Children with Autism: The Third Phase
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Boulevard A (2nd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Barbara Metzger, Ph.D.
BARBARA METZGER (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools), ANGELA L. POLETTI (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools)
Description: A curriculum for teaching young children with autism advanced skills will be presented. The curriculum is presented in a flow chart format that specifies the sequence of teaching programs. The curriculum has a heavy emphasis on teaching language and play/social skills. The curriculum also covers imitation/observational learning, school readiness and self-help skills. Incorporating peer play dates and school into a childs program will also be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: - Read the curriculum flow chart to determine the sequence of skills. - Identify the programs of the third phase of the curriculum as well as the overall goal and ideal timeline. - Identify the goal of each program. - Identify potential mistakes for each program. - Identify teaching tips for each program. - Identify play activities to incorporate into your teaching. - Identify strategies for increasing peer play success. - Identify strategies for increasing school success.
Activities: Watch video clips of specific programs and specific teaching methods/strategies; Lecture; Question and answer; In vivo practice of teaching methodologies/strategies.
Audience: Parents and professional who want to learn about the curriculum and methodologies to teach a young child with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Application of OBM Strategies in Service Settings for Individuals with Autism: Promoting Quality Outcomes
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
4D (4th floor)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daphna El-Roy, Ph.D.
DAPHNA EL-ROY (Eden II Programs), JOANNE GERENSER (Eden II Programs)
Description: The past decade has seen a considerable growth in the incidence of autism and a corresponding development of programs serving individuals with autism. While these programs are essential to meet the needs of the autism community, issues of attracting, training and retaining a qualified workforce becomes very difficult. In addition to the competition among programs serving individuals with autism, these agencies must also compete with employment opportunities that are less stressful and less demanding than working with individuals with autism. There have been hundreds of articles and many books published on the effectiveness of using the principles of applied behavior analysis to change behavior. The use of applied behavior analysis has been widely supported for the treatment and education of children with autism. Despite the widespread use of behavioral teaching techniques in the field of special education, few providers apply these same principles to address staff behavior change. Organizational behavior management (OBM), also referred to as Performance Management (PM), is the application of applied behavior analysis to organizational improvement (Abernathy & Harshbarger, 2002). The field of organizational behavior management provides us with an empirically validated, data based framework to impact employee performance, professional development as well as overall organizational health. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an overview of organizational behavior management and how to utilize behavior management techniques to address common issues within the field of human services and more specifically, to programs serving individuals with autism. Topics to be addressed include issues of staff retention and turnover, staff development as well as issues of quality assurance and improvement.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop participants will be able to: - Understand basic principles of organizational Behavior Management as applied to autism service settings. - Apply a variety of assessment techniques to identify program strengths, weaknesses and areas in need of improvement. - Become familiar with components of a quality improvement plan and strategies for implementation. - Become familiar with data collection procedures and strategies for evaluating efficacy of quality improvement efficacy plan.
Activities: Activities include didactic instruction and small group work. Participants will be given various sample plans and assessment tools for review.
Audience: Program administrators, clinical supervisors and other related professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Where Do We Begin? ABA/VB Programming for Children Newly Diagnosed with Autism
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Continental A (1st floor)
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, M.S.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Pennsylvania Verbal Behavior Project)
Description: Children receive the diagnosis of Autism at various ages ranging from under two years to over six years of age. Regardless of the age at diagnosis or the severity of the presenting symptoms, newly diagnosed children need effective, individualized programming started as soon as possible. This workshop will utilize Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior to provide a framework for assessing and programming for a child newly diagnosed with autism or a related disorder. The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (Partington and Sundberg, 1998)will be discussed with an emphasis on the areas of receptive language, vocal and motor imitation, tacts, mands, and intraverbals . Initial programming for children based on ABLLS will then be demonstrated. In addition to providing participants with specific ways to improve positive behaviors such as language, this workshop will also review ABA principles that are used to reduce negative behaviors such as crying and hitting. Through lecture, video examples, and small group activities, the participants will leave with a better understanding of Applied Behavior Analysis utilizing Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior as it relates to beginning programming for children at various points on the autism spectrum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: - Identify three early indicators of autism in young children. - Define and discuss the importance of pairing with reinforcement and mand training for early learners. - Give one example of a receptive skill, a motor imitation skill, a mand, a tact, and an intraverbal. - Name three antecedent and three reactive strategies that may prevent or decrease negative behaviors.
Activities: Lecture, demonstration and discussion; review of video tapes and small group activities.
Audience: Professionals who work with children with autism and related disorders including behavior analysts, speech pathologists, psychologists, special education teachers, administrators, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: BACB
Teaching Thinking and Reasoning Skills with Thinking Aloud Problem Solving (TAPS)
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Lake Erie (8th floor)
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), KRISTINE F. MELROE (Morningside Academy)
Description: We often tell students to think, but many are quite unsure what we mean by that. Analytical skill is often an expected ability or talent, and not directly taught. By analytical ability, most teachers mean the set of thinking and reasoning skills that we use to comprehend literature and textbooks, understand lectures, and apply knowledge to solve problems. Analytical ability is also required to score well on tests such as standardized reading comprehension tests, mathematical aptitude tests, and academic aptitude tests such as the SAT. Analytical skills are also important in invention, discovery, creativity and solving interpersonal communication problems. While acknowledging that these analytical skills are very important, most teachers do not have systematic methods for teaching them. Teachers may encourage analytical thinking, and even demonstrate it now and again in their teaching, but such demonstration and encouragement are always deeply embedded in the context of teaching something new in a social or natural science class, or in math or English literature. So how does one systematically teach analytical skills? In a radical behavior analysis, much of what we call thinking and reasoning involves a private conversation with oneself as a speaker and as a listener and reactor to ones own speaking. These conversation skills can be learned. From a radical behavioral account we can identify key thinking and reasoning repertoires that we can teach to learners in order to teach them analytical skills and improve their skills at figuring out solutions to problems. One powerful method for improving students analytical ability is called TAPS, Thinking Aloud Problem Solving. It was designed by Arthur Whimbey, and further developed by the Morningside instructional design team. It is a direct, logical extension of a radical behavioral account of thinking and reasoning. TAPS directly teaches teachers how to directly teach students analytical thinking skills. It does this by teaching both teachers and students how to verbalize their thinkingtheir observations, thoughts, and decisions as a speaker, their reactions and adjustments as a listener to their own speaking, and how speakers and listeners dialogue. The context for learning these skills may be puzzles and brain teasers, logic problems, mathematical word problems, physics problems, verbal analogy questions, or reading comprehension exercises-- whatever the teacher deems appropriate for their learners. In TAPS, teachers model good talk aloud problem solving, and peers practice with each other in pairs. During their talking out loud, students get feedback from their teacher and peers, and often hear themselves more clearly and provide their own self-corrections. Later, students learn to engage in self-dialogue, at first out loud, and then privately as they become expert reasoners and problem solvers. Our data show that students who learn TAPS in addition to basic academic skills make significantly more gains on standardized tests than students who learn only specific academic skills. Workshop participants will receive a minimal amount of materials to allow them to participate in practice exercises. We encourage you to purchase Morningsides TAPS three-ring binder in the ABA bookstore for $60. It includes all the materials we will present in our slide shows, as well as articles and teaching materials which will allow you to implement TAPS immediately upon your return home. Your workshop experience will be enhanced if you purchase this notebook in the ABA bookstore before you attend the workshop This workshop is offered in honor of Arthur Whimbey, who died this past year. We also have a symposium during the convention to pay tribute to Whimbeys important work in showing that intelligence can be taught.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: - Learn to say and write the speaker, listener, and dialoguing repertoires of TAPS while solving logic and other problems. - Practice the speaker, listener, and dialoguing repertoires of TAPS while solving logic and other problems. - Learn to say and write how to coach others as they practice TAPS. - Practice coaching others as they practice TAPS.
Activities: We will demonstrate the steps we take to teach students the speaker, listener, and dialoguing behaviors involved in reasoning and analytical thinking. We will model and prompt these behaviors, then you will practice them in speaker/listener pairs while solving logic, verbal analogy, and math exercise of all kinds. During your talking aloud, you will get feedback from Morningside consultants as well as your peers. Then you will practice the behavior out loud "in the same skin" and eventually privately. You will also learn how to coach these behaviors.
Audience: All teachers, behavior therapists and specialists, staff trainers, college professors, and others who work with learners who need to improve their analytical skills. Students must have the verbal skills necessary to speak their thinking and reasoning out loud.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Architecture: Designing Individualized Programs for Children with Severe Mental Disabilities
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Lake Huron (8th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sebastien Bosch, Ph.D.
SEBASTIEN BOSCH (California Unified Service Providers), ERIC MAIER (California Unified Service Providers)
Description: We will present and discuss curriculum issues and program development. There, we will introduce the concept of behavioral architecture and its applications for program design. We will demonstrate the process of behavioral profiling and how it can be used to develop IEP and IFSP goals and objectives that will best meet the needs of the client. We will also give basic rules of behavioral architecture based on cumulative-hierarchical learning and behavioral cusps for professionals involved in programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will (be able to): - Practice conducting a behavioral Cusp Assessment. - Conduct a behavioral profile assessment. - Learn/refine their selection of appropriate intervention targets. - Learn/refine their IEP goals writing skills. - Refine their treatment recommendation skills.
Activities: The instructors will present the training objectives through lecture, guided observation and guided practice. The activities will include, (1) completing a Behavioral Cusp Assessment, (2) completing a Repertoire Mapping chart, (3) writing IEP goals, and (4) writing IEP recommendations.
Audience: Parents, therapists, consultants and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavior analytic terms and verbal behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Scientific Approach to Validating Academic Outcomes: A Recipe for Abandoning Cookie Cutter Assessment Practices
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Lake Michigan (8th floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Alison L. Moors, M.A.
ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SUSAN K. MALMQUIST (Malmquist & Associates)
Description: With the recent enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act, school districts and clinicians alike have been forced to look at data collection in a whole new light. The contingencies attached to student progress seem to have shifted, resulting in perceived hardship for many teachers to prove learning has occurred. Moreover, a schools budget may be impacted by the ability to document these performance outcomes in an acceptable fashion. The focus of this workshop will be to illustrate a Behavioral Problem Solving Approach to academic assessment that is consistent with current federal legislation. Topics covered include: 1) how to use a multi-level assessment system, including both summative and formative evaluation; 2) how to make empirically-validated instructional decisions, such as appropriate curriculum placement; and 3) how to demystify the question, How do we prove that no child is left behind?
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: - Describe at least two historical uses of assessment within behavior analytic program models. - Describe at least five common myths of academic assessment methodology. - Describe at least three features of a problem solving approach to assessment. - Describe at least four assessment modules that lead to effective educational programming. - Describe at least two data collection techniques that efficiently report progress using a Behavioral Problem Solving Approach to assessment.
Activities: During this workshop, participants will demonstrate the above outcomes by presenter-led small group activities which illustrate the following skill sets: See an example of a common myth of assessment use/ list the rationale against; See an example of assessment data usage/state whether most or least effective approach; See a set of assessment data/ Write possible problem identification; See a set of assessment data and problem/write at least one example of a curricular solution within the participant�s expertise area; See a scenario utilizing a Behavioral Problem Solving Approach to assessment/describe a possible data collection procedure.
Audience: This is an intermediate level workshop designed for Behavior Analysts, Clinical Psychologists, School Psychologists, Principals, Public School Teachers, and others who work within a service delivery model where assessment data are used to illustrate progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Creating Academic Programs for Children with Autism and Other Disabilities Using Microsoft PowerPoint
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
4C (4th floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: William A. Flood, M.A.
WILLIAM A. FLOOD (May South, Inc.), PAUL W. HEERING (May South, Inc.), STEPHEN T. NORTH (May South, Inc.)
Description: When creating academic programs (school or home-based) for children with Autism and other developmental disabilities, it is challenging to develop programs that are reinforcing to each child. In an effort to find higher reinforcing activities, a greater number of classrooms are using computers for either teaching academic skills or as pure reinforcing activities. Recent advances in technology have allowed for the creation of extremely innovative electronic educational software that many children find reinforcing. Unfortunately, many of these programs are designed for typically developing children and do not use the principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis. This workshop will teach you how to create low-cost academic programs on the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint with the intention of teaching and/or generalizing skills. The workshop will give a basic overview of how to use the program Microsoft PowerPoint. You will learn how to integrate behavioral principles and procedures into the computer program to ensure the most effective teaching. Finally, the instructor will display examples of academic programs created and successfully implemented with children with autism. Participants are encouraged to bring their personal laptops and develop academic programs alongside the instructor.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Operate the basic functions of the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint. - Identify common mistakes from traditional multimedia teaching programs. - Create basic academic programs in PowerPoint. - Integrate behavior principles (e.g., prompting, prompt fading, reinforcement, extinction, etc.) into their academic programs. - Recognize various academic programs (e.g., match-to-sample, receptive object identification, reading comprehension) that can easily be taught with PowerPoint.
Activities: The workshop will begin with a brief lecture about the computer program Microsoft PowerPoint. The remainder of the workshop will consist of interactive hands-on teaching in which the participants are systematically guided through the creation of academic programs in PowerPoint. The participants are strongly encouraged to use their personal laptop computers and create academic programs concurrently with the instructor.
Audience: Teachers, parents, behavior analysts, or anyone in charge of creating curriculum for children with disabilities/autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using The Assessment of Basic Language and Learner Skills (The ABLLS) to Develop a Language-Based Curriculum for Individuals with Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Continental B (1st floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (James W. Partington, Ph.D., A Psychological Corporation)
Description: The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (The ABLLS), based on Dr. Skinners analysis of verbal behavior, provides a mechanism to analyze learner skills, develop a comprehensive language-based curriculum, and track skill acquisition for individuals with autism or other developmental disabilities. The workshop will provide participants with the necessary information to use The ABLLS to develop and monitor educational programs. Participants will gain a thorough understanding of the multiple uses the information gained from The ABLLS can provide in the development and adjustment of an intervention program. Specific topics will be covered with relevant examples including administering and interpreting The ABLLS, analysis of the learners skills, curriculum development, educational planning, the evaluation of priorities, and determining IEP objectives.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: - Identify basic learner skills that are important to include in a curriculum for young children with autism. - Identify examples of B. F. Skinner�s verbal operants. - Describe how curricular variables affect the motivation of young children with autism. - Identify how teaching a child to mand for reinforcers results in the development of several other important learner skills. - Identify components of a behavioral language assessment that should be reviewed in order to determine the most appropriate elements to be included in a language intervention program for young children with autism.
Activities: Information regarding the development of The ABLLS and the concept of basic learner skills will be provided in a lecture format. Scoring of The ABLLS to determine skill strengths and deficits in the 25 assessment areas will be described and practiced. In addition, procedures for transferring the scoring information to the skills tracking grids will be illustrated. Video examples of a child's skills over the course of her intervention program will be used to show how the child's progress is captured by the ABLLS. Discussions regarding the analysis of skills, evaluation of educational priorities, and determination of IEP objectives for two students will be conducted.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for behavior analysts, teachers, speech and language pathologists, or other individuals who are responsible for implementing, developing, or monitoring educational programs for children with autism or other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Working with Developmentally Disabled Sex Offenders in Community-Based Settings
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Waldorf (3rd floor)
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Holly V. Steele, Ph.D.
HOLLY V. STEELE (Psychological Management Group), KIMBERLY E. CHURCH (Human Development Center), HOLLY ARNOLD (Human Development Center)
Description: In recent years, increasing focus has been placed on the risks and difficulties associated with treating people with mental retardation who engage in sexual misconduct and live in non-secure, community-based settings. The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with behavioral strategies which have been demonstrated to decrease the relapse/recidivism rate of individuals who are sex offenders and who have developmental disabilities. The subjects are twenty-three adult males with mental retardation, all of whom participate in behaviorally-oriented group treatment in an independent practice setting. Of this number, ten live in community-based group homes, and seven live in non-secure but segregated group homes in a rural setting. Two subjects are in Supported Independent Living, in staffed homes or apartments, and the remaining two live in their own apartments with minimal staff contact. Eleven subjects have engaged in sexual misconduct with both children and adults (rape, coerced sex, sexual battery, lewd and lascivious behavior, etc.), while ten have histories of sexual misconduct with children only. Four subjects have engaged in other types of inappropriate sexual behavior, such as sex with animals, rectal digging associated with using feces as a masturbatory lubricant, fetishism, public masturbation, and exposure. Clients ages range from 19 to 65, and all function within the mild or moderate ranges of mental retardation. Techniques used in treatment of these individuals include direct instruction, modeling, behavioral rehearsal, and guided feedback. In addition, treatment includes sex education, extensive analysis of remote and immediate antecedents to sexual misconduct, consequence anticipation, acquisition of replacement behaviors, identification of risk factors for re-offending, learning the effects of sexual abuse upon victims, and impulse management strategies. Of clients who participate in group treatment, 21 of 23 also receive behavioral programming directly addressing sexual misconduct in their residential and vocational settings. Data from these individual programs will be presented. Measures used by staff to assess clients responses to high-risk situations in community settings will be distributed. An agency policy regarding clients sexual behavior will be presented, and ramifications of its use discussed. Difficulties encountered in collecting data on behavior which is both dangerous and covert will be examined, as will the effects associated with treating this population on clinicians and staff.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: � Name and describe basic behavioral techniques for use with developmentally disabled sex offenders. - Describe the process of obtaining extensive information about antecedents to episodes of sexual misconduct. - Develop and implement a behavior program which includes both reduction procedures for sexual misconduct and acquisition procedures for replacement behaviors. - Use measures (distributed in the workshop) for assessing the responses of sex offenders in high risk situations. - Identify difficulties associated with conducting behavioral research with sex offenders. - Identify difficulties described in the literature as being encountered frequently by therapists, staff, and other caregivers providing services to sex offenders.
Activities: Each participant will receive a handbook of training materials that includes examples of a functional behavior assessment, a behavior analysis service plan, and risk assessments. Various interventions and assessment measures will be reviewed in detail with participants. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss the material presented.
Audience: The target audience includes psychologists and other mental health professionals, behavior analysts, administrators, and individuals involved in the provision of services to individuals who have engaged in sexual offending behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Implementing Behavioral Models in Robots: What a Learning Robot Can Teach Us
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
4K (4th floor)
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: William R. Hutchison, Ph.D.
WILLIAM R. HUTCHISON (Behavior Systems), BETSY J. CONSTANTINE (Context Systems)
Description: The workshop will introduce participants to robot technology and its uses in behavioral research. Participants will be given an overview of robot technology, including sensor types, sensor preprocessing, motors and actuators, and alternative approaches to controlling robot motors. Instructors will present an existing quantitative/computational model of operant learning?the Seventh Generation system?that is currently being used to control robots capable of operant conditioning. By studying the design and operation of the operant model interacting directly with the real world, participants will have an opportunity to reexamine some basic behavior analytic principles, such as primary reinforcement, conditioned reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, transfer of stimulus control, etc. Participants will explore these principles by working with an actual robot whose behavior is learned and controlled by the Seventh Generation behavioral model. After observing demonstrations of a variety of teaching procedures and the effect each has on the robots learning behavior, participants will analyze those processes at a level of detail unachievable with living subjects. Participants will have a hands-on opportunity to develop a simple teaching procedure with the Seventh Generation operant learning system and use it to teach a small mobile robot?the Garcia robot from Acroname, Inc.?to perform a simple behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants will be able to: - Describe basic learning processes at a level appropriate for control of a robot. - Describe key issues and problems in implementing behavior analytic models in robots. - Discuss parallels and differences between teaching robots and teaching living organisms. - Describe several areas of current research in robotics and machine learning relevant to behavior analysis. - Develop a simple example of computerized training and an example of live training for a Garcia robot with the Seventh Generation operant learning system.
Activities: Classroom presentation and discussion. The class will break into 2 or 3 lab groups after each topic, each with a robot and instructor to demonstrate the topic. By the last stage of the workshop, the groups will be able to demonstrate a simple training procedure with the robot.
Audience: Psychologists and behavior analysts interested in computational models of learning and how working with robots can improve our teaching procedures. Behavior analysts who are interested in developing computational behavioral models and robotics are particularly welcome.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preparation for Adult Years: Transitioning Individuals with Autism from School to Community
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
4L (4th floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Julia R. Fisher, Other
LINDA S. MEYER (Alpine Learning Group), ERIN RICHARD (Alpine Learning Group), ANGELA RODRIGUEZ (Alpine Learning Group), PETER F. GERHARDT (Alpine Learning Group), JULIA R. FISHER (Alpine Learning Group)
Description: Consistent with federal mandates (e.g., IDEA, 1990) the IEPs of learners 14 years of age and older must include a statement of transition needs. For this reason, educational goals for these learners need to focus on preparation for adult life (e.g., functioning fully in community settings, developing relevant job skills, and increasing self-care and domestic skills). Some of the skills prioritized include the production aspects of a job (e.g., sorting mail or data entry) as well as skills to address successful integration into the work environment (e.g., using a public restroom, taking a break). Two successful models, supported volunteer and supported employment programs, will be described. The programs goal is to help teenage and adult learners acquire and perform age appropriate, functional skills in a variety of integrated, natural community environments (e.g., a public library, a YMCA). Instructional strategies for teaching job skills and systematic analyses to address problem behavior will be presented. Staff use objective data measures to document the effects of intervention and participants success. Potential employment sites are identified based on empirical data which illustrate the learners proficiency in a particular job, and anecdotal data regarding the learners preferred work environment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: - Identify behaviorally based teaching strategies to teach functional skills required for adolescents and adults with autism to hold community job placements. - State specific skill acquisition programs (e.g., expressive and receptive language, social skills, number concepts) which are prerequisites to job placement. - Identify discreet, effective motivational systems used in community job settings. - Identify data collection procedures and summaries to identify successful interventions. - Find community volunteer and employment placements. - Identify successful strategies for problem solving challenging behavior in community job placements.
Activities: Listen to didactic presentation; View videotapes of adults and adolescents on the job; Participate in problem solving sessions addressing challenging behavior in the community.
Audience: Professionals who work with learners with autism ages 14 and older; Parents who have children ages 14 years of age and older.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
An Overview of Assessing, Classifying and Treating Feeding Difficulties in Children with Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
4M (4th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Tracey G. Galiatsatos, M.S.
TRACEY G. GALIATSATOS (New England Center for Children), WILLIAM H. AHEARN (New England Center for Children)
Description: Feeding problems are common among children diagnosed with developmental disabilities. The feeding difficulties of these children stem from and are maintained by, numerous biological and environmental factors. This workshop will begin by providing an overview of factors which may trigger feeding difficulties. Biological factors, such as dysfunction of the GI system, and environmental factors, such as child-feeder interactions, will be discussed. The workshop will also address feeding evaluations and the role of a comprehensive feeding team. The classification and assessment of feeding difficulties becomes a critical issue in providing appropriate treatment for these behaviors. Participants will learn to classify feeding difficulties. Emphasis will be placed on behavior interventions of three topographical categories: insufficient food intake (i.e. food-type selectivity, food-texture selectivity, insufficient caloric intake), specific skill deficits (i.e. self-feeding, chewing skills), and disruptive behavior emitted during meal times (i.e. crying, food expulsion). Case studies of each category will be discussed. Behavioral interventions that will be reviewed include: food exposure, simultaneous presentation, positive reinforcement, and escape prevention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: - Identify the biological and environmental factors which may cause feeding difficulties - Identify common variables that are related to the development of feeding problems - Describe assessment tools which may be used to conduct feeding assessments - Categorize and prioritize feeding needs given a hypothetical case - Describe environmental factors that occasion and maintain feeding problems - Identify common behavior principles (e.g. reinforcement, prompting, extinction) used to address feeding difficulties
Activities: Through the use of didactic presentation, handouts, and case illustrations, workshop participants will develop an understanding of feeding difficulties and possible behavioral treatment options.
Audience: This workshop is targeted for clinicians and therapists who have a basic understanding of behavior analytic terms and theory.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing and Implementing an ABA Program for Students with Autism, PDD-NOS, and Asperger's in a Public School Setting
Friday, May 27, 2005
6:00 PM–9:00 PM
Private Dining Room 4 (3rd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.S.
JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Marlborough Public Schools), ALISON R. MOSES (Marlborough Public Schools), JENNIFER TERAKEDIS (Marlborough Public Schools), AMANDA J. SPITZER (Marlborough Public Schools), ROBERT F. POLSINELLI (Marlborough Public Schools), JOSH KOZIOL (Marlborough Public Schools), KERRIE M. OTIPOBY (Marlborough Public Schools)
Description: Over the past several years, much progress has been made in the emphasis on and the development of programming for students with disabilities in general education settings. While the incidence of students on the autism spectrum receiving programming in public school settings has dramatically increased, quality programming based on the principles of applied behavior analysis is limited. Furthermore, due to the unique challenge public school environments present, very few school systems have successfully implemented a district-wide ABA program. Many of the public schools that have developed ABA programs have not been able to support a growing number and age-range of students while providing high quality comprehensive programming. In addition, school systems that have developed programs often do not have a centralized system of management as well as the appropriate number of qualified supervisory staff. Much ABA public school programming is based on the skills of individuals, and when the individuals resign, the program no longer exists. This data-based workshop focuses on the implementation of a district-wide behavioral treatment program for students of various skill levels on the autism spectrum, ranging in age from 3-13. This workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to identify the essential elements of a comprehensive program based on the principles of applied behavior analysis. Participants will be provided with the skills necessary to: 1. Develop program goals 2. Develop an appropriate organizational structure 3. Develop a thorough supervision model 4. Identify the correct number and qualifications of supervisory staff 5. Develop work performance standards for staff 6. Develop a comprehensive and competency-based staff training program 7. Develop a variety of staff training strategies, including feedback, peer review, goal setting, public posting, and video samples 8. Develop a comprehensive set of teaching programs within the frameworks of general education curriculum 9. Develop and implement a system for management of student programming 10. Develop systems to address/coexist with existing political and administrative policy and protocol
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify the essential elements of a comprehensive school-based program based on the principles of applied behavior analysis - Develop program goals and timelines to evaluate progress on goals - Identify key components a comprehensive and competency-based staff training program - Identify the most appropriate staff training strategies for their respective settings - Develop an appropriate supervision model including organizational structure and job descriptions for staff - Identify the correct number and qualifications of supervisory staff - Identify the scope of a comprehensive set of teaching programs - Identify a system for management of student programming - Identify possible issues with existing political and administrative policy and protocol - Identify a method for addressing district-specific obstacles
Activities: Didactic instruction; Discuss and develop a list of the essential elements of a comprehensive ABA program; Develop a training outline and a strategy for follow-up/competency-based training; Discuss and brainstorm a list of possible roadblocks and solutions; Develop an outline for implementing a program including goals, organizational structure, clinical supervision, and student programming; Develop realistic goals and timelines for implementation of a program.
Audience: Behavior Analysts working in public school settings; scholl administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Schedule-Induced Behaviors: Origins of Excessive Behaviors and Procedures to Minimize Their Influence
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford A (3rd floor)
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Jeff Kupfer, Ph.D.
JEFF KUPFER (Florida Residential Solutions, LLC)
Description: Schedule-induced or adjunctive behaviors (sometimes maladaptive and always excessive) are behaviors that are maintained at a high probability by stimuli that derive their reinforcing properties as a function of parameters governing the availability of some other class of reinforcement. In non-human subjects, some schedules of reinforcement have been shown to generate strange behaviors such as: polydipsia, attack against members of its own species, self-induced escape, pica, and hyperactivity; In human subjects, these same schedules can exaggerate behaviors such as fluid intake, aggression, pacing, grooming, eating, stereotyped behavior, smoking and, quite possibly-- wretched excess. This presentation is an introduction to schedule-induced behaviors. A brief video-tape will be shown demonstrating various types of schedule-induced behaviors in a rat and pigeon. Studies describing functional relationships with reinforcement schedules and generator schedules (i.e., schedules that promote schedule-induced behaviors) will be reviewed, as well as functional assessment and measurement strategies. Alternative reinforcement strategies in applied settings will be reviewed and case studies will be presented comparing fixed- vs. variable-DRO schedules.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop participants will be able to: - Provide introduction into schedule-induced behavior and expand functional analysis approaches - Review methods to measure and assess schedule-induced behavior - Describe possible pitfalls in using common schedules of reinforcement - Provide alternatives to minimize the influence of schedule-induced behaviors
Activities: Participate in discussion regarding: contents of literature review; measurement and assessment suggestions; procedures to maximize effects of positive reinforcement and minimizing the influence of reinforcement schedules that induce excessive behaviors; and environmental management strategies to channel excessive behaviors into more productive and adaptive outlets.
Audience: Professionals and paraprofessionals actively involved in developing, implementing and monitoring behavior treatment plans, students that desire a review of schedule-induced behaviors and implications.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Clients with Maladaptive Habits, Tics, Tourettes Syndrome, and Stuttering Using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Program
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Boulevard A (2nd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: R. Gregory Nunn, Ph.D.
R. GREGORY NUNN (National University)
Description: Maladaptive and undesirable habits, tics, Tourettes Syndrome (TS), and stuttering are extremely common problems which can seriously affect the personal relationships and self-esteem of individuals who suffer from them. Because these problems can cause acute psychological distress, many different types of treatments for them have been developed. Habit Reversal is a behavioral treatment approach which has proven to be an effective, General treatment for habits and tics including TS (Azrin & Nunn, 1973; Azrin & Nunn, 1977; Nunn, 1978; Azrin, Nunn & Frantz, 1980; Azrin & Peterson, 1988a; Finney, Rapoff, Hall, & Christopherson, 1983; Franco, 1981; Zikis, 1983: Miltenberger, 2001).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify and diagnose maladaptive habits, tics, TS, and stuttering with children and adults. - Understand the theoretical rationales that have spawned the many treatments for these types of problems. - Understand the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures. - Understand common pitfalls of treatment and ways of overcoming them.
Activities: In this Workshop we will discuss the identification, nature, and treatment of children, adolescents, and adults with these type of problems. Specifically we will cover the diagnosis and treatment of individuals using the Habit Reversal and Regulated Breathing Treatment Procedures of Azrin and Nunn as well as treatment variations that have evolved from their original work. Case studies are included where possible and workshop participants are strongly encouraged to provide input.
Audience: All practitioners, educators, and other professionals working with children, adolescents, or adults presenting with these types of problems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Toilet Training for Autistic & Encopretic Children: Data-Based Bio-Behavioral Intervention
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford B (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Ben-Zvi, M.A.
MICHAEL BEN-ZVI (NATAV Private Practice, Israel)
Description: While early intensive interventions are widely used to improve communicative, cognitive and other skills, toilet training for autistic children is still a challenge to behavior analysis. Encopresis is a very disturbing illness, not so rare with normal children. The combination of those two is even worse. The use of Reflexes and Respondent conditioning (in combination with operant conditioning) is needed for complex behaviors that are only partly Operant. The purpose of this workshop is to address that need, especially for the acquiring of proper bowl movement on toilet, both for Encopretic and Autistic children. The workshop will cover the theoretical assumptions behind the intervention, the protocol of treatment and its accommodations to each child. Ethical considerations, Data collection and decision making in the course of intervention will be discussed. Case studies will be presented, and the toilet training of urination will be addressed shortly.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participant will be able to: - Know and understand the protocol of intervention - Explain the intervention to parent of non trained child - Gather the required data for decision making before and through the intervention - Detect the relevant symptom of Encopresis and apply the proper intervention. - Address ethical considerations and rejections. - Support parents through implementation of the intervention.
Activities: Activities will include presentation of both rational and practical issues, analyzing data records, practicing the collection of data on relevant Data sheets, and discussion of questions.
Audience: Behavior analysts, consultants and program managers of interventions with autistic population, clinicians who address Encopresis, parent of Encopretic and autistic children.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Train Caregivers in Functional Behavioral Assessment and Treatment Development
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4A (4th floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Julia T. O'Connor, Ph.D.
JULIA T. O'CONNOR (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Description: As the functional behavior assessment methodology has expanded from the highly controlled research context to homes, schools and community settings, more questions have arisen regarding how to incorporate the family and other caregivers of the client into the assessment and treatment process. Caregiver participation in behavioral assessments allows the clinician to establish a context that more closely replicates the conditions in the natural environment. This workshop is designed to train professionals how to collaborate with parents throughout the functional analysis and treatment development process. The primary focus will be to assist the professional in teaching parents and other caregivers of children with developmental disabilities how to analyze behavior and develop function based treatment strategies in a collaborative relationship. Participants will have the opportunity to practice in small groups. Materials will be provided to participants including how to define behavior, identify target situations, and identify potential reinforcers as well as sample data collection sheets and other handouts describing the principles of applied behavior analysis and conducting functional analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Train caregivers how to define target maladaptive behaviors. - Train caregivers to conduct stimulus preference assessments and functional analyses in home and community settings. - Train caregivers to identify appropriate alternative/adaptive behaviors. - Train caregivers how to link functional analysis outcomes to possible treatment strategies. - Assess caregiver integrity on implementation of the functional analysis and treatment.
Activities: Participants will be involved in didactic presentation, discussion, and interactive activities.
Audience: Clinicians working with parents with developmentally disabled children with behavior problems. Masters level therapists, psychologists, and family members are welcome. Participants should have a fundamental understanding of the principles of applied behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Pediatric Sleeplessness: Identification and Intervention
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 5 (Lower Level)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert W. Montgomery, Ph.D.
ROBERT W. MONTGOMERY (Reinforcement Unlimited), JASON T. CAVIN (The Learning Tree, Inc.)
Description: Pediatric sleeplessness and sleep disruptions are among the most common concerns of parents. Excessive sleepiness in a child is a symptom that is often underrecognized and misinterpreted, but when left untreated can lead to serious behavioral, academic, developmental, and medical consequences. Pediatric sleeplessness is widely prevalent and often behaviorally based. Research supports that pediatric sleeplessness can be treated effectively with nonpharmacologic interventions. This workshop will review the nature of sleep and sleep disruption (including common pediatric sleep disorders), and introduce the participant to behavioral treatment strategies (e.g., extinction, parent education, positive routines, sleep hygiene). Finally, behavioral interventions for children with special needs will be discussed (i.e., developmental disabilities, ADHD, and mood disorders).
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Recognize the three main types of sleep disruption. - Analyze the environment, in light of the research, in order to maximize the potential for restful sleep. - Describe the most common behavioral mistakes made during sleep preparation and list research supported sleep preparation habits that increase the likelihood of productive sleep. - Have criteria for when to refer those with sleep disruption for medical evaluation.
Activities: Didactic and interactive discussion will be conducted throughout the session. Participants are encouraged to come with questions and case examples as an interactive session will be included.
Audience: BCBAs, BCABAs, consultants, teachers, parents, and anyone interested in how sleep impacts behavior and how to improve the sleep of children and adolescents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: BACB
Private Practice Model of Consulting
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Continental B (1st floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Terence G. Blackwell, M.A.
TERENCE G. BLACKWELL (CERG Management, Inc.), PAUL F. CONLEY (Paul Conley Publishing)
Description: The workshop is designed to teach people how to establish their own professional consulting business using a Private Practice Model. Topics include: how to identify clients, pricing of services, leveraging your time, building your business through centers of influence, creating a public presence and getting beyond creating a income, to designing a lifestyle.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will understand: - Defining your niche market - Determining the structure of a Private Practice - Creating a public presence - Assessing the viability of your business
Activities: Analyzing behaviors that lead to successful business models for Private Practitioners; behavior of successful marketing of services; Business Model review, case study of successful independent Private Practice Models.
Audience: Individuals interested in establishing Private Practice model consulting business in the field of ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Use of Computer and Video Technology with Children with Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Joliet (3rd floor)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (The Genesis School), MICHELE LEYKUM (The Genesis School), ERIN SPARACIO (The Genesis School)
Description: Often children with autism have great difficulty learning new skills, and one factor that often impedes learning by children with autism is the social component of the learning process. The use of video-based intstruction has been successful in teaching a variety of new skills. This workshop will provide information on a variety of video-based instructional methods that can be used successfully to teach skills to children with autism. Specific methods to be reviewed will include: video modeling, video rehearsal, video priming. In addition to video-based instruction, computer-based instruction and a combination of the use of video and computer technology will also be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe at least 3 video-based instructional methods that can be used with children with autism - Describe at least 2 uses of video modeling with children with autism. - Explain how reinforcement contingencies can be used through video contingencies - Provide a rationale for using computer or video technology for children with autism
Activities: Participants will observe video clips depicting a variety of video-based instructional techniques. Participants will be asked to select a behavior that they would like to increase using video-based instruction and will work on developing a plan to use video-based instruction to teach a skill. Volunteers will also have an opportunity to sample computer-based technology programs.
Audience: Special educators, psychologists, school personnel, behavior analysts and parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Communication-Based Behavior Interventions
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Continental C (1st floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John J. Pokrzywinski, M.A.
JOHN J. POKRZYWINSKI (Arlington Developmental Center), DIANA BRADBERRY (Arlington Developmental Center), RICHARD W. POWELL (Shelby Residential and Vocational Services), IRFA KARMALI (Shelby Residential and Vocational Services)
Description: This workshop emphasizes positive reinforcement of alternative behaviors to reduce problem behaviors (replacement behaviors). It encourages procedures that increase the contextual fit of behavior support plans; presents procedures that allow identification and manipulation of setting events and discriminative stimuli; Discussion includes procedures to encourage a communication-based environment. The procedures described in the workshop are designed to: Emphasize nonaversive and naturalistic procedures to reduce the likelihood of problem behaviors; increase the acceptance of behavior support plans, and thus the likelihood of success and generality; and increase collaboration between professional and direct-support staff.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify and discuss procedures to reduce problem behaviors by emphasizing positive reinforcement of alternative behaviors (replacement behaviors). - Identify and discuss procedures to modify antecedent & setting event manipulations which reduce the occurrence of problem behaviors and the need for corrective interventions. - Identify and discuss procedures that increase the acceptability of behavior support plans and increase the likelihood of success and generality (contextual fit). - Describe and discuss procedures to encourage a communicative environment. - Describe and discuss procedures to increase collaboration between all team members and direct-support staff.
Activities: Workshop activities include discussions of Eliminative versus educative strategies to deal with problem behaviors; Antecedent events & contextual variables; Functional behavior assessment & replacement behavior development; Discrete trial training (DTT) and natural environment training (NET); Verbal behavior considerations.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, Speech-Language Pathologists, Direct-Support Staff & Supervisors, Psychologists, Nurses, Advocates, Independent Support Coordinators, and others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: BACB
Graphing with Microsoft Excel
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4C (4th floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly A. Schulze, Ph.D.
SARAH E. ROBERTS (Minnesota Autism Center), KIMBERLY A. SCHULZE (St. Cloud State University), EMILY RUDRUD (St. Cloud State University), ERIC RUDRUD (St. Cloud State University)
Description: articipants will be provided with systematic instruction on graphing single-subject research designs with Microsoft Excel. Single-subject designs covered include: ABAB, Multiple Baseline, Alternating Treatments, and Cumulative Records. Participants will also learn to graph session-by-session learner acquisition data. Participants will be provided with a CD providing detailed text instructions, a streaming video with demonstrations, and templates for learner acquisition data.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Enter data on Excel spreadsheet for appropriate single-subject research design. - Graph data for single-subject design. - Edit graph content (titles, axis, background, condition, trend lines). - Graph learner acquisition data.
Activities: Participants will be provided with instruction and practice in graphing single-case designs. We encourage participants to bring laptop computers to practice entering data and graphing results.
Audience: Practitioners and researchers who need to graph data in an efficient manner. Faculty and graduate students who teach behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: BACB
Introduction to Data Collection Methods
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Boulevard B (2nd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Bobby Newman, Ph.D.
BOBBY NEWMAN (Room to Grow), TAMMY HAMMOND NATOF (Effective Interventions)
Description: Too often, individuals who are attempting to apply behavior analytic instruction have not been trained in the usage of a full range of data collection methodologies. They have one or two particular systems that are in use at their program (e.g., percent correct or frequency), but avoid the use of a myriad of other data collection strategies (e.g., fluency, latency, probe data, etc.). This is an introductory level workshop that will describe various systems of data collection commonly used within Applied Behavior Analytic settings (e.g., intensive programs for individuals diagnosed with developmental disabilities, mainstream educational settings, adult rehabilitation programs). Various systems of data collection in applied settings will be introduced and explored. These will include: frequency data, rate measures, latency, magnitude, duration, percent correct (in a trial by trial format), and probe data. In addition, specific data sampling techniques such as Partial Interval Recording and Momentary Time Sampling will be discussed. How and when to use each of the above will be discussed, and practice will be provided from videotaped and audio examples. A pop quiz of given scenarios will also be provided, and participants encouraged to discuss which data collection system they would employ for each scenario and why.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will (be able to): - Learn the definitions of each of the several types of data collection listed above - Learn how to use each type of data collection. - Learn when to use each type of data collection. - Practice systems of deriving inter-observer agreement - Teach others data collection strategies.
Activities: Participants will hear lecture and will partake in practice in the various types of data collection described.
Audience: This is an introductory level workshop for parents and direct care providers, as well as staff trainers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Preference-Based Teaching: Procedures for Helping People with Developmental Disabilities Enjoy Learning Without Problem Behavior
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Waldorf (3rd floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Dennis H. Reid, Ph.D.
DENNIS H. REID (Carolina Behavior Analysis and Support Center), CAROLYN W. GREEN (J. Iverson Riddle Developmental Center)
Description: This workshop will describe a preference-based teaching approach for helping people with developmental disabilities enjoy learning functional skills without problem behavior during teaching sessions. The focus is on how to make teaching programs highly preferred (as indicated, for example, through indices of happiness and absence of indices of unhappiness). A program approach will be described and demonstrated that: (a) enhances the preferred nature of teaching programs to increase learner enjoyment in participating in the programs, and (b) removes the motivation for problem behavior that often occurs in attempts to escape or avoid the programs. Specific strategies to be described include how a teacher or instructor can build rapport with a learner and establish his/her attention as a reinforcer, using preferred events as antecedents and consequences to teaching sessions, interspersing preferred events within instructional trials, incorporating efficient choice opportunities within the teaching process, and timing the scheduling of teaching sessions to promote learner enjoyment. Summaries of recent behavior analytic investigations will also be provided to demonstrate the evidence base of preference-based teaching.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe how to include a preferred event before, during and after a teaching session to enhance the preferred features of the session for a learner with disabilities. - Describe how to use establishing operations to maximize the preferred nature of at least one aspect of a teaching session. - Describe how at least one learner choice can be embedded within a teaching session to enhance the preferred nature of the session for a learner. - Describe three things a teacher can do to establish his/her attention as a preferred event for a learner.
Activities: Activities of participants will include: (1) listening to instructor lecture/presentations, (2) viewing overhead presentation of key points, (3) completing pencil and paper activities relating to scenarios depicting applications of key points, (4) viewing role-play demonstrations of target procedures by instructors, (5) practicing target procedures in role-play situations with performance feedback by instructors (provided until individual participants demonstrate competency in accordance with performance checklists employed by instructors) , and (6) opportunities to ask questions of instructors and receive instructor answers.
Audience: The target audience includes anyone who implements skill-acquisition teaching programs with people who have developmental disabilities including autism. Examples of target audience participants include teachers, teacher assistants, residential direct support and supervisory staff, vocational support staff (e.g., job coaches), behavior analysts, behavior specialists and technicians, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB
The Teaching of Successful Intelligence
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Williford C (3rd floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: T. V. Joe Layng, Ph.D.
JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy), T. V. JOE LAYNG (Headsprout)
Description: When the environment requires a learner to produce verbal stimuli that sequentially and systematically make one pattern of behavior more likely than another in order to meet a contingency requirement, reasoning is defined. This process is akin to what Skinner (1969) described as an "inspection of reinforcement contingencies" such that an individual can describe behavior that meets contingency requirements without direct shaping or rules. Procedures have been developed that train learners in reasoning and in the inspection of the requirements for reinforcement in most problem solving situations. The workshop will begin with a brief introduction to approaches to teaching intelligence, including Sternbergs analytical, practical, and creative intelligences, and an overview of effective and ineffective thinking skills strategies. The body of the workshop will be spent actively applying a Talk Aloud Problem Solving (TAPS) method derived from Bloom, 1950, and Whimbey & Lockhead, 1999) for teaching effective reasoning, and a method of teaching analytical thinking, Fluent Thinking Skills (FTS), (Robbins and Layng, 2004) based upon generating and answering questions that can be used for elementary school through graduate school and for effectively solving everyday problems at home and in the workplace.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Define and distinguish between reasoning and analytical thinking. - Describe the relation between reasoning, analytical thinking, and intelligence - Apply TAPS and FTS to a variety of situations requiring reasoning or analytical thinking. - Describe how to teach TAPS and FTS to others.
Activities: Discuss reasoning and analytical thinking as described in workshop introduction; Play TAPS game to learn basic concepts; In groups of two, Apply TAPS to solve problems with one person taking the role of problem solver and the other the role of active listener. Both individuals will take turns as problem solver and active listeners; Play FTS game to learn basic concepts, Apply FTS to quickly learn a difficult subject unfamiliar to most participants.
Audience: Those who work in educational, therapeutic, or business settings where reasoning, thinking or the teaching of intelligence is important.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Behavior Systems Technology in Teacher Education Programming: Principles, Practice, and Hands-On Applications
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4D (4th floor)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), DANIEL W. BALDERSON (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
Description: The workshop will provide introduction to, and hands on application of, a data supported protocol for the (a) comprehensive description, (b) discrete and sequential analysis, and (c) feedback and goal-setting activities necessary to effective teacher training in postsecondary classroom and on-site K-12 deliberate practice environments. Workshop activities include (a) introduction to the importance of a behavior systems approach to teacher training, (b) hands-on observation system construction, and (c) simulated data collection and analysis activities designed for instructional purposes. Additionally, detailed explanation and hands-on interaction with protocols designed for a range of logically sequenced training activities are provided, including (a) classroom video observations, (b) on-site data-based assessment and immediate feedback and goal-setting, and (c) research and development into effective educational practice. Workshop participants will leave with a conceptual and applied familiarity with behavior systems educational protocols designed for effective professional training practice. Participants will be provided with a complimentary copy of the complete software tools and methods procedures on CD ROM, and MSWORD files of all necessary illustration materials in relation to the educational protocols discussed as a function of workshop participation. *While some computer hardware will be provided, it is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop hardware to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with technologically-based instructional skills in the area of applied behavioral teacher training. Skills include the ability to (a) design observation systems that match with training objectives, (b) construct video-based observational learning laboratory experiences in relation to training objectives, (c) implement on-site data-based feedback and goal-setting experiences to determine if training objectives have been met, and (d) develop a set of applied research activities to document the relative effectiveness of professional training activities. At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Discuss in conceptual and applied ways the principles and practice of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional teacher training. - Construct observation systems relevant to their particular professional teacher training objectives. - Design and implement video-based observational learning activities in relation to educational objectives for professionals in training. - Understand and apply a range of computer-based data collection and analysis techniques in relation to recommended data-based on-site feedback and goal setting instructional protocols. - Develop an applied research agenda in relation to professional training objectives to determine the relative effectiveness of instructional efforts.
Activities: Activities include review of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to professional training activities; hands-on application of observation system construction designed as compatible with professional training objectives; hands-on application of observational laboratory development in relation to the classroom instruction of relevant behavior analytic professional training objectives; hands-on application of data-based on-site feedback and goal-goal setting protocols in relationship to deliberate practice activities of professional trainees; and introduction and review of recommended research activity development in relation to determining the relative effectiveness of recommended professional training activities.
Audience: Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in the area of professional teacher education in specific, and in the area of postsecondary training for professional competencies in general. Those working in postsecondary educational settings where focus is on the education, on-site training, and assessment of professional practice competencies, and who are challenged with how to teach, describe, and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary materials particularly appealing to a wide range of professional training, assessment, and applied research applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Performance Management in Service Delivery for Children with Autism: Measuring and Attaining Exemplary Staff Performance
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 1 (Lower Level)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael Fabrizio, M.A.
MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HOLLY ALMON (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), SARA J. PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), AMY KING (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: This workshop will provide participants multiple opportunities to learn how to evaluate service delivery staff performance in three critical areas: verbal behavior about the service being delivered, contingency-shaped behavior involved in delivering the service, and verbally-mediated behavior involved in problem solving related to the service being delivered. Sample forms and feedback systems will be shown, and participants will practice evaluating staff performance via contrived practice and videotape review.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe three important repertoires to be developed in service delivery personnel. - Evaluate examples of service personnel�s performance related to verbal behavior about service. - Evaluate examples of service personnel�s performance related to contingency-shaped service behavior. - Describe at least three sample repertoire areas which relate directly to each participant�s own service delivery personnel.
Activities: Throughout this workshop, participants will: Participate in discussion about topics being addressed; complete evaluations measuring service delivery personnel verbal behavior; complete evaluations measuring service delivery personnel contingency-shaped behavior through the review of multiple videotaped examples; complete evaluations measuring service delivery personnel verbally-mediated behavior using real life sample performance data; and begin to develop instruments to measure each of the above in the work each participant supervises or performs in their professional life.
Audience: People supervising the performance of staff members delivering services to persons with disabilities. Individuals supervising and designing instructional or skill-building programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Re-evaluating Practice, the Big Picture, or Why We Really Do What We Do
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Private Dining Room 4 (3rd floor)
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly A. Smalley, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY A. SMALLEY (Behavior Support Consultation Advocacy)
Description: Take a few minutes and remember why we are in this, what our objectives are, and what our output should achieve. This workshop will present lively discussion around the greater context in which we work, peoples lives. With specific regard to individuals with developmental disabilities and challenging behavior we will task analyze our practice to assure that our interventions are socially valid, acceptable, and result in real beneficial quality of life change. Working backwards from where we want to be (LROP) using crowding out, manipulating molar variable to acquire a "goodness of fit" and teaching to strengths, how do we get from here to there? Discussion will hopefully include facilitating contrived and natural networks of support, enriched environments, communication, pivotal skill building, gainful employment, and sex.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Be able to discuss and plan for social validity and acceptability of interventions in schools and families. - Generate practical examples of manipulating molar variables, 'Crowding out", teaching incompatible and or alternative behaviors, that have practical meaning in a consumers life. - Self assess outcomes of behavioral practice and long-term implications for the folks you serve. - Conduct informal ecological assessments (such as circles of support or other social density tools) around the soft and fuzzy components of life (Recreation and leisure skills /friends/ relationships).
Activities: Brief informal self-assessment/ survey
Audience: Direct service staff who work with individuals with developmental disabilities (such as individuals with MR/DD ASD), those who design and implement behavior support plans, Teachers, families, consumers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Strategies for Successful Inclusion Programming in a Public School Setting
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 2 (Lower Level)
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.S.
KERRIE M. OTIPOBY (Marlborough Public Schools), JACKIE M. WARD (Marlborough Public Schools), BENJAMIN R. BRUNEAU (Marlborough Public Schools), CARRIE ROBBINS (Marlborough Public Schools), JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Marlborough Public Schools), AMANDA J. SPITZER (Marlborough Public Schools), JENNIFER TERAKEDIS (Marlborough Public Schools), ALISON L. MOORS (Marlborough Public Schools)
Description: As a result of the trend toward inclusion in general education settings, many public schools are faced with the task of developing programming for students on the autism spectrum. Many strategies based on the principles of applied behavior analysis, however, have been more likely to occur in more restrictive settings. Specific guidelines and strategies are limited for successful inclusion. Furthermore, the majority of data-based strategies to promote successful inclusion have been conducted in primarily pre-school settings. This workshop will focus on data-based strategies to successfully include pre-school, elementary, and middle school students on the autism spectrum in general education settings. In addition, strategies for teaching social and age-appropriate leisure skills will be discussed, including social skills groups, social coaching, reverse inclusion strategies, and methods to teach appropriate play skills. Participants will acquire the skills necessary to develop high-quality data-based inclusion programming, including: 1. How to determine which skills to address in inclusion settings; 2. Identification of appropriate inclusion opportunities; 3. Education for general educators; 4. Data collection systems for educational objectives; 5. Development of data systems to determine for individual students the amount and type of support required and data-based strategies to fade staff support; 6. Strategies to fade support; 7. Reinforcement system strategies for inclusion settings; 8. When and how to provide modified academic instruction; 9. Social skills training program will be reviewed, including strategies for the development of assessments, teaching programs, and strategies for generalization; 10. Strategies of teaching appropriate per interaction and play skills. Participants are encouraged to bring actual student profiles to use in exercises.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify key considerations in the development of high-quality data-based inclusion - Develop data systems to determine for individual students the amount and type of support required - Identify data-based strategies to fade staff support. - Identify strategies for the development of social skills assessments and teaching programs
Activities: Didactic instruction; Discuss and develop a list of essential data; Develop a plan for collecting data on educational objectives.
Audience: Behavior analysts and teachers working with students on the autism spectrum
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Instructional Design for Students with Special Needs: Identifying Critical/Variable Attributes for Effective Programming
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 3 (Lower Level)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Alison L. Moors, M.A.
ALISON L. MOORS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), KELLY J. FERRIS (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), HOLLY ALMON (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting), LESLEY LUCAS-PAHL (Fabrizio/Moors Consulting)
Description: Once teachers have established scope and sequences from students Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or assessment reports, they must still create a plan for how they will break up the skills into teachable units. To divide each skill into teachable units, teachers must (1) identify the critical and variable attributes of instructional stimuli and (2) plan for cumulative programming within the instruction. This workshop will help teachers identify critical and variable features to better design appropriate instructional sequences and plan systematically for ongoing cumulative review necessary to facilitate student learning and skill retention of what they have learned thus far within any given instructional sequence.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify critical and variable attributes of instruction. - Identify the boundaries of critical attributes. - Design instructional sequences based on the identified critical features. - Plan for cumulative programming within instruction. - Learn to Fast Cycle through the designed sequence based on students performance.
Activities: Group and individual practice discrimination critical from variable attributes; Individual practice outlining critical attributes of a skill; Practice writing instructional sequences; Writing instructional sequences with cumulative programming; Drawing Fast Cycle tracks on instructional sequences based on data based decisions.
Audience: Professionals whose job descriptions include program/instructional design for students with special needs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Students with Autism to Respond to Threatening Social Situations in Mainstream Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Stevens 4 (Lower Level)
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lori E. Bechner, M.A.
LORI E. BECHNER (Alpine Learning Group), JULIA R. FISHER (Alpine Learning Group), CAREN GANS (Alpine Learning Group), ALEXANDRA HOLBERTON (EPIC School)
Description: Children with autism who are included in mainstream settings may encounter threatening social situations such as teasing, name calling, bullying, and being told to do inappropriate things for the humor of others. Without the skills needed to respond appropriately in these threatening social situations, individuals with autism in mainstream settings are often at risk for being taken advantage of which can result in physical and emotional harm, as well as result in limited social relationships with peers. Research in training self-protection skills has concentrated on teaching typically developing children to respond when presented with physically harmful situations. Research in teaching self-protection skills to individuals with developmental disabilities, although limited, has also focused on teaching individuals to respond when presented with physically harmful situations. There is, however, little research focused on teaching individuals with developmental disabilities to respond to threatening social situations. This workshop will describe potentially threatening social situations, and discuss strategies to teach students with autism to respond to such situations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Describe threatening social situations which may be encountered by children with autism in mainstream settings - List and describe strategies to teach students with autism to respond to threatening social situations - Understand and discuss use of video review and peer procedures - Review and explain sample curricula to teach applicable self protection skills.
Activities: Didactic presentation, discussion, video, sample curricula.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, educators, other clinicians working with children with autism, graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing and Implementing Effective, Accurate and Comprehensive Behavior Intervention Plans
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
4B (4th floor)
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jose D. Rios, M.S.
JOSE D. RIOS (CalABA Past President), EVANGELINA HURTADO (Therapeutic Pathways), JOHN YOUNGBAUER (North Los Angeles County Regional Center)
Description: Effective intervention requires well-defined description of procedures, plans must be clinically accurate and they must be implemented with integrity. Support staff and teachers can best assist individuals with problem behaviors when they have the guidance of a well-designed and effective intervention plan. Unfortunately, behavior plans for persons with developmental disabilities are often poorly designed- they often lack clinical accuracy for the individuals specific behavior problems and are often difficult to implement. This workshop will address plans that are clinically challenged and review problems and the necessary steps needed to remedy them. Beginning with the importance of an accurate functional assessment, this workshop will review how to design plans in residential and educational settings. We will discuss and critique poorly designed plans and describe common problems that we have encountered in these plans. The workshop also will address staffs concerns and barriers in the implementation of treatment plans and will also provide some steps to remedy these problems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: - Better evaluate treatment intervention plans for individuals with behavior problems. These guidelines include how to define procedures effectively, implement clinical accuracy, and treatment integrity. - Use the Rights to Effective Treatment when designing plans and understand how they apply to treatment design and implementation. - Address environmental factors that affect the accurate implementation of treatment plans in residential facilities and educational settings. Participants will learn helpful tips used in consulting with staff and supervisors to improve the effectiveness of treatment plan implementation. - To recognize common problems found in poorly designed behavior plans and to correct such problems when they occur.
Activities: This workshop will be primarily didactic with a review of some handouts and checklists.
Audience: This presentation is geared for individuals who are or will soon be designing, evaluating or implementing functional assessment and intervention plans. The primary focus is the use of behavior plans within residential settings although examples involved in educational settings also will be addressed.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: BACB
Talk the Talk, Walk the Walk: A Training Model for Behavior Analysts to Teach Theory and Clinical Skills to Teachers and Paraprofessionals
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Erie (8th floor)
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Justin A. DiDomenico, M.S.
JUSTIN A. DIDOMENICO (Partners in Learning), KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners in Learning), LAURA KENNEALLY (Partners in Learning), LORI A. LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning)
Description: Developing competencies in Applied Behavior Analysis requires a mastery of both theory and application. Successful Behavior Analysts require both an in depth knowledge of theory and the ability to apply the skills in clinical and school settings. This workshop is designed for trainers to teach the competencies of ABA to teachers, paraprofessionals and other clinical staff to master both theory and demonstrate core clinical skills required to enact IEP goals. Participants will be able to identify core competencies in theory and train staff to display these skills to mastery in applied settings. Trainers will receive a manual and DVD with video models and training modules.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned (about): - The key components of theory required to train teachers and paraprofessionals. This includes paper and pencil mastery exams. - How to teach and measure clinical skills in applied settings. - How to develop skills to measure the staff�s skill acquisition of clinical skills. - create a program to motivate and monitor the staff�s skill acquisition. - To create and design individual core competencies for each staff member tailored to their skill level of both mastery of theory and application. - How to create and maintain home programs to ensure generalization of skills across settings.
Activities: Using lecture, video demonstrations, handouts and discussion, participants will learn the key training protocols for staff to effectively implement ABA based IEP goals.
Audience: This workshop is designed for Behavior Analysts who train teachers and paraprofessionals who work with children with autism. This will help teach the staff to understand and demonstrate the core competencies of Applied Behavior Analysis in order to be effective practitioners.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W75
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Application of ABA to Learning Disabilities: Strategies for Reading Acquisition and Motivation
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Huron (8th floor)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sara White, M.A.
JENNIFER M. GILLIS MATTSON (State University of New York, Binghamton), SARA WHITE (State University of New York, Binghamton), RAYMOND G. ROMANCZYK (Institute for Child Development)
Description: Approximately 5% of children have a learning disability, including reading disorders. Recent research suggests that children who have a reading disability have impaired phonemic awareness and decoding skills, which are necessary skills for beginning reading. Research also suggests that individuals with learning disabilities have deficits in social skills. This workshop will primarily cover reading disabilities, but will also provide information and strategies for improving students social behavior. The first part of the workshop will provide an overview of the current research on reading interventions. A short-term, intensive, after school reading clinic model that utilizes the framework of ABA for both reading instruction and improving social behavior will be described. Topics will focus on implementing a behavioral assessment specifically designed for reading, selecting individualized reading goals for children, implementation of token economy systems within a reading program, and data collection and analysis strategies to assist with monitoring student progress. This workshop will also review a unique software program to assist teachers, parents, or other professionals, with material selection and construction. This software program contains letters, phonemes, blends, diphthongs, digraphs, nonsense words, and grade-level sigh vocabulary words that are printable in flashcard formats. The software was initially developed in 2000 and refined over the past four years.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned (about): - The current research on interventions for reading disabilities. - An individualized goal selection procedure that includes how to use standardized assessment data and behavioral assessments to select appropriate goals for reading (all levels). - Effective teaching methods for reading instruction within an ABA framework. - Motivational strategies that may be effectively implemented for individuals with reading disabilities. - A database that contains letters, phonemes, blends, diphthongs, digraphs, nonsense words, and grade-level SV words. The database will allow participants to print out flashcards for teaching. - Reading curricula and receive a goal sequence for reading instruction - How to incorporate social skills training into reading interventions, as exemplified by the after school reading clinic model that will be presented.
Activities: 1. Lecture on current research on interventions for reading disabilities; 2. Lecture on individualized goal selection; 3. Group exercise on developing goals from standardized and behavioral assessment; 4. Lecture on behavior analytic teaching strategies as applied to reading disabilities; 5. Overview of software for instructional material development; 6. Lecture on appropriate curricula for students with learning disabilities; 7. Group exercise on the use of reading curricula; 8. Group exercise on incorporating social skills development into instruction for students with learning disabilities.
Audience: This workshop is designed for teachers, parents, and professionals and paraprofessionals providing reading instruction to students (Kindergarten through 6th grade level)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
A Model for Supporting Individuals with Severe Dysfunctional Behaviors in Community Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Lake Michigan (8th floor)
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Stephen C. Luce, Ph.D.
STEPHEN C. LUCE (Melmark), ANGELA F. SMITH (Melmark), JAMIE PAGLIARO (Melmark)
Description: Individuals who exhibit severe dysfunctional behaviors can be successfully maintained in community settings with the proper support. Five components have been identified as essential to a successful program: psychiatric consult services, a behavior support plan, staff training, communication amongst staff, and funding. This workshop will provide an overview of the staff training literature, highlighting the pyramidal model and performance feedback methods. Participants will also learn strategies to facilitate meetings with program stakeholders to identify meaningful behavioral outcomes and to conduct functional behavior assessment. Finally, the five essential components will be reviewed, and case studies will illustrate direct applications that resulted in program success.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: - Identify the five components of a successful program for maintaining individuals with severe dysfunctional behaviors in community settings. - Cite research-based staff training methods (performance feedback, pyramidal model, etc.) - Facilitate meetings with program stakeholders to identify meaningful behavioral outcomes and to conduct functional behavioral assessment. - Identify maintenance and generalization strategies to ensure long-term program success.
Activities: 1. Lecture and question/answer session on the staff training literature; 2. Practice the task-analyzed steps of facilitating effective meetings with program stakeholders to identify meaningful behavioral outcomes and to conduct functional behavioral assessment; 3. Review the five essential components of successful programming for individuals with severe dysfunctional behavior in community settings; 4. Evaluate case studies.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards program administrators, behavioral consultants and clinicians providing support to individuals with severe dysfunctional behaviors in community-based settings. Participants should be familiar functional assessment procedures and the current literature on reducing dysfunctional behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Compassion and Behavior Change: Using Relationship to Enhance Acceptance Interventions for Health Related Behaviors
Saturday, May 28, 2005
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Private Dining Room 3 (3rd floor)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Gifford, Ph.D.
ELIZABETH GIFFORD (Center for Health Care Evaluation), BARBARA S. KOHLENBERG (University of Nevada School of Medicine), JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden), TOBIAS LUNDGREN (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Description: This workshop is designed to help clinicians develop usable skills in relational and acceptance-oriented behavior therapies. Specifically, we will focus on using corrective experiences within the treatment session to facilitate client awareness, acceptance, cognitive and behavioral flexibility, and personal fulfillment. Participants will learn skills from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy. The workshop will focus on health related behaviors, including addiction treatment and behavioral medicine.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned (about): - Acceptance based interventions for health related behaviors, including addiction, epilepsy, and smoking. - The therapeutic relationship in treatment for medically relevant disorders. - How to maximize the potential of acceptance based interventions through relationship processes. - Enhancing the development of competence in functional analysis through supervision.
Activities: Participants will view tapes, engage in discussion and exercises, and listen to presentation of didactic material.
Audience: Practitioners interested in enhancing their therapeutic relationships, and improving skills in acceptance based interventions for health related behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W78